Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
2.1.3. Expanding lifelong learning opportunities 
60.  Against  a  background  of  slow  labour  force  growth  and  ageing  populations  in 
industrialized  countries,  the  current  workforce  is  the  primary  source  for  improving 
labour  productivity  in  most  of  the  high-income  OECD  countries.  Technological  and 
workplace change make skills obsolete rapidly. Some 30 per cent of the working age 
population in Europe is “low skilled” (CEDEFOP, 2007). In the United States, more than 
40 per cent of the workforce, and more than 50 per cent of high school graduates as well 
as 16 per cent of college graduates, were found to suffer from basic skills deficiencies 
(The Conference Board, 1999). 
61.  While the needs for lifelong learning opportunities are substantial, access remains 
unequal among categories of enterprises and employees and also economic sectors. In 
France and Germany, employers spend on average more than 3 per cent of their payroll 
on training, while their counterparts in other countries spend far less. Technologically 
advanced  sectors  spend  the  most;  small  and  medium-sized  firms  invest  far  less  in 
training. In France, employees of large enterprises (500 or more employees) are twice as 
likely to participate in skills upgrading courses than are employees of firms with fewer 
than  20  employees  (Gasskov,  2001).  Men  typically  have  better  access  to  lifelong 
learning  than  women.  Women  may  need  encouragement  and  incentives  to  take 
advantage  of  training  opportunities  if  they  cannot  see  how  they  would  benefit  from 
training  (for  instance,  if  discrimination  bars  entry  into  higher-level  work).  And 
arrangements for where and when training takes place need to allow for responsibilities 
outside work.  
62.  Links  between  lifelong  learning  and  enterprise  productivity  have  been 
demonstrated by numerous studies.  For  example,  several  sector  studies in the  United 
States in the 1990s found that private sector training had a positive impact on workers’ 
productivity and other outcome measures important to both workers and employers, such 
as  wages,  sales  per  worker,  scrap  rate  and  the  adoption  of new  workplace  practices 
(table 2.1).  
Table 2.1.  United States: Impact of private sector training 
Study 
Output measure 
Impact 
Lynch: non-college trainees 
Wages 
A year of formal on-the-job training raises 
wages as much as a year at college. 
Holzer et al., 1993: Michigan 
manufacturing 
Scrap rate 
Repeat training and scrap rate is reduced by 
7 per cent. 
Krueger, 1993: Computers 
Wages 
Workers who use computers earn 10–15 per 
cent higher wages. 
Black and Lynch, 1996:  
Non-manufacturing 
Sales per worker 
Computer training increases productivity by 
more than 20 per cent. 
Black & Lynch, 1996: Manufacturing   
Sales per worker 
Providing a higher proportion of training  
off-the-job increases productivity. 
Ichniowski, Shaw and Prennushi, 
1994: Steel 
Uptime 
Where training is linked with progressive work 
practices, uptime is 7 per cent higher. 
Source: Lynch, 1997. 
63.  More  recently the European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training 
(CEDEFOP) summarized its review of research findings on the effects of training on 
firms’ productivity, suggesting that an increase of 5 per cent of employee participation in 
training leads to a 4 per cent increase in productivity, and even a 1 per cent increase in 
25
Add a link to a pdf in acrobat - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf edit hyperlink; pdf email link
Add a link to a pdf in acrobat - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add url pdf; pdf reader link
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
training days leads to a 3 per cent increase in productivity. Training provided through 
external courses had, on average, a much higher impact on productivity. The share of 
overall  productivity  growth  attributable  to  training  was  approximately  16  per  cent 
(CEDEFOP, 2007).  
64.  Incentives to invest in lifelong learning are a necessary part of a joint public and 
private commitment. Government policies and incentives schemes target enterprises, to 
encourage higher investment in lifelong learning for staff, and individuals, to encourage 
engagement  in  lifelong  learning  programmes.  Measures  and  provisions  targeted  at 
enterprises include: deduction of training expenditures from corporate tax; compulsory 
tax exemption schemes that ensure a minimum level of expenditure on training (France); 
voluntary industry training levies to finance skills training and apprenticeships (Denmark, 
Belgium and the Netherlands); training clauses in collective agreements (such as in the 
Netherlands); independent skills assessment centres for employees; and paid education 
and  training leave (in  compliance with the  ILO  Paid  Educational  Leave  Convention, 
1974  (No.  140)).  Incentives  directed  at  individuals  include:  fellowships,  vouchers, 
student loans and new financial mechanisms like “individual learning accounts”. More 
research  could  further  explore  which  of  these  approaches  works  better  under  which 
circumstances. 
65.  The  European  Commission’s  new  common  principles  of  flexicurity  strongly 
emphasize  the  importance  of  lifelong  learning  (European  Commission,  2007).  The 
integrated strategy to enhance both flexibility and security in the labour market aims to 
ease  transitions:  from  school  to  work,  between  jobs,  between  unemployment  or 
inactivity and work, and from work to retirement. Lifelong learning is one of the four 
mutually supporting policy components: 
ɽ
flexible  and  reliable  contractual  arrangements  through  labour  laws,  collective 
agreements and work organization; 
ɽ
comprehensive lifelong learning strategies to ensure the continual adaptability and 
employability of workers, particularly the most vulnerable; 
ɽ
effective active labour market policies that help people to cope with rapid change, 
reduce unemployment spells and ease transitions to new jobs; and 
ɽ
social  security  systems  that  provide  adequate  income  support,  encourage 
employment  and  facilitate  labour  market mobility,  including  such  provisions  as 
unemployment benefits, pensions, health care and attention to balancing work and 
family responsibilities. 
66.  The common principles recognize lifelong learning as a crucial factor for both the 
competitiveness  of  enterprises  and  workers’  employability:  “High  quality  initial 
education,  broad  key  competences  and  continuous  investments  in  skills  improve 
enterprises’  opportunities  to  cope  with  economic  change  and  workers’  chances  of 
staying employed or finding new employment” (European Commission, 2007, p. 6). The 
Commission  statement  acknowledges  the  importance  of  extending  opportunities  for 
lifelong learning beyond  the highest  skilled workers to  low-skilled workers,  the  self-
employed and older workers; of cost-sharing arrangements; and of involving government, 
social partners, enterprises and individual workers. While acknowledging that flexicurity 
approaches  should  be  adapted  to  country  circumstances,  the  principle  of  combining 
lifelong learning with contractual and social protection and active labour market policies 
is regarded as crucial.  
26 
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
add hyperlinks pdf file; accessible links in pdf
Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
2.1.4. Active labour market policies and combating  
inequality in the labour market 
67.  Inequalities in incomes, access to employment and skill endowment are growing 
simultaneously  between  groups  of  people  in  industrialized  countries.  For  example, 
globally, women earn on average only two-thirds of men’s pay. In the EU, women earn 
on average 16 per cent less than men (Beblo et al., 2003). Occupational segregation is 
the principal reason for pay gaps. 
6
68.  Globalization, foreign competition  and  technological change  give  a premium to 
workers with marketable skills in the labour market, while squeezing out workers who 
have  few  or  obsolete  skills.  Helping  individuals  out  of  unemployment,  raising  their 
chances of finding better, more decent jobs, and helping them to change careers, are an 
important policy challenge for governments.  
69.  Active labour market policies and adjustment programmes have many objectives, 
for  example:  meeting  labour  shortages;  introducing  people  to  work;  promoting 
entrepreneurship;  and  overcoming  social  obstacles  to  employment,  such  as  drug  or 
alcohol  addiction,  illiteracy  and  poor  numeracy,  or  employers’  resistance  to  hiring 
disadvantaged  or  long-term  unemployed  people.  Programmes  combine  career 
information and counselling, core work or life skills development activities, occupation-
specific vocational training, work experience (paid or non-paid), subsidized on-the-job 
training  and  support  services  such  as  child  care  and  transportation.  Labour  market 
adjustment programmes also address the demand side of the labour market, for example 
by providing subsidies to employers to hire workers or by running public job-creation 
programmes. 
70.  The  summary  results  of  over  90  evaluations  of  labour  market  adjustment 
programmes  in  mostly  OECD  countries  are  provided  in  table  2.2.  Strategies  that 
appeared to help women  return  to the  labour market are specifically  included  in this 
overview.  Programme  results  have  been  mixed.  When  these  programmes  are  not 
supported by other policies and measures they tend to be ineffective. Success, measured 
for example by improved earnings and job take up and retention, is likely to increase 
when  training  programmes are: combined with work experience; targeted  to  meet  the 
needs  of  specific  groups  and  based  on  careful  analysis  of  the  demand  for  skills; 
combined with other measures, such as wage subsidies or tax incentives, that encourage 
employers to take up young, unemployed and marginalized workers; and negotiated and 
agreed upon by the parties concerned.  
6
In  addition  to  occupational segregation, which is  of great  importance to  skills  development, other factors 
accounting for earning differentials include interrupted careers due to family responsibilities and differences in 
fringe benefits and bonuses offered to men and women managers (Beblo et al., 2003; Wirth, 2004). 
27
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
Table 2.2.  Evaluation results of active labour market training programmes 
Programme 
Source 
Appear to help 
Comments 
Training for long-
term unemployed 
(28 evaluations) 
Dar and Tzannatos 
(1999) 
Women and other disadvantaged 
groups 
No more effective than job 
search assistance to increase 
re-employment probabilities 
and post-intervention 
earnings; two to four times 
more costly. 
Formal classroom 
training 
Meager and Evans 
(1998) 
Women re-entrants. Does not appear 
to help prime-age men and older 
workers with low initial education 
Important that courses have 
strong labour market 
relevance or signal “high” 
quality to employers. Should 
lead to a qualification that is 
recognized and valued by 
employers. Keep 
programmes relatively small 
in scale. 
On-the-job training  Martin and Grubb 
(2001)  
Women re-entrants; single mothers 
Must directly meet labour 
market needs. Hence the 
need to establish strong links 
with local employers, but this 
increases the risk of 
displacement. 
Retraining workers 
displaced in mass 
lay-offs  
(12 evaluations) 
Dar and Tzannatos 
(1999) 
Little positive impact: positive results 
mainly when economy is improving  
No more effective than job 
search assistance and 
significantly more expensive. 
Rate of return usually 
negative. 
Training for young 
people  
(19 evaluations) 
Betcherman, 
Olivas and Dar 
(2004) 
Positive impact in developing 
countries 
Employment and earning 
prospects not improved. 
Negative real rate of return to 
these programmes when 
costs are taken into account. 
Additional evaluation shows 
positive employment impact 
in developing countries.  
Training in 
vocational skills 
(36 evaluations) 
Meager and Evans 
(1998) 
Disadvantaged groups; especially 
prime-aged women 
Results patchy, but positive 
effects on employment and 
earnings are as 
commonplace as no or 
negative effect. Higher 
positive impact when training 
involves placement with a 
private sector employer. 
Appears less effective than 
other active measures, 
especially direct job creation, 
where compared. Evidence of 
creaming, deadweight and 
substitution effects. 
Source: Auer et al., 2005. 
28 
Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
2.1.5. Training and reintegrating older workers into employment  
71.  Maintaining  labour  market  participation  of  older  workers  is  seen to  help offset 
labour and skill shortages, improve productivity and alleviate the economic impact of 
ageing.  Policies  address  the  concerns  of  older  workers  about  maintaining  access  to 
training  in  new  technologies,  discrimination  in  the  labour  market  and  having  their 
experience and skills appreciated as assets for enterprise productivity (Stein and Rocco, 
2001).  
72.  Policies on labour market participation and productivity of older workers in many 
countries are motivated by demographic trends within ageing economies. 
7
For example, 
Japan’s working age population is expected to shrink at an average annual rate of 0.8 per 
cent in the next 20 years and as a result strategies for raising productivity increasingly 
target older workers (see box 2.4). By 2030, in Europe, there will be 14 million more 
workers aged 55 to 64 years and 9 million fewer persons aged between 15 and 24 years. 
It is expected that there will be 2 million fewer learners in secondary and tertiary TVET. 
There is therefore an increasing need to enable older workers to acquire modern skills 
and remain highly productive (Bulgarelli, 2006).  
Box 2.4 
Ageing population and training and productivity policy in Japan 
Despite the fact that Japan’s capital–labour ratio is among the highest in the world, 
the ageing of the population,  and anticipated population  decrease projected over the 
next two decades, has resulted  in a  call for accelerating productivity growth. Japan’s 
Third Science and Technology Plan aims to foster human resource development and a 
competitive research environment. The programme is expected to increase total public 
research and development (R&D) spending to 25 trillion yen over five years (1 per cent 
of gross domestic product (GDP) on an annual basis, well above the national average of 
0.7 per cent during 2001–03.) The education and skills training programmes are shaped 
by  the  key  focus  areas  proposed  by  the  Plan,  including  life  sciences,  information 
technology,  environment  and  nanotechnology  and  materials.  Support  for researchers 
targets the young, female and older workers. The share of  women researchers  is  to 
increase from 11 to 25 per cent.  
73.  Policies  to  maintain  the  employability  of  older  workers  address  such  issues  as 
“trainability”  and  the  economic  payoffs  of  training.  Although  employers  rate  older 
workers highly in terms of their dependability, loyalty and commitment, their abilities to 
learn  new  skills  and  master  new  concepts,  ideas  and  approaches  are  sometimes 
questioned.  In  the  United  States,  for  example,  some  research  has  shown  that  older 
employees receive  less training in or outside  enterprises than younger  workers (Imel, 
1991).  Employers  might  invest  less  in  training  older  workers  because  they  question 
whether such training will “pay off” in terms of the length of time these trained workers 
will  remain  employed.  However, both research  and practice show that  older  workers 
respond  to  training  as  efficiently  as  do  younger  workers.  If  extra  training  may  be 
required,  employers  may  see  these  costs  offset  by  turnover  among  older  workers 
compared to younger ones.  
74.  The gender dimension of the labour force participation of older workers has been 
an important feature in policies targeting the training and productivity of this age group. 
Older men have been over-represented in declining industries and under-represented in 
growth areas, and have therefore been affected by the reduced demand for low-skilled 
7
Labour market and  social protection implications of demographic  change will be  the  subject of a general 
discussion at the 98th Session (2009) of the International Labour Conference. 
29
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
workers.  During  recessions  and  as  part  of  policies  to  boost  employment  of  younger 
workers, active labour market policies have often included early retirement schemes.  
75.  Another  gender-related  issue  to  take  into  account  is  that  mid-career  and  older 
women  returning  to  work  (after  raising  a  family)  have  specific  skill  and  retraining 
requirements.  If  these  needs  are  not  met,  women  re-entering  the  labour  market  may 
experience downward occupational mobility. This  underutilization of female  workers’ 
skills has implications for economic productivity. 
76.  The  OECD  and  the  European  Commission  have  both  recommended  integrated 
comprehensive  policy  approaches  to  address  the  range  of  issues  surrounding  older 
workers (learning and  productivity, social security  costs, discrimination in  the labour 
market). In Austria, the so-called “Employment Pact” for older workers was launched as 
 tripartite initiative  in  the  mid-1990s 
8
to  increase  the supply  of  older  workers  and 
stimulate  demand  for them  by  lowering  the  cost  of  employing  them.  It  includes  the 
following measures:  
ɽ
encouraging  later  retirement  and  flexible  retirement  (for  example,  gradual 
reduction of working time while contributing to pension benefits); 
ɽ
legislation to counter age discrimination (already in force for several decades in the 
United States); 
ɽ
guidance and training programmes targeting older workers, accompanied by advice 
and guidance for employers; 
ɽ
employment  placement  services  and  support  for  other  labour  market 
intermediation; and  
ɽ
coordinated  and  comprehensive  packages  of  age-friendly  employment  measures 
and policies developed and implemented jointly by government, employers, trade 
unions and civil society. 
2.2.  Countries of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and  
the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) 
9
2.2.1. Higher productivity but stagnant employment growth  
77.  When market-oriented economic policies were introduced in the early 1990s, all 
CEE and CIS countries had comparatively low productivity levels. Labour hoarding and 
the absence of market incentives for the production of goods and services were major 
contributing factors (van Ark, 1999). High employment levels prevailed and wages were 
low. As reforms were introduced, however, employment levels fell, drastically in CEE 
countries  and  less  so  in  CIS  countries.  High  unemployment  and  low  wages  have 
8
In the face of declining labour force participation and rising unemployment of persons over the age of 50, the 
Austrian  Government  and  representatives  of  employers  and  employees  (within  the  national  context  of  the 
country’s national Action Plan for Employment) put in place a set of policies aiming, on the one hand, to provide 
incentives for employers to retain and train workers over the age of 50 and, on the other, to ease these workers’ 
return to employment if they become unemployed (European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and 
Working Conditions, 1999). 
9
Central and Eastern Europe (CEE):  Albania, Bosnia and  Herzegovina,  Bulgaria,  Croatia, Czech  Republic, 
Estonia,  Hungary,  Latvia,  Lithuania,  Montenegro, Poland,  Romania,  Serbia, Slovakia,  Slovenia, The former 
Yugoslav  Republic  of  Macedonia  and  Ukraine.  The Commonwealth  of Independent States  (CIS): Armenia, 
Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Republic of Moldova, Russian Federation, Tajikistan, 
Turkmenistan (Associate Member) and Uzbekistan. 
30 
Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
triggered  migration  outflows  from  Central  Europe  to  Western  Europe  and  from  the 
Central Asian Republics to the Russian Federation.  
78.  Recently,  some  CEE  countries  have embarked  on  a  path  of positive  economic, 
productivity and employment growth; in other countries, this has not happened yet. By 
contrast, many of the Central Asian Republics face difficulties in resuming  economic 
productivity and employment growth, as GDP per capita still remains below 1990 levels. 
The  limited  available  data,  especially  from  the  CIS  countries,  show  that  the  painful 
adjustment period has not ended in most of the countries in this group. 
ɽ
Across  the  CEE  countries,  employment  growth  continues  to  lag  behind  GDP 
growth, and in some countries employment levels have fallen, particularly in post-
conflict  economies.  Across  the  countries  that  have  joined  the  EU,  annual  GDP 
growth rates are typically three to four times higher than employment growth rates 
(Cazes and Nesporova, 2006).  
ɽ
Measured  from  1995  to  2005,  productivity  rose  dramatically  in  many  CEE 
countries. Growth rates ranged from about 40 per cent in Bulgaria, Czech Republic, 
and Slovenia, to just over 100 per cent in Estonia and Latvia (ILO, 2007a). 
ɽ
However,  on  average these countries had  large shares of  workers  in vulnerable 
employment (12.7 per cent on average across the CEE countries). Despite the large 
productivity gains, this share fell by less than one and a half percentage points on 
average across these countries during that same ten-year period (ILO, 2007a).  
ɽ
In the CIS  countries,  vulnerable  employment  was  even higher (19.7  per  cent of 
employment in 2005) (ILO, 2007a). 
ɽ
Fully one fifth of the workers in Central and South-Eastern Europe and the CIS 
countries lived on US$2 per day (ILO, 2008c).  
79.  Most countries started the transformation process with universal primary education 
and literacy rates and a strong tradition of secondary education, including technical and 
vocational training. Data for 2005 show that on average 85 per cent of the labour force 
had secondary or higher education (ILO, 2007a). The ability to attract new investment 
has  also  hinged  on  the  availability  of  skilled  workers.  Many  car  manufacturers,  for 
example, were drawn to the Czech Republic and Hungary, as these countries offered a 
skilled workforce, competitive wage rates and proximity to European markets. However, 
education and training participation rates have dropped, partly as a result of economic 
hardships and partly because much of what was offered had become irrelevant in the 
transition from a command to a market economy. The ageing workforce will present a 
major economic, labour and policy challenge for many years to come, with important 
implications for education, training and migration policies.  
2.2.2. Investing in relevant education and training programmes 
80.  The pursuit of market-oriented economic  and social policies and the collapse of 
training in state-owned enterprises have drastically reduced the supply of training, and 
what is on offer is not always relevant to new labour force needs in emerging industries 
and services. A major policy challenge for CEE/CIS countries is to restructure education 
and training systems and to invest in education and training that is relevant to the new 
market economy. 
81.  In  most  CEE/CIS  countries,  public  education  and  training  budgets  declined 
markedly  in  the  1990s.  Participation  in  school  education  went  down  as  fees  were 
introduced and  parents withdrew  children from  school,  which  threatened future skills 
31
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
development  in  the  region.  Vocational  education  and  training  output  plummeted.  In 
Kazakhstan, 42 per cent of the population aged between 14 and 18 years was enrolled in 
vocational training and technical education programmes in 1989; by 2000, the share had 
dropped to just 24  per cent (UNICEF, 2004). Poor pay for teachers and deteriorating 
training infrastructure exacerbated the problems.  
82.  Investing in new skills that are in demand in the new economy is the new focus. 
Many CEE countries are upgrading secondary and vocational curriculum materials and 
investing in new areas  of  skills, for example in  banking, finance,  computer  software, 
administration and secretarial work. Training in core work skills is also being integrated 
in  curricula  to  enhance  individuals’  employability.  Many  CEE/CIS  countries  are 
endeavouring to improve programme quality by setting competency standards to guide 
the  development  of  new  curricula  and,  ultimately,  strengthen  qualifications  systems, 
including skills recognition. Systems for skills assessment, accreditation and recognition 
are expected to improve individuals’ employability and labour market efficiency.  
83.  Investing in managerial and entrepreneurial training is also a high priority. Job 
and  wealth  creation  depend  on  an  enterprise  culture  based  on  risk-taking  and 
entrepreneurship.  The  medium-sized  enterprise  sector  has  grown  in  the  CEE/CIS 
countries but  is  still  relatively  small.  In  2003,  enterprises  employing  more  than  250 
employees accounted for 51.2 per cent of total employment in the Russian Federation, 
compared to 34.2 per cent in the European Union (RSMERC, 2004).  
84.  For  both  small  and  larger  enterprises,  business,  managerial  and  entrepreneurial 
training has become an important tool for boosting innovation, productivity and growth. 
Demand  for  accountants  and  managers  and  for  courses  in  organizational  behaviour, 
labour  relations,  human  resources  management,  marketing  and  related  subjects  has 
mushroomed,  while  demand  for  engineering  and  science  professionals  has  dwindled 
generally  throughout  the  region.  In  the  Russian  Federation,  business  training 
programmes tripled their output in a decade to 140,000 graduates in 2000 (Mechitov and 
Moshkovich,  2004).  Governmental  and  non-governmental  programmes  increasingly 
support small business development, investing in local incubators that provide business 
support services and entrepreneurial skills training. Many secondary school programmes 
also inculcate business skills and culture in young people, a learning component that was 
missing in the past (a specific example is given in box 2.5). 
Box 2.5 
Know About Business (KAB) programme in Central Asia 
In 2002, the ILO and vocational training institutions in some Central Asian countries 
started the KAB programme to promote positive attitudes among young people towards 
enterprise  and  self-employment.  The  KAB  programme  gives  vocational  education 
students knowledge and practical skills to start, operate and work productively in a small 
enterprise, and accustoms them to an environment where full-time wage jobs are scarce. 
The  curriculum  has  been  adopted  as  the  official  business  education  curriculum  for 
secondary and vocational training schools. An assessment carried out in Kyrgyzstan in 
2007  showed  that  44  national  vocational  training  institutions  (42  per  cent  of  all 
institutions in the country) had introduced the programme, with more than 4,000 students 
participating. An additional 15,000 individuals are expected to participate in the training 
by 2009. 
Source: ILO, 2007d. 
32 
Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
2.2.3. The role of labour market institutions in mitigating  
the negative effects of economic restructuring  
85.  National public employment services (PESs) were established in the early 1990s to 
address the needs of the burgeoning population of unemployed and dislocated workers in 
most of  the  CEE/CIS countries.  They  primarily administered  unemployment benefits, 
but  have  also  begun  to  implement  active  labour  market  policy  measures  to  combat 
unemployment and help individuals to find jobs (Cazes and Nesporova 2006). 
10
They 
canvassed businesses for vacancies, which they matched with jobseekers’ skills profiles, 
and provided career guidance, training and retraining to the unemployed in preparation 
for new occupations, including self-employment.  
86.  PESs address important equity concerns, taking  into account the fact  that many 
jobless  people  lack  resources  and  can  only  afford  training  and  retraining  with  PES 
assistance. These services help the most disadvantaged in society access employment, 
for example  by supporting job placements for persons with  disabilities (ILO, 2004b). 
They also help young people to find a first job, particularly those who lack alternative 
means to do so. They have proven vital in helping young people to gain access to labour 
market information and career advice and in identifying suitable job vacancies (Cazes 
and Nesporova, 2006). 
11
87.  Strengthening social dialogue on education and training plays an important role in 
making training programmes more relevant. 
12
A recent ILO survey of national social 
dialogue on employment policies (Rychly and Vylitova, 2005), found that workers’ and 
employers’  organizations are becoming more  active  in  the  field of training policy. In 
Poland, for example, they are instrumental in designing training curricula. In Estonia, 
they are members of the Foundation for Vocational Education and Training Reform. In 
the  Czech  Republic,  they  are  represented  on  the  Council  for  Human  Resources 
Development. In most CEE/CIS countries, the social partners are increasingly active in 
administering PESs.  
88.  The social partners, and employers’ organizations in particular, can be instrumental 
in  improving the  quality  and  efficiency  of education  and training  systems.  They  can 
identify  the  skills  needs  of  enterprises  and  translate  these  into  training  policies  and 
programmes. Employers’ organizations can raise their members’ awareness of the need 
for more and better workplace training. Evidence concerning current levels of training 
taking place  in  enterprises  is scant.  A survey conducted  by the Georgian  Employers’ 
Association  revealed  that  43  per  cent  of  its  members  did  not  invest  in  improving 
employee  skills,  although  85  per  cent  recognized  that  such  investment  could  raise 
productivity  and  competitiveness  significantly.  In  Azerbaijan,  only  about  half  the 
enterprises surveyed had plans to provide training to their employees (ILO, 2006h).  
10
Across 11 CEE countries, total expenditure in 2002–03 on labour market policies as a percentage of GDP 
ranged from 0.28 per cent in Lithuania to 1.25 per cent in Poland, with the share devoted to active labour market 
policies being 16 per cent in Lithuania and 11 per cent in Poland.  
11
In Romania in 2004, for example, the youth unemployment rate was 21.4 per cent, compared to a rate of 
7.1 per cent for adults. In Poland, the figures were 39.5 per cent and 18.8 per cent. 
12
“Members should … define, with the involvement of the social partners, a national strategy for education and 
training, as well as establish a guiding framework for training policies at national, regional, local, and sectoral 
and enterprise levels” (Recommendation No. 195, Paragraph 5(a)). 
33
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
2.2.4. Education, training and lifelong learning to raise  
workforce productivity, adaptability and mobility 
89.  The  European  Union’s  Lisbon  Strategy  is  the  major  policy  instrument  of  CEE 
countries for enhancing productivity, innovation and competitiveness. It advocates more 
R&D  and  investment  in  human  capital,  education  and  skills  to  boost  productivity, 
innovation and competitiveness. Increased investment resources would raise the demand 
for skilled workers and contribute to overall job creation.  
90.  The  Lisbon  Strategy  has  education  and  training  policy  implications  for  the 
European Union’s CEE member countries, and also for aspiring members in the region, 
which need highly skilled and adaptable workers who are able to create and use new 
technologies  effectively.  In  boosting  innovation  and  competitiveness,  policies  and 
programmes relating to lifelong learning will gain importance. With the accession of a 
number of CEE States to the EU, the Lisbon Strategy is the main policy instrument for 
enhancing  productivity  and competitiveness, and all  new  EU Members have  national 
action plans in place for its implementation. These countries are also directed by the EU 
Guidelines for Growth and Jobs that call for improved access to vocational, secondary 
and higher education, as well as efficient lifelong learning strategies. 
13
91.  Improving  workers’  labour  force  participation,  adaptability  and  mobility  is 
particularly  relevant  in  the  countries  of  Eastern  Europe,  including  Ukraine  and  the 
Russian Federation,  because  of their  rapidly ageing  labour  force.  Paying  attention to 
older women will be exceptionally important because of their longer life expectancies. 
14
In the near future, there will be fewer workers than today in these countries to operate 
factories, offices  and workplaces. A reduction in  the number of  workers may induce 
productivity-enhancing investments. The demographic  trend  is also likely to  motivate 
policies  to  increase  labour  force  participation,  encourage  workers’  adaptability  and 
enable  older  workers  to  remain  in  or  re-enter  the  workforce.  Introducing  polices  to 
manage  the flow of  skilled  workers  in  and  out  of  CEE/CIS  countries  is of  growing 
importance  as  a  policy  instrument  to  manage  the  supply  and  demand  of  workers  at 
various skill levels – a theme addressed in Chapter 4. 
92.  Many countries in the region have large migrant worker populations. The Russian 
Federation  (14  million  migrants),  Ukraine  (7  million)  and  Kazakhstan  are  large  net 
receivers of migrant workers. In the Russian Federation, many of them come from the 
Caucasus and Central Asia, and send remittances to their home countries. Meanwhile 
Central European workers, particularly construction workers, migrate in large numbers 
to  Western  Europe, causing  skill  shortages at home.  At  present, some 15,000 highly 
educated specialists leave Ukraine each year. Bulgaria is estimated to have lost 50,000 
scientists and skilled workers since the early 1990s (Mansoor and Quillin, 2007). Many 
countries  fear that  the “brain  drain”  may  damage  their  future  ability to  innovate and 
compete internationally. Furthermore, the poor labour market situation in many countries 
(in  particular  Belarus,  Republic  of  Moldova  and  Ukraine)  is  resulting  in  increasing 
vulnerability  of  young  women  in  the  region  to  exploitation  with  the  rise  in  human 
trafficking. 
13
http://ec.europa.eu/growthandjobs/index_en.htm 
14
Women’s life expectancy is longer in all regions. In the Eastern European and CIS countries, the gap in life 
expectancy between women and men has  increased since transition for a variety  of reasons. In the Russian 
Federation, for example, women live 13.3 years longer than men on average (UNECE, 2003). 
34 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested