how to upload and download pdf file in asp net c# : Add links to pdf in preview software SDK cloud windows wpf html class wcms_09205415-part958

Skills policies responding to global drivers of change: Technology, trade and climate change 
385.  A recent study by the OECD (2005) argues that workers who are displaced due to 
the opening of trade are more adversely affected than workers who lose their jobs as a 
result of technological or structural changes or macroeconomic slow-down. They tend to 
experience longer spells of unemployment and larger wage losses when they return to 
employment. Workers in declining sectors tend to be older, less well-educated and to 
have  substantial  occupation-  and  industry-specific  skills.  If  they  do  not  find 
re-employment  in  the  same  industry,  which  is  often  unlikely,  their  technical  and 
vocational skills, as well as tacit industry-specific capabilities, lose value on the labour 
market. 
386.  However, targeting social security and training measures at trade-related job losses 
is difficult, even in developed countries, as shown by the Trade Adjustment Assistance 
Programme in the United States and similar measures in other developed countries. And 
this is even truer in developing countries. General and permanent social security systems, 
combined with active labour market policies, can have a better impact than temporary or 
narrowly targeted mechanisms (Kletzer and Rosen, 2005). Moreover, lifelong learning is 
a type of unemployment insurance in that  it eases the transition to new employment, 
occupations or industries in the event of job loss. 
387.  (iii) Social dialogue: trade liberalization brings structural changes and intensified 
competition in domestic and international markets. Social dialogue has been shown to be 
an effective instrument in reconciling differences on how to maximize the benefits and 
minimize the costs of increased participation in global markets. Workers seek a source 
of security and advancement through training. The aim of enterprises in this respect is to 
enhance  flexibility  and  responsiveness  to  increasingly  competitive  and  dynamic 
(international)  markets.  Governments  seek  to  enhance  international  competitiveness, 
technological  development,  regional  development,  equity  and  social  integration 
(Schömann et al, 2006). These different  agendas place enormous pressure on  training 
systems during  the  process of change, reforms and  adjustment (Heyes,  2007; Nübler, 
2008b). 
388.  For example, in Germany, the interest of companies in modernization in response 
to global changes and that of workers in training for employment protection need to be 
reconciled. Company agreements  have been negotiated  between employers and works 
councils for the introduction of teamwork as a new form of work organization and the 
systematic preparation of the workforce through training. This has resulted in increased 
productivity  at  the  enterprise  level.  Workers  have  negotiated  an  entitlement  to 
continuous training to ensure their employability in the company and in external labour 
markets (Nübler, 2008b). Similarly, in Austria social dialogue has helped to manage the 
process  of  structural  adjustment  in  the  iron  industry  by  creating  a  foundation  that 
provides joint solutions for retraining and social protection. The interests of enterprises 
and  the  economy  have  been  served  by  maintaining  and  developing  local  human 
resources to accommodate newly emerging sectors and adjust to new technologies. Other 
examples also demonstrate the effectiveness of social dialogue over extended periods of 
change in technologies and markets (box 6.2 on Singapore) and at the international, as 
well as the national or sector levels (box 6.3 on the retail industry). 
135
Add links to pdf in preview - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding hyperlinks to pdf; adding hyperlinks to a pdf
Add links to pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add link to pdf acrobat; pdf reader link
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
Box 6.2 
Employability and labour market adjustment in Singapore 
In Singapore, the Workforce Development Agency (WDA) is the central body for the 
coordination  of  all  human  capital  issues.  It  enhances  the  employability  of  workers 
through multiskilling and retraining. In the long term, the goal is to assist workers to stay 
employed by maintaining up to date skills and to cooperate with employers with a view to 
strengthening human  resource practices in  a  system that promotes  lifelong  learning. 
Training programmes targeting both young and older workers cater for the needs of the 
working  population  through  the  Adult  Cooperative  Training  Scheme  (ACTS)  and  the 
Training Initiative for Mature  Employees  (TIME). The Modular Skills Training Initiative 
(MOST) provides reskilling and skills upgrading courses through a part-time programme 
offered during the day, in the evening and at weekends. 
The WDA also provides opportunities for the certification of vocational and technical 
skills  acquired by  workers  outside the  formal  school  system.  This contributes to  the 
recognition and portability of their skills and their employability. The Reskilling for New 
Economy  Workforce  (ReNEW)  programme  offers  a  fast-track  programme  for  the 
certification  of  skills  through  intensive  courses.  Private  institutions,  such  as  the 
Singapore  Institute  of  Management  (SIM),  the  Singapore  Training  and  Development 
Association (STADA) and the Singapore Human Resource Institute (SHRI) also provide 
degree courses to update workers’ skills.  
Trade unions contribute to the education and training of their members through the 
Skills  Redevelopment  Programme  (SRP),  originally  established  in  the  manufacturing 
sector  and  later  extended  to  support  worker  (re)training  in  the  service  sector.  The 
National Trades Union Congress also launched an Education and Training Fund (N-ETF) 
to  support  some  40  IT  and  office skills  courses. Enterprises contribute  to  workforce 
development through a skills development levy of 1 per cent of gross wages and can 
reclaim most training costs from the Skills Development Fund (SDF). 
Source: Leggett, 2007; Osman-Gani, 2004; Wong, 2001. 
Box 6.3 
Matching retail workers’ skills to new  
technological requirements 
The strongest and most competitive firms in the retail industry have adopted new 
technologies  early.  Radio-frequency  identification  (RFID)  technology  promises  to 
revolutionize  supply  chain  and  retail  store  operations.  RFID’s  non-line-of-sight  and 
unique  serialization  properties  vastly  enhance  control  of  these  operations.  An  ILO 
tripartite meeting in 2006 (Tripartite Meeting on Social and Labour Implications of the 
Increased  Use  of  Advanced  Retail  Technologies,  Geneva,  18–20  September  2006) 
concluded that these technologies increase productivity, improve the quality of consumer 
service, make commerce more competitive and offer good job opportunities to workers 
with various levels of education, training and qualifications.  
However,  by  facilitating  widespread  automation  of  low-skilled  functions,  RFID 
technologies are expected to displace a substantial proportion of the sector’s current 
workforce.  Many  of these workers may  find  it  difficult  to move on and adapt  to new 
functions without upgrading their skills. The ILO will convene a global forum (November 
2008)  to  examine  how  social  dialogue  should  accompany  technological  change, 
including by understanding job impact, minimizing job loss and maximizing prospects for 
skills  and  training  to  aid  employability  and  improve  business  productivity  and 
competitiveness. 
Source: http://www.ilo.org/public/english/dialogue/sector/techmeet/tmart06. 
136 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add links to pdf acrobat; clickable pdf links
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Management Using C#.NET Imaging
navigate viewing document by generating a thumbnail preview. on each part by following the links respectively & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change link in pdf file; add links pdf document
Skills policies responding to global drivers of change: Technology, trade and climate change 
6.2.3. The role of multinational enterprises in skills development 
and technology transfer 
389.  MNEs are often at the leading edge in the use of new technology. Moreover, they 
are frequently more capital and skill intensive than local firms and they require workers 
with technical knowledge,  such as engineers  (Lall, 2000). Many developing countries 
attract FDI and MNEs with the intention of linking their national knowledge system to 
the global knowledge system, developing tacit skills and creating technology spillovers. 
However, such learning is not automatic and many less and least developed countries 
have experienced only modest knowledge spillovers from MNEs (UNCTAD, 2007). The 
debate remains open on this point and further empirical research is needed to understand 
how  MNEs  can  best  contribute  to  building  up  social  capabilities.  The  Tripartite 
Declaration of Principles concerning Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy (ILO, 
2006d,  p.  4)  offers  guidance  to  MNEs,  governments  and  employers’  and  workers’ 
organizations in this area (see box 6.4). 
Box 6.4 
Guidance in the area of training laid down in the ILO’s  
Tripartite Declaration of Principles concerning  
Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy 
“Governments,  in  cooperation  with  all  the  parties  concerned,  should  develop 
national policies  for  vocational training and guidance  … This  is the framework  within 
which multinational enterprises should pursue their training policies.” 
“… multinational enterprises should ensure that relevant training is provided for all 
levels of their employees … as appropriate, to meet the needs of the enterprise as well 
as the development policies of the country. … This responsibility should be carried out, 
where  appropriate, in  cooperation  with  the  authorities  of the country,  employers’ and 
workers’ organizations and the competent local, national or international institutions.” 
“Multinational enterprises operating in developing countries should participate, along 
with  national  enterprises,  in  programmes,  …  encouraged  by  host  governments  and 
supported by employers’ and workers’ organizations … [which] should have the aim of 
encouraging skill formation and development as well as providing vocational guidance, 
and  should  be  jointly  administered  by  the  parties  which  support  them.  Wherever 
practicable,  multinational  enterprises  should  make  the  services  of  skilled  resource 
personnel available to help in training programmes organized by governments ...”  
“Multinational  enterprises,  with  the  cooperation  of  governments  …  should  afford 
opportunities  within  the  enterprise  as  a  whole  to  broaden  the  experience  of  local 
management in suitable fields such as industrial relations.” 
390.  Empirical analysis suggests that strategies to incorporate FDI policies into export-
led  growth  and  development  strategies  have  been  more  successful  than  import 
substitution approaches, in part because of the stronger incentives for MNEs to transfer 
skills  and  up  to  date  technology  to  the  host  country.  To  be  able  to  compete  in 
international  markets,  export-oriented  firms  have  an  incentive  to  use  the  latest 
technologies,  quality  control  procedures  and  management  techniques  (Moran  and 
Wallenberg,  2007).  MNEs  are  also  motivated  to  invest  in  training  for  their  local 
professional  and  managerial  staff.  This  generates  horizontal  transfers  of  skills  and 
technology between the MNE and its affiliates. When domestic producers form part of 
global networks and value chains, MNEs need to keep the local sourcing and supplier 
networks at the competitive frontier (as discussed in Chapter 3). They therefore have an 
incentive to provide on- and off-the-job vocational training for suppliers, subcontractors 
and  customers,  and  to  invest  in  tertiary  education  through  close  collaboration  with 
universities and R&D centres, and the establishment of their own training centres. 
137
C# Word - Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET
of original Word file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness C# Demo: Convert Word to PDF Document. Add references
pdf hyperlinks; check links in pdf
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
PowerPoint file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness C# Demo: Convert PowerPoint to PDF Document. Add references
adding links to pdf in preview; add links to pdf in acrobat
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
391.  Government policies and institutions play an important role in fostering skills and 
knowledge spillovers from MNEs to the local economy by attracting higher value added 
FDI and technology and skills-intensive MNEs, and by enabling the domestic economy 
to learn from MNEs. Joint ventures and networks of enterprises in local clusters or along 
global value chains can help to establish cooperation between MNEs and the domestic 
economy,  and  accordingly  facilitate  the  flow  of  knowledge  and  skills.  Firms  can 
organize  training  and  technological  spillovers  effectively  through  such  learning  and 
innovation networks (Zachmann, 2008). 
392.  Evidence from some large economies, in particular China, India and the Republic 
of Korea, suggests that joint ventures between domestic and international firms, within a 
coherent export-oriented development strategy targeting technological catching up, have 
benefited  industry-wide  learning.  These  countries  first  attracted  MNEs  in  selected 
sectors largely by offering access to domestic markets. They favoured joint ventures to 
promote learning and technology transfer. As a consequence, they were able to develop 
significant technological and investment capabilities and diversify their production and 
export structure. The automobile industry in all three countries provides an interesting 
example of the creation of inter-firm and industry-wide learning in networks covering 
international car companies, local assembly firms and local suppliers (box 6.5). 
Box 6.5 
Learning networks in the Chinese and  
Indian automobile industries 
China and India export a wide range of highly sophisticated products that is beyond 
what  might  be expected  on  the  basis of  their per capita income levels.  Their  export 
profiles are skewed towards high-productivity goods. Learning networks have played a 
critical role in developing this investment and productive capacity. 
India  liberalized  the  automobile  industry  in  the  1990s.  National  car  assembling 
companies,  such  as  Maruti  Udyog  Ltd.  (MUL),  a  joint  venture  between  the  Indian 
Government and the Suzuki Motor Corporation (Japan), and the private company Tata 
Engineering and Locomotive Company Ltd. (TELCO), a leading domestic car assembly 
firm, faced the need to meet two sets of standards:  
ɽ
international quality standards set by global automobile manufacturers entering the 
Indian market; and  
ɽ
high local content standards set by national regulations.  
The Indian automobile industry tends to rely on numerous small supplier companies 
and it was therefore a challenge to meet international quality standards. In response, the 
assembly companies (TELCO and MUL) developed close linkages with their suppliers. 
Through these linkages, they upgraded the skills base of their suppliers, transforming the 
supply chain into a learning chain based on a collaborative and reciprocal relationship 
between assemblers and suppliers. The network has created an industry-wide learning 
process and the development of technological, networking and production capabilities at 
the industry level. 
In China, since the mid-1990s, foreign investors have played a key role in building 
social capabilities: “... if China has welcomed foreign companies, it has always done so 
with the objective of fostering domestic capabilities” (Rodrik, 2006, pp. 7, 18). Foreign 
investors  are  required  to enter joint  ventures with  domestic  firms in  order to  ensure 
technology transfer. The strong domestic producer base has contributed to the creation 
of domestic supply chains. The automobile parts industry has been promoted through 
local content requirements, which has forced the companies to cooperate closely with 
local  suppliers  to  ensure  high  quality.  Substantial  knowledge  and  skills  have  been 
transferred from foreign to domestic enterprises and domestic first-tier suppliers have 
now achieved levels close to international best practice. 
Source: Okada, 2004; Rao, 2004; Rodrik, 2006, pp. 7, 18. 
138 
C# PDF: C# Code to Create Mobile PDF Viewer; C#.NET Mobile PDF
In Default.aspx, add a reference to the path in for Windows Forms application, please follow above links respectively. More Tutorials on .NET PDF Document SDK.
adding hyperlinks to pdf files; add links to pdf in preview
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to HTML in C#.NET
The HTML document file, converted by C#.NET PowerPoint to HTML converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and Add references:
pdf reader link; convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks
Skills policies responding to global drivers of change: Technology, trade and climate change 
393.  In  Africa,  foreign  investment  is  largely  targeted  at  natural  resources,  which 
generates limited spillover effects. For example, investments in mining are not strongly 
embedded in domestic economies as they have few forward and backward linkages in 
host economies. UNCTAD concludes that national policies have not yet found levers to 
enhance  the  impact  of  higher  FDI  inflows  on  building  domestic  technological 
capabilities or the development of domestic enterprises (UNCTAD, 2007, pp. 41–42). 
6.3.  Climate change 
394.  One of the major drivers of change, along with technology and trade, is climate 
change.  Sustainable development  and the integration of environmental protection  into 
economic and social development  objectives has long been an  important issue on  the 
national and international policy agenda. Environmental sustainability is an integral part 
of the ILO’s objective of sustainable enterprise. 
395.  Within  the  sustainable  development  agenda,  climate  change  is  now  an  urgent 
concern.  The  level  and  structure  of  employment  and  skill  needs  in  many  places 
worldwide will be affected both by the direct impact of global warming (particularly in 
agriculture, fishing, tourism and mining) and by the policies adopted at the community, 
national  and  international  levels  to  address  climate  change  and  its  effects  (World 
Resources Institute et al., 2005). 
396.  Knowledge and  awareness of  the  employment and skills implications of climate 
change  and  the  related  policies  are  still  scarce  (Kuhndt  and  Machiba,  2008).  This 
explains  in  part  why  “decisions  on  climate  policies  are  rarely  assessed  from  the 
standpoint  of employment” (ETUC,  2007, p. 182).  The ILO  Director-General,  in his 
Report to the ILC in 2007 (ILO, 2007k), highlighted the need to undertake research to 
identify the scale and nature of the employment transformation that will accompany the 
shift to more sustainable patterns of production and consumption. 
397.  Lessons from previous experiences of transition suggest that the transition process 
needs to be managed in a proactive manner and that steps have to be taken to facilitate 
the  adjustment  of  labour  markets  so  as  to  maximize  opportunities  for  new  jobs  and 
address potential job losses. Skills development will play a prominent role in this process 
(ILO, 2007k). 
398.  Skills development is relevant to both mitigation and adaptation policies: 
ɽ
adaptation policies aim to reduce the negative impact of global warming;  
ɽ
mitigation policies seek to reduce global warming itself by cutting greenhouse gas 
emissions and developing a low-carbon economy. 
6.3.1. Skills that enhance the capacity of the  
most vulnerable to adapt 
399.  Measures to improve the capacity to adapt to the impact of climate change need to 
be targeted at the most vulnerable social groups and geographical regions. Poor people in 
developing countries, who are often engaged in agriculture in tropical, semi-arid or arid 
regions, and people in low-lying areas, tend to be the most severely affected, as their 
economic activity and location are most climate sensitive (Abramovitz et al., 2002). 
400.  A  fundamental  need  is  for  developing  countries  to  be  able  to  monitor  climate 
trends and their impact on local productive activities. For example, the Commission on 
Agricultural  Meteorology  of  the  World  Meteorological  Organization  is  helping  to 
strengthen the occupational profile and skills of agricultural meteorology in developing 
139
C# Word - Convert Word to HTML in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB to HTML converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and Add references:
add a link to a pdf in acrobat; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PowerPoint
Conversely, conversion from PDF to PowerPoint (.PPTX) is also split PowerPoint file(s), and add, create, insert including editing PowerPoint url links and quick
add hyperlinks to pdf; add link to pdf
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
countries by  providing  training  and  advisory  services  to  the  agricultural  community. 
These skills are in high demand where changing weather conditions are giving rise to the 
need for adjustment measures in relation to crops, livestock and forests (Walker, 2005). 
401.  In agricultural communities, it is therefore necessary to improve knowledge of new 
technologies, crop selection  and diversification, together with the  skills  to  apply this 
knowledge (Stern, 2007; IPCC, 2007a). The diversification of crop varieties has been 
introduced in many countries in Africa and in Brazil to broaden farmers’ choices (IPCC, 
2007b). Communicating this knowledge through rural communities and enabling farmers 
to  use it to  manage their future was discussed in  Chapter 4. In agriculture and  other 
negatively affected sectors, governments, the social partners and the TVET system need 
to develop, devise and implement proactive measures so that workers, enterprises and 
communities are able to adapt to these far-reaching environmental changes and to the 
public policies and international agreements formulated to protect the environment. The 
regional and community response to restrictions on fishing in an area that is dependent 
on the industry offers an example of the type of institutions that are needed to build the 
capacity for adaptation (box 6.6). 
Box 6.6 
Responding to environmental change:  
Diversification in Spanish fishing communities 
According  to  the  European  Union,  Spain  has  the  11  regions  that  are  most 
dependent  on  the  fisheries  sector  in  the  entire  Community.  The  potential  loss  or 
downsizing of fishing (due to diminishing stocks and environmental protection policies) is 
driving  urgent  development  and  job-creation  measures.  Diversification  includes 
aquaculture and  new non-maritime activities.  The target groups are  middle-aged and 
older men who learned their trade through on-the-job experience and who have limited 
broader education or training, and women seeking to supplement family earnings. The 
response strategy  draws  on the  commitment  of  all  the  stakeholders  and  institutional 
assets of the region, for example: 
The  General Union of Workers, in its  response,  identified promising employment 
alternatives to fisheries, depending on the geographical conditions and on the training 
and preferences of the workers affected, and included retraining among the investments 
required to develop these alternatives. 
Universities  and  training  centres  contribute  their  capacities  in  the  form  of 
technological consultancy, management, awareness raising and specialized training to 
improve the adaptability of workers.  
GUIMATUR  is  a  Galician  association  composed  exclusively  of  women  shellfish 
gatherers, net makers and repairers, which was created in 2004 as a result of training 
courses subsidized from European funds. The association disseminates the traditional 
artisanal  maritime  culture  of  southern  Galicia,  through  tourist  routes  and  activities, 
enabling  women  to  supplement  their  income  during  closed  seasons  or  seasonal 
stoppages. The approach is appreciated for the income generated, as well as for the 
manner in which it values and protects the cultural heritage of the Galician maritime town 
involved (Cambados). 
The  consolidation and  implementation of  the ideas  conceived by fishery workers 
themselves requires access to technical and financial support from outside the affected 
communities. The different forums, networks and spaces for the exchange of opinions 
play  a  fundamental  role  in  publicizing  initiatives  and  sharing  learning  about  the 
experiments that are being carried out in other regions or countries, and in learning from 
the problems and strengths of other initiatives. 
Source: www.guimatur.org/main.aspx. 
140 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.Word
Conversely, conversion from PDF to Word (.docx) is also and split Word file(s), and add, create, insert document, including editing Word url links and quick
clickable links in pdf files; pdf link to specific page
Skills policies responding to global drivers of change: Technology, trade and climate change 
6.3.2. Mitigation: Skills and capabilities for “green” jobs 
402.  A  broad  range  of  new  and  different  skills  at  the  vocational,  technical  and 
managerial  levels  are  needed  to  reduce  greenhouse  gas  emissions  and  facilitate  the 
transition to low-carbon economies. Renewable energy and energy-efficient technologies, 
as  well  as  policies  and  institutions  advocating  a  shift  from  carbon-intensive  to  low-
carbon activities are increasing the demand for new and different skills for “green jobs”, 
while the skills used in so-called “brown” jobs will be in decline (Jochem and Madlener, 
2003). 
403.  Various studies, mainly in industrialized countries, have estimated the potential net 
employment effect of mitigation policies. 
2
However, as in the case of technology and 
trade, which are discussed above, if the potential is to be realized, economies require 
new,  diversified  and  greater  skills  (ILO,  2007k).  These  include  high-level  skills  for 
research and development in new technologies, technical skills related to the installation, 
operation  and  maintenance  of  energy-efficient  buildings,  and  the  many  core  skills 
required to support the implementation of reforms and changes. 
404.  Many  countries  are  developing  training  policies  and  programmes  to  meet  the 
“green” skills profile of new or upgraded occupations. In the United States, the Green 
Jobs Act of 2007 authorizes up to US$120 million a year in funding for the training of 
workers for jobs in the clean energy sector to design, manufacture, install, operate and 
maintain  a  host  of  innovative  renewable  energy  and  energy-efficient  technologies. 
3
There is also increasing demand for new occupational skills from artisans, architects and 
construction  engineers  as  a  consequence  of  green  or  energy-efficient  building  and 
rehabilitation  in  Germany,  stimulated  by  the  German  Alliance  for  Work  and  the 
Environment,  a  joint  agreement  between  the  Government,  employers’  organizations, 
trade unions and environmental NGOs. Private training providers, universities, chambers 
of  commerce  and  business  organizations,  such  as  regional  crafts  associations,  have 
responded and developed continuous training programmes (UNEP, 2007). 
405.  In South Africa, technological catching up in the renewable energy sector has been 
coordinated with  skills development  programmes.  The  Government’s White  Paper on 
Renewable Energy (2003) supports the establishment of renewable energy technologies 
(solar  water  heating  and  biofuels)  with  the  potential  to  create  35,000  jobs.  The 
Government is designing new occupational skills in agriculture, for example to grow oil-
bearing crops for bio-diesel and for solar heating (Visagie and Prasad, 2006). In China, 
the  Government  adopted  the  2003–10  National  Rural  Biogas  Construction  Plan, 
providing new employment opportunities for many unemployed farmers in rural areas. 
In order to meet the shortage of technical capacity for the operation and maintenance of 
the digesters in Shanxi Province, 40 training courses were held and by 2005 over 4,000 
people  had  been  awarded  the  National  Biogas  Professional  Technician  Certificate 
(Kuhndt and Machiba, 2007). Further research continues, not only on skills and markets 
for biofuels, but also on their long-term environmental costs and benefits. 
406.  In the waste and recycling sector, competences and social capabilities are needed 
for  the  technical  mastery  and  management  of  the  process,  as  well  as  to  devise  new 
technologies and facilitate the emergence of new generations of designers and product 
developers who  take  fully into account the composition of the materials used for  the 
manufacture of products. Skills and competencies of this type are still largely missing in 
universities and TVET  institutions, and in  the business and  public  sectors. Japan  has 
2
See, for example, European Commission, 2005; Apollo Alliance, 2004; Kuhndt and Machiba, 2008. 
3
For details, see http://www.worldwatch.org (Oct. 2007). 
141
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
142 
placed recycling and the material-cycle society high on the agenda and has developed a 
national  plan  which  includes  capacity  building  through  technical  cooperation  and 
support, with a view to developing the relevant systems (Government of Japan, 2005). 
407.  Improved knowledge of the  employment  and skills impact of  climate change is 
needed so that governments and the social partners can agree on joint solutions to face 
the challenges of climate change at the national, industry and company levels. The above 
examples emphasize that appropriate skills development (so-called green skills for green 
jobs) can  offer  proactive support for the creation  of  new jobs through mitigation and 
adaptation  measures,  thereby  fostering  sustainable  development.  However,  there  will 
also  be  a  growing  need  to  help  reskill  the  workers  who  are  affected  and  build  the 
capacities  of  the  most  vulnerable  workers  in  developing  countries  so  that  they  can 
respond more effectively to the local consequences of climatic changes. 
408.  Supportive  policies  can  at  the  same  time  promote  sustainable  enterprises  and 
sustainable development, as pointed out by Juan Somavia, the Director-General of the 
ILO,  in  his  foreword  to  the  conclusions  of  the  general  discussion  concerning  the 
promotion of sustainable enterprises (ILO, 2007e): 
Promoting sustainable enterprises is about strengthening the institutions and governance 
systems  which  nurture  enterprises  –  strong  and  efficient  markets  need  strong  and  effective 
institutions. It is also about ensuring that human, financial and natural resources are combined 
equitably and efficiently in order to achieve innovation and enhanced productivity. This calls 
for new forms  of  cooperation between government,  business, labour  and  society at  large  to 
ensure  that  the  quality  of  present  and  future  life  and  employment  is  maximized  whilst 
safeguarding the sustainability of the planet. 
409.  In  conclusion,  this  brief  overview  underlines  the  value  of  the  efforts  made  by 
labour  ministries,  trade  unions  and  employers’  organizations  to  integrate  skills 
development issues and strategies into the design of policies on trade, technology and the 
environment.  Coordination  with  the  ministries  and  agencies  responsible  for  policy 
design and implementation in these areas is therefore required if national education and 
skills development systems are to be able to: (1) equip workers, employers and young 
women and men with the skills required by emerging industries and jobs; and (2) build 
national capabilities to manage the transition between declining and growing sectors and 
occupations. Without such measures, the result will be skill gaps, high individual and 
social  adjustment  costs,  and  missed  opportunities  to  boost  productivity,  accelerate 
employment growth and expand development. 
Main policy orientations arising out of the report 
1.  Meet skills demand in terms of  
relevance and quality 
ɽ
Increase  the  capacity  of  schools,  training  institutes  and  enterprises  to  deliver 
relevant and high-quality skills, and to respond to rapidly changing skills needs.  
ɽ
Expand the availability of good quality basic education as an essential right and as 
a foundation for vocational training, lifelong learning and employability. 
ɽ
Upgrade informal apprenticeship systems to deliver skills and knowledge as a basis 
for higher value added activities and more advanced technologies. 
ɽ
Facilitate recognition of skills for the effective and efficient matching of workers’ 
skills  with  skills  required  in  enterprises  (irrespective  of  where  the  skills  were 
gained). 
ɽ
Promote equal opportunities for women and men in access to relevant and quality 
education,  vocational  training  and  workplace  learning,  and  to  productive  and 
decent work. 
ɽ
Target  training  and  employment  services  on  women  and  men  in  disadvantaged 
population groups to help them realize their potential for productive work and for 
contributing to economic and social development. 
ɽ
Improve  the  capacity  of  labour  market  institutions  to  collect  and  communicate 
reliable and up to date information on skills needs in current labour markets as a 
basis for better informed choices of stakeholders and career guidance. 
ɽ
Promote social dialogue in training at the enterprise, sectoral and national levels to 
improve the relevance of skills training to market needs.  
2.  Mitigate adjustment costs 
ɽ
Promote the capacity of workers and enterprises adversely affected by technology, 
market or climate changes to adapt to the new conditions.  
ɽ
Reduce  the  risk  for  women  and  men  of  long-term  unemployment  or 
underemployment by updating skills and reskilling workers in a proactive way, in 
particular by anticipating changes and their implications for skills development. 
ɽ
Extend the availability of affordable training in new skills and occupations as part 
of opportunities for lifelong learning with a view to maintaining the employability 
of workers and the sustainability of enterprises. 
ɽ
Encourage  the  reintegration  of  unemployed  workers  into  employment  by 
combining training with job guidance and employment services. 
143
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
144 
ɽ
Ease  the transition  between jobs  by  strengthening  social  protection  measures in 
coordination with active labour market policies. 
ɽ
Enhance the capacity of governments and employers to effectively manage the shift 
from declining sectors into more competitive activities and sectors.   
ɽ
Promote social dialogue in training for effective adjustment processes. 
3.  Sustain a dynamic development process  
ɽ
Promote  skills  development  policies  as  a  strategic  component  of  national 
development strategies and plans. 
ɽ
Foster the coordination and alignment of basic education, vocational training and 
employment services with R&D, industrial, trade, technology and macroeconomic 
policies. 
ɽ
Build  up  social  capabilities  to  prepare  for  new  technologies  and  emerging 
opportunities in domestic and global markets. 
ɽ
Facilitate a continuous process of lifelong learning.  
ɽ
Improve the capacity of labour market information systems to create, update and 
disseminate  information  on  future  skills  needs  to  inform  forward-looking  skills 
development policies.  
ɽ
Extend access to good quality training in the informal economy and build systems 
to recognize the skills acquired outside formal training in order to assist workers 
and employers to move into the formal economy. 
ɽ
Develop  and  maintain  institutional  arrangements  through  which  ministries, 
employers’  and  workers’  representatives  and  training  institutions  recognize  and 
respond to changing skills needs, in particular due to changes in technologies, trade 
and climate. 
ɽ
Foster the capacity of local enterprises to absorb new knowledge and skills. 
ɽ
Encourage investment in skills training for new occupations and jobs. 
ɽ
Promote  social  dialogue  in  training  to  build  institutional  trust,  forge  social 
consensus and facilitate policy coordination and cooperation between stakeholders. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested