how to upload and download pdf file in asp net c# : Add link to pdf file Library application component .net html windows mvc wcms_0920545-part963

Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
2.3.  Developing countries in Asia and the Pacific,  
Latin America, the Arab States and Africa 
93.  This group comprises a diverse group of over 80 countries (see the annex to this 
chapter). Most countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as many countries 
in Asia, including China and India, and among the Arab States, belong to this group. 
Some two dozen countries in Africa are covered in this group, while most are classified 
as LDCs. 
15
94.  An important characteristic of countries in this group is the combination of high 
growth and productivity in some sectors and regions and low productivity and persistent 
poverty in other economic sectors or regions. As indicated in Chapter 1, responses are 
needed  to  address  the  resulting  twin  challenges  for  skills  development,  which  are: 
(1) meeting the demand for higher skills in the growing higher-technology, often export-
oriented sectors, thus removing one potential constraint on future growth; and (2) using 
skills  development  to  improve  productivity  and  support  formalization  of  economic 
activities in the still largely impoverished informal economy.  
2.3.1. Patterns in productivity, education and employment 
95.  Employment  and  productivity  trends  vary  substantially  among  countries  in  this 
group: 
ɽ
Most countries in Asia have improved their competitiveness in the global economy, 
driven by low production costs, abundant pools of skilled and semi-skilled labour 
and rapid growth in labour productivity. Overall in Asia, productivity increased by 
40 per cent from 1995 to 2005 (ILO, 2006c). Poverty has retreated, although as 
many as 1 billion workers (60 per cent of all workers) live on less than US$2 per 
day (ILO, 2007p). The ILO’s 14th Asian Regional Meeting called for measures to 
promote  productivity  growth,  and  to  enhance  enterprise  and  national 
competitiveness  and  faster  growth  in  the  number  of  decent  jobs  available  for 
workers (ILO, 2006c).  
ɽ
In Latin America and the Caribbean productivity has risen only slightly: 0.6 per 
cent on average per year from 1997 to 2007. Unemployment in 2007 was 8.5 per 
cent, slightly less than the 8.9 per cent rate five years earlier. In 2007, 8.0 per cent 
of the labour force lived on less than US$1 per day. One quarter of all workers in 
the region lived on less than US$2 per day (ILO, 2008c). One substantial challenge 
for most countries in Latin America is to create decent job opportunities for the 
working poor while also reducing unemployment.  
ɽ
In the Middle East, productivity has remained at about the same level over the past 
ten years, actually decreasing by 0.2 per cent on average per year between 1997 
and 2007. Employment levels have likewise stagnated, with unemployment rates 
remaining high. One fifth of workers live on less than US$2 per day (Fahim, 2008; 
ILO, 2008c). In North Africa, productivity growth was higher – 1.4 per cent annual 
15
The UNDP lists 137 developing countries or areas, of which 50 are designated least developed countries. The 
classification is made  according to three criteria: low  income (three-year  average estimate  of gross national 
income per capita under US$750), weakness in composite Human Assets Index (based on indicators of nutrition, 
health, education and adult literacy) and economic vulnerability (based on indicators of instability of agricultural 
production, instability of exports, proportion of non-traditional activities in manufacturing and services, handicap 
of economic smallness and population displaced by natural disasters) (UN Office of the High Representative for 
the  Least  Developed  Countries,  Landlocked  Developing  Countries  and  Small  Island  Developing  Countries, 
www.un.org/special-rep/ohrlls/ldc; 29 Jan. 2008). 
35
Add link to pdf file - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
clickable links in pdf from word; c# read pdf from url
Add link to pdf file - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf link open in new window; add links to pdf document
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
average growth (1997–2007) but two-fifths of workers live on US$2 per day (ILO, 
2008c). 
96.  Reviewing  the  relationships  between  trends  in  education,  productivity  and 
employment for even a handful of countries in this group is difficult owing to the lack of 
up to date comparable data. The best available proxy for skills is literacy, expressed as 
the proportion of the population over the age of 15 that can read and write. Owing to 
greater data availability, the measurement used to capture trends in quality employment 
relates to the working poor, that is the percentage point change in the number of workers 
living on US$2 per day. Productivity remains the same: output per worker in constant 
dollars. Trends are calculated  as simple averages for 1995–2005  for  productivity and 
working poor, but literacy is for the latest year available. 
16
97.  Relationships between these three variables are summarized in figure 2.7. While 
conclusions  must  be  guarded  because  of  the  small  sample  size  for  which  data  are 
available  (relative  to  the  large  number  of  countries  in  this  group),  the  picture  that 
emerges  is  that  those  countries  with  the  best  performance  in  improving  labour 
productivity and higher literacy rates registered the best average performance, as a group, 
in reducing the share of working poor.  
98.  Across  the  six  countries  which  had  relatively  better  performance  in  increasing 
labour productivity and had relatively higher literacy rates, the average reduction in the 
share of working poor was 15 percentage points, compared to the 5 percentage point 
reduction achieved by countries which had high literacy but relatively low improvements 
in productivity. The two countries with relatively strong productivity growth but high 
rates  of  illiteracy  (Pakistan  and  India)  reduced  the  share  of  working  poor  by  4  and 
13 percentage points respectively.  
16
Trend data for literacy is not available for comparable periods, necessitating the use of a static measurement. 
36 
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update, and delete PDF file metadata, like
pdf link to email; add links to pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
pdf hyperlinks; clickable links in pdf files
Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
Figure 2.7.  Developing countries: Productivity, literacy and working poor 
Developing countries 
Change in share of working poor at US$2 a day, 1995–2005 
Grouped according to countries' relative performance in 
labour productivity (1995–2005) and literacy
-20.00
-15.00
-10.00
-5.00
0.00
5.00
Percetage point change in share of working poor
Relatively high 
productivity 
growth and high 
literacy
Relatively high 
productivity 
growth but 
relatively low 
literacy
Relatively low 
productivity 
growth but 
relatively high 
literacy
six countries
two countries
eight countries
Source: ILO, 2007a; UNESCO/UIS, 2007. 
2.3.2. Addressing skills shortages in high-growth  
countries and sectors 
99.  Skills  shortages  curtail  the  expansion  of  higher-productivity  sectors  and  the 
expansion of local production into higher value added activities. 
ɽ
Among  Asia’s  high-growth  countries,  rapid  development  has  accelerated  the 
demand  for  higher-skilled  workers,  professional  staff  in  the  medical  and  legal 
fields  and  business  managers.  For  several  years,  media  reports  and  surveys  of 
multinational enterprises (MNEs) have decried shortages of skilled labour in China 
and  India. 
17
Recent government initiatives in China aim to improve the general 
skill level of the  labour force  and ensure  that shortfalls in  skill quality will  not 
become  an  obstacle  to  expanding  employment  and  economic  growth  (China, 
Institute for Labour Studies, 2007).  
ɽ
In Latin America there is a general concern that while coverage of education and 
training has increased, the quality of that education has not adequately equipped 
young people for the labour market. This has led to calls to increase the vocational 
content of secondary education.  
17
A recent Economist Intelligence Unit Corporate Network Survey among 600 chief executives of multinational 
companies with businesses across Asia found that a shortage of staff was their biggest concern in China and 
South-East Asia. It was the fourth biggest concern in India (after problems with infrastructure, bureaucracy and 
rising wages for skilled workers) (The Economist, 2007). 
37
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; clickable links in pdf
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
add hyperlink pdf document; add link to pdf
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
ɽ
In  the  Arab  States,  employers  often  identify  a  lack  of  skills  as  a  barrier  to 
expanding business and employment. 
18
Education systems in these countries tend 
to prepare students for public sector jobs, which used to be the primary employer 
for labour market entrants, and have not developed sufficient linkages to the private 
sector (Assad and Roudi-Fahimi, 2007).  
100.  There  is  no  single  model  of  an  effective  national  response  to  the  challenge  of 
upgrading skills development and bridging skills gaps. But across the range of responses, 
improving coordination and expanding the availability of training are two critical factors. 
101.  Improving coordination between prospective employers and education and training 
providers is an effective and feasible way to reduce the mismatch between education and 
training outcomes and employment opportunities. Employer involvement at the local or 
industry level is most important in three ways:  
ɽ
First, employers’ involvement in the management of training institutions helps to 
keep institutions abreast of changing technologies, the kind of technical and ICT 
equipment used at the workplace, and which industries, occupations and skills are 
declining or rising in demand. The development of competency-based standards in 
close cooperation with industry can help training become more relevant so that the 
skills acquired improve trainees’ employability. 
ɽ
Second,  employers  can  provide  experiential  learning  by  accepting  interns  or 
apprentices – sometimes with agreements of later employment – that enhance the 
systematic and classroom-based knowledge learning through practical application.  
ɽ
Third, feedback mechanisms through which employers and the trainees they hire 
can  systematically  inform  training  providers  of  whether  the  quality  of  training 
matches  on-job  expectations.  Sometimes  this  is  organized  directly  within  the 
labour  market area of  training  institutions,  and in  other  places  it  is  coordinated 
through local employment offices of the national employment service. 
102.  A community- and industry-driven training system is thus essential to redressing 
both sides of the skills mismatch coin: relevance and quality of training. This is one of 
the key objectives of ongoing vocational training reform policies in Egypt, for example 
(see box 2.6). Strengthening ties between tertiary education and the private sector is also 
growing  in  many  developing  countries  in  order  to  provide  the  professional  and 
management skills needed by a growing private sector.  
18
For example, in a World Bank Institute survey, 27 per cent of firms interviewed in a sample of Arab States 
said that education and skills of the workforce were a major constraint (Tan, 2006). 
38 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Have a try with this sample C#.NET code to add an image to the first page of PDF file.
add links pdf document; pdf link to specific page
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Have a try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image to the first page of PDF file. ' Open a document.
add link to pdf file; clickable pdf links
Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
Box 2.6 
Egypt: Demand for reforming the training system 
Various  studies  have  noted  that  the  Egyptian  vocational  and  education  training 
system does not provide skills that are in demand by employers and young people for 
the following reasons: 
ɽ
inadequate involvement of employers in the management of training centres; 
ɽ
weak links to employers to facilitate post-training employment; 
ɽ
poorly trained and paid teachers; 
ɽ
out of date equipment; 
ɽ
concentration of training for women in traditional occupations; 
ɽ
low quality of training, with inadequate attention to theory as well as practice and 
therefore, perhaps, not surprisingly; 
ɽ
low esteem of vocational training among students and parents. 
Efforts  to  address  weaknesses  and  fragmentation  include:  coordinating  training 
policy  under  the  Supreme  Council  for  Human  Resources  Development;  improving 
training  quality  through  investments  in  curricula,  improved  teachers’  salaries,  and 
offering combined general (coursework) and practical (internship) training; and providing 
retraining to adult workers under the Social Fund for Development. 
Source: Fahim, 2008; Amer, 2005; de Gobbi and Nesporova, 2005; Van Eekelen et al., 2001. 
103.  Increased training provision must accompany this enhanced flow of information 
about what kind and levels of training are needed – otherwise training institutions will 
not be able to respond and adjust their training. Public financing systems increasingly 
link  funding  to  employment  outcomes,  whether  for  centralized  public  training 
institutions or, increasingly, for individual training institutions. Strong ties to prospective 
employers are crucial to meeting these expectations of accountability. 
19
104.  Methods  of  financing  skills  development  increasingly  emphasize  demand-
responsiveness and accountability for performance. They include: (1) payroll levies on 
employers;  (2)  fees  paid  by  enterprises  or  trainees;  (3)  self-funding  by  training 
institutions through production and sale of goods and services; (4) community support; 
and  (5)  expansion  of  training  provision  by  non-governmental  organizations  in  the 
informal economy and by private sector providers in the formal economy (Johanson and 
Adams, 2004, p. 9).  The  effectiveness  of  such  approaches depends on  many  factors, 
including programmes to develop markets for training by demonstrating the benefit of 
training to employers and workers, improving the efficiency of tax administration and 
labour or employment service administrations, and providing public information on the 
performance of individual institutions in order to inform consumer choice and improve 
accountability. 
105.  Encouraging  workplace  learning  is  one  form  of  increasing  private  sector 
investment in skills development – targeting adult workers already in the workforce. As 
technologies  or  products  change,  employers  become  keenly  aware of  what skills  are 
needed by their workers. There should be no mismatch between training provided at the 
workplace and the specific types and levels of skills actually needed. The catch is that 
workers  must  have  the  ability  to  learn  –  basic  skills,  aptitude  for  learning, 
communication  skills  –  based  on  their  pre-employment  education  and  training.  The 
second  challenge  is  maintaining  a  policy  environment  that  encourages,  or  provides 
19
See Galhardi, 2002 and 2004 for compilation of survey data on investment in training for selected countries in 
the Americas region and elsewhere. 
39
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
adding links to pdf in preview; add hyperlink pdf file
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Add necessary references: using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Note: When you get the error "Could not load file or assembly 'RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic' or any other
add links to pdf file; check links in pdf
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
incentives for employers and workers to extend workplace training. This topic is itself 
the subject of Chapter 3 of this report.  
106.  One of the causes of skills gaps is the fact that more often than not training of girls 
and young women is limited to traditional occupational areas rather than being geared to 
new demands in the labour market. Overcoming barriers that deter women from training 
– at and outside the workplace – serves the twin objectives of reducing inequality and 
meeting labour market needs. Unequal division of labour within the family is a major 
barrier to increasing women’s participation in education and training. Targeting women 
requires an effort to schedule training in accordance with their requirements as regards 
when and how  to learn. This commitment  must  start at  the  secondary and vocational 
training  levels  (see section 4.2 in  Chapter  4) and  continue at  the workplace  (lessons 
learned in overcoming barriers to women’s training in entrepreneurship are summarized 
in Chapter 3). Special effort is needed to reduce occupational segregation 
20
in training 
and subsequently in employment, so that women are prepared to meet the skills needs in 
emerging industries and occupations. As in the case of Botswana (box 2.7), efforts to 
improve training begin with a commitment to overcome gender bias. 
Box 2.7 
Gender mainstreaming of national vocational training in Botswana 
The  Botswana  Training  Authority,  in  collaboration  with  the  Women’s  Affairs 
Department within the Ministry for Labour and Home Affairs, drafted a “National policy for 
mainstreaming gender into vocational training and work-based learning” (2000) with the 
following objectives: 
ɽ
Increase access of women into vocational education and training and reduce their 
attrition once they begin the training. 
ɽ
Eradicate gender blindness and increase gender awareness in vocational training 
institutions by integrating inclusive  language into curricula, improving  attitudes  of 
trainees, instructors and administrators towards gender disparity, equality and equity 
in  vocational  training  and  promoting  gender  training  to  overcome  gender 
stereotyping and prejudice. 
ɽ
Articulate  what  constitutes  sexual  harassment,  raise  awareness  of  it  and  create 
strict reporting and response mechanisms. 
ɽ
Develop  and  implement  a  system  of  regular  data  collection  and  reporting  of 
information  by  gender  in  all vocational  training  institutions  about  the  status  and 
training needs of men and women with a view to reducing occupational segregation. 
Source: Botswana Training Authority, 2006. 
107.  Examples  from  India,  Brazil  and  Jamaica  (boxes  2.8–2.10)  illustrate  policy 
initiatives to address challenges on coordination, expansion and inclusion. The following 
section examines ways to enable persons already working in the informal economy to 
acquire the skills needed for higher productivity formal economy jobs.  
20
Occupational segregation refers to the concentration of women or men in certain trades, fields of work or 
industries. For example, a survey on the participation of women in vocational and technical training in Latin 
America found that the ten specific sectors with the greatest number of female students reported 77 per cent 
female enrolment (Silveira and Matosas, 2001). 
40 
Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
Box 2.8 
Addressing the demand–supply gap of skills development in India 
India’s  economy  is  highly  dichotomous  and  shows  signs  of  becoming  more  so. 
Productivity  has  grown  rapidly  in  the  modern  sector,  led  by  services,  transport, 
communications and manufacturing, and the share of employment has been decreasing 
in  agriculture  and  growing  in  the  service  sector.  However,  employment  growth  is 
insufficient to absorb the estimated 12.8 million labour market entrants each year, or to 
create more productive jobs for the vast majority of workers who make a living in the 
informal  economy.  There  is  concern that  even  vocational  training  graduates  are  not 
highly employable owing to the mismatch between what they have been taught and what 
employers need – in both technical and core skills (FICCI, 2007; TeamLease, 2007).  
Expansion, quality and inclusion comprise the goals of the Planning Commission’s 
strategy to address the skills gap, make education and training relevant to labour market 
needs  and  improve the  access  of  poor  and  vulnerable people  to  skills development 
opportunities  (Planning  Commission,  Report  of  the  Working  Group  on  Skills 
Development and Training).  
Expansion: India’s Five-Year Plan (2007–12) foresees a tenfold expansion of education 
and training infrastructure, from some 5,000 to about 50,000 industrial training institutes 
(ITIs) and industrial training centres under the Ministry of Labour and Employment, to 
provide training in relevant skills for industry and service sectors and also in skills for 
agricultural and rural employment. “The challenge … is to increase the skilled workforce 
from  5  per  cent  at  present  to  about  50  per  cent.  To  make  our  working  people 
employable, we must create adequate infrastructure for skill training and certification and 
for imparting training. Industrial Training Institutes must keep pace with the technological 
demands of modern industry and the expanding universe of technical knowledge” (Prime 
Minister Manmohan Singh at the Indian Labour Conference, April 2007, New Delhi).  
Quality: Upgrading of training facilities, tools, faculty and curricula are all targeted. With 
World Bank assistance, some 500 ITIs are to become “Centres of Excellence” that will 
be  closely  linked  to  industry.  Industry  Management  Committees  are  to  be  given 
enhanced financial and programme development autonomy to manage individual ITIs. 
State  governments  will,  however,  retain  ITI  ownership  and  continue  to  regulate 
admissions and fees.  
Inclusion: Over 90 per cent of Indian workers earn a living in the informal economy. Few 
of them have the necessary skills to help improve their productivity and income-earning 
capacity.  The  Skills  Development  Initiative  aims  to  provide  1  million  workers  with 
employable skills over the next five years and 1 million workers each year after that. The 
Initiative’s public–private partnership combines provision of short-term training courses 
with certification. The programmes target poor and less-educated individuals who cannot 
afford mainstream long-term training programmes owing to high entry qualifications and 
costs.  In  partnership  with  the  ILO,  the  Ministry  of  Labour  and  Employment  is 
implementing a pilot programme focusing on four clusters: brassware (Moradabad, Uttar 
Pradesh),  glassware  (Firozabad,  Uttar  Pradesh),  textiles  (Tiruppur,  Tamil  Nadu)  and 
domestic  workers  (Delhi).  While  the  programme  aims  to  contribute  to  improving 
productivity  and  competitiveness  of  enterprises  and  employability  of  workers  in  the 
clusters,  it  also  pilot  tests  implementation  frameworks  and  methodologies  for  skills 
provision and certification in the informal economy. 
Source: Ratnam and Chaturvedi, 2008. 
41
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
Box 2.9 
Training for new industries in Brazil 
In  Brazil,  the  challenges  of  new  technologies  and  the  aim  to  extend  industrial 
development to new geographical areas were the reasons behind the initiative of the 
National Confederation of  Industry to start a  new education and training programme. 
Building  on  the  PLANFOR  worker  qualification  programme  (1995–2002),  Brazil’s 
Education for New Industry programme plans to expand the outreach and functions of 
SESI (social service for workers and their families) and SENAI (the national industrial 
training service) to cover basic and continuous education and vocational training. The 
training supports the strategic  plan for industrial  development. It is designed  to meet 
employers’ requirements for greatly improved basic work skills so that workers can read 
instructions, interpret graphs and exchange knowledge. Its objectives are ambitious: the 
40 per cent of industrial workers who are currently either illiterate or have completed 
fewer than eight years of education are expected to complete basic education; nearly 
700,000  workers  are  expected to  complete intermediate-level education and improve 
their basic and vocational skills. The programme will also provide initial, further, lifelong 
and  specialized  industrial  training,  and  middle-level  technical  education  linked  with 
formal education. Graduates of the programme, 40 per cent of them technicians, are 
expected to fill the 1 million new industrial jobs that are envisaged in the new industries. 
The programme focuses mainly on industrial workers and their families/communities.  
Source: Gallart, 2008. 
Box 2.10 
Skills development and productivity and the  
National Training Agency of Jamaica (HEART Trust/NTA) 
One  of  the  goals  of  the  National  Development  Plan  2030  is  to  reduce  the 
“productivity gap”. Jamaica’s growth in labour productivity was the lowest in the region, 
at 0.4 per cent per annum over the past decade and a half. The low level of adoption of 
new  technologies,  slow  skills  upgrading,  low  economic  relevance  of  education, 
concentration of activity in tourism and mining with little diversification and the growth of 
the  informal  economy,  are  all  factors  in  the  low  productivity  growth.  The  National 
Development  Plan  responds  by  creating  incentives  for  enterprise  development  and 
performance,  a  national  qualification  framework  being  adopted  by  all  education  and 
training providers, and by increasing cooperative training programmes with private sector 
enterprises. 
The Jamaica Productivity Centre, a tripartite organization funded by the Ministry of 
Labour and Social Security and comprising representatives from the Jamaica Employers’ 
Federation and  the  Jamaica Confederation  of Trade Unions,  helps firms to  diagnose 
productivity  and  competitiveness  gaps  and  design  solutions  while  also  influencing 
secondary and tertiary curricula to provide competence-building training and educational 
programmes.  The Centre works with the enterprise based training section of  HEART 
trust/NTA to develop a productivity measurement methodology for monitoring the impact 
of training on enterprise productivity. 
Source: McArdle, 2007. 
2.3.3. Promoting formalization: The role of training  
Members should identify human resources development, education, training and lifelong 
learning  policies  which  …  address  the  challenge  of  transforming  activities  in  the  informal 
economy  into  decent  work  fully  integrated  into  mainstream  economic  life;  policies  and 
programmes should be developed with the aim of creating decent jobs and opportunities  for 
education and training, as well as validating prior learning and skills gained to assist workers 
and  employers  to  move  into  the  formal  economy  (Human  Resources  Development 
Recommendation, 2004 (No. 195), Paragraph 3(d)). 
42 
Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
108.  The  conclusions  of  the  general  discussion  on  skills  at  the  International  Labour 
Conference in 2000 (as quoted in Chapter 1), the conclusions of the general discussion 
on the informal economy in 2002, and the subsequent Human Resources Development 
Recommendation,  2004  (No.  195)
address  the  connections  between  more  and  better 
training  and  formalizing  work  and  enterprises.  Formalization  brings  better  working 
conditions  and  rights  at  the  workplace  for  workers  and  fairer  competition  among 
employers. For society, formalization expands the tax base and makes laws and labour 
regulations easier to enforce. 
109.  As noted in the conclusions of these tripartite ILO discussions, skills development 
is not a panacea – it is not the only necessary condition for formalization – but it is one 
essential contributing factor. Among other factors, the importance of policies to expand 
employment  growth  in  the  formal  economy  must  be  highlighted.  Improving  skills 
matching  and  efforts  to  promote  formalization  through  better  skills  development 
assumes an expanding formal economy with jobs to fill. The pace of job creation must 
accelerate to absorb the un- and underemployed, including providing better employment 
opportunities for those in the informal economy. In the absence of such job creation, the 
informal economy will continue to absorb larger portions of the labour force who cannot 
find decent work despite having higher qualifications. 
110.  In  many  developing  countries  a  large  formal  economy  coexists  with  a  large 
unorganized informal economy. It is especially in this group of countries that there is an 
important  opportunity  to  use  training  as  a  bridge  from  livelihoods  in  the  informal 
economy to more productive and decent work in the formal economy.  
111.  Many countries pursue explicit broad policies and programmes that include skills 
development to  help  move  workers  and  enterprises  into  the  formal  economy  and  so 
create durable, productive and decent employment. 
21
These efforts are discussed under 
three broad policy headings: extending access to training outside the high-growth formal 
economy; recognition of prior learning; and including formalization in entrepreneurship 
training.  
112.  Improving access to quality skills development outside high-growth urban areas is 
the first requirement. In many developing countries people’s access to relevant education 
and  training  programmes that  could enhance their productivity at work often remains 
inadequate.  Training  opportunities  may  simply  be  lacking;  illiteracy  may  bar  young 
people and adults from vocational training; education and training services may be too 
expensive  or  have  a  poor  record  of  enabling  trainees  to  move  into  better  jobs;  and 
training may not fit the needs of certain population groups, such as women or migrant 
workers.  
113.  Education  enrolment  and attendance  figures have  improved  in most  developing 
countries.  However,  the  quality  of  education  and  its  relevance  to  employability  and 
careers  in  the  formal  economy  are  becoming  the  paramount  policy  issue.  In  Latin 
America,  there  are  calls  to  increase  the  job  or  skills-related  components  included in 
secondary education programmes, especially in marginal rural and urban areas, in order 
to enable students to obtain a grounding in technical and job-related skills that will give 
them a better chance of entering the job market (Pieck, 2007, p. 13). Efforts to redress 
deficiencies  in  formal  education  and  improve  articulation  between  basic  and  general 
21
For  a  review,  see  reports  and  articles  collected  for  the  ILO  Interregional  Symposium  on  the  Informal 
Economy: Enabling Transition to Formalization, held on 27–29 November 2007, Geneva, to share experience on 
formalization of the informal economy. 
43
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
education, on the one hand, and work-related training, on the other, reveal some good 
practices that might be adapted more generally. These are: 
ɽ
Link local  and  national  training  institutions.  In  Honduras,  Education  for  Work 
Centres (Centros de Educación para el Trabajo – CENETs) provide education and 
training primarily for poor women in rural and urban communities with low levels 
of education. They build on local needs assessments and community participation, 
but  are  also  linked  to  the  national  vocational  training  institution  INFOP.  The 
training  combines  core  skills,  such  as  training  in  literacy  and  gender  issues, 
technical and vocational training (in agriculture, agro-industry, trade and services) 
and entrepreneurship training. A recent impact assessment found that employment 
in the communities rose by 136 per cent following training, increased investment 
and introduction of new technologies (Rosal, 2007; Ooijens et al., 2000). 
ɽ
Combine remedial education and employment services with technical training. The 
Training for Work Programme (Programa de Capacitación Laboral – CAPLAB) in 
Peru (1997–2006) integrated poor underemployed and unemployed young people 
and  women  into  the  labour  market  by  matching  vocational  training  to  the 
experience  and  motivation  of  trainees,  targeting  demand  in  the  labour  market, 
primarily  of  local  small  enterprises,  and  including  on-the-job  experience.  The 
programme  is  based  in  formal  training  institutions  and  emphasizes  training  of 
trainers  in  new  technologies  and  training  methods,  and  in  ways  of  combining 
technical training with remedial education where necessary and linking training to 
decentralized employment services. Originally donor funded, the programme was 
incorporated in the General Law on Education in 2003 (CAPLAB, 2007). 
ɽ
Take women’s training needs into account. Programmes that target women, or men 
and women, need to take into account the particular circumstances that influence 
women’s  abilities  to  take  advantage  of  training  opportunities,  such  as  family 
responsibilities and workload, the seasonal character of work or ability to travel to 
training centres. Some of the ways in which public policy can meet these criteria 
for targeting women workers stem from experimentation in the private and non-
government sectors, where women have taken the initiative to organize training in 
ways that are accessible and meaningful to them. For example, teleworking in the 
small office/home office (SOHO) industry appears to be growing in some Asian 
countries.  It  is  a  new  type  of  working  space,  which  appears  to  be  particularly 
relevant in helping  women improve  their access  to  the technical  and core skills 
development,  networking  and  employment  benefits  traditionally  associated  with 
formal economy work. 
22
ɽ
Target young adults who have missed out on good secondary education. So-called 
“second  chance  programmes”  target  adults  who,  for  whatever  reason,  did  not 
receive an adequate education at a younger age. Such programmes generally offer 
flexible  timing,  short  duration  courses  and  social  services,  where  needed,  to 
facilitate  entry  into  the  formal  labour  market.  For  example,  the  Chilecalifica 
programme launched in 2002 by the Chilean Ministries of Education, Economics, 
and  Labour  aims  to  improve  the  level  of  schooling,  the  quality  of  technical 
training,  national  certification  of  skills  and  competencies  and  labour  market 
information. Between 2002 and 2004, some 74,000 people were certified through 
the programme; for those who completed the course, income levels increased by 
22
For  example,  see  information  about  “eHomemakers”  in  Malaysia  that  provides  professional  training  on 
business development, financial planning, shariah law and networking to women working from home in ICT and 
other office support work (available at http://www.ehomemakers.net). 
44 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested