how to upload and download pdf file in asp net c# : Convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks software control project winforms azure web page UWP wcms_09205413-part956

Skills policies as drivers of development 
a broader and stronger skill base stand to benefit the most because their resulting 
productivity growth will be even higher (Coe and Helpman, 1995; Mayer, 2001).  
5.1.3. Collecting and disseminating information 
on skills requirements and supply 
316.  Rapid and fundamental changes in the economy, including the emergence of new 
technologies, result in continuous changes in labour markets and in the demand for more, 
new  and  different  skills.  However,  the  development  of  skills  requires  a  substantial 
amount of time and investment. Information is therefore needed for markets to function 
and for governments to coordinate policies effectively. The early identification of skills 
requirements is critical as it helps to reduce uncertainty and increase incentives to invest 
in training. It avoids skills shortages and development and growth bottlenecks by helping 
to reduce skills mismatches. And it helps to prepare workers for changes in the demand 
for skills and to maintain employability and employment.  
317.  Labour  market  information  systems  (LMIS)  are  intended  to  provide  up  to  date 
information on current and future skills requirements, skills shortages and training needs 
(see  section  5.2.2  below).  Labour  market  analysis  helps  governments,  workers  and 
employers,  TVET  system  managers  and  other  actors  to  develop  a  common 
understanding of changes over time in the demand for skills, make informed choices in 
relation  to  training,  and  design  and  formulate  effective  skills  development  policies 
(Hilbert and Schömann, 2004). The challenge is to develop institutions which effectively 
identify future skills requirements, translate skills requirements into the supply of new 
skills and coordinate and synchronize skills development policies with trade, investment 
and technology policies (Powell, 2007).  
318.  In order to coordinate the flow of information so that it reaches both women and 
men, it is necessary to take into account the gender dimension in the communication of 
information. Labour market and training information is frequently unavailable to women 
because it is conveyed through channels to which they do not have equal access, such as 
associations  and  placement  services  geared  to  male  users,  informal  networks,  radio 
programmes broadcast at times when women are not available to listen, etc.  
5.1.4. The experience of “catching up” countries:  
The integration of skills development policy 
into the national development strategy 
319.  Skills and competence development has been a strategic element in the national 
development plans of Costa Rica, Ireland, the Republic of Korea and Singapore. Even 
though these countries differed substantially in their initial conditions, which meant that 
the sequencing and focus of their policies were somewhat different, they each adopted 
very similar strategies in at least four areas: the proactive role of government; outward-
oriented learning; the sectoral approach to building capabilities; and a forward-looking 
skills development approach.  
320.  The proactive role of governments: the Governments of Costa Rica, Ireland, the 
Republic  of  Korea  and  Singapore  have  taken  an  active  role  in  promoting  exports, 
investment, technology transfer, technological change and human resource development. 
They have effectively used these policies to build up competences and capabilities at the 
enterprise,  industry  and  national  levels.  These  countries  have  formulated  national 
development strategies as a framework for policy coordination and coherence. 
115
Convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; add hyperlinks to pdf online
Convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
change link in pdf; pdf hyperlink
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
321.  Outward-oriented  learning  strategy:  learning  from  foreign  sources  has  been  of 
great importance in all “catching up” countries. Costa Rica and Ireland have chosen an 
FDI intensive strategy by attracting high-tech MNEs, particularly in the electronics and 
IT sectors, combined with efforts to create linkages between foreign and domestic firms 
and to promote training by MNEs (following an earlier stage, in the case of Costa Rica, 
of attracting investment in agriculture and textiles). A well-educated labour force has 
supported both  the  process of attracting high-tech FDI and the learning process. Viet 
Nam  is  currently  embarking  on  an  FDI-intensive  learning  strategy.  The  Republic  of 
Korea  originally  opted  for  a  more  autonomous  learning  strategy,  with  the  focus  on 
learning by  doing  in national  enterprises. Technological capabilities  were  built up by 
importing  capital  goods  and  learning  through  reverse  engineering,  importing 
disembodied scientific and technological knowledge, such as open-source publications, 
and  hiring  foreign  consultants  and  trainers.  With  the  increasing  complexity  of 
technology,  however,  the  country  also  relied  on  FDI  to  improve  its  technological 
knowledge  base.  Enterprises  and  the  country  as  a  whole  built  up  the  capability  to 
diversify and to trade by increasing investment in non-traditional sectors and engaging in 
international trade. 
322.  The  sectoral  approach  to  building  capabilities:  a  sectoral  approach  to 
industrialization  was  adopted  by  Costa  Rica,  Ireland,  the  Republic  of  Korea  and 
Singapore,  albeit  at  different  stages of  their  development  process.  Costa  Rica  in  the 
1980s and Ireland in the 1990s began to identify sectors where local initial conditions 
offered  the  potential  for  high  growth.  At  an  early  stage  of  their  development,  the 
Republic of Korea and Singapore defined strategic sectors with a high learning potential 
to move up the learning and value added chain. Sectoral strategies provided the basis for 
their  skills  development  strategies.  For  example,  Hong  Kong  (China),  Ireland  and 
Singapore  established  sectoral  bodies  to  monitor  developments  in  specific  sectors, 
including  the  influence  of  globalization,  new  technologies  and  new  management 
practices.  They  assessed  how  these  changes  affected  demand  for  skills  and  then 
communicated this information to the skills development system. 
323.  A forward-looking skills development approach: education and training policies in 
successful late starters anticipated future skills requirements in order to ensure the timely 
supply of the skills necessary to achieve the nation’s development goals. The challenge 
is to develop the ability of countries to build up a trajectory of learning and innovation 
and to develop a proactive strategy that integrates science, technology and learning into 
industrial, trade and investment policies with a view to achieving economic and social 
development.  
324.  In  the  Republic  of  Korea,  the  Government  designed  a  sequential  expansion  of 
formal education and vocational training based on industrial development plans. In order 
to bridge the time lag between investment in skills and the accumulation of the skills 
stock, the Government based human resource development policies on the forecasting of 
skill  demands.  Furthermore,  at  each  stage  of  development,  government  policies 
channelled young people into particular training programmes. In the past, the transition 
to higher value added industries was accomplished without major skills shortages, but 
more recently a skills mismatch can be observed (Cheon, 2008). Ireland has a history of 
skills  forecasting  since  the  1960s.  The  objective  is  to  provide  early  information  to 
workers, enterprises and training institutions on future skills requirements. As described 
below  in  the  case  study  of  Ireland,  a  sophisticated  institutional  framework  has  been 
developed to collect and interpret data on the future demand for skills and the supply of 
skills, and to transform this information rapidly into skills development (Shanahan and 
Hand, 2008). 
116 
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Why do we need to convert PDF document to HTML webpage using VB.NET programming code?
adding a link to a pdf in preview; pdf email link
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Our PDF to HTML converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML
add hyperlink pdf; add links to pdf
Skills policies as drivers of development 
5.2.  Coordinating skills development policies 
with economic policies  
325.  Skills development policies and strategies need to be coordinated with and closely 
linked to  industrial,  trade,  technology,  macroeconomic  and  environmental  policies to 
create a sustainable and dynamic development process (as shown in the central panel of 
figure  5.1).  The  management  of  this  process  is  a  complex  matter  and  there  is 
increasingly widespread recognition that market forces and private entrepreneurship, as 
well  as  governments  and  institutions,  have  an  important  role  to  play  in  this  respect 
(Rodrik 2004, p. 2). In particular, social dialogue represents an effective institution for 
managing the coordination process.  
326.  Problems relating to information, incentives  and coordination, and the resulting 
market  failures,  call  for  government  interventions.  Enterprises  need  to  invest  in  the 
discovery of profitable activities and the search for the best technologies to produce a 
particular product within the local economy. The first firms that innovate may not earn 
the full return on their investment  in  terms of learning and  discovery because, as the 
value of their discovery becomes evident, other firms will imitate them, although at a 
lower  cost  as  they  benefit  by  learning  from  the  experience  of  the  first  innovators. 
Government  policies  and  institutions  need  to  provide  incentives  to  entrepreneurs  to 
invest in discovery, for example by protecting the returns of the firm for a limited period 
of time, so as to trigger a socially efficient level of investment in the search process and 
to promote the development of non-traditional activities (Hausmann and Rodrik, 2003).  
327.  Information problems also arise because employers recruiting skilled workers need 
to be able to judge accurately the nature and level of the workers’ skills. Institutions can 
reduce  this  risk  by  helping  to  identify  and  assess  skills  in  a  credible  manner  and 
communicating the information efficiently to employers and the labour market.  
328.  Coordinating  the  adoption  of  new  technologies  and  diversification  into  new 
industrial  sectors  with  skills  development  can  be  a  challenge.  Investment  in  human 
capital  alone  would  lead  to  diminishing  returns  on  skill  accumulation  (more  skilled 
workers, but  not  necessarily jobs for them). On the other hand, increased technology 
transfer alone, without appropriately prepared workers and managers, is unlikely to be 
enduring. It may even have negative development consequences by exacerbating income 
inequality  if  only  the  advantaged  sectors  of  society  can  obtain  the  relevant  training 
(Mayer, 2001). The challenges of coordination can be addressed through  policies and 
institutions that:  (1)  align incentives  for  workers, enterprises and  the  public sector to 
invest in complementary forms of knowledge and skills; and (2) promote cooperation 
between the various skills providers with a view to establishing coherent and consistent 
learning paths. 
329.  Moreover, in  view  of  the  risk of  “government failure”, Lall  (2000)  and  Rodrik 
(2004) suggest that governments need to design institutional arrangements and monitor 
outcomes  carefully.  Government  policies  and  coordination  efforts  may  be  subject  to 
failure  due  to lack  of  information,  technical  skills  or good  governance.  Furthermore, 
government  interventions  are  prone  to  political  capture  or  corruption,  or  to  the 
temptation to “pick winners” rather than to facilitate a market-based process.  
330.  Policies and interventions therefore need to focus, not on investment outcomes – 
which are inherently unknowable beforehand – but on getting the policy process right. 
“We need to worry about how we design a setting in which private and public actors 
come together to solve problems in the productive sphere, each side learning about the 
opportunities and constraints faced by the other ...” (Rodrik, 2004, p. 3). The risks of 
117
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images DNN, C#.NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET
add url pdf; pdf link to attached file
VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in
C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Generating thumbnail for PDF document is an easy work and gives
add link to pdf file; add hyperlink in pdf
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
corruption, opportunistic behaviour and favour seeking need to be minimized throughout 
the process.  
331.  The  institutional  framework  plays  a  key  role  in  meeting  the  challenges  of 
information and coordination for the effective management of development dynamics 
and  the  integration  of  a  forward-looking  skills  development  process.  Well-designed 
institutional settings facilitate collaboration between the public and private sectors, elicit 
information about objectives, trends and bottlenecks, and distribute responsibilities for 
solutions. They encourage and enable enterprises, education and training institutes and 
R&D institutes to invest in knowledge, technology and the discovery of products and 
processes that are well established in world markets and can be produced at home (Lall, 
2000;  Rodrik,  2004).  Finally, institutions facilitate cooperative behaviour  and  help to 
reconcile the  diverging  interests  of individuals and organizations,  thereby  supporting 
reform processes in the economy and in the education and training system.  
332.  National  development  frameworks  may  provide  an  opportunity  for  countries  to 
integrate  skills  development  into  broad  national  development  processes.  Skills 
development plays an important role in national development strategies, five- or ten-year 
national development plans, national employment policies, Poverty Reduction Strategies 
(PRSs)  and  Decent  Work  Country  Programmes  (DWCPs).  These  are  the  principal 
vehicles for articulating and implementing national  development goals  in  general and 
tripartite  commitments  to  reduce decent  work deficits  in  particular.  PRS  and  DWCP 
processes  to  devise  these  strategies  are  intended  to  give  stakeholders  a  voice  in 
prioritizing needs and aligning national budgets and development assistance with these 
strategies. 
6
333.  The current prevalence of these processes, aided in no small part by the importance 
placed  on  them  by  the  United  Nations system,  the World  Bank  and bilateral  donors, 
provides  an  opportunity  for the  integration  of skills development  into broader  policy 
goals,  such  as  promoting  private  sector  development,  boosting  the  growth  of  key 
economic  sectors  and  extending  the  benefits  of  economic  growth  to  disadvantaged 
regions and groups within countries (as suggested in Chapter 4). 
334.  These  national  processes  also  provide  an  institutional  framework  for  the 
coordination of  policies across government  agencies. This is  potentially a  substantial 
advantage for skills policy, where responsibilities in such areas as education, vocational 
training,  labour  market  information,  employment  services,  career  guidance, 
unemployment  benefits  and  retraining  services are  divided  between  many  ministries, 
departments  and  agencies  at  the  national  level  and  their  provincial  or  regional 
counterparts.  
335.  Social dialogue, to coordinate the process of skills development with the national 
development strategy, and skills forecasting and labour market information systems, for 
the early identification of skills needs, are therefore two critically important institutions 
for effective forward-looking skills development.  
5.2.1. The role of social dialogue 
336.  Social dialogue  is  an  institution  that is of  great  importance  in  coordinating the 
process  of  “catching  up”.  Building  the  social  capacity  for  learning,  innovation  and 
productivity requires more than a change in mindset and a relationship of trust between 
individuals:  it  requires  institutionally  embedded  relations  of  trust  between  agencies, 
6
For a review of ILO work to enable workers’ and employers’ organizations to participate in PRS processes at 
the national level, see ILO, 2007l. 
118 
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
Able to convert PDF documents into other formats (multipage TIFF bookmarks and metadata; Advanced document cleanup and Annotate and redact in PDF documents; Fully
adding hyperlinks to pdf files; add hyperlink to pdf
PDF Image Viewer| What is PDF
advanced capabilities, such as text extraction, hyperlinks, bookmarks and write, view, render, report and convert word document without need for PDF.
add links to pdf file; add url to pdf
Skills policies as drivers of development 
departments  and  other  organizations  involved  in  the  TVET  system,  science  and  the 
production system (Brown, 1999).  
337.  Cooperation through social dialogue builds institutional  relations in training and 
therefore creates trust on the basis of continuous working relations, thereby helping to 
ensure  that incentives  are  well  targeted. Institutions  generate behavioural  rules  which 
provide the basis for regularity and predictability in the behaviour of the social partners, 
governments, agencies and other organizations involved. Through repetitive cooperative 
behaviour, institutions and organizations develop a reputation over time for behaving as 
expected (Dasgupta, 2000). And this is a process that can discipline excesses, avoid the 
abuse of incentives and facilitate the adoption of appropriate corrective measures.  
338.  Social dialogue also plays a key role in processes to reform the TVET system and 
in  shaping national skills development strategies  (Ishikawa,  2003).  Reform processes 
become successful through dialogue as all actors are “aligned” and become committed to 
working towards the achievement of a shared common goal. It is through process that 
the traditional roles and functions of public education and skills providers, as well as 
labour market  institutions, are changed  and new functions emerge  that are aligned to 
achieving the success of the strategy (Bird, 2006). South Africa provides an interesting 
example  of  a  country  in  which  social  dialogue  has  resulted  in  the  successful 
development of the National Skills Development Strategy. The involvement of the social 
partners in the process of designing and implementing the National Skills Development 
Strategy is considered to be a major factor of success (box 5.2).  
Box 5.2 
Social dialogue in national skills development in South Africa 
The National Skills Development Strategy was drawn up between August 2003 and 
February 2005 through a process of extensive cooperation between the Government and 
employers’ and workers’ organizations. The process involved consultation, evaluation, 
research and the exchange of information and amendments. The Government played 
the central role as the convenor of the social dialogue process and as the final arbiter of 
the national skills strategy, which was part of a national reform process of the training 
system. The Deputy President’s Office coordinated the reform process and ensured the 
input of the social partners. The close political relationship between the ruling party in 
government  and  the  dominant  trade union  federation  resulted  in close collaboration, 
which provided a broad basis for collaboration in the implementation of the national skills 
strategy.  
Social  dialogue  took  place  at  the  national  level  and  was  managed  through  a 
statutory  body,  the  National  Skills  Authority,  on  which  the  Government,  employers’ 
organizations,  trade  unions,  providers  of  education  and  training  and  the  community 
(targeting  special  interests)  were  represented.  This  contributed  to  the  successful 
coordination  of  actions.  As  a  result  of  this  process,  the  strategy  was  universally 
supported when launched in February 2005 at the national, sectoral and provincial levels 
and amongst the labour, business and community constituencies. 
Source: Bird, 2006. 
339.  Social dialogue echoes the needs and aspirations of its constituents. Its relevance 
grows  as  it  enables  more  voices  to  be  heard.  There  is  therefore  a  pressing  need  to 
increase the  participation  of women,  minorities, older and younger  workers  in  social 
dialogue structures and mechanisms. The low number of women in leadership positions 
119
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
in  representative  bodies  has  been  identified as  hindering  the improvement  of gender 
equality in national skills development strategies. 
7
5.2.2. Early identification of skills needs: Methodologies,  
approaches and systems 
340.  The early identification of skills needs is an important element of forward-looking 
skills development strategies as it serves to link future labour market needs with skills 
development  systems.  This  helps  to  reduce  uncertainty  over  future  skills  demand, 
thereby increasing incentives for workers and employers to invest in training. It helps to 
prepare workers for the changing demand for skills and to maintain employability and 
employment.  At  the  level of  the national  economy, it  reduces  skills  mismatches  and 
avoids  skills  shortages  and  bottlenecks  to  development  and  growth.  Countries  have 
developed  a  wide  variety  of  approaches and methods  for  identifying skills needs and 
disseminating and using the respective information.  
341.  Quantitative  forecasting  approaches  use  economic  statistics  models  to  analyse 
macroeconomic data from national accounts and data from labour force surveys with a 
view to forecasting long-term trends in labour markets at the national or regional level. 
These top-down approaches project national growth, productivity, labour supply, labour 
market participation, working time and other macroeconomic variables. For each sector, 
changes are forecast in the demand for occupations and the level of employment in each 
occupation. The implications are then analysed in terms of changes in education, training 
and qualifications.  
342.  The early forecasting models developed during the 1960s and 1970s adopted the 
“manpower requirement approach” developed by the OECD. Their sole purpose was to 
inform  planning  policies  of  ministries  of  education,  manpower  planning  and  human 
resources development.  Many  developed and developing countries in  all regions used 
these approaches until the 1980s. However, the manpower planning approach proved to 
be  inflexible,  rigid  and  too  limited  in  informing  the  labour  market  and  the  skills 
development  system  in  an  increasingly  dynamic  world.  It  also  suffered  from  many 
methodological shortcomings (Neugart and Schömann, 2002).  
343.  As a consequence, new forecasting models evolved which focus on the medium to 
long term (three to ten years), use much more sophisticated projection methods, provide 
information to a wider group of potential users and integrate dynamic trends. Although 
these advanced models continue to face methodological problems and other limitations, 
a number of developed and middle-income countries use this method to provide regular 
forecasts of labour market trends (box 5.3) (Neugart and Schömann, 2002). 
7
Consult http://www.ilo.org/public/english/dialogue/themes for more information on gender and social dialogue 
(January 2008). 
120 
Skills policies as drivers of development 
Box 5.3 
Skills forecasting in the Netherlands 
A highly sophisticated forecasting approach is used in the Netherlands. Since 1989, 
the  Research  Centre  for  Education  and  the  Labour  Market  (ROA)  at  Maastricht 
University has issued forecasts every two years, and so far eight waves of forecasts 
have  been  generated.  The  model  forecasts  the  growth  rates  in  demand  for  each 
occupation by analysing trends in occupational shifts. It does not forecast employment 
levels  for a  given  type of education,  but  consistently  integrates  supply and  demand 
interactions and dynamic effects, such as labour market adjustment and technological 
changes, into  skill profiles in specific occupations. The information is disseminated to 
labour markets to improve the educational and occupational choices of individuals, as 
well  as  to  inform  and  support  educational,  economic  and  labour  market  policy 
formulation. 
Source: Cörvers and Hensen, 2007; Cörvers and de Grip, 2002. 
344.  Furthermore, many countries have developed qualitative approaches to identifying 
skills  requirements  in  the  short  and  medium  term.  In  contrast  with  quantitative 
forecasting models based on macroeconomic data, these approaches collect and analyse 
data  and  information  from  such  sources  as  enterprise  surveys,  media  vacancy 
announcements  and  expert  stakeholder  panels.  Germany  relies  heavily  on  qualitative 
approaches and has developed an integrative approach in which the social partners are 
major actors (box 5.4). 
Box 5.4 
Early identification and distribution of skills in Germany: 
The FreQueNz network 
In 1999, the federal Government and the social partners in the Alliance for Jobs, 
Training and Competitiveness adopted a resolution calling for the improvement of the 
early  identification  of  new  skills  and  qualification  needs.  The  system  identifies 
qualification  needs  at  the  federal,  sectoral,  regional  and  local  levels  and  combines 
various  methods  and  approaches.  It  gives  preference  to  shorter-term  qualitative 
knowledge of specific developments and changes in requirements on the labour market. 
It  brings together various  organizations, institutions and  networks: the  social partners 
(DGB – the German Confederation of Trade Unions and KWB – the German Employers’ 
Organization  for  Vocational  Training),  the  Federal  Institute  for  Vocational  Training 
(BIBB), educational institutions, vocational education and training actors and research 
institutions  in  the  FreQueNz  network.  Knowledge  of  changing  skills  needs  is 
disseminated  widely  to political actors,  the social  partners, the labour  administration, 
research  institutions,  educational  and  training  organizations  and  other  associations. 
Information on skills requirements is translated into specific qualification requirements 
and the definition of new qualifications by the BIBB. 
345.  In  many  European  countries,  quantitative  and  qualitative  analyses  are  now 
combined  to  improve  the  coordination  of  skills  development  with  labour  market, 
structural and development policies (Strietska-Ilina, 2007). LMIS in many European and 
“catching  up”  countries  coordinate  the  collection,  processing,  storage,  retrieval  and 
dissemination  of  labour  market  information  (Mangozho,  2003).  Labour  market 
information (LMI) analysis units,  sometimes  also called labour market  observatories, 
aim  to  provide  up  to  date  information  on  the  trends  and  dynamics  of  sectoral  and 
occupational skills requirements, new occupations and the skills that will emerge as a 
result  of  technological  and  economic  change.  The  user  groups  for  this  information 
include policy-makers in ministries of planning, education, economic development and 
121
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
labour, employers’ and workers’ organizations, enterprises, training institutions, public 
employment services and individual students, workers and jobseekers.  
346.  Successful “catching up” countries, and particularly Hong Kong (China), Ireland, 
the Republic of Korea and Singapore, adopt a sectoral approach to identifying skills and 
training needs for development (Shanahan and Hand, 2008; Cheon, 2008; Powell, 2007). 
Strategic sectors for development are adopted through tripartite processes. Government 
policies and institutional arrangements link industrial and investment policies with skills 
development by undertaking specific analyses of sectoral occupational and skills needs. 
Labour market analysis, establishment surveys, qualitative feedback from stakeholders 
and  specific  studies  of  cross-sectoral  issues  are  among  the  approaches  used  in  this 
process.  Sectoral  bodies:  (1)  monitor  developments  in  their  sector,  including  the 
influence  of  globalization,  changing  technology  and  new  management  practices; 
(2) analyse how these changes affect the demand for skills; and (3) assess the degree to 
which each of the sectors has the appropriate skills to support economic changes. The 
relevant ministries translate information on future skills requirements into education and 
training supply, for example by expanding the number of training centres and institutions, 
providing  grants  for  training  in  the  required  skill  areas  or  removing  incentives  for 
training in low priority areas or fields in which labour demand is shrinking.  
347.  Developing countries often experience  difficulties  in  organizing and maintaining 
LMIS for several reasons. First, the practice of using LMI to guide demand-based skills 
development systems is not well understood in many transition and developing countries. 
Second, many countries experience great difficulty in producing the basic labour market 
statistics that underpin labour market information, such as household and labour force 
surveys. Third, there is insufficient cooperation between institutions to ensure that LMI 
products are credible and relevant. Lack of cooperation also results in poor distribution 
of the information that is developed (Sparreboom, 2001).  
348.  South Africa’s National Skills Development Strategy (introduced in box 5.2 above) 
includes the establishment of a skills development information unit. This unit relies on 
various  approaches  to  identify  skills  needs,  including  basic  labour  market  analysis, 
stakeholder panels at the national and sectoral levels and more advanced econometric 
analysis of future skills needs. The unit is located in the Department of Labour, which 
also manages the new Skills Development Strategy, so that the production of relevant 
labour market  information  can  be  closely aligned to  the  needs  of  policy-makers  and 
stakeholders (Sparreboom, 2004). 
349.  Experience  has  shown  that  good  LMIS  can  be  developed  and  strengthened  in 
developing and industrialized countries by:  
ɽ
tailoring LMI to the needs of the various users; 
ɽ
diversifying  sources  of  LMI  and  using  a  variety  of  public  and  private  sector 
institutions; 
ɽ
combining quantitative and qualitative LMI; 
ɽ
finding multiple uses for information and nurturing intelligent users of LMI; 
ɽ
promoting continuous improvements in data gathering; 
ɽ
assessing the usefulness of LMI; and 
ɽ
developing political and institutional support. 
122 
Skills policies as drivers of development 
5.2.3. A case study: Coordinating skills development for 
sustainable dynamic growth in Ireland  
350.  Ireland has experienced extraordinary growth in productivity, employment, wages 
and national income since the mid-1990s. During the 1980s, it adopted a development 
vision  and  common  understanding  which  recognized  that,  through  high  levels  of 
education and training, the country could produce skills that would drive productivity, 
innovation and entrepreneurship, create competitive advantages and boost employment. 
The  Irish  National  Development  Plan  and  the  ten-year  social  partnership  agreement 
Towards 2016 provide the framework for national policy-making (Shanahan and Hand, 
2008).  Ireland’s  skills,  industrial,  labour  market  and  research  policies  are  highly 
interconnected  through  a  network  of  interlinked  organizations  and  an  institutional 
framework that enables effective policy coordination between the various policy areas. 
The social partners are important informants, consultants and sustainers of the process.  
351.  Education  and  training  policies  are coordinated  at  the  ministerial  level  by the 
Department  of  Education  and  Science  (DES)  which,  for  example,  coordinates  the 
planning  and  development  of  general  and  vocational  education  institutes  through  the 
Vocational Education Committees and the Higher Education Authority. The Department 
of Enterprise, Trade and Employment (DETE) is responsible for enterprise training and 
labour force development and, through its tripartite national Training and Employment 
Authority (FAS), coordinates the Irish apprenticeship scheme and continuous vocational 
training for the labour force, including training programmes for the unemployed.  
352.  The  future  demand  for  and  supply  of  skills  are  coordinated  through  forward-
looking  skills  development  policies  based  on  a  skills  forecasting  and  labour  market 
information system. In 1997, the Expert Group on Future Skills Needs (EGFSN) was set 
up by the Government to monitor all sectors of the Irish economy and to identify current 
or future skills shortages. The Board of the Expert Group comprises representatives of 
government  departments,  the  social partners, science  and  research and education and 
training  authorities.  This  network  provides  effective  channels  for  the  collection  of 
information and advice from all stakeholders in the economy and for the dissemination 
of the information produced by the skills identification system to the respective policy 
fields, including R&D, industry, labour market and skills development.  
353.  The Expert Group, together with the National Training and Employment Authority 
(FAS),  which  is  responsible  for  the  provision  of  training  and  employment  services, 
“translates”  the  information  produced  by  the  skills  identification  system  into  skills 
development.  The  Expert Group advises  the  ministries  responsible for  education  and 
enterprise development, trade and employment (the DETE and the DES respectively), 
thereby contributing to policy coherence in the skills development system. The National 
Development Plan Gender Equality Unit also contributes to  this institutional strength, 
contributing information on gender equality in training, occupational segregation, men 
and women in training, apprenticeships and company-sponsored training, and offering 
suggestions  for the  improvement  of  accessibility  and  the  reduction  of  segregation in 
training and employment. 
8
354.  The institutional strength in the country aids coordination in many other ways (as 
summarized  in  figure  5.3).  Institutions  that  promote  national  enterprises  (Enterprise 
Ireland)  and  attract  FDI  (IDA  Ireland)  cooperate  through  the  National  Policy  and 
Advisory Board for Enterprise, Trade, Science, Technology and Innovation (Forfás) with 
a view to fostering skills and technology spillovers from foreign to domestic enterprises. 
8
The fact sheet is available at http://www.ndpgenderequality.ie (January 2008). 
123
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
The National Competitiveness Council (NCC), composed of representatives from many 
agencies, the social partners and outside experts, identifies industries with a high growth 
potential  (such  as  biotechnology  and  ICT)  and  analyses  the  technologies  and  skills 
needed  to  support  their  growth.  The  Advisory  Council  for  Science,  Technology  and 
Innovation  (ASC)  advises on  the  Government’s  science  and  technology  strategy  and 
research agenda, which the Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) implements. Forfás has the 
role  of  encouraging  coordination  between  scientific  research,  enterprise  development 
and  inward  investment, and of  linking all this information  to the  skills  development 
system (Shanahan and Hand, 2008).  
355.  In conclusion, forward-looking and coordinated policies have been at the heart of 
Ireland’s success. The country is currently aiming to attract investment in knowledge-
intensive industries and to develop the bio-pharmaceuticals and international financial 
services  sectors.  Policies  and  institutions  build  expertise  and  clusters,  develop  R&D 
capacity and provide highly educated personnel and support for advanced technologies. 
Institutions  which identify  skills  requirements  early,  communicate  the  information to 
training  authorities  and  promote  training  within  enterprises  contribute  to  creating  a 
dynamic sectoral development process. Social dialogue, particularly at the national level, 
plays a central role in the skills development process and in coordination. 
Figure 5.3.  Policy coordination in Ireland 
Dep. of Enterprise, 
Trade and 
Employment (DETE)
Dep. of Education 
and Science
(DES)
Industrial 
Development
Agency (IDA)
Science Foundation
Ireland (SFI)
Enterprise Ireland
(EI)
Nat. Employment 
and Training
Authority
Vocational Education 
Committees
Bodies include
social partners
Bodies include
enterprises
Expert Group on 
Future Skills Needs
(EGFSN)
Forfás
National
Competitiveness
Council (NCC)
Advisory Council on 
Science, Technology
Skills policies
Early
identification
of skills
and Innovation (ACS)
Agencies
R &D policy
Industry and 
investment
policy
Advisory
councils
Sector training
agencies
356.  To summarize, skills development can be a powerful catalyst for change. To realize 
this  potential,  skills  development  policies  need  to  be  integral  components  of  broad 
national development strategies so as to prepare the workforce and enterprises for new 
opportunities  and  adopt  a  proactive  approach  to  dealing  with  change.  Analysis  of 
countries with some considerable success in launching and sustaining dynamic growth 
processes shows that effective skills development policies: build capacities to adapt new 
technologies  and  diversify  economic  activities;  sustain  a  learning  trajectory  that  is 
aligned with growth opportunities and priorities; and develop institutions that collect and 
share information, thereby helping to anticipate trends and match the demand for and the 
124 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested