Target groups 
recipient communities also had the technical and entrepreneurial skills, and an enabling 
business environment, to encourage investment of remittances in small businesses and 
livelihood creation. Researchers have suggested that the greater share of remittances is 
from  workers  with  low skill levels.  While  this may  seem  paradoxical,  it  is  families’ 
needs at home rather than migrant workers’ earning levels abroad that most influence 
remittances (Lucas, 2005; Katseli et al., 2006). 
293.  Ethical employment services that assist workers in securing overseas employment 
are in the front line of countries’ efforts to prevent exploitation of migrant workers. They 
are increasingly important also in providing cross-country job-matching services. In this 
role they need credible information on skills and qualifications. In some cases they are 
also providers of training. They may organize and assess technical training to fill specific 
needs  of  employers  in  the  destination  countries  or  they  may  provide  training  in 
employability  skills,  including  language,  culture,  work  practices  and  rights  and 
responsibilities  at work.  Their growing  role has  led  to increased efforts  to help  them 
follow good practices in their recruitment and job-matching work to help mitigate the 
potential for labour migration to undermine development (box 4.15). 
Box 4.15 
Private employment agencies and labour migration 
Private employment agencies (PREAs) play an important role in the functioning of 
labour markets. One of the fastest growing types of PREA is the overseas placement 
agency,  which  helps  employers  to  recruit  workers  abroad  and  assists  workers  in 
migrating for employment. 
ILO Convention No. 181 and Recommendation No. 188 on PREAs were adopted in 
1997 to recognize the growing role of PREAs and also to recognize the need to protect 
the  interests  of  workers  assisted  by  these  agencies.  The  Convention  establishes 
parameters for the services to be provided by these agencies.  
In 2007 the ILO published the Guide to private employment agencies: Regulation, 
monitoring  and  enforcement  as  a  joint  effort  between  the  Skills  and  Employability 
Department and the Special Action Programme to Combat Forced Labour (part of the 
Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work programme). It can assist national legislators 
in  drafting  legal  frameworks  in  line  with  Convention  No.  181  and  includes  many 
examples of existing national legislation from both developed and developing countries. 
Also included are descriptions of how legislation and regulations can be implemented by 
governments to help prevent the exploitation of migrant workers. 
294.  Sector or occupation policies aim to prevent movements of highly skilled migrant 
workers and those with advanced education from diminishing health care and education 
service  capacity  because  of  these  service  sectors’  vital  importance  to  social  and 
economic development.  Under  the  auspices of  its  Sectoral Activities  Programme, the 
ILO  launched  an  action  programme  on  migration  of health-care workers in  2006, in 
close partnership with other UN agencies (box 4.16).  
105
Add a link to a pdf in preview - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf link to email; add hyperlink to pdf in
Add a link to a pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding links to pdf document; adding a link to a pdf
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
Box 4.16 
ILO Action Programme on “The International Migration of  
Health Service Workers: The Supply Side” 
This  action  programme  was  launched  in  2006  with  the  aim  of  developing  and 
disseminating  strategies  and  good  practices  for  the  management  of  health  services 
migration from the supplying countries’ perspective. The action programme responded to 
concern  over  the  growing  trend  to  meet  health  workforce  shortages  in  developed 
countries by hiring nurses and other health-care workers from developing countries. The 
programme, in close collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO) and the 
International  Organization  for  Migration  (IOM),  assists  participating  pilot  countries  in 
addressing the implications of migration for health services and for the migrant workers, 
increasingly women, and their families. Currently, the pilot countries include Costa Rica, 
Kenya, Romania, Senegal and Trinidad and Tobago. 
Through the programme, the ILO is active in the Global Health Workforce Alliance 
partnership (GHWA, launched in May 2006 and hosted by the WHO) and, along with the 
ILO’s International Migration Programme, in the Health Worker Migration Policy Initiative 
(launched in May 2007 under the GHWA) to find practical solutions to the problem of the 
increasing migration of health workers from developing to developed countries.  
Source: http://www.ilo.org/public/english/dialogue/sector/sectors/health.htm. 
295.  The roundtable on “Human capital development and labour mobility: Maximizing 
opportunities and minimizing risks” at the Global Forum on Migration and Development 
(Brussels, July 2007) found that the movement of skilled and trained professionals can 
put countries of origin at risk and that this is most likely in vulnerable sectors such as 
health and education (ILO, 2004c). But it also cited OECD and WHO research which 
concluded  that migration was  not  the principal cause  of  weak  health-care systems in 
developing  countries  and  that  a  variety  of  policies  were  needed  (OECD,  2007b).  It 
recommended  establishing  “a  matrix  of  good  practices  for  countries  of  origin  and 
destination and for  joint actions  between them that can  help retain, train and recover 
skilled  health  personnel for  development” (p.  7).  Similarly, a  UN  General  Assembly 
discussion on migration (UN, 2006b) recommended consideration of measures to retain 
highly  skilled  workers  by,  among  other  things,  ensuring  equitable  pay  and  decent 
working  conditions,  and  the  promotion  of  the  return,  even  on  a  temporary  basis,  of 
skilled workers to their countries of origin. Some countries reported having adopted, or 
were considering the adoption of, codes of conduct “barring the active recruitment of 
health workers from developing countries affected by labour shortages in the health and 
education sectors” (p. 4). Other suggestions were for cooperative arrangements to train 
skilled workers in developing countries or for compensatory schemes. 
296.  Good practice principles (table 4.3) and promising initiatives have been identified 
by the ILO’s International Migration Programme (Wickramasekara, 2003; 2007; Lowell 
and Findlay, 2002; ILO, 2005f, Annex II): 
ɽ
bilateral agreements, such as the South Africa–United Kingdom Memorandum of 
Understanding  on  Reciprocal  Educational  Exchange  of  Healthcare  Personnel 
(2003)  which,  inter  alia,  promotes  the  recognition  of  qualifications  of  South 
African health-care professionals, encourages short-term working arrangements in 
the United Kingdom and provides for return to South Africa with new skills and 
experience; 
ɽ
medical tourism, to increase opportunities for trained health-care professionals to 
work at home by capitalizing on lower-cost but high-quality health care relative to 
services in some developed and developing countries; marketing health services to 
foreigners is an initiative finding much success in Thailand and the Philippines; 
106 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview component enables compressing and
add hyperlink to pdf in preview; clickable pdf links
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo
add url link to pdf; change link in pdf file
Target groups 
107
ɽ
codes  of  practice instigated by destination  countries to  control recruitment from 
countries  vulnerable  to  skill  exodus  by  managing  migration  with  the  origin 
countries. The policy, under the UK Department of Health, is aligned with the UK 
Department for International Development (DFID), creating policies that can serve 
both domestic health-care delivery needs and international development objectives. 
Table 4.3.  Good practices in promoting “brain gain” 
Countries of origin 
Countries of destination 
ɽ
Initiatives to remain and return 
ɽ
Flexible, transparent immigration policies  
ɽ
Promote linkages with nationals abroad 
(including short-term secondments or sabbatical 
visits) 
ɽ
Adopt circulation-friendly visa regimes and 
encourage circular, temporary and exchange 
movements 
ɽ
Promote short-term movements 
ɽ
Direct technical assistance to human resources in 
health and education 
ɽ
Improve institutional and physical infrastructure   
ɽ
Recognition of overseas qualifications and 
experience 
ɽ
Incentives for remittances by emigrants 
ɽ
Ensure portability of acquired social security 
rights 
ɽ
Bilateral agreements with destination countries   
ɽ
Codes of conduct on ethical recruitment and 
accountability mechanisms for recruitment 
agencies and employers 
ɽ
Long-run retention is linked to economic growth 
and diversification 
ɽ
Inclusion of migrant workers in learning 
opportunities 
ɽ
Adequate allocation of public resources to health 
services 
ɽ
Effective recognition systems for skills acquired 
through working abroad 
Source: Wickramasekara, 2007. 
297.  In  summary,  research,  policy  experience,  governments,  workers  and  employers 
highlight  the  challenge  of  achieving  “win-win”  outcomes  from  international  labour 
migration  –  for  individual  workers,  employers  and  national  economic  and  social 
development. The principles of fair treatment and protection for migrant workers have 
been articulated through tripartite discussions and agreements. The potential for labour 
migration to contribute to productivity growth and development objectives in countries 
of origin and countries of destination is high. But the risks of adverse results are also 
high in some countries. There is still much to learn about the effectiveness of national 
and international efforts to put the agreed principles into action and to monitor the results 
of adapting good practices to different national and industry circumstances. 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe provide users the most individualized PDF page image inserting function, allowing developers to add and insert
add hyperlink to pdf acrobat; adding links to pdf in preview
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
pdf link open in new window; adding links to pdf
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Able to add a single text character and text string to PDF files using online source codes in C#.NET Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe
pdf link to specific page; add links to pdf document
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Independent component for splitting PDF document in preview without using external PDF VB.NET PDF Splitting & Disassembling DLLs. Add necessary references:
add a link to a pdf in acrobat; convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks
Chapter 5 
Skills policies as drivers of development 
Members should identify human  resources development  … policies which …  facilitate 
lifelong learning and  employability  as part of  a  range  of policy  measures designed to  create 
decent  jobs,  as  well  as  to  achieve  sustainable  economic  and  social  development 
(Recommendation No. 195, Paragraph 3(a)). 
298.  Education and skills policies not only help countries respond to technological and 
economic  changes,  but  are  themselves  drivers  of change.  A better  trained workforce 
makes it easier for enterprises to adopt new technologies and for countries to attract FDI 
and diversify their production structures. This chapter focuses on the third objective of 
effective  skills  development  policies,  namely  to  initiate  and  sustain  a  dynamic 
development process (as introduced in Chapter 1). First, it reviews the components that 
are necessary for a forward-looking skills development policy and, second, it shows how 
skills  development  can  be  closely  linked  and  coordinated  with  economic  and  social 
policies in order to increase both productivity and employment growth.  
299.  The chapter draws on the experience of countries that have been successful in using 
skills policies to help trigger and maintain a dynamic process of employment growth. 
These countries include Japan, the “East Asian Tigers” (Hong Kong (China), Republic 
of Korea, Singapore), the “Celtic Tiger” (Ireland), Costa Rica and Viet Nam, with the 
latter being an example of a country that is at the beginning of the process of catching 
up. 
1
Development  in  these  countries  has  been  characterized  by  rapid  technological 
catching  up  and  sophistication,  the  diversification  of  production  into  non-traditional 
activities and a shift from low to high technology activities. FDI has been attracted in 
higher value added sectors and exports expanded in technology intensive manufacturing 
and  services.  This  process  has  resulted  in  economic  and  social  development  and  a 
virtuous circle of rising productivity and high growth rates. 
5.1.  Capabilities, technology and information:  
A dynamic process 
300.  The dynamism of the development process can be explained by three main factors:  
(1)  a  national  commitment  to  technological  catching  up  and  the  diversification  of 
production and the export structure into higher value added sectors; 
1
Since 1985, Viet Nam has experienced high growth rates in GDP and in manufacturing exports, has attracted 
significant  FDI,  shifted  the  export  structure  from  mainly  primary  products  to  manufactured  products  with 
increasing levels of value added manufactured products, and seen an increase in wages and the demand for skills 
(Henaff, 2008). However, although the country has been able to diversify into low-technology manufacturing, it 
has not yet moved into higher technology sectors to a significant extent. 
109
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Advanced component for splitting PDF document in preview without any third-party plug-ins installed. C# DLLs: Split PDF Document. Add necessary references:
add a link to a pdf in preview; active links in pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Preview PDF documents without other plug-ins. this PDF document metadata adding control, you can add some additional information to generated PDF file
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; add hyperlink pdf file
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
(2)  the building of social capabilities and a learning trajectory in alignment with the 
catching up process, taking into account efficiency and equity aspects (as defined 
further in box 5.1); and 
(3)  the  collection,  updating  and dissemination  of information  on  current  and  future 
skills requirements and the translation of this information into the timely supply of 
occupational and entrepreneurial skills and competences. 
301.  A  virtuous  circle  within  economies  is  created  by  simultaneously  building  up 
distinct,  yet complementary bodies  of knowledge in  relation to these three  factors,  as 
indicated in figure 5.1. This involves three policy orientations: (1) developing scientific, 
technological and commercial knowledge as a basis for catching up and diversification; 
(2)  expanding  the  tacit  (or  implicit)  knowledge  underpinning  the  occupational  and 
entrepreneurial competences  of individuals,  and building the capability of  societies to 
mobilize,  communicate  and  accumulate  such  tacit  knowledge;  and  (3)  sustaining 
institutions  that  collect  and  disseminate  the  data  and  information  needed  to  make 
effective policy choices so as to meet current and future skills requirements.  
Figure 5.1.  Skills development strategy for a dynamic process of sustainable development 
Global opportunities and challenges 
–  Foreign markets and investment 
–  Regional integration and agreements 
–  Global knowledge and new technologies 
–  Climate change and eco-efficiency 
National Development Strategy 
(1) Upgrade 
technology  
and diversify 
production 
structure 
(enterprises, 
workplaces, 
value chains) 
Technology policy 
Macroeconomic policy 
Trade and investment policy 
(2) Build up individual competences and  
social capabilities 
ɷ  Responsive (current skills demand) 
ɷ  Mitigative (shocks) 
ɷ  Strategic (development) 
ɷ  Forward-looking (future skills demand)
ɷ  Coordinated (effectiveness) 
ɷ  Attentive to target groups (social 
inclusion) 
Skills development policies 
Labour market policy 
(3) Collect and 
disseminate 
information 
on current 
and future 
skills 
requirements 
and the 
supply of 
skills 
5.1.1. Upgrading technology and diversifying production structure 
302.  Technological  development  is  the  major  driver  of  long-term  productivity 
improvements.  Developing  countries  can  benefit  from  the  advanced  technologies 
available in industrialized countries and catch up with technological leaders through the 
transfer  of  technologies  and  their  diffusion  within  the  economy.  Openness  and  new 
information  and  communication  technologies  improve  the  access  of  enterprises  and 
economies to  a wider technological and scientific  knowledge  base (see, for  example, 
110 
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Add text to certain position of PDF page in Visual Basic .NET class. Add text to PDF in preview without adobe reader component installed.
adding hyperlinks to pdf documents; c# read pdf from url
Skills policies as drivers of development 
Grossman and Helpman, 1991). Knowledge may be incorporated in imported goods and 
services. It may spill over from FDI or be transferred through licensing agreements with 
foreign  firms.  It  may  also  result  from  local  efforts  and  incremental  changes.  More 
recently, the Internet has offered access to substantial knowledge, data and information. 
303.  The  diversification  of  a  country’s  production  structure  is  an  another  important 
element  of  a  dynamic  development  process.  Empirical  evidence  shows  that  the 
development  of  poor  countries  is  closely  linked  with  an  increase  in  the  variety  and 
diversity of their economic activities (Imbs and Wacziarg, 2003; Klinger and Lederman, 
2004). As poor countries develop, their economies expand into non-traditional activities, 
with  enterprises  exploring  and  introducing  products  and  processes  that  are  well-
established  in  world  markets. 
2
This  highlights  the  dynamic  aspect  of  comparative 
advantages as “the trick seems to be to acquire mastery over a broader range of activities, 
instead of concentrating on what one does best” (Rodrik, 2004, p. 7). 
304.  Diversification  is  the  result  of  entrepreneurial  activities  to  “discover”  the  cost 
structure of an economy or, in other words, to identify new activities (new to the country, 
but already well established on world markets) that can be undertaken at a sufficiently 
low  cost  to  be  profitable.  Entrepreneurs  must  experiment  with  new  product  lines, 
tinkering  with  technologies  from  established  producers  abroad  and  adapting  them  to 
local conditions. Hausmann and Rodrik (2003) call this a process of “self discovery”. 
These search and discovery activities have great social value, as other companies learn 
and  imitate,  thereby  raising  the  technological  level  of  the  sector  and  increasing 
diversification.  The  garments  industry  in  Bangladesh,  cut  flowers  in  Colombia, 
information technology (IT) in India and salmon in Chile are well-documented examples 
of such development (Rodrik, 2004). 
305.  Hence, catching up involves both the deepening of technological capabilities at the 
enterprise  level  –  starting  with  easier  activities and  functions and moving  into  more 
complex ones – and the widening of those capabilities through their development and 
application in an increasing variety of economic sectors.  
306.  A development strategy which combines catching up in technological development 
with investment in  non-traditional  sectors  helps to  ensure that  productivity growth is 
accompanied by employment growth in a context of accelerating technological change. 
New  technologies  increase  productivity,  while  diversification  into  non-traditional 
activities creates demand for labour and results in employment growth. The East Asian 
Tigers 
3
and,  more  recently,  Ireland  and  Costa  Rica,  have  focused  on  technological 
development and diversification as a strategic objective in their development strategies.  
307.  Recent  analysis  suggests  that  government  policies  play  an  important  role  in 
industrial and technological development. This role, however, is different from the old 
approach  of  “picking  the  winner  or  loser”  and  is  discussed  in  section  5.2.  There  is 
growing consensus in development literature and among international organizations that 
development-oriented governments play an important role in promoting and facilitating 
technological development, boosting entrepreneurial search and discovery and catalysing 
private  investment and innovation  (Lall,  2000; Hausmann  and Rodrik, 2003;  Rodrik, 
2004; De Ferranti et al., 2003; UNIDO, 2005, p. 12; WTO, 2006, p. 68; UNCTAD, 2007, 
p. 8). 
2
Imbs and Wacziarg (2003) also provide  evidence that,  beyond a certain level of income, the development 
process is characterized by increasing specialization. 
3
Powell, analysing the case of Singapore, concludes that: “Put simply, the priority for economic development 
determines the process of skills formation” (2007, p. 12). 
111
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
5.1.2. Building individual competences and social capabilities 
308.  Countries  start  with  very  different  initial  conditions  and  levels  of  skills  and 
competences. Learning and building capabilities is a cumulative and long-term process 
which cannot  “leapfrog”  stages.  This  process is characterized  by “path dependency”, 
which means that it builds on the existing knowledge base and grows incrementally. The 
gap between the existing level of competence and the task to be mastered needs to be 
small enough so that learning the next step is feasible. 
309.  Governments,  enterprises  and  workers  all  play  important  roles  in  building 
competences.  Governments invest in education and training and provide incentives to 
encourage  investment  by  employers  and  workers  in training  and  on-the-job learning. 
Enterprises  invest  in  the  training  of  their  managers  and  workers  and  introduce 
continuous improvements in work organization. Individuals take advantage of education 
and training opportunities to acquire new skills and knowledge.  
310.  Basic  general  education  and  core  competences  are  the  foundation  of  social 
capabilities and of a national knowledge system. The capabilities of individuals to read, 
write and communicate, understand basic mathematics and adopt a favourable attitude 
towards work and change are prerequisites if enterprises and the economy are to upgrade 
technology  and  diversify  (ILO,  1999). Because  core  competences  are  relevant  across 
occupations and professions, as well as across low- and high-level jobs, they enhance the 
employability of workers. Moreover, competence in mathematics and science becomes 
increasingly  important  as  society  moves  towards  the  knowledge  economy.  Better 
educated workers are at an advantage in implementing technology. 
311.  The crucial importance of establishing a basic level of competences in society as a 
precondition for creating a dynamic development process is demonstrated by the history 
of Costa Rica, Ireland, the Republic of Korea and Viet Nam. Each of these countries had 
achieved high levels of basic education and an adult literacy rate of over 70 per cent 
when their per capita income was still at a relatively low level. When the four countries 
began to industrialize and to catch up, the share of their population with at least primary 
education  was  significantly  above  the  average for  countries  with  a  similar  GDP  per 
capita at the time (see figure 5.2). 
4
Educational “catching up” therefore preceded the 
technological  catching up process in  these  countries.  This  shows  the commitment of 
governments  and  the  private  sector  to  invest  a  substantial  portion  of  their  scarce 
resources in basic education and to promote institutional development in the education 
and  training  system. And the commitment  to education  has remained  evident in their 
comparably higher levels of literacy as they have moved along the development process.  
4
Some countries in the control groups also had similar high shares of basic education, but were not successful in 
generating a dynamic development process. This emphasizes the general point that, while a broad educational 
base may be necessary, it is not sufficient to trigger a virtuous circle. 
112 
Skills policies as drivers of development 
Figure 5.2.  Educational attainment of “catching up” countries  
0,00%
10,00%
20,00%
30,00%
40,00%
50,00%
60,00%
70,00%
80,00%
90,00%
100,00%
Ireland 1975
Costa Rica 1975
Republic of Korea 
1960
Viet Nam 1990
% of total population aged 15 and over with minimum 
primary education
Share of primary education in the population of Ireland, Costa Rica, Republic of Korea and Viet Nam 
compared with the average share of primary education in countries with similar per capita GDP
Share of primary education of the total population aged 15 and over
Average share of primary education in countries with a similar per capita GDP during the period concerned
See annex for data sources and the list of countries in the comparison group.  
312.  To  take  advantage  of  domestic  and  global  opportunities  for  sustainable 
development,  it  is  necessary  to  build  the  capability  of  enterprises  and  countries  to 
transfer  technologies  in  a  competent  manner,  diversify  into  competitive  economic 
sectors, enter international markets and gain market shares, as well as to achieve eco-
efficiency and protect the natural environment. Managerial and entrepreneurial skills, in 
addition to the mastery of technical and vocational  skills, are critical to entering and 
maintaining the development process. 
313.  This  body  of  skills,  competences  and  knowledge  can  only  be  developed  in  a 
complex and gradual learning process because much of the underlying knowledge is tacit 
(see  box  5.1).  Unlike  scientific  and  technological  knowledge, tacit  knowledge  at  the 
individual level can only be created through experimentation, research and learning by 
doing in particular circumstances. This highlights the importance of “learning to learn”, 
problem solving and management skills (Enos et al., 2003). 
113
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
Box 5.1 
The meaning of social capability 
The capabilities and competences of individuals are determined by both explicit and 
tacit knowledge elements. Individuals need to know the technological and commercial 
principles,  regulations  and  other  rules  that  they  follow  (this  is  explicit and codifiable 
knowledge referred to as declarative knowledge) and they need to be able to apply them 
competently (this is tacit or procedural knowledge). Tacit knowledge cannot easily be 
codified and can therefore only be communicated and transferred between individuals 
through a process of demonstration, observation, imitation and practice.  
Tacit  knowledge  becomes  collective  knowledge  when  it  is  shared  between  the 
members  of  a  community  and  embedded  in  institutions  such  as  networks,  teams, 
clusters  or  “communities  of  practice”. It is  expressed  through  routines,  rules,  shared 
norms,  conventions,  regulations,  laws  and  standards.  Building  social  capabilities 
therefore  involves  an  extensive  process  of  practice  and  learning  by  doing; 
communication to others within social networks (families, communities, enterprises); and 
embedding  the  knowledge  in  institutions  (by  creating  or  adapting  rules,  standards, 
regulations,  conventions).  Technological  capability  is  acquired  by  identifying 
technological  knowledge  (codified  or  embedded  in  machines),  learning  the  rules  of 
technology transfer (codifiable) and learning how to apply the rules, that is, how to adopt 
new  technologies,  adapt them to  local conditions  and exploit international knowledge 
spillovers (tacit) (Lall, 2000). In the same way, trade-related, industrial and environmental 
capabilities  are  acquired  by  engaging  in the  activity,  learning the  rules  of  the game 
(codified) and learning how to apply them effectively (tacit). 
Source: Polanyi, 1967; Cohen and Levinthal, 1990; Lall, 2000; Nelson and Winter, 1982; North, 1990. 
314.  Tacit knowledge cannot easily be codified, but the accumulated experience of the 
past  and  commonly  shared  understanding  are  embedded  in  institutions  such  a  rules, 
norms, traditions, conventions and regulations (Nelson and Winter, 1982). Furthermore, 
institutions  are  required  to  transform  an  individual’s  tacit  knowledge  into  socially 
provided  knowledge.  Networks,  industrial  clusters  and  communities  of  practices 
mobilize and  communicate  tacit knowledge at the levels of  the  enterprise, sector and 
economy.  Hence, interpersonal, communication and teamworking  skills are of  central 
importance  since  they  lubricate  interfaces  between  people  within  and  between 
organizations and assist in the generation and diffusion of knowledge. 
315.  Skills, knowledge and capabilities therefore have two major functions: 
ɽ
First, as human capital, they influence productivity and comparative advantages. 
Formal  education  and  training  increase  human  capital  and  labour  productivity. 
Learning by doing in enterprises creates economies of scale as per unit production 
costs fall with increasing productivity.  
ɽ
Second  –  and  this  is  highly  relevant  for  the  virtuous  circle  –  individual 
competences and social capabilities function as a catalyst or driver of development 
by increasing the speed with which new technologies are adopted and productivity 
growth achieved (Mayer, 2001, p. 34) and therefore the speed of the exploration 
and discovery of new markets and products. 
5
This is demonstrated by empirical 
studies showing that countries which import capital embodying new technologies 
are more likely to improve productivity. Research further shows that countries with 
5
McCartney points out that successful policy cannot simply be judged in terms of its static effects 
and the degree to which markets are liberalized: “Once we consider economies as dynamic rather than 
static  entities  and  evaluate  policy  in  terms  of  achieving  dynamic  not  static  efficiency,  what  we 
conceive of as good policy becomes far more nuanced” (2004, p. 6). This suggests that there may be 
trade offs between static and dynamic efficiency in the short or medium term.
114 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested