how to upload and download pdf file in asp net c# : Add hyperlink to pdf Library SDK component asp.net wpf html mvc wcms_0920543-part961

Chapter 2 
Connecting skills development to 
productivity and employment growth in 
developing and developed countries 
38.  Countries at different levels of economic development face different challenges 
and  constraints  in trying to  improve the quality and relevance of skills in  order to 
improve productivity and increase employment. Data presented in Chapter 1 show the 
positive  relationship  between  productivity, employment  and  poverty  reduction.  This 
chapter  focuses  on  the  skills  dimension.  Adding  information  about  skills  levels  is 
constrained by lack of internationally comparable data. Therefore, education attainment 
and literacy rates are used as rough proxies for skills. 
39.  The sections of this chapter focus on policies to overcome constraints in using 
skills development to promote productivity and employment growth in unison – whether 
in terms of expanding access to basic, vocational or higher-level skills or in terms of 
utilizing these skills in ways that benefit both enterprises and workers. This chapter 
reviews experience in four groups of countries (following United Nations Development 
Programme (UNDP) classifications developed for the Human Development Index, as 
listed in the annex to this chapter), namely:  
(1)  high-income countries of the OECD; 
(2)  CEE/CIS countries; 
(3)  developing countries; and 
(4)  least developed countries (LDCs). 
40.  The review for each country group starts with a succinct overview of available data 
on the relationships between productivity, employment and education as a proxy for 
skills (drawing mainly on latest available data compiled by the ILO and published in Key 
Indicators  of  the  Labour  Market,  fifth  edition,  2007  (ILO,  2007a),  and  Global 
Employment Trends 2008 (ILO, 2008c)). This is followed by examination of selected 
policy issues that are of particular importance to countries in the group. 
41.  After contrasting data by country groups and regions, the chapter begins with the 
group for which data are most readily available (the OECD countries) in order to explore 
the empirical evidence of the relationships between skills, productivity and employment 
most easily. Reliable  and comparable  data are  available for a smaller  proportion  of 
countries in the other groups. This affects the choice of data variables and restricts the 
level of confidence with which conclusions, or broad indications, can be drawn from the 
statistical evidence. 
15
Add hyperlink to pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink pdf file; add link to pdf file
Add hyperlink to pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks; c# read pdf from url
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
42.  Figures  2.1 and 2.2  contrast  productivity  levels  and  growth trends  by country 
groups. Measured in constant dollars and at purchasing power parity, figure 2.1 shows 
that in 2006 productivity in high-income OECD countries was four times higher than 
productivity in developing countries and nearly 18 times higher than in LDCs. In terms 
of trends, however, productivity grew fastest in the CEE/CIS country group and the 
group of developing countries. 
Figure 2.1.  Productivity levels by country groups, 1996 and 2006 
0
10,000
20,000
30,000
40,000
50,000
60,000
70,000
World
High-income
CEE and CIS
Developing
Least developed
Output per worker (in constant 2000 US$ at PPP)
OECD
countries
countries
1996
2006
Source: ILO, 2007a. 
16 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Word to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
add url link to pdf; add hyperlink to pdf online
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Excel to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
adding hyperlinks to pdf documents; add links to pdf document
Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
Figure 2.2.  Productivity trends by country groups, 1996–2006 
80
90
100
110
120
130
140
150
160
170
1996
1998
2000
2002
2004
2006
GDP per person employed (1996=100)
CEE and CIS
Developing countries
Least developed countries
OECD
Source: ILO, 2007a
.
43.  The education indicator most widely available across countries is literacy, reported 
as the share of the population above the age of 15 years able to read and write. Figure 2.3 
summarizes UNESCO data on average literacy rates by country group. Literacy is nearly 
universal in the OECD and CEE. In LDCs, however, only half of the population is 
literate, and literacy rates are even lower for women: nearly six out of ten women over 
the age of 15 years cannot read and write. 
Figure 2.3.  Average literacy rates of population over the age of 15, by country group 
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
Developed countries
Central and Eastern Europe
Developing countries
Least developed countries
Total
Male
Female
Source: UNESCO/UIS, http://www.uis.unesco.org (Jan. 2008). 
17
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. Hyperlink Edit. XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document
add hyperlinks to pdf online; pdf hyperlink
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. Hyperlink Edit. XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF
add a link to a pdf file; clickable links in pdf from word
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
44.  Figure  2.4 looks at  narrower regional  groupings of developing  and developing 
countries, summarizing trends in productivity, literacy, working poverty and vulnerable 
employment (the latter two being more qualitative indictors of employment) over the last 
ten years. Changes in the share of workers living in poverty and workers in vulnerable 
employment are presented side by side with  productivity growth.
1
Relatively larger 
gains in productivity were associated with relatively larger reductions in poverty and 
vulnerable employment. The best performance in terms of reducing the share of workers 
living  on  US$2 per day  (by 24 percentage points) and vulnerable  employment  (by 
7 percentage points) was achieved in East Asia, which also had the highest productivity 
growth (almost 8 per cent average growth per annum). Large productivity gains were 
also associated with significant reductions in working poor and vulnerable employment 
in South Asia and South-East Asia. By contrast, productivity and poverty gains were 
relatively modest in Latin America and the Caribbean. Sub-Saharan Africa registered 
very small gains in productivity and only a 1.4 percentage point reduction in the share of 
workers living on less than US$2 per day. 
45.  Most  regions  registered  greater  success  in  expanding  literacy  than  in  raising 
productivity or reducing poverty. As a basis for future learning, this success bodes well 
for achieving fundamental economic and social objectives. It also raises expectations for 
higher learning and skills attainment, as well as for more productive and decent work. 
Expanding basic education without a corresponding increase in productive work did not 
result in substantial success in cutting working poverty across North Africa, the Middle 
East and sub-Saharan Africa.  
1
Vulnerable employment is an indicator of status in employment and comprises contributing family workers and 
own-account workers (those that are self-employed and do not employ even one other person). “By definition, 
contributing family workers and own-account workers are less likely to have formal work arrangements. If the 
proportion of vulnerable workers is sizeable, it may be an indication of a large subsistence agriculture sector, lack 
of growth in the formal economy or widespread poverty” (ILO, 2007a). 
18 
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. C#.NET Sample Code: Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
add page number to pdf hyperlink; add link to pdf acrobat
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Insert text, text box into PDF. Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add,
adding hyperlinks to a pdf; add hyperlinks pdf file
Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
Figure 2.4.  Productivity, literacy, working poor and vulnerable employment, by region; 1997–2007 
-30.0
-25.0
-20.0
-15.0
-10.0
-5.0
0.0
5.0
10.0
15.0
20.0
25.0
East Asia
SE Asia & Pacific
South Asia
Latin Am & Caribbean
Middle East
Sub-Saharan Africa
North Africa
labour productivity annual average growth 1997-2007
% point change in share of working poor $1/day 1997-2007
% point change in share of working poor $2/day 1997-2007
% point change in share of vulnerable employment 1997-2007
% point change in share of population above age 15 literate, 1985/94 to1995/2005
Source: ILO, 2008c; literacy data from UNESCO, see figure 2.3 for web site. Region groups from the two data sets match 
closely but ILO includes Pacific Island countries with South-East Asia while UNESCO does not. Data on literacy is for latest 
year available, which varies by country and is therefore cited, by UNESCO, for a range of years. 
2.1. High-income OECD countries 
2
2.1.1. Growth in productivity and employment 
46.  Economic growth in the industrialized countries has continued as scientific and 
technical knowledge  has been  used to raise the productivity  of  labour and  of  other 
production inputs. The systematic application of knowledge and science to producing 
goods and services has greatly increased the value of education and training for women 
and  men.  A comparative  study  of selected  OECD countries (van Ark  et al.,  2007) 
documented the general downward trend in the share of low-skilled workers and the 
increase in the share of highly skilled workers in industry.  
47.  Taking a simple average across the group of 23 high-income OECD countries for 
which comparable trend data were available, growth in the share of the labour force with 
tertiary  education  was  6.2  per  cent,  productivity  growth  was  27.4  per  cent  and 
employment growth was 14.2 per cent over the 1995–2005 period. Productivity growth 
and  rising  education  levels  in  the  labour  force  have  been  associated  with  faster 
employment growth. As summarized in figure 2.5, the group of countries that achieved 
above-average growth in both productivity and education (measured as the change in the 
share of the labour force with tertiary education) showed a higher average growth in 
2
UNDP Human Development Report 2006 classification of 24 countries: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, 
Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Luxembourg, 
Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States. 
19
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Export PowerPoint hyperlink to PDF. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting PowerPoint to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
add links to pdf online; accessible links in pdf
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Export PowerPoint hyperlink to PDF in .NET console application. C#.NET Demo Code: Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET Application. Add necessary references:
add hyperlink pdf; adding a link to a pdf
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
employment  than  groups  of  countries  with  above-average  performance  in  either 
productivity or education, but not both.  
48.  The first column in figure 2.5 shows that the six OECD countries with relatively 
Figure 2.5.  OECD high-income countries: Higher growth in productivity and  
high growth in productivity and tertiary education increased employment by 25.3 per 
cent on average. The average employment growth  for countries with relatively high 
growth in productivity but not education (just three countries summarized in column two) 
was about half that rate (12.2 per cent), while countries with relatively high growth in 
education  but  not  productivity  experienced  still  lower  employment  growth  (nine 
countries with average employment growth of about 7.9 per cent). 
tertiary education associated with higher employment growth
Change in employment, 1995–2005 (in per cent)
Averages for countries grouped by relative  performance in 
labour productivity and tertiary education, 1995–2005
0.0
5.0
10.0
15.0
20.0
25.0
30.0
Employment growth 1995–2005 (%)
Above average increase 
in both productivity 
and tertiary education
Above average 
increase in 
productivity but not 
in tertiary 
education 
Below average 
increase in both 
productivity and
tertiary education 
Below average 
increase in 
productivity but 
above average 
increase in tertiary 
education 
six countries
three countries
nine countries
five countries
Source: ILO, 2007a; UNESCO/UIS 2007, see figure 2.3 for web site.
49.  A  recent OECD  study  (OECD,  2007a)  found  a  negative  statistical  correlation 
between employment and productivity growth, measuring employment and productivity 
in terms of hours worked (rather than per worker, as in the ILO data) and over a longer 
35-year period (1970 to 2005). One of the explanations suggested for this finding was 
that the measurement of labour productivity does not account for changes in the quality 
of labour. 
3
Although the data presented in figure 2.5 are for a shorter period of time and 
so not directly comparable to this OECD analysis, adding even a rough indicator of 
change of labour quality (share of labour force with tertiary education) appears to show a 
3
For example, if employment grows faster for low-educated than high-educated workers, the average level of 
skills among the employed would decline. An overall increase in employment, then, would lead to a reduction in 
average measured labour productivity (OECD, 2007a, p. 60). 
20 
Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
favourable relationship between productivity and employment. More importantly than 
the statistical correlation, the OECD analysis concluded that pro-employment policies 
tend to improve productivity. The revised OECD job strategy (see box 2.1) provides 
guidelines for improving both the quantity and the productivity of employment. 
50.  Measuring quality of employment in terms of vulnerable forms of employment 
Figure 
rather than the educational level of workers also appears to show a positive relationship 
with productivity growth. As shown in figure 2.6, countries with higher productivity 
growth tended to have greater success in decreasing the share of vulnerable employment. 
As described above, vulnerable employment is the proportion of contributing family 
workers and own-account workers out of total employment and is a category of work 
that tends to be without employment contract or social protection. 
4
2.6.  Change in productivity and vulnerable employment, 1995–2005 
Austria
Ireland
New Zealand
-12
-10
-8
-6
-4
-2
0
2
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
Percentage point change in share of vulnerable 
employment, 1995–2005
Greece
Spain
Iceland
Japan
Portugal
Percentage change in labour productivity, 1995–2005
Australia
a
Italy
Germany
Switzerland
Source: ILO, 2007a. 
51.  Ensuring the continuing relevance of skills acquired by both job entrants and mid-
stries 
career workers is a key policy challenge confronting industrialized countries. Success in 
this effort minimizes the risk of skills gaps that can constrain enterprise growth and 
jeopardize the employability of workers. Box 2.1 summarizes the policy guidelines on 
labour force skills and competencies of the “restated OECD Jobs Strategy” (OECD, 
2006a). Recommendations on skills development – as one of the four pillars of the job 
strategy – address many questions concerning training relevance and accessibility. 
52.  Structural transformations and growing competition in more and more indu
make it increasingly difficult for workers with low skills to find productive employment. 
Continuing adjustment of skills development programmes for new job entrants, skills 
upgrading programmes for those in the workforce, and retraining for the unemployed 
and those returning to work, are all essential. These challenges are examined below, 
4
Based on how countries categorize employment data collected at the national level, time trend data for 
vulnerable employment were not available for the larger set of OECD countries. 
21
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
while questions of connecting skills development to longer-term technological change 
and sustained productivity and employment growth are taken up in Chapter 5. 
Box 2.1 
Restated OECD Jobs Strategy, 2007 
The  OECD  Jobs 
prove  labour  market 
perf
ation as well as job search 
more and better 
paid
n with social partners where 
establishing a system of recognition of new competencies gained by adults through 
ɽ
’ 
ɽ
, training leave or schemes 
ɽ
e limits and allowing 
ɽ
es are targeted to the specific needs of 
“D.2
to: 
eople  acquire  skills 
ɽ
work,  notably  through  improved  apprenticeship 
Sour
Strategy  to  reduce  joblessness  and  im
ormance was formulated  in  the  mid-1990s. Based  on  an analysis  of what was 
working and what not, the OECD “restated” the Jobs Strategy on the basis of four pillars: 
A.  Set appropriate macroeconomic policy 
B.  Remove impediments to labour market particip
C.  Tackle labour- and product-market obstacles to labour demand 
D.  Facilitate the development of labour force skills and competencie
To ensure that workers have the right skills, which can help create
jobs, pillar D comprises the following policy guidelines: 
“D.1 Promote high-quality initial education and, in coordinatio
this is consistent with national practice, set conditions likely to improve labour force skills 
by: 
ɽ
training and experience, including foreign credential recognition of new immigrants; 
ensuring that training is more demand driven and responds effectively to firms
changing skill requirements, and encouraging greater quality of training provision, 
including through performance monitoring of providers; 
supporting training programmes – e.g. training vouchers
that help women alternate between work and training – which include co-financing 
from private agents and address training inequalities by providing effective learning 
opportunities for disadvantaged groups, notably low-educated; 
expanding the scope of apprenticeship contracts by easing ag
flexible compensation arrangements; and 
ensuring that some employment programm
disadvantaged including through second-chance schools. 
In order to facilitate school to work transition, it is essential
ɽ
reduce  early exits from education  and ensure that young p
relevant  to  labour  market  requirements,  including  by  broadening  vocational 
programmes, strengthening links between general and vocational education and 
improving career guidance; and 
help  combine  education  with 
systems or more informal channels.” 
ce: OECD, 2006a. 
2.1.2. Job-entry education and training: Improving  
cent years, failings of pre-employment and job-entry 
access, relevance and quality  
53.  Despite progress made in re
training to provide employable skills constrain employment and productivity growth. In 
the European Union (EU), 25.3 per cent of young people aged between 20 and 24 years 
had not completed upper secondary education in 2004 (Tessaring and Wannan, 2004). 
This  effectively  excludes  them  from  higher-level  vocational  education  and  training 
programmes. With limited access to higher-level pre-employment training, many young 
people can, at best, participate only in shorter courses that give them access to low-
quality and temporary jobs. Manifestations of poor relevance of pre-employment job-
entry training include high unemployment and long job searches among graduates, and 
22 
Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
lack of adequate  employability or core  work skills (ILO, 2004f and 2006b;  OECD, 
2007a).
.
54.  Addressing  the  shortcomings  in  terms  of  the  relevance  and  quality  of  pre-
employment training demands a host of policies and measures. The measures reviewed 
below are among the instruments countries are using to improve access to, and raise the 
relevance and quality of, pre-employment training. 
55.  Integrating core and technical skills training is becoming imperative in improving 
employability. The higher probability of changing jobs and occupations over a lifelong 
career,  or  of  working  with  new  technologies,  as  well  as  the  trend  towards  flatter 
management hierarchies within enterprises, have raised the demand for employability 
skills, for example, the ability to work in teams, take responsibility for quality control, 
and  embrace  opportunities  for  continual  learning 
5
(OECD,  2007a).  In  the  United 
Kingdom, employers have identified certain core work skills, including communication, 
customer relations, teamworking and problem-solving skills, but also literacy, numeracy 
and  general  information  and  technology  skills,  as  being  deficient  among  many 
jobseekers, acting as a brake on recruitment and causing loss of potential productivity to 
enterprises (Confederation of British Industry, 2007).  
56.  Quality  assurance  is  likewise  receiving  increasing  attention.  Many  OECD 
countries are putting in place quality assurance systems to increase the transparency of 
the  quality  of education  and  training  programmes offered by accredited  public  and 
private training providers. Such efforts aim to ensure that private and public investment 
in training has higher returns in terms of relevance of training and employability of 
trainees. Such quality assurance systems could include monitoring the content of training 
programmes against sector or national standards, as well as tracing, and publicizing the 
post-training employment experience of programme graduates.  
57.  Certification  of  skills  and  recognition  of  skills  acquired  on  the  job  comprise 
another area that is being developed. Some countries are pursuing both accountability to 
standards and recognition of prior learning through national qualification frameworks. 
Box 2.2 illustrates the sophisticated and highly regulated quality assurance systems in 
Australia’s  technical  and  vocational  education  and  training  (TVET)  and  the  social 
partners’  involvement  in  the  development  of  standards  and  skills  assessment  and 
certification.  Apprenticeship  systems  in  some  European  countries  similarly  involve 
employers  and  trade  unions in  defining occupational standards  and  curricula. Skills 
assessment schemes, increasingly based on occupational standards, help individuals to 
identify  their  skill  deficiencies  and  provide  a  guide  for  the  learner  and  training 
institution/provider (ILO, 2000a, para. 17).  
58.  Occupational standards and competency-based training are intended to improve 
the relevance of training and thus of the employability of trainees. Competency-based 
training shifts the emphasis from time spent in training courses to what trainees can 
actually  do  as  a  result  of  the  training.  Based  on  sound  labour  and  work  analysis 
involving the social partners, occupational standards provide the essential link between 
workplace  requirements  and  education  and  training  institutions  and  programmes. 
Standard setting has strengthened institution–industry collaboration and provided better 
guidance to students on the skills and knowledge they should be able to master and 
demonstrate.  
5
Employability “relates to portable competencies and qualifications that enhance an individual’s capacity to 
make use of the education and training opportunities available in order to secure and retain decent work, to 
progress within the enterprise and between jobs, and to cope with changing technology and labour market 
conditions” (Recommendation No. 195, Paragraph 2(d)). 
23
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
Box 2.2 
Quality assurance system in TVET in Australia 
In 2002 the Australian Quality Training Framework set nationally agreed standards 
for the  TVET system. This quality system  defines the  registration and accreditation 
process  for  training  providers  and  the  specifications  for  the  design  of  training 
programmes. TVET programmes can only be accredited and qualifications recognized 
throughout Australia if they are developed in compliance with the national guidelines. 
Training  providers  submit  evidence  of  compliance  with  standards  covering  staff 
qualifications and experience, training facilities and client support services. Many of the 
learning and assessment programmes in Australia are based on nationally endorsed 
training packages linked to industry or enterprise-specific performance standards, called 
competencies  which  lead  to  nationally  recognized  qualifications.  They  have  been 
developed and maintained in consultation with industry through industry skills councils. 
Training packages describe the skills and knowledge needed to perform effectively in the 
workplace.  
Source: Gasskov, 2006. 
59.  Public–private  partnerships  in  training  involve  public  authorities,  enterprises, 
trade unions and education and training institutions in addressing issues of quality and 
relevance of pre-employment training. Industry engagement is increasing in many areas: 
in national education and training policy development; identifying industry’s skill gaps 
and  projecting  future  demand  (see  box  2.3);  advising  education  and  training 
professionals  on  the  content  of  occupational  standards;  advising  on  skills  and 
competency  assessment  and  certification  provisions  and  methods;  and,  importantly, 
increasingly accepting students for longer periods of on-the-job training and directly 
providing  workplace  training  facilities.  The  apprenticeship  or  dual  training  systems 
found in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland are classic examples of successful 
public–private partnerships in vocational education and training.  
Box 2.3 
Identifying skill gaps and improving training supply: 
United Kingdom sector skills councils (SSCs) 
SSCs  bring  together  employers,  trade  unions  and  professional  bodies  and 
governments to develop skills that UK businesses need. The Sector Skills Development 
Agency oversees the work of the councils and provides the link with government. Each 
SSC agrees with its partners on sector priorities and targets to address four key goals:  
ɽ
Reducing skills gaps and shortages 
ɽ
Improving productivity, business and public service performance 
ɽ
Boosting skills in the sector and promoting equal opportunities  
ɽ
Improving  training  supply,  including  apprenticeships  and  higher  education,  and 
national occupational standards. 
In 2006 the regional skills assessment report written by Asset Skills, one of the 
SSCs, found that the property and housing sector was underperforming and had lower 
than average sector productivity owing to considerable skill gaps in the sector. On the 
basis  of identified  skills  shortages,  the council set  up nine  priorities for the sector 
including the following: customer service training for the whole sector; development of 
qualification framework that reflects the workplace; delivering functional information and 
communications technology (ICT) skills to the sector as a whole; delivering adult literacy 
and numeracy in the workplace; and delivering training for those most disadvantaged in 
the workplace. 
Source: Asset Skills, 2006. 
24 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested