Skills policies as drivers of development 
supply  of  skills.  Coordination  between  agencies,  stakeholders,  training  institutions, 
employers and workers necessitates a degree of institutional sophistication, which in turn 
requires effective social dialogue. 
125
Add hyperlink pdf document - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
clickable links in pdf files; add links pdf document
Add hyperlink pdf document - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlink to pdf online; pdf links
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
126 
Annex 
Comparing education data of “catching up” countries 
with a comparison group of countries 
9
GDP p.c. PPP 2000 
constant US$
1
Primary 
education (%)
2
Average years 
of schooling 
Ireland 1975 
Comparison group (unweighted average) 
Argentina 
Greece 
Portugal 
South Africa 
Spain 
9 840 
11 010 
11 132
12 432
8 997
9 625
12 861
96.50 
78.62 
93.40
84.80
64.10
61.40
89.40
7.09 
4.85 
6.30
5.91
2.77
4.55
4.74
Costa Rica 1975 
Comparison group (unweighted average) 
Algeria 
Brazil 
Mexico 
Nicaragua 
Peru 
Uruguay 
5 681 
5 718 
4 834
5 560
6 474
5 973
5 298
6 171
88.30 
66.33 
33.50
73.10
72.00
54.50
73.00
91.90
5.14 
3.79 
2.01
2.99
3.93
2.99
4.61
6.20
Republic of Korea 1960
3
Comparison group (unweighted average) 
Dominican Republic 
Honduras 
Haiti 
Thailand 
Sri Lanka 
Ghana 
Liberia 
Mozambique 
Tunisia 
1 226 
1 268 
1 302
1 398
1 055
1 078
1 378
1 300
1 230
1 327
1 343
56.20 
34.24 
64.70
43.10
9.80
63.10
72.90
20.50
10.60
14.50
9.00
4.25 
1.81 
2.70
1.87
0.78
4.30
3.94
0.97
0.67
0.48
0.61
Viet Nam 1990 
Comparison group (unweighted average) 
Congo 
Central African Republic 
Kenya 
Guinea-Bissau 
Nepal 
Rwanda 
Sudan 
1 153 
1 204 
1 292
1 267
1 124
1 002
1 036
1 036
1 674
86.80 
41.00 
60.40
37.10
65.10
22.80
24.50
43.60
34.10
3.84 
2.41 
5.13
2.35
3.65
0.65
1.55
2.10
1.64
Source: World Bank, World Development Indicators (apart from the Republic of Korea). 
Primary education and average years of schooling from: Barro, R.J. and Lee, J.-W. (2000). International Data on Educational Attainment: 
Updates and Implications. CID Working Paper No. 42. Data tables: http://www.cid.harvard.edu/ciddata/barrolee/ 
appendix_data_tables.xls, 24 Nov. 2007. 
Republic of Korea data: http://www.ckan.net/package/read/econ-gdp-historical, 24 Nov. 2007.
9
Countries in bold are the so-called “catching up” countries. Countries in the comparison groups (in italics) were 
selected for their similar levels of GDP per capita. The year was chosen based on the period when the catching up 
country concerned started to industrialize, apply new technologies, diversify economic activities and grow. The 
table shows the difference between the respective countries and comparison groups in terms of primary education 
and average years of schooling. 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing
add hyperlinks pdf file; add a link to a pdf
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing
add hyperlinks to pdf; add hyperlink pdf document
Chapter 6 
Skills policies responding to global drivers 
of change: Technology, trade and 
climate change 
Employability is an “individual’s capacity to … secure and retain decent work, to progress 
within  the  enterprise  and  between  jobs,  and  to  cope  with  changing  technology  and  labour 
market conditions” (Recommendation No. 195, Paragraph 2(d)). 
357.  Viewed  from  a global perspective,  change  in  workplaces and labour  markets is 
being  driven  by  powerful  and  interconnected  forces:  rapid  technological  advances 
(particularly  ICTs)  and  their  global  diffusion,  increased  trade  and  FDI,  intensified 
competition in international markets and, more recently, climate change and the urgent 
need to improve the management of energy and waste. Together they have the potential 
to trigger major transformations in economic systems in all regions of the world (ILO, 
2006a; ILO, 2007k). 
358.  Chapter 5 examined the strategic role of skills development in achieving national 
economic  and  social  objectives,  essentially  in  terms  of  technological  change, 
diversification and  development. The present  chapter looks at  how skills policies can 
also help to develop effective responses to externally induced changes in the economy. 
Three contemporary global drivers of change are taken as examples: technology, trade 
and  climate  change.  The  twin  goals  are  to  be  able  to  take  advantage  of  emerging 
opportunities  for  increased  productivity,  employment  and  development,  while  at  the 
same time mitigating the cost for workers and enterprises that are adversely affected by 
global changes. The chapter therefore refers to all three objectives of skills development 
policy, as described in Chapter 1: matching the demand for and supply of new skills; 
facilitating adjustment and mitigating its costs; and sustaining a dynamic development 
process. 
6.1.  Building social capabilities to promote 
technological catching up 
359.  In view of the major role of technological skills and competences in influencing 
innovation  and  diversification,  it  is  important  for  technological  change  and  skills 
development to go hand in hand. The GEA points out that a strong skills base promotes 
productivity and employment by enabling enterprises to move with greater ease up the 
value chain. 
360.  While  developed  countries  are  pushing  the  technological  frontier,  developing 
countries are moving towards that frontier (UNCTAD, 2007, p. 6). Imitation allows for 
investment in non-traditional sectors and for the application of new technologies to a 
broader  variety  of  economic  activities.  The  movement  to  a  more  sophisticated  and 
127
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update
add links in pdf; add links to pdf in acrobat
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Add necessary references DOCXDocument doc = new DOCXDocument(inputFilePath); // Convert it to PDF document.
clickable links in pdf; check links in pdf
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
diversified production structure will result in the growth in the long term of productivity, 
competitiveness in international markets and income. 
361.  The  current  phase  of  technological  change  is  characterized  by  strong 
complementarities between technology and skills. This means that skills and technology 
must be enhanced simultaneously in order to ensure the sustainability of productivity 
growth and development. Technological change is also characterized by a skills bias due 
to several factors: 
ɽ
skilled  workers are  more adept at  learning and  implementing new technologies; 
even  the  simple  adoption  of  existing technologies  requires  a  minimum  level of 
general education and training of the workforce (World Bank, 2003); 
ɽ
the  availability  of  skilled  workers  creates  incentives  for  firms  to  develop  skill-
intensive technologies (Acemoglu and Pischke, 2001); and 
ɽ
substantial  engineering,  scientific  and  managerial  skills  are  needed  at  higher 
technological levels (Beaudry and Patrick, 2005). 
362.  The  level  of  skills  and  competences  attained  in  a  population,  the  quality  of 
education and training and the skills structure are important determinants of a society’s 
capability to master technologies (Zachmann, 2008). While all developing countries are 
improving their skills base, the process of building social capabilities is highly uneven 
between  countries  and  regions.  This  section  draws  links  between  the  education  and 
training levels and systems in the various countries and regions and the level and type of 
technologies that they attract and adopt. 
6.1.1. A solid base of general and core skills 
363.  At  the  early  stage  of  technological  development,  it  is  essential  to  achieve  a 
minimum  level  of  educational  attainment  in  the  population.  A  good  educational 
foundation,  in  combination  with  relatively  low  wages,  has  helped  some  developing 
countries to attract investment in labour-intensive low-skill industries, such as garments 
and footwear. 
364.  However, in most of the countries of sub-Saharan Africa, manufacturing tends to 
consist of the low-level processing of natural resources and the manufacture of simple 
consumer goods for domestic markets (UNCTAD, 2003). Moreover, in many of these 
countries  a  large  share  of  employment  is  in  petty  trade.  The  level  of  basic  formal 
education is very low and the average adult literacy rate (age 15 and above) is only 61 
per cent (UNESCO, 2007). In the informal economy in many African countries, as noted 
in  Chapter  2,  the most common means of delivering  skills,  namely through  informal 
apprenticeship, does not enable young people to learn updated technologies. A number 
of  countries  currently  have  policies  to  upgrade  the  informal  apprenticeship  system, 
including  improvements  in  the  learning  of  both  technical  skills  and  theoretical 
knowledge (examples include Benin, Ghana, Mali, Senegal and Togo). 
365.  Core skills, such as client service, social, interpersonal and language skills,  are 
important  in  attracting  and  adopting  new  ICTs.  Activities  in  the  fields  of  business 
services and data processing, such as call centres and back office services, combine the 
use  of  high-level  communications  technology  and  semi-skilled  workers.  The 
technological content of the work is relatively low, but workers require language skills, 
as well as social and communication skills. The eastern Caribbean countries have seized 
the opportunity of the new service markets to step onto the first rung of the knowledge 
economy, with low-cost semi-skilled labour being engaged in exporting data-processing 
services. The  combination of  excellent  telecommunications technology  and relatively 
128 
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Excel to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
add links to pdf acrobat; add links to pdf online
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url), which provide quick access to the website or other file.
pdf edit hyperlink; add a link to a pdf file
Skills policies responding to global drivers of change: Technology, trade and climate change 
low wage semi-skilled IT workers has attracted many companies from the United States 
to the island countries (UNDP, 2005, p. 61). 
366.  A  broad  foundation  of  basic  skills  therefore  helps  countries  to  attract  low-
technology  manufacturing,  and  also  ensures  the  “trainability”  of  the  workforce.  The 
combination of widespread basic skills and the core skills that facilitate lifelong learning 
serve as a catalyst in moving to higher value added activities. 
6.1.2. Scope, structure and quality of secondary education 
367.  The scope and quality of secondary education and training plays an important role 
in building social capabilities for technological and industrial advancement. Costa Rica, 
Ireland and the Republic of Korea invested substantially in secondary education with a 
view  to  promoting  industrialization.  When  Ireland  entered  the  European  Economic 
Community in 1973, it received substantial subsidies from the European Social Fund, 
which  it  invested  largely  in  educational  reform  to  provide  mass  education  at  the 
secondary level. Costa Rica consistently invested in education and skills development 
and has been able to provide free, compulsory and universal education up to the ninth 
grade since 1948, with funds saved from abolishing the military (Monge Naranjo, 2008). 
This later helped to attract high-technology manufacturing, for example in electronics 
and software (Te Velde, 2005; Shanahan and Hand, 2008). 
368.  Many Asian countries expanded their secondary education between 1960 and 2000, 
during  which  period  they  moved  from  low  to  higher  levels  of  technology  and 
diversification.  In  contrast,  many  Latin  American  countries  focused  on  expanding 
tertiary education, which has resulted in a high average number of years of schooling, 
but has not created a structure and distribution of education that has strengthened the 
broad social capabilities required for technological catching up. For example, average 
educational attainment is at the same level in both Malaysia and Panama, at 7.9 years of 
schooling, but in Malaysia 43 per cent of the population over the age of 15 has some 
secondary  schooling,  compared  to  29  per  cent  in  Panama.  Garrett  (2004,  p.  13) 
concludes  that  the  relatively  low  performance  in  secondary  education  has  prevented 
many  Latin  American  countries  from  gaining  access  to  and  adopting  sophisticated 
technology. 
369.  Competences in mathematics and science have also been identified as an important 
element  in  moving  into  the  knowledge  economy.  Broadening  the  base  of  scientific 
literacy appears to have a greater economic impact than building smaller cohorts of very 
highly trained scientists working in R&D (World Bank, 2003). 
6.1.3. Technical, vocational and R&D skills 
370.  Technical and vocational education and training at the secondary and tertiary levels 
are highly relevant  for the adoption of more complex and sophisticated technologies. 
The shift from low to medium and higher technologies requires substantial investment in 
vocational and technical skills, as well as in technical subjects in tertiary education. In 
the Republic of Korea and Singapore, secondary level vocational education and training 
played a crucial role in shifting the economy from labour-intensive low-level technology 
to more advanced technology during the early phase of industrialization (see box 6.1). 
129
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Add necessary references doc As DOCXDocument = New DOCXDocument(inputFilePath) ' Convert it to PDF document.
accessible links in pdf; add email link to pdf
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit. Support adding and inserting hyperlink (link) to PDF document; Allow to create, edit, and remove PDF bookmark
add page number to pdf hyperlink; pdf link
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
Box 6.1 
Vocational education and training in the  
Republic of Korea and Singapore 
In the Republic of Korea, vocational education and training played a crucial role in 
shifting the economy from low and semi-skilled labour-intensive manufacturing industries 
to more advanced technologies, heavy manufacturing and chemical industries. Following 
 vast  economic  development  plan  in  the  1960s,  the  Government  expanded  basic 
education to the middle school level, anchored vocational training at the secondary level 
through  vocational  high  schools  and  established  two-year  junior  colleges  to  expand 
technical  education  at  the  tertiary  level.  In  addition,  it  anticipated  emerging  skills 
shortages  and  started  up  a  public  non-formal  training  system  under  the  Ministry  of 
Labour to  increase  the  supply  of  skilled  craftspersons  and  operatives.  The  massive 
promotion of heavy and chemical industries in the 1970s was accompanied by a further 
expansion  of  formal  and  non-formal  vocational  education  and  by  an  emphasis  on 
science  and engineering in junior colleges. In  addition, a Special Law for Vocational 
Training, enacted in 1974, required companies with over 500 employees to train 15 per 
cent of their workforce.  
In Singapore, vocational  education  and training was  equally important during the 
industrialization phase. Singapore’s efforts to move to higher value added sectors in the 
mid-1970s  included adding  a  vocational  stream  to  secondary  education, establishing 
joint bilateral technical institutes with France, Germany and Japan and creating a Skills 
Development Fund, which was initially used to finance the improvement of workers’ skills 
and the ability of employers to provide training. Through its Vocational and Industrial 
Training  Board  (VITB),  founded  in  1970,  Singapore  also  established  a  series  of 
programmes to upgrade  the skills  of  those  who  were already  in  the workforce.  The 
overarching goal was to support the enhancement and diversification of the industrial 
base of the economy and to make sure that the move towards higher value added forms 
of production was not held back by inadequacies in the education and training of the 
workforce. 
Source: Osman-Gani, 2004; Powell, 2007; Cheon, 2008. 
371.  The  successful  expansion  of  Costa  Rica,  India,  Ireland  and  Israel  in the  global 
software and IT industry can largely be explained by the availability of a large supply of 
relevant IT skills and competences, and particularly the abundant supply of engineering 
and technology graduates (Arora and Gambardella, 2004). As a result, these countries 
were prepared and could take advantage when global opportunities emerged. Costa Rica 
and Ireland were able to target MNEs through their investment promotion agencies and 
to  train  workers  rapidly  in  the  ICT  skills  required  to  attract  FDI.  Furthermore, 
particularly  in  Ireland  and  Israel,  the  inflow  of  skilled  migrants  (including  returning 
migrants) added to the supply of relevant IT skills. 
372.  Today, China, India and the Republic of Korea are the three leading countries in 
terms  of  total  technical  enrolment  at  the  tertiary  level. Indeed,  already  in  1995  they 
accounted for 44 per cent of the developing world’s technical enrolments (UNCTAD, 
2003).  The  Republic  of  Korea  has  the  world’s  highest  proportion  of  the  population 
enrolled in engineering  and other  technical subjects.  This strong  skills base  at a high 
technical level has been developed to prepare the move into the knowledge economy. 
373.  R&D skills take on greater importance as countries adopt and absorb ever more 
complex technologies. The knowledge-intensive sectors are the most dynamic in terms 
of their “learning potential”. As technologies become more complex, the significance of 
R&D  increases  to  monitor,  absorb  and  adapt  technologies,  lower  transfer  costs  and 
obtain technologies that are not easily available under licence. The Republic of Korea 
and  Singapore  had  already  invested  heavily  in  the  development  of R&D capacity to 
prepare for the knowledge economy, while Ireland has recently started to focus on R&D 
130 
Skills policies responding to global drivers of change: Technology, trade and climate change 
with a view to moving into higher value added sectors. China’s R&D as a percentage of 
GDP grew from around 0.7 per cent in 1997 to 1.1 per cent in 2002 (UNIDO, 2005, 
p. 63). This reflects the strategy in China of diversifying manufacturing into medium-
level technologies and, at the same time, catching up with cutting-edge technologies in 
some sectors and shifting into the knowledge economy. 
374.  Within  countries,  technological  change  may  affect  men  and  women  differently. 
Occupational segmentation along gender lines may perpetuate a digital or technological 
gap.  Skill  polarization  between  an  elite  group  of  technologically  skilled  specialist 
workers  and  the  larger  mass  of  technically  semi-skilled,  flexible  or  casual  workers 
receiving low-level training may prevent women from preparing for employment in new 
industries  or  occupations.  Technological  change  often  makes  lower-skilled  labour 
redundant. If women are concentrated in lower-skilled jobs, then they are relatively more 
vulnerable than men to both the qualitative and the quantitative impact of technological 
change (Biasiato, 2007). On the other hand, gender roles may not be fully segregated in 
certain  areas  of  new  technology.  Women  who  begin  working  in  these  areas  are  at 
something of an advantage, as they do not have to overcome the perception that they are 
intruding on what has been accepted as “men’s work”. 
6.2.  Maximizing the benefits and minimizing the 
costs of trade and investment 
375.  The interlinkages between trade, foreign investment, employment and development 
have recently been the subject of increased attention by the ILO and other international 
organizations. For  example,  in 2006 the ILO undertook a  joint study with the World 
Trade  Organization  on  trade  and  employment  (ILO/WTO,  2007).  The  World 
Commission on the Social Dimension of Globalization (2004, para. 275) pointed out that 
“All countries  which have  benefited from globalization have  invested significantly in 
their education and training systems.” 
6.2.1. Skills and technology for competitiveness 
376.  The benefits deriving from trade  are not simply a residual effect of openness to 
trade.  Many  countries  face  important  supply-side  constraints  and  therefore  seek  to 
develop social capabilities  so  that they can benefit from trade and  take advantage  of 
global opportunities to induce  and sustain a dynamic development  process.  Countries 
can  develop  new  comparative  advantages  through  this  dynamic  process.  They  can 
strengthen  their productive capacities, their  capacity  to  respond to  the  opening  up  of 
trade and their capacity to deal with change. With strong social capabilities, economies 
can take advantage of emerging opportunities in international markets and are therefore 
able  to  benefit  from  trade.  Social  capabilities,  technological  development  and 
diversification into non-traditional economic activities help prepare economies to take 
advantage of the opportunities and potential available through trade. 
377.  Figure 6.1 groups countries according to their performance in education  and the 
export of manufactured  goods.  In Africa, labour costs per hour are  the  lowest in  the 
world,  but  so  are  average  educational  levels:  most  African  countries  have  not 
participated  in  the  global  growth  of  manufactured  exports  and  the  diversification  of 
production  locations.  These  countries are  grouped  in  the  lower  left-hand  area  of  the 
figure. 
131
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
132 
378.  The  figure  shows  that  there  is  a  particularly  strong  correlation  between 
manufactured exports and education levels (measured in the average years of schooling 
of persons over the age of 15) in Asia and in CEE countries. This suggests that, as these 
countries invest in education and training, they are developing skills that are needed to 
diversify export structures and increase their competitiveness on international markets. 
379.  However, in Latin American countries the share of manufactured exports is usually 
low, independent  of  the average level of schooling achieved. This lack of correlation 
suggests that education and skills development in most Latin American countries does 
not  adequately  create  the  social  capabilities  required  for  export  diversification  and 
international competitiveness. 
1
3
3
S
k
i
l
l
s
p
o
l
i
c
i
e
s
r
e
s
p
o
n
d
i
n
g
t
o
g
l
o
b
a
l
d
r
i
v
e
r
s
o
f
c
h
a
n
g
e
:
T
e
c
h
n
o
l
o
g
y
,
t
r
a
d
e
a
n
d
c
l
i
m
a
t
e
c
h
a
n
g
e
Figure 6.1.  Education and manufactured exports 
0.00
20.00
40.00
60.00
80.00
100.00
0.00
2.00
4.00
6.00
8.00
10.00
12.00
Average years of schooling
S
h
a
r
e
o
f
m
a
n
u
f
a
c
t
u
r
e
d
e
x
p
o
r
t
s
i
n
t
o
t
a
l
m
e
r
c
h
a
n
d
i
s
e
e
x
p
o
r
t
s
Central and Eastern Europe
Latin America
Middle East and North Africa
South and South-East Asia
Sub-Saharan Africa
Bangladesh
Tunisia
Pakistan
China
Slovenia
Philippines
Czech Republic
Slovakia
Hungary
Poland
Romania
Bulgaria
Guatemala
India
Thailand
Mexico
Jordan
Argentina
a
Panama
Uruguay
Trinidad and Tobago
Peru
Chile
Venezuela, 
Bol. Rep. of
Brazil
Indonesia
South Africa
Honduras
Colombia
Egypt
Zimbabwe
Mauritius
Malaysia
Costa Rica
Kenya
Sri Lanka
Uganda
Malawi
Nicaragua
Ghana
Cameroon
Algeria
a
Bolivia
Iran, Islamic 
Rep. of
Zambia
Paraguay
Ecuador
Tanzania, 
United Rep. of
Sudan
Mozambique
Gambia
Benin
Croatia
Source: World Bank, 2007; Barro and Lee, 2000.
00.
S
k
i
l
l
s
f
o
r
i
m
p
r
o
v
e
d
p
r
o
d
u
c
t
i
v
i
t
y
,
e
m
p
l
o
y
m
e
n
t
g
r
o
w
t
h
a
n
d
d
e
v
e
l
o
p
m
e
n
t
6
.
2
.
2
.
E
n
h
a
n
c
i
n
g
t
h
e
c
a
p
a
b
i
l
i
t
y
t
o
a
d
j
u
s
t
3
8
0
.
T
h
e
m
e
a
s
u
r
e
s
a
d
o
p
t
e
d
i
n
v
a
r
i
o
u
s
r
e
l
a
t
e
d
a
r
e
a
s
a
r
e
t
a
k
i
n
g
o
n
g
r
o
w
i
n
g
i
m
p
o
r
t
a
n
c
e
i
n
d
e
v
e
l
o
p
i
n
g
t
h
e
s
k
i
l
l
s
a
n
d
c
a
p
a
c
i
t
y
t
h
a
t
a
r
e
r
e
q
u
i
r
e
d
t
o
t
a
k
e
a
d
v
a
n
t
a
g
e
o
f
t
r
a
d
e
-
r
e
l
a
t
e
d
o
p
p
o
r
t
u
n
i
t
i
e
s
a
n
d
t
o
a
d
j
u
s
t
t
o
t
h
e
r
e
s
u
l
t
i
n
g
c
h
a
n
g
e
s
.
T
h
r
e
e
s
u
c
h
a
r
e
a
s
a
r
e
:
e
x
t
e
r
n
a
l
a
s
s
i
s
t
a
n
c
e
,
s
o
c
i
a
l
p
r
o
t
e
c
t
i
o
n
a
n
d
s
o
c
i
a
l
d
i
a
l
o
g
u
e
.
3
8
1
.
(
i
)
E
x
t
e
r
n
a
l
a
s
s
i
s
t
a
n
c
e
:
t
h
e
r
e
i
s
e
v
i
d
e
n
c
e
t
h
a
t
a
c
c
e
s
s
t
o
g
l
o
b
a
l
m
a
r
k
e
t
s
d
o
e
s
n
o
t
i
n
i
t
s
e
l
f
s
p
u
r
i
n
v
e
s
t
m
e
n
t
i
n
n
e
w
s
u
p
p
l
y
c
a
p
a
c
i
t
y
i
n
t
h
e
l
e
s
s
d
e
v
e
l
o
p
e
d
c
o
u
n
t
r
i
e
s
(
S
t
i
g
l
i
t
z
a
n
d
C
h
a
r
l
t
o
n
,
2
0
0
6
)
.
M
a
n
y
c
o
u
n
t
r
i
e
s
l
a
c
k
t
h
e
r
e
s
o
u
r
c
e
s
t
o
i
n
v
e
s
t
i
n
d
e
v
e
l
o
p
i
n
g
t
h
e
h
u
m
a
n
c
a
p
i
t
a
l
,
k
n
o
w
l
e
d
g
e
,
i
n
f
o
r
m
a
t
i
o
n
,
i
n
s
t
i
t
u
t
i
o
n
s
a
n
d
i
n
f
r
a
s
t
r
u
c
t
u
r
e
t
h
a
t
a
r
e
n
e
c
e
s
s
a
r
y
t
o
r
e
m
o
v
e
i
n
t
e
r
n
a
l
b
a
r
r
i
e
r
s
t
o
t
r
a
d
e
.
T
h
e
r
e
c
e
n
t
A
i
d
f
o
r
T
r
a
d
e
(
A
f
T
)
i
n
i
t
i
a
t
i
v
e
i
s
d
e
s
i
g
n
e
d
t
o
p
r
o
v
i
d
e
m
o
r
e
a
i
d
t
o
l
e
s
s
d
e
v
e
l
o
p
e
d
c
o
u
n
t
r
i
e
s
t
o
e
n
h
a
n
c
e
t
h
e
i
r
t
r
a
d
e
c
a
p
a
b
i
l
i
t
i
e
s
a
n
d
i
m
p
r
o
v
e
t
r
a
d
e
p
r
e
p
a
r
e
d
n
e
s
s
(
O
E
C
D
/
W
T
O
,
2
0
0
6
a
n
d
2
0
0
7
)
.
3
8
2
.
I
n
J
u
l
y
2
0
0
6
,
t
h
e
W
T
O
T
a
s
k
F
o
r
c
e
d
e
f
i
n
e
d
t
h
e
s
c
o
p
e
o
f
A
i
d
f
o
r
T
r
a
d
e
,
w
h
i
c
h
e
n
c
o
m
p
a
s
s
e
s
:
ɽ
t
r
a
d
e
p
o
l
i
c
y
a
n
d
r
e
g
u
l
a
t
i
o
n
s
,
i
n
c
l
u
d
i
n
g
t
h
e
t
r
a
i
n
i
n
g
o
f
t
r
a
d
e
o
f
f
i
c
i
a
l
s
,
i
n
s
t
i
t
u
t
i
o
n
a
l
a
n
d
t
e
c
h
n
i
c
a
l
s
u
p
p
o
r
t
t
o
f
a
c
i
l
i
t
a
t
e
t
h
e
i
m
p
l
e
m
e
n
t
a
t
i
o
n
o
f
t
r
a
d
e
a
g
r
e
e
m
e
n
t
s
a
n
d
t
o
a
d
a
p
t
t
o
a
n
d
c
o
m
p
l
y
w
i
t
h
r
u
l
e
s
a
n
d
s
t
a
n
d
a
r
d
s
;
ɽ
t
r
a
d
e
d
e
v
e
l
o
p
m
e
n
t
,
i
n
c
l
u
d
i
n
g
i
n
v
e
s
t
m
e
n
t
p
r
o
m
o
t
i
o
n
,
i
n
f
o
r
m
a
t
i
o
n
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
a
n
d
t
r
a
i
n
i
n
g
t
o
b
u
i
l
d
i
n
s
t
i
t
u
t
i
o
n
a
l
a
n
d
e
n
t
e
r
p
r
i
s
e
c
a
p
a
b
i
l
i
t
i
e
s
,
e
s
t
a
b
l
i
s
h
b
u
s
i
n
e
s
s
s
u
p
p
o
r
t
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
a
n
d
p
r
o
m
o
t
e
p
u
b
l
i
c
p
r
i
v
a
t
e
n
e
t
w
o
r
k
i
n
g
,
e
-
c
o
m
m
e
r
c
e
a
n
d
m
a
r
k
e
t
a
n
a
l
y
s
i
s
;
ɽ
b
u
i
l
d
i
n
g
p
r
o
d
u
c
t
i
v
e
c
a
p
a
c
i
t
y
,
f
o
c
u
s
i
n
g
o
n
p
r
i
v
a
t
e
s
e
c
t
o
r
a
n
d
S
M
E
d
e
v
e
l
o
p
m
e
n
t
:
t
r
a
i
n
i
n
g
p
r
o
g
r
a
m
m
e
s
i
n
t
h
i
s
c
o
n
t
e
x
t
a
r
e
u
s
u
a
l
l
y
d
i
r
e
c
t
e
d
a
t
t
r
a
d
e
s
u
p
p
o
r
t
i
n
s
t
i
t
u
t
i
o
n
s
o
r
e
n
t
e
r
p
r
i
s
e
s
;
ɽ
t
r
a
d
e
-
r
e
l
a
t
e
d
i
n
f
r
a
s
t
r
u
c
t
u
r
e
;
a
n
d
ɽ
t
r
a
d
e
-
r
e
l
a
t
e
d
a
d
j
u
s
t
m
e
n
t
.
3
8
3
.
A
t
t
h
e
c
o
n
c
e
p
t
u
a
l
l
e
v
e
l
,
A
i
d
f
o
r
T
r
a
d
e
h
a
s
s
o
f
a
r
p
l
a
c
e
d
e
m
p
h
a
s
i
s
o
n
p
h
y
s
i
c
a
l
i
n
f
r
a
s
t
r
u
c
t
u
r
e
a
n
d
t
h
e
r
e
m
o
v
a
l
o
f
s
u
p
p
l
y
s
i
d
e
c
o
n
s
t
r
a
i
n
t
s
,
w
i
t
h
r
e
l
a
t
i
v
e
l
y
l
i
t
t
l
e
i
m
p
o
r
t
a
n
c
e
b
e
i
n
g
g
i
v
e
n
t
o
d
e
v
e
l
o
p
i
n
g
t
h
e
s
o
c
i
a
l
c
a
p
a
b
i
l
i
t
i
e
s
r
e
q
u
i
r
e
d
t
o
b
e
n
e
f
i
t
f
r
o
m
t
r
a
d
e
.
I
t
w
o
u
l
d
t
h
e
r
e
f
o
r
e
b
e
h
e
l
p
f
u
l
i
f
a
d
d
i
t
i
o
n
a
l
e
m
p
h
a
s
i
s
w
e
r
e
g
i
v
e
n
t
o
t
h
e
c
o
o
r
d
i
n
a
t
i
o
n
o
f
e
d
u
c
a
t
i
o
n
a
n
d
s
k
i
l
l
s
d
e
v
e
l
o
p
m
e
n
t
p
o
l
i
c
i
e
s
,
o
n
t
h
e
o
n
e
h
a
n
d
,
w
i
t
h
t
e
c
h
n
o
l
o
g
y
a
n
d
i
n
n
o
v
a
t
i
o
n
p
o
l
i
c
i
e
s
,
o
n
t
h
e
o
t
h
e
r
.
I
n
p
a
r
t
i
c
u
l
a
r
,
t
h
e
r
o
l
e
o
f
b
u
i
l
d
i
n
g
a
n
d
u
p
g
r
a
d
i
n
g
t
e
c
h
n
o
l
o
g
i
c
a
l
c
a
p
a
b
i
l
i
t
y
a
n
d
i
t
s
i
m
p
a
c
t
o
n
e
x
p
o
r
t
c
o
m
p
e
t
i
t
i
v
e
n
e
s
s
a
n
d
p
o
v
e
r
t
y
r
e
d
u
c
t
i
o
n
n
e
e
d
s
t
o
b
e
t
a
k
e
n
i
n
t
o
a
c
c
o
u
n
t
.
1
3
8
4
.
(
i
i
)
S
o
c
i
a
l
p
r
o
t
e
c
t
i
o
n
:
t
r
a
d
e
p
o
l
i
c
i
e
s
c
a
u
s
e
s
h
i
f
t
s
i
n
t
h
e
o
c
c
u
p
a
t
i
o
n
a
l
c
o
m
p
o
s
i
t
i
o
n
o
f
e
m
p
l
o
y
m
e
n
t
.
W
h
i
l
e
s
e
c
t
o
r
s
p
r
o
d
u
c
i
n
g
f
o
r
e
x
p
o
r
t
w
i
l
l
g
r
o
w
,
w
i
t
h
a
r
i
s
e
i
n
t
h
e
r
e
l
a
t
e
d
e
m
p
l
o
y
m
e
n
t
o
p
p
o
r
t
u
n
i
t
i
e
s
,
o
t
h
e
r
s
e
c
t
o
r
s
t
h
a
t
l
o
s
e
t
h
e
i
r
c
o
m
p
e
t
i
t
i
v
e
n
e
s
s
a
s
a
r
e
s
u
l
t
o
f
t
h
e
r
i
s
e
i
n
i
m
p
o
r
t
s
a
r
e
l
i
k
e
l
y
t
o
d
e
c
l
i
n
e
.
T
r
a
d
e
-
r
e
l
a
t
e
d
a
d
j
u
s
t
m
e
n
t
a
n
d
i
n
c
l
u
s
i
v
e
s
o
c
i
a
l
p
r
o
t
e
c
t
i
o
n
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
c
a
n
e
a
s
e
t
h
e
t
r
a
n
s
i
t
i
o
n
b
e
t
w
e
e
n
j
o
b
s
a
n
d
m
i
t
i
g
a
t
e
t
h
e
s
o
c
i
a
l
c
o
s
t
o
f
j
o
b
l
o
s
s
e
s
.
E
x
t
e
r
n
a
l
a
s
s
i
s
t
a
n
c
e
t
o
p
r
o
v
i
d
e
h
e
l
p
i
n
d
e
s
i
g
n
i
n
g
p
o
l
i
c
i
e
s
a
n
d
d
e
v
e
l
o
p
i
n
g
i
n
s
t
i
t
u
t
i
o
n
s
t
h
a
t
c
a
n
r
e
c