how to upload and download pdf file in asp net c# : Adding links to pdf document Library SDK component asp.net wpf html mvc wcms_0920542-part960

Productivity, employment, skills and development: The strategic issues 
14.  Many countries of Central and Eastern Europe have recently experienced increased 
productivity but without employment growth. This is explained by the transition from 
central planning to a market economy, the liberalization of domestic  markets and  the 
lowering of barriers to international trade and capital flows. 
15.  By contrast, countries which have achieved higher growth in employment than in 
productivity are typically found in Latin America, the Arab States and Africa. In these 
regions, with few exceptions, population growth led to employment growth, but largely 
in  the  informal economy  and  other  low-productivity activities.  The situation  in  some 
countries, including in the Arab States, is that growth has been concentrated in extractive 
industries with low employment potential. 
1.2.2. Short-term trade-offs: Genuine and 
demanding public policy response 
16.  Labour productivity gains (higher output per worker) resulting from labour-saving 
technologies will lead to job creation only if the enterprise concerned can gain a bigger 
share  of  the  market  or  if  the  economy  can  diversify  into  new  products  or  markets. 
Competitive pressures drive investment, innovation, skills upgrading and other factors in 
the  overall  development  process.  However,  even  when  higher  productivity  spurs 
economic growth and employment expands overall, labour-saving technological changes 
and the relative growth and decline of specific sectors result in job losses in some places 
and in some industries, for actual workers, enterprises and communities. 
17.  Training  is  a  vital  component  of  socially  responsible  preparation  for  and 
adjustment  to  the changes brought  about  by  improved productivity  at  the  individual, 
enterprise and community levels. Lifelong learning is a form of unemployment insurance: 
it reduces the risk of employment prospects being tied to technologies and products that 
become  obsolete.  Retraining  and  employment  services  for  those  who  lose  their  jobs 
should be part of the social contract to share both the gains and the pains of change, 
enabling those in declining sectors to enter growing ones. Other essential components of 
a social response include income support, pensions and social security provisions related 
to  employment,  and  labour  market  policies to  promote  access  for  enterprises to  new 
investment  funding,  market  information  and  other  services.  The  importance  of 
expanding social security provisions cannot be overstated. However, neither reskilling 
nor  social  security  provisions  will  ultimately  be  effective  in  the  absence  of  national 
strategies to expand the market, stimulate aggregate demand and boost job creation. The 
Decent  Work  Agenda  –  comprising  representation  and  voice,  social  protection, 
employment promotion and protecting the rights  of workers – is a fair  as well  as  an 
efficient approach to adjusting to economic and technological change. 
1.2.3. Using productivity and employment to boost development 
18.  Given that the problem in many developing countries is not the absence of work, 
but  rather  the  prevalence  of  work  that  is  insufficiently  productive  to  yield  a  decent 
income, it is imperative that both employment and productivity growth be pursued in 
unison. In this  regard, research has underscored the importance of market size,  of  an 
enabling  environment  to  promote  sustainable  enterprise  and  investment,  of  pro-poor, 
employment-rich development policies, and of working towards two major objectives at 
the  same  time (ILO, 2002;  ILO,  2005a;  Ghose et  al., 2008). These objectives are as 
follows: 
5
Adding links to pdf document - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink to pdf acrobat; pdf link to attached file
Adding links to pdf document - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
active links in pdf; add email link to pdf
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
ɽ
First, the rate of growth of wage employment in the formal economy must exceed 
that of the labour force in the economy as a whole, in order to ensure that labour 
moves  from  the  informal  economy  into  formal,  more  productive  and  decent 
employment.  This  requires  dynamic  high-growth sectors,  “catching-up”  through 
enterprise development  and  the development  of the  requisite technical and  core 
skills needed to use new technologies and access new markets. 
ɽ
Second,  labour  productivity  in  the  informal  economy  must  increase  so  that 
underemployment and poverty there are progressively reduced. 
19.  Skills development is central to both of these objectives. In order to achieve the 
first objective,  the  workforce must be “employable”, that  is, capable of learning  new 
technologies and workplace practices, engaging in social dialogue and participating in 
opportunities  for  continued  learning.  Basic  and  vocational  education  prepare  young 
people for the world of work and ongoing workplace learning. The policy environment, 
quality of local training service providers, and growth strategies of enterprises, must all 
coincide in  favour of  expanding  on-the-job  training. Employment  services must share 
information about occupations and skills needed in the labour market and ease the school 
to work transition. Furthermore, having a more skilled workforce can stem the decline in 
the employment content of growth in the formal economy. 
20.  To  achieve the second objective, access  to training must extend deeper into  the 
informal  and  rural  economies,  which  is  where  most  people  living  in  poverty  work, 
especially women (see box 1.1). This applies most of all to those who are self-employed 
or who work in micro- and small enterprises or in subsistence agriculture. Furthermore, 
the  quality  of  the  available  training  must  be  improved  through  the  extension  of  the 
services provided by vocational training systems into under-served areas, improvements 
in  informal  apprenticeships,  and  measures  to  help  small  enterprises  upgrade  their 
technical and entrepreneurial skills. 
Box 1.1 
Gender and the informal economy 
Across  all countries,  women are  over-represented  in jobs and tasks  that require 
fewer and lower value skills, are lower paid and offer restricted career prospects. In most 
countries, women account for the majority of workers in the informal economy, which 
implies greater job insecurity, as well as lack of access to training, social protection and 
other  resources,  making  them  comparatively  more  vulnerable  to  poverty  and 
marginalization. There is a significant overlap between being a woman, working in the 
informal economy and being poor. 
Source: Carr and Chen, 2004. 
21.  In  the  long  term,  meeting  national  and  global  commitments  to  improve  basic 
education and increase literacy will open technical and vocational training opportunities 
to  a  broader section of the  population. In  the  meantime,  however,  there  is  a  need to 
develop innovative ways of upgrading skills and recognizing the latent skills of those 
already in the workforce, even if they have not had adequate basic education. Strategies 
to improve productivity in the informal economy must enable workers there to use new 
skills  as  leverage  to  help  them  move  into  decent  formal  work  (see  section  2.3  in 
Chapter 2). This strategy for skills development and the informal economy (or “informal 
sector”, as it was called at that time) was articulated in the conclusions of the general 
discussion on training for employment in 2000: 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Besides, using this PDF document metadata adding control, you can
pdf email link; adding a link to a pdf in preview
VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
detail guides on these functions through left menu links. on C#.NET PPT image adding library. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
adding hyperlinks to pdf; add hyperlink to pdf in
Productivity, employment, skills and development: The strategic issues 
Training can be one  of the  instruments that, together with other measures,  address the 
challenge of the informal sector [sic] … Informal sector work is unprotected work that is, for 
the most part, characterized by low earnings and low productivity. The role of training is not to 
prepare people for the informal sector and keep them in the informal sector; or to expand the 
informal sector; but  rather it  should go in  conjunction with other  instruments, such as fiscal 
policies, provision of credit, and extension of social protection and labour laws, to improve the 
performance  of  enterprises  and  the employability  of  workers  in  order to transform what  are 
often marginal, survival activities into decent work fully integrated into mainstream economic 
life. Prior learning and skills gained in the sector should be validated, as they will help the said 
workers gain access to the formal labour market. The social partners should be fully involved in 
developing these programmes. (ILO, 2000a, para. 7.) 
22.  According to data for the period 1991 to 2005 (figure 1.2), the group of countries 
that increased both productivity and employment also experienced the greatest average 
reduction in poverty, whether defined at the extreme level of US$1 a day or the slightly 
less extreme figure of US$2 a day. 
3
The average reduction in the proportion of workers 
living on less than US$2 a day in countries where both productivity and employment 
increased  was  8  per  cent  over  the  14-year  period.  Among  the  countries  which 
experienced  an  increase  in  productivity  but  not  in  employment,  the  decline  in  the 
incidence  of  poverty  was  slightly  lower,  at  just  over  5.5 per  cent.  In  stark  contrast, 
poverty  did  not  decline  on  average  in  countries  which  did  not  experience  a  rise  in 
productivity, regardless of employment growth. 
Figure 1.2.  Average changes in poverty for countries grouped by relative performance in 
productivity and employment growth, 1991–2005 
–8
–6
–4
–2
0
2
4
Productivity increase,
employment increase
(51 countries)
Productivity increase,
employment decrease
(13 countries)
Productivity decrease,
employment increase
(23 countries)
Productivity decrease,
employment decrease
(3 countries)
Change in poverty at US$1 per day
day
Change in poverty at US$2 per day 
ay 
Percentage point change share of working poo
Source: Key Indicators of the Labour Market, fifth edition, 2007 (Geneva, ILO); Global Employment Trends Model, 2007; Working 
Poor Model, 2007. High-income OECD countries excluded. 
3
The World  Employment Report  2004–05 found that poverty reductions  were greater in countries that  had 
increased both agricultural productivity and employment (ILO, 2005a). For more recent analysis on agricultural 
employment,  see  Promotion  of  rural  employment  for  poverty  reduction,  report  for  the  general  discussion, 
International Labour Conference (ILC), 2008 (ILO, 2008a). 
7
View Images & Documents in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
document or image file, like Word, PDF or TIFF other mature image viewing features, like adding or deleting page And you can find the links to these professional
adding links to pdf document; add a link to a pdf
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
23.  Until recently, employment was not included in the set of targets by which progress 
towards meeting  international  goals to reduce  poverty was measured.  Decent work is 
now, however, more widely acknowledged to be the principal means by which people 
can  escape  poverty.  Full  and  productive  employment  and  decent  work  for  all  was 
therefore  included  in  2007  as  a  specific  target  under  MDG  1  to  eradicate  extreme 
poverty and hunger. 
4
This establishes a commitment to halving between 1990 and 2015 
the proportion of the world’s population living on less than US$1 a day. 
24.  Productivity growth, measured as the rate of growth of GDP per person employed, 
is one of the four agreed indicators countries  are  encouraged  to  use  to  measure their 
progress  towards  meeting  this  target.  The  other  three  indicators  are:  the  ratio  of 
employment  to  population;  the  share  of  “vulnerable  employment”  (defined  as  the 
proportion of own-account and contributing family workers in total employment); 
5
and 
the proportion of the working poor (proportion of employed people living below US$1 a 
day, measured in PPP). 
1.3.  Skills policies for a virtuous circle: Linking 
productivity, employment and development 
25.  The  process  of  skills  development  for  productivity,  employment  growth  and 
development  is  complex  and  is  influenced  by  policies  and  institutions.  The  Human 
Resources  Development  Convention,  1975  (No.  142),  and  the  Human  Resources 
Development Recommendation, 2004 (No. 195), emphasize the roles of governments, 
employers  and  workers  and  the  importance  of  social  dialogue  in  designing  and 
implementing  training  policies  and  programmes  that  are  appropriate  for  country 
circumstances. 
1.3.1. Objectives of skills development policy 
26.  Countries have very different initial economic and social conditions, and different 
levels  of  skills  and  competences. Effective development  processes are  forged from a 
social contract of shared objectives to propel the economy forward, expand decent work 
and raise living standards. The design, sequencing and focus of their policies need to 
respond to  their  different  levels of  development. However,  experience  shows that  all 
countries that have succeeded  in linking  skills with productivity, employment growth 
and  development,  have  targeted  skills  development  policy  towards  three  objectives, 
described in the following paragraphs. 
27.  Objective 1. Meet skills demand in terms of relevance and quality. Skills policies 
need  to  develop  relevant  skills,  promote  lifelong  learning,  deliver  high  levels  of 
competences and  a sufficient  quantity  of  skilled workers to  match  skills  supply with 
demand. Furthermore, equal opportunity in access to education and work is needed to 
meet the demands for training across all sectors of society. Policies designed to meet 
skills demand contribute to productivity, employability and decent work because: 
ɽ
enterprises  can  use  technologies  efficiently  and  fully  exploit  productivity 
potentials; 
4
The new target, “Achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all, including women and young 
people,” was proposed to the UN General Assembly by the Secretary-General at its 61st Session (2006). Under 
the MDG monitoring framework, the Inter-Agency and Expert Group on MDG Indicators, in which the ILO 
participated, selected the indicators for the target on decent work. See http://mdgs.un.org/unsd/mdg/Data.aspx. 
5
Own-account workers are self-employed workers who do not employ even one other person (ILO, 2007a). 
Productivity, employment, skills and development: The strategic issues 
ɽ
young  people  acquire  employable  skills  which  facilitates  their  transition  from 
school to work and smooth integration into the labour market; 
ɽ
workers build up and improve competences, and develop their career in a process 
of lifelong learning; and 
ɽ
disadvantaged population groups have access to education, training and the labour 
market. 
28.  Objective 2. Mitigate adjustment costs. Training policies and programmes lessen 
the  costs for  workers  and  enterprises  that  are  adversely  affected  by  technological or 
market  changes.  Such externally  induced  changes  can result  in  enterprises  adjusting, 
downsizing or even closing down. Workers risk losing their jobs and their skills may 
become  obsolete.  Upgrading  skills,  retraining  and  reskilling  of  workers  are  essential 
elements of active labour market policies and facilitate reinsertion of workers into labour 
markets. Policies to retrain workers and entrepreneurs proactively and prepare them for 
change help to insure against job loss, reduce the risk of unemployment and re-establish 
workers’ employability. 
29.  Objective 3. Sustain a dynamic development process. At the level of the economy 
and  society,  skills  development  policies  need to  build  up  capabilities and knowledge 
systems  which  induce  and  maintain  a  sustainable  process  of  economic  and  social 
development.  The  first  two  objectives  of  skills  matching  and  cost  mitigation  take  a 
labour market perspective and focus on skills development as a response to technological 
and  economic  changes;  they  are  essentially  short-  and  medium-term  objectives.  By 
contrast,  the  developmental  objective  focuses  on  the  strategic  role  of  education  and 
training policies in triggering and continuously fuelling technological change, domestic 
and foreign investment, diversification, and competitiveness. 
30.  Figure  1.3  presents  an  integrated  framework  for  sustaining  a  dynamic  skills 
development process, which is explained more fully in Chapter 5. It is based on building 
national ability to respond to external challenges, integrating skills development policies 
into  national  development  strategies,  and  the  development  of  the  following  three 
processes: 
(1)  Upgrading technologies  and diversifying  economic activities  into non-traditional 
sectors.  When  technological  upgrading  is  combined  with  investment  in  non-
traditional  sectors  (diversification)  productivity  growth  comes  together  with 
employment  growth  in  a  context  of  accelerating  technological  change.  While 
technological  change  increases  productivity  in  enterprises  and  value  chains, 
diversification into  non-traditional  activities creates  demand  for labour  and  new 
employment opportunities. 
(2)  Building  up  the  competences  of  individuals  and  the  capabilities  of  society. 
Widespread general education and occupational competences are the foundation of 
social  capabilities  to  innovate,  transfer  and  absorb  new  technologies,  foster 
creativity  and  innovations,  diversify  the  production  structure  into  higher  value 
added activities, attract more knowledge-intensive domestic and foreign investment 
and take advantage of global opportunities. 
(3)  Collecting,  updating  and  disseminating information  on  current  and future  skills 
requirements  and  translating  this  information  into  the  timely  supply  of 
occupational and entrepreneurial skills and competences. Throughout this process 
of  change,  information  needs  to  be  obtained and  passed on to  decision-makers. 
Information to better match skills demand and supply improves the efficiency of 
labour  markets.  Accessible  and  reliable  information  on  the  skills  that  will  be 
9
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
needed  and  valued,  and  on  the  skills  workers  and  young  people  are  actually 
acquiring, reduces uncertainties, which in turn maintains incentives and motivation 
for investment in both new technologies and skills. Early identification of the skills 
that will be in demand in particular growth sectors is essential for informed policy 
decisions and investment choices by employers and workers. National development 
strategies and skills policies need to be informed by sex-disaggregated data in order 
to monitor and overcome gender bias in training and employment. 
31.  These three processes need to be developed simultaneously in order to establish a 
virtuous circle and a sustainable process of increasing productivity, employment growth 
and economic and social development. The experience of countries in aligning skills to 
both productivity and employment growth is examined in Chapter 5. 
32.  As depicted in the central square of figure 1.3, skills development policies are not 
pursued in isolation; along with technology, labour market, macroeconomic, trade and 
other  policies,  they  are  an  integral  part  of  national  development  strategies.  These 
strategies reflect the aspirations of societies and, on the basis of labour standards and 
institutions, make up the countries’ preparation for and response to global opportunities 
and challenges (indicated in the top box of the figure). External drivers of change, such 
as trade and investment, regional integration, technological advances and climate change, 
offer  both  opportunities  for  growth  and  challenges  to  existing  economic  activities. 
Workforce skills, entrepreneurship and innovation, and the ability to learn and adapt, are 
among the critical social capabilities that influence competitiveness, productivity growth 
and employment in the face of these challenges and opportunities. The three side bars in 
the figure represent the critical processes (listed above) of a skills development policy 
that  can  meet  skills  demands,  mitigate  adjustment  costs  and  sustain  dynamic 
development processes. 
1.3.2. Information and coordination challenges: A role for 
government policies, institutions and social dialogue 
33.  Markets,  if  unsupported  by  government  policies  and  institutions,  are  unable  to 
translate skills development effectively into productivity, employment and development. 
This is due to problems  affecting information, incentives  and coordination.  Countries 
have developed different institutional frameworks in the context of their own historical, 
political, economic and cultural development to overcome these problems. The challenge 
for government policy is to develop and foster institutional arrangements that establish 
and  maintain  the  capacity  of  governments,  employers,  workers,  schools,  training 
institutions and universities to respond effectively to changing skill and training needs as 
well  as  playing  a  strategic  and  forward-looking  role  in  facilitating  and  sustaining 
technological, economic and social advancement. The role of institutions in improving 
information, coordination  and social  dialogue  is introduced  here, and  further  analysis 
and examples are provided in Chapter 5. 
10 
Productivity, employment, skills and development: The strategic issues 
Figure 1.3.  Skills development strategy for productivity, employment and sustainable development 
National development strategy 
(2) Build up individual competences and 
social capabilities  
(3) Collect and 
disseminate  
information on 
current and 
future skills  
requirements 
and skills 
supply 
(1) Upgrade 
technology 
and 
diversify 
production 
structure 
(enterprises, 
workplaces, 
value chains) 
Global opportunities and challenges 
Technology policy 
Macroeconomic policy 
Trade and investment policy 
Labour market policy 
Skills development policies 
Responsive (current skills demand) 
Mitigative (shocks) 
Strategic (development) 
Forward-looking (future skills demand)
Coordinated (effectiveness) 
Attention to target groups (social 
inclusion) 
 Foreign markets and investment 
 Regional integration and agreements 
 Global knowledge and new technologies 
 Climate change and eco-efficiency 
34.  Information and incentive problems arise as a result of uncertainty regarding the 
skills  required  in  enterprises  and  the  future  returns  which  can  be  expected  from 
investment in training. In addition, enterprises recruiting workers cannot easily know the 
skills  an  individual  worker  has  acquired  or  know  for  sure  whether  a  newly  trained 
worker will stay in the enterprise long enough to recover training costs. Such problems 
reduce incentives for employers and workers to invest in training. Interventions need to 
change the incentive structures to encourage an efficient level of investment in education 
and training and effective use of skills in enterprises. Institutions such as apprenticeships, 
high-performance  workplaces  (HPWs),  accountable  public  training  institutions  and 
assessment and certification systems overcome uncertainties and incentive problems. 
35.  Coordination problems need to be addressed at three levels: 
(i)  Cooperation  between  the  various  providers  of  skills  training,  such  as  schools, 
training institutions and enterprises, is needed in order to establish coherent and 
consistent learning paths. Learning is a cumulative process and competences are 
created by acquiring a combination of different skills, for example, technical and 
core skills (see figure 1.4) and explicit and tacit knowledge (defined in box 1.2). 
This requires learning in different contexts, including classrooms, workplaces and 
networks,  such  as  families,  communities,  clusters  or  value  chains.  Policies  and 
11
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
institutions  need  to  coordinate  these  different  learning  activities  for  effective 
development of competences and lifelong learning. 
Figure 1.4.  Core skills and technical skills: Defining occupational and professional competences 
Technical and vocational: 
the possession of 
appropriate technical, 
vocational and/or business 
knowledge and the ability to 
apply this in practice, 
including the planning of 
tasks.
Cognitive/problem 
solving: 
abilities to analyse and 
solve technical and/or 
business-related problems 
effectively using high-level 
thinking skills, and to apply 
methodologies. 
Social: 
ability to interrelate with 
others, work in teams, 
motivate and demonstrate 
leadership, manage client 
relations. 
Occupational/ 
professional/ 
entrepreneurial 
competence 
Communication:  
ability to read and write, 
handle information such as 
to understand graphs, 
collect information, 
communicate with others, 
computer use, language 
skills. 
Learning: 
ability to acquire new 
knowledge, learn from 
experience, openness to 
new solutions and 
innovations. 
Vocational/technical skills 
Core skills 
Source: ILO, 2007i. 
Personal behavioural/ 
ethical: 
appropriate personal and 
professional attitudes and 
values, ability to make sound 
judgments and take decisions. 
Box 1.2 
Implicit (tacit) and explicit knowledge 
Modern  theories  of  knowledge  and  learning  differentiate  between  two  forms  of 
knowledge with distinct properties. Knowledge about facts, events, principles and rules 
(knowing “something” or “declarative” knowledge) can be articulated and codified. These 
explicit forms of knowledge can easily be communicated between individual persons in a 
process of teaching and learning. In contrast, “procedural” knowledge (knowing “how to 
do something”) refers to a person’s capacity to apply rules and principles in a competent 
way while performing a task or job (for example, knowing in theory how to ride a bicycle 
does not mean the ability to ride one in practice). Procedural knowledge in combination 
with declarative knowledge determines a person’s skills. Procedural knowledge is tacit in 
the sense that an individual cannot describe and articulate the “knowing how to do” or 
the procedure he or she follows. Tacit knowledge is implicit in skills and individuals apply 
it unconsciously, but it  can  be observed  by others during  the  execution  of the  task. 
Implicit knowledge cannot be taught, but only acquired and “discovered” in a process of 
observation, practice and experience. This refers to the importance of socially provided 
learning at the workplace, in  working  side-by-side  with a skilled person as well as in 
social networks such as families, enterprises or communities. 
Source: ILO, 2007i. 
12 
Productivity, employment, skills and development: The strategic issues 
13
(ii)  Coordination  between  skills  development  and  enterprises  is  required  to  match 
skills supply and demand. Labour market intermediaries identify skills needs and 
communicate this information to schools, training institutions and apprenticeship 
systems to create the required skills. Labour market information systems or labour 
market observatories, for example, identify skills needed in the economy. Public 
and private employment services communicate information to workers, support job 
placement, brokering and recruitment, and guide workers’ training decisions and 
careers. Institutions that provide credible assessment and certification of workers’ 
skills help enterprises more easily recognize workers’ skills and match them with 
their demand. 
(iii)  Coordination  of  skills  development  policies  with  industrial,  investment,  trade, 
technology and  macroeconomic  policies  is  needed to  effectively integrate  skills 
development policies into the national development strategy and to achieve policy 
coherence. Building skills, competences and capabilities in society is a long-term 
process and cannot be leapfrogged. A forward-looking skills development strategy 
is therefore needed to ensure the timely supply of skills required in future labour 
markets. Institutions need to encourage cooperation between different ministries, 
ensure effective exchange of information and forecast skill needs. 
36.  Social  dialogue  and  collective bargaining  at  the enterprise,  sector  or  national 
levels are highly effective institutions in creating incentives for investment in skills and 
knowledge. They can help coordinate the skills development process and integrate skills 
development into the national development strategy. Building the capability in societies 
for  learning  and  innovation  –  and  for  using  skills  and  competencies  –  requires  high 
levels of commitment, motivation and trust. Social dialogue and collective bargaining 
can build trust among institutions with common goals, create a broad commitment to 
education and training and a culture of learning, and build consensus in the design and 
implementation of skills development strategies. In particular, social dialogue can be a 
powerful means of reconciling diverging interests and in creating support for reforms of 
training  systems.  Furthermore,  social  dialogue  supports  policy  coordination  as  it 
provides  channels  for  ongoing  communication  of  information  among  employers, 
workers and governments. 
37.  In  addition  to  promoting  skills  development,  social  dialogue  and  collective 
bargaining also promote equitable and efficient distribution of the benefits of improved 
productivity.  Productivity  gains  need to  be  shared  between  enterprises,  workers  and 
society  in  a  fair  way  in  order  to  achieve  and  maintain  a  sustainable  development 
dynamic. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested