Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
9.7  per  cent  on  average  and  their  employment  rate  increased  by  5.7  per  cent 
(Gallart, 2008). 
ɽ
Enable rural migrant workers to secure formal urban employment. This likewise 
may  require  targeted  interventions  or  support.  In  China,  for  example,  assisting 
workers to migrate from low-productivity informal rural work to formal work in 
urban areas is one of the strategies for overcoming skills shortages and for reducing 
rural poverty (box 2.11). In a separate approach, distance learning programmes, for 
example  education  in  English,  computer  programming,  economics  and 
management, are being extended to rural informal economy workers in the more 
poorly served areas (Wu, 2007).  
Box 2.11 
Training rural workers for formal urban jobs:  
The Dew Drop Programme in China 
In 2004, the Chinese Government launched the Dew Drop Programme, a combined 
anti-poverty and skills training programme that encourages people from poor rural areas 
to migrate to urban areas where skill shortages are acute. The stated goal, according to 
the State Council Leading Group of Poverty Alleviation and Development, is to provide 
free vocational training for 5 million young farmers and 200,000 older persons from poor 
rural areas and help them to find jobs in cities during the 11th Five Year Plan (2006–
2010). Comprising skills training, modest subsidies and relocation assistance to urban 
areas  facing  specific  skills  shortages,  the  Dew  Drop  Programme  is  part  of  a  larger 
ambitious government poverty reduction campaign. Government reports suggest that in 
2006 the project budget included US$95 million for training, approximately 1.65 million 
farmers, an increase of 29 per cent from 2005. Nearly 1.3 million of those trained went 
on to  find work  in  urban areas,  furthering the  programme’s  objective  to  reduce  both 
urban  labour  shortages  and  rural  poverty.  Recent  legislation,  in  particular  the 
Employment  Protection  Law,  is  intended  to  integrate  the  national  labour  market, 
including providing vocational training for both laid-off urban workers and rural migrant 
workers.  Other  efforts  target  improving  working  conditions  so  that  jobs  in  labour-
intensive, export-oriented industries are more attractive to migrant workers. In Guangdon 
Province, only 4.8 million out of 7.3 million vacancies were reported filled in 2007. 
Source:  State  Council  Leading  Group  Office  of  Poverty  Alleviation  and  Development,  China, 
http://en.cpad.gov.cn. 
114.  In  all  these  examples,  the  advantage  of  anchoring  the  outreach  in  national 
vocational training institutions  lies in the fact  that their experience,  human  resources, 
infrastructure and tripartite governance help to align training supply and demand. The 
challenge for the training institutions is to adapt training to the needs of people with low 
levels of education and scant employment experience. The goal is to equip them with the 
skills  and  competencies  needed  in  the  smaller  enterprises  likely  to  hire  them,  while 
instilling skills and the ability to learn that will, in turn, help these enterprises to adopt 
newer technologies and become competitive in the formal economy. 
115.  Schemes for the recognition of prior learning (RPL) aim to open formal economy 
jobs  to  those  who  have  not  had  the  advantage  of  formal  vocational  training.  Prior 
learning  embraces  all  skills,  no  matter  where  or  how  they  were  acquired:  at  the 
workplace, in the community, at home, through informal apprenticeships or “learning by 
doing” in the formal or informal economy. Recognition means certification of skills on 
the basis of standard  qualification criteria. Certification is intended to help employers 
more easily recognize the skills and  competencies of job applicants and  thus make it 
easier for workers to compete for jobs in the formal economy.  
45
Add hyperlinks to pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add a link to a pdf file; pdf hyperlink
Add hyperlinks to pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding links to pdf document; adding hyperlinks to pdf documents
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
116.  RPL has been particularly prominent in skills development in South Africa. The 
country shares the characteristic of many developing countries in that the industrial and 
technology-based economy thrives alongside a very large informal economy. A formal 
RPL  system  was instigated by the Government to  redress  the  legacy of apartheid  by 
recognizing  the  skills  and  learning  of  those  who  had  been  denied  access  to  formal 
education,  training  and  employment  (box  2.12).  System  reforms  elsewhere  that 
emphasize a qualification-based approach and recognition of acquired vocational skills 
are  also  expected  to  improve  employment  opportunities  for  those  in  the  informal 
economy.  
Box 2.12 
Recognition of prior learning (RPL) in South Africa 
The  South  African  Qualifications  Authority  (SAQA)  has  developed  common 
procedures  and  guidelines  for  the  implementation  of  RPL  within  the  National 
Qualifications  Framework.  The  comprehensive  guidelines  encompass  assessment, 
feedback and quality management systems and procedures. Industry “Sector Education 
and  Training Authorities”  (SETAs)  develop  industry-specific plans  (for example in the 
tourism,  hospitality  and  sport,  health  and  welfare,  construction,  insurance,  and 
engineering sectors)  to advise on RPL procedures, set skills verifications procedures 
(including, when necessary, through observation rather than examination) and organize 
provision of upgrading training. Some of these industries particularly target workers in 
the informal economy. For example, RPL is directed towards the construction trades with 
a large number of workers in informal work without certification to enable them to access 
jobs that require qualifications. The system is expected to continue promoting lifelong 
learning as well as job entry into the formal economy.  
Source: Blom, 2006; SAQA, 2004; Dyson and Keating, 2005. 
117.  National  qualifications  frameworks (NQFs)  comprise a  comprehensive  approach 
for testing and certifying competencies and for appraising the effectiveness of different 
training providers. Implementation of NQFs is proving to require large commitments – 
to develop and, even more, to maintain them (such as keeping assessments abreast of 
technologies). Some cautionary notes are emerging from researchers. “One of the newest 
innovations, national qualifications frameworks, … is proving difficult to implement for 
countries that  have  limited  capacity.  More  limited  competency-based  systems appear 
effective and more feasible” (Johanson and Adams, 2004, p. 5).
23
118.  Small enterprise development (SED) efforts can directly support formalization as 
part of strategies to promote productivity and decent work. For example, surveys of large 
and  small enterprises in Ghana, Kenya  and Zimbabwe found a positive impact of all 
SED  support  mechanisms  on  productivity,  including  workplace  or  outside  training, 
internal R&D, hiring expatriates, access to foreign buyers and suppliers and technology 
transfer  by  means  of  technical  assistance  or  licensing.  Of  these  measures,  employee 
training had  the greatest impact  on  productivity.  The effects were relatively larger  in 
small enterprises where skill levels were lower (Biggs et al., 1996).  
119.  The  experience  in  Ghana  (described  in  box  2.13)  and  the  following  examples 
highlight the  importance  of giving more  attention to  training,  for both managers and 
workers, in  addition  to other measures  that  promote formalization, such as  access to 
credit and product markets and improving the environment for sustainable enterprise. 
23
For information about the challenges of implementing and maintaining such approaches, see the following 
ILO working papers: Tuck, 2007; Young, 2005; and Dyson and Keating, 2005. 
46 
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links. How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Files in C#.NET Class. Add necessary references:
add page number to pdf hyperlink; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
pdf links; active links in pdf
Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
ɽ
In  Kenya,  the  Programme  on  product  improvement  and  inter-firm  linkages 
between  micro  and  formal  enterprises  developed  by  the  Federation  of  Kenya 
Employers helps informal operators to enter into subcontracting arrangements with 
large enterprises, including applying the ILO’s Start and Improve Your Business 
programme  and  other  tools  in  the  CD  package  Employers’  organizations  and 
enterprise  development  in  the  informal  economy:  Moving  from  informality  to 
formality (ILO, 2006m).  
ɽ
In Peru, the Department of Micro and Small Enterprises of the Ministry of Labour 
and  Employment  Promotion  supports  PRODAME  (Programa  de  Autoempleo  y 
Microempresa) in providing free guidance and counselling services to individuals 
who wish to create or formalize a small enterprise, and PROMPYME (Centro de 
Promoción de la Pequeña y Micro Empresa) in helping small enterprises to raise 
their productivity and competitiveness by accessing new markets, including public 
procurement, a market available only to formal registered enterprises (ILO, 2005j). 
ɽ
In South Africa, the National Productivity Institute provides education and training 
to  small-business  owners  to  help them  improve  their  productivity  by  becoming 
formal  businesses,  in  particular  in  learning  to  follow  regulations  on  production 
processes,  minimum  wages,  insurance,  labour  regulations,  etc.  (National 
Productivity Institute, 2003, cited in ILO, 2005a, p. 109). 
Box 2.13 
A decentralized pro-poor strategy to upgrade  
the informal economy in Ghana 
In Ghana, the policy to promote pro-poor growth focuses on upgrading the informal 
economy  by  expanding  opportunities  for  decent  work.  The  work  pilot  tested  in  two 
districts  through  partnership  between  the  Ministry  for  Manpower,  Youth  and 
Employment, the Trade Union Congress of Ghana, the Ghana Employers’ Association 
and  the  ILO  under  the  Ghana  Decent  Work  Pilot  Programme  established  local 
institutions  for  social  dialogue,  bringing  together  local  government,  elected assembly 
officials and representatives of small enterprise associations. Statutory subcommittees of 
the District Assemblies for Productive and Gainful Employment draw up and implement 
local economic development plans that are helping hundreds of small local enterprises to 
upgrade their business and expand into the formal economy. The partnership between 
the private and the public sector removes constraints on growth through investments in 
infrastructure,  training  and other factors.  The  small business  associations  encourage 
members  to  join  the  national  health  insurance  scheme  and  pension  fund.  The 
subcommittees  have  initiated  “decent  work  savings  and  credit  unions”  that  bolster 
economic stability as well as mobilizing capital for investment. Voice, organization and 
local social dialogue have led to improvements in governance and conflict resolution and 
generated  local  tax  revenue,  providing  additional  fiscal  resources  for  investments  in 
infrastructure  and  training  that  further  encourage  growth  and  improved  working 
conditions. The training manual for small business associations in Ghana was developed 
jointly by the Informal Sector Desk of the Trade Union Congress of Ghana, the training 
unit  of  the  Ghana  Employers’  Association  and  two  national  providers  of  business 
services to small and medium enterprises. 
Source: www.ilo.org/led, van Empel, 2007. 
47
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
all PDF page contents in VB.NET, including text, image, hyperlinks, etc. Replace a Page (in a PDFDocument Object) by a PDF Page Object. Add necessary references:
adding an email link to a pdf; pdf link
VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in
PDF document is an easy work and gives quick access to PDF page and file, or even hyperlinks. How to VB.NET: Create Thumbnail for PDF. Add necessary references:
add links to pdf online; adding hyperlinks to pdf files
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
2.4. Least developed countries 
2.4.1. Low productivity and education and persistent working poverty 
120.  The LDCs comprise some 50 countries in the world (as listed in the annex to this 
chapter; for distinctions between “developing” and “least developed”, see footnote 15). 
Two-thirds are in sub-Saharan Africa and many others are in Asia. There are also many 
least developed small island countries. Recent developments in these countries underline 
the fact that low skills, low productivity and working poverty reinforce one another in a 
vicious circle.  
121.  A  distinctive  characteristic  of  the  poorest  countries  is  a  generally  low level  of 
education. As  discussed  in Chapter 4, only  one fifth of boys  and girls  of secondary-
school age in sub-Saharan Africa actually attend school (UNICEF, 2007). This is exactly 
half the average attendance rate worldwide.  
122.  Data  availability  is  particularly  poor  for  examining  the  relationships  between 
productivity, skills and employment. Comparable data to measure changes over the last 
decade in all three of these categories is available for only a dozen countries. Across this 
small sample, poverty remains high, with 48 per cent of workers on average living on 
less  than  US$1  per  day. The literacy  rate on  average  across  these  dozen countries is 
52 per  cent  of  the  population  over  the  age  of  15.  Given  that  statistics  are  generally 
available  for  better-off  countries,  there  is  reason  to  assume  that  the  actual  situation 
across the entire set of LDCs is more sobering still. 
123.  The  good  news  is  that  average  growth  in  productivity  was  high  among  the 
countries in this  sample – 31 per cent  from 1995 to 2005 – and  productivity growth 
appears to be correlated with a decreasing share of working poor (figure 2.8). However, 
with such a narrow education base, only a small proportion of the potential workforce is 
able  to  take  advantage  of  any  opportunities  for  higher  productive  work  in  newer 
technologies or service sectors. Poorly educated and without marketable skills, most of 
the  labour  force  cannot  find  decent  and  productive  jobs  in  the  formal  economy.  In 
sub-Saharan  Africa  75  per  cent  of  workers  earn  a  living  in  the  informal  economy. 
Income earned from informal economic activity is too low to lift more than a minority of 
them out of poverty. 
48 
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
by this .NET Imaging PDF Reader Add-on. Include extraction of text, hyperlinks, bookmarks and metadata; Annotate and redact in PDF documents; Fully support all
add hyperlink pdf; adding hyperlinks to a pdf
PDF Image Viewer| What is PDF
advanced capabilities, such as text extraction, hyperlinks, bookmarks and Note: PDF processing and conversion is excluded in NET Imaging SDK, you may add it on
add url to pdf; add hyperlinks to pdf online
Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
Figure 2.8.  Least developed countries: Changes in productivity and numbers  
of working poor (at US$1 per day), selected countries 
Burkina Faso
Ethiopia
Madagascar
Malawi
Mozambique
Senegal
United Rep. of Tanzania
Yemen
Mali
Uganda
Zambia
Cambodia
-50
-40
-30
-20
-10
0
10
20
30
40
-10
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
Productivity growth 1995-2005 (% change)
Change in share of working poor 
(%  change 1995-2005)
Source: ILO, 2007a; ILO, 2007o.
2.4.2. Policy priorities: Improving training quality and availability 
124.  Education and training systems in LDCs have many weaknesses and are not yet, in 
general,  assets  in  terms of  achieving development goals.  Educational  output  is  often 
distorted, favouring academic non-technical qualifications, while  vocational,  technical 
and  employability skills  training that could  open  up labour market opportunities is in 
short supply. Many young people tend to consider vocational and technical training to be 
a second-class choice for a career.  
125.  LDCs need to confront the following twin challenges in broadening coverage and 
improving  the  quality  of  skills  training  so  as  to  improve  productivity  and  promote 
income growth:  
ɽ
first, to raise the productivity of women and men in the informal economy, where 
most young people, women and entrepreneurs work today; and  
ɽ
second, to reform education and training systems so that they provide the skills and 
competencies that will be needed to boost the growth of decent work in the formal 
economy. 
126.  A recent study by the African Union identified specific areas of skills development 
that  were considered crucial  for economic and social  development in  Africa
.
 In two 
priority areas, agriculture and rural development, and indigenous and cottage industries, 
the emphasis is on upgrading traditional and informal skill acquisition systems (African 
Union,  2007). The ILO’s  11th African  Regional Meeting (Addis Ababa,  April  2007) 
concluded  that  African  member  States  should  enact  strategies  that  include  “… 
(re)training  opportunities for  the  working  poor, especially young people  and women, 
with the aim of ensuring that half of Africa’s workforce has obtained new or improved 
skills by 2015” (ILO, 2007c). 
49
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
127. Many governments have recently designed policies that emphasize training for 
workers in the informal economy. Policies in Senegal give priority to vocational training 
for small producers and the self-employed. In Benin, government technical schools now 
provide skills training to informal sector master craftspersons and apprentices. Zambia’s 
training policies are largely focused on raising skills for the informal economy. Some 
initiatives  endeavour  to  improve  the  links  between  formal  training  institutions  and 
informal sector workers and entrepreneurs.  
128.  Many financial and non-financial barriers have to be overcome in order to increase 
the access of the poor to training. These barriers include opportunity costs of training 
time in terms of livelihood, high entry requirements or high fees for training courses and 
social factors that often put pressure on women to enter training that only gives them 
access  to  low-productivity  jobs.  Women  face  obstacles  in  upgrading  their  work  or 
receiving  training  because  of  the  unpaid  work  they  are  expected  to  do  within  the 
household. Unpaid household work may help other household members to participate in 
training and higher level paid employment, but leaves women with less time to expand 
their  business  and  improve  their  productivity.  Box  2.14  summarizes  some  general 
lessons learned  from  numerous  small-scale projects and  larger programmes that have 
successfully overcome these barriers. 
Box 2.14 
Improving the access of the poor to training: Lessons learned 
Reduce  financial  entry  barriers: governments should fund specific poverty targeted 
interventions for the poor to facilitate access to mainstream (formal) skills training.  
Lower the non-financial access barriers to formal courses, and/or provide additional 
assistance to the poor to overcome them, for example by addressing their lack of formal 
educational background, before they undertake skills training. 
Develop  skills  development  strategies  for  disadvantaged  groups:  rural  groups, 
specific categories of women,  young women  and men, those working in  the informal 
economy, and men and women with disabilities. 
Develop  special  facilities  that  respond  to  difficult  personal  circumstances  (in 
terms, for example, timing, location or training methodology). 
Avoid training the poor (and especially poor women) in traditional trade areas so 
that  they  are  not  marginalized  further;  train  them  instead  for  businesses  using  new 
technologies  (such  as  mobile  phone  repair)  and  train  women  in  traditionally  male 
occupations.  Long  and  sustained  efforts  of  advocacy  and  awareness  raising  at  the 
community and institutional level are often required to help build public support for new 
economic roles of women. 
Support financially informal apprenticeship training (elaborated below). 
Source: Palmer, 2007. 
129.  Illiteracy  puts  formal  training  out  of  reach  for  many  people  in  the  informal 
economy, including for apprentices and master craftspersons. The success of combining 
literacy training with livelihood training has been demonstrated by many programmes, 
such  as  the  Society  for  the  Development  of  Textile  Fibres  in  Senegal,  the  Tangail 
Infrastructure  Development  Project  in  Bangladesh  and  the  Somaliland  Education 
Initiative for Girls and Young Men (Oxenham, 2002).  
130.  In  the  United  Republic  of  Tanzania,  the  Vocational  Education  and  Training 
Authority has designed and tested an integrated training programme comprising literacy, 
technical and managerial training, as literacy is an important precondition for effective 
skills training. Trainees are linked with credit and business development providers. An 
50 
Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
evaluation found that the quality of the products and services produced by the trainees 
improved and sales and profits increased (Johanson and Adams, 2004). 
131.  Informal  apprenticeships  can  improve  training  and  productivity  outcomes. 
Informal  apprenticeships  are  a  major  supplier  of  skills  and  training  for  work  in  the 
informal  economy.  However,  the  quality  of  training  is  often  low  as  the  theoretical 
foundations  of  a  trade  are  lacking  and  technology  is  rudimentary.  In  many  LDCs, 
numerous  initiatives  endeavour  to  upgrade  apprenticeship  training  in  view  of  its 
potential to raise productivity and employability. Some efforts have been piecemeal but 
others have taken a comprehensive approach (Nübler, 2008a). 
132.  In  Benin,  the  Artisans’  Support  Office  (Bureau  d’appui  aux  artisans)  seeks  to 
complete  the training of  apprentices  by  working with various  trade  associations. The 
Bureau links master craftspersons and apprentices who are trade association members to 
reputable  public  or  private  sector  training  providers  for  complementary  training.  It 
finances  the  programmes  and  acts  as  a  technical  adviser.  The  trade  associations 
implement  and  supervise  the  training,  develop  new  training  modules,  participate  in 
trainee  selection,  negotiate  instructors’  fees,  monitor  apprentices’  attendance, 
co-organize tests at the end of the training and participate in programme evaluation. The 
concept of complementary apprentice training was new to the master craftspersons, and 
advocacy  and  information  efforts  were  needed  to  secure  their  participation.  Other 
success factors include investing in upgraded equipment and teacher training (Johanson 
and Adams, 2004). 
133.  Making  informal  apprenticeships  more  effective  requires  an  integrated  strategy, 
comprising the following elements: 
ɽ
Improving the image of apprenticeship training by means of general awareness-
raising  campaigns  about  its  role  and  opportunities,  including  in  primary  and 
secondary schools. 
ɽ
Conducting  market  surveys  to  determine  trades  and  skills  that  have  market 
potential and the complementary support needed. 
ɽ
Assisting  the  poor  in  financing  apprenticeship  when  households  cannot  afford 
apprenticeship fees and costs of tools and equipment.  
ɽ
Improving quality and relevance of skills training, e.g. by complementing training 
on the job with theoretical training or by providing master craftspersons in informal 
apprenticeships with technical, entrepreneurial and pedagogical skills. 
ɽ
Combining  skills  training  with  development  of  literacy  and  numeracy  for 
apprentices without sufficient basic education.  
ɽ
Upgrading the skills of master craftspersons, as improving their skills will translate 
into better or more relevant skills for their apprentices.  
ɽ
Developing national schemes for the recognition of skills through the assessment 
and  certification of skills,  whether or not they were acquired in the informal or 
formal apprenticeship system.  
ɽ
Providing post-training support for graduates through job-matching  employment 
services or access to microfinance and other support for self-employment. 
ɽ
Encouraging  young  women  to  enter  apprenticeships.  If  apprenticeships  are  to 
provide equitable and high-quality training for young men and women, efforts are 
needed  to improve  understanding  of  occupational  segregation and find  ways  in 
51
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
which  apprenticeships  can  help  to  overcome barriers  to  young  women  entering 
non-traditional fields of work. 
24
134.  Formal public training systems in LDCs face problems of relevance, quality and 
equity.  
ɽ
Formal TVET systems fail to deliver skills for existing jobs.  
ɽ
The quality of training has deteriorated as budget cuts have curtailed investments in 
facilities, equipment and staff salaries. 
ɽ
Equity in access to education and training is a critical problem in LDCs. Women 
and  girls  are  under-represented  in  vocational  education  and  training,  in  some 
countries making up only a small fraction of enrolments and often ending up in 
occupational  streams  traditionally  reserved  for  women,  like  hairdressing  and 
secretarial work.  
135.  New policies and delivery systems have been introduced by many LDCs to address 
these problems, many of which centre on coordination and partnerships with the private 
sector. For example, Malawi, United Republic of Tanzania and Zambia have established 
national consultative or coordinating bodies (national training authorities) that advocate 
partnership as a means of improving efficiency in the use of public money by making 
vocational  education  and  training more responsive  to  the job  market.  Structuring the 
relationship between the training system, employers and trade unions is a major feature 
of national training authorities (Johanson and Adams, 2004).  
136.  Delivery of education and training has been another area of innovation, generally 
focused on introducing dual training programmes (combining institution-based education 
and  training  with  enterprise-based  instruction),  competency-based  training,  expanded 
training services and distance teaching. Putting competency-based training into operation 
is  a  complex  process,  involving  the  development  of  job  analysis-based  standards, 
preparation of new modular course materials and design of new assessment methods and 
performance  tests.  It  puts  pressure  on instructors  and  institution  managers  to  deliver 
these skills and raises expectation of employers’ involvement. 
137.  In recent years, there has been much policy and programme development activity 
to encourage enterprises to expand workplace learning, while improving the quality of 
training. In a number of French-speaking African countries (for example, Benin, Burkina 
Faso, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea, Mali, Niger, Senegal and Togo) training funds have 
been  established.  The  funds  are  primarily  fed  by  money  collected  in  enterprises  (a 
certain  percentage  of  their  payroll).  The  funds  finance  employee  training  within  or 
outside the enterprise and constitute the embryo of these countries’ emerging systems of 
lifelong learning. Box 2.15 illustrates the rationale and operations of Senegal’s Fonds de 
développement  de  l’enseignement  technique  et  de  la  formation  professionnelle 
(FONDEF).  
24
See ILO, 2005e. 
52 
Connecting skills development to productivity and employment growth in developing and developed countries 
Box 2.15 
Senegal: Fonds de développement de l’enseignement  
technique et de la formation professionnelle (FONDEF) 
FONDEF  is  an  autonomous  organization  that  finances  the  bulk  of  continuous 
training and lifelong learning in enterprises. FONDEF receives money from the State and 
from enterprise contributions (based on a payroll levy). Its aim is to sharpen enterprise 
staff skills and create a real market for continuous training. Enterprises pay 25 per cent 
of the training costs. FONDEF finances training in all types of economic activity, supports 
training plans of public and private sector enterprises and training programmes agreed 
upon  by  sector  and  branch  organizations  and  groups  of  enterprises.  FONDEF’s 
contributions can amount to a maximum of 75 per cent of total training costs. Once a 
selection committee (consisting of representatives of FONDEF’s administration and the 
social partners) has approved a training plan, the training is contracted to one or more 
private or public training providers (at present 130) accredited by FONDEF. In almost 
three  years (2004–06) FONDEF financed training in 106 enterprises for nearly 7,000 
staff. Small and medium-sized enterprises accounted for 52 per cent of the requests for 
financing training, while 31 per cent of such requests came from large enterprises. The 
banking  and  financial  sector  and  industry  (textiles,  food)  were  among  the  major 
beneficiaries. There were few beneficiaries among very small enterprises. 
Source: World Bank, 2007a. 
138.  Training by itself does not create jobs, nor does it necessarily raise productivity in 
the informal economy. These objectives can best be achieved in an economic and labour 
market  environment  that  supports  the  development  and  use  of  skills  and  the 
formalization of informal activities. For example, the  participants of the 11th African 
Regional Meeting agreed  that  strategies to  escape  the  informal  economy  trap  should 
integrate,  among  other  things,  “policies  for  the  increased  registration  of  informal 
businesses, skills development, improved and safer working conditions, the extension of 
social  protection  coverage  and  the  encouragement  of  freely  chosen  associations  of 
informal economy workers and employers” (ILO, 2007c, p. 9).  
53
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
54 
Annex 
Country groups 
High-income OECD countries 
Australia 
Austria 
Belgium 
Canada 
Denmark 
Finland 
France 
Germany 
Greece 
Iceland 
Ireland 
Italy 
Japan 
Korea, Rep. of 
Luxembourg 
Netherlands 
New Zealand 
Norway 
Portugal 
Spain 
Sweden 
Switzerland 
United Kingdom 
United States 
(24 countries or areas) 
Central and Eastern Europe 
and the Commonwealth of 
Independent States (CIS) 
Albania 
Armenia 
Azerbaijan 
Belarus 
Bosnia and Herzegovina 
Bulgaria 
Croatia 
Czech Republic 
Estonia 
Georgia 
Hungary 
Kazakhstan 
Kyrgyzstan 
Latvia 
Lithuania 
The Former Yugoslav  
Rep. of Macedonia 
Moldova, Rep. of 
Montenegro 
Poland 
Romania 
Russian Federation 
Serbia 
Slovakia 
Slovenia 
Tajikistan 
Turkmenistan 
Ukraine 
Uzbekistan 
(28 countries or areas) 
Developing countries 
Algeria 
Antigua and Barbuda 
Argentina 
Bahamas 
Bahrain 
Barbados 
Belize 
Bolivia 
Botswana 
Brazil 
Brunei Darussalam 
Cameroon 
Chile 
China 
Colombia 
Congo 
Costa Rica 
Côte d’Ivoire 
Cuba 
Cyprus 
Dominica 
Dominican Republic 
Ecuador 
Egypt 
El Salvador 
Fiji 
Gabon 
Ghana 
Grenada 
Guatemala 
Guyana 
Honduras 
Hong Kong (China) 
India 
Indonesia 
Iran, Islamic Rep. of 
Iraq 
Jamaica 
Jordan 
Kenya 
Korea, Dem. Rep of 
Kuwait 
Lebanon 
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 
Malaysia 
Marshall Islands 
Mauritius 
Mexico 
Micronesia, Fed. Sts. 
Mongolia 
Morocco 
Namibia 
Nauru 
Nicaragua 
Nigeria 
Oman 
Pakistan 
Palau 
Panama 
Papua New Guinea 
Paraguay 
Peru 
Philippines 
Qatar 
Saint Kitts and Nevis 
Saint Lucia 
Saint Vincent and the 
Grenadines 
Saudi Arabia 
Seychelles 
Singapore 
South Africa 
Sri Lanka 
Suriname 
Swaziland 
Syrian Arab Republic 
Thailand 
Tonga 
Trinidad and Tobago 
Tunisia 
Turkey  
United Arab Emirates 
Uruguay 
Venezuela, Bolivarian Rep. of 
Viet Nam 
West Bank and Gaza Strip 
Zimbabwe 
(89 countries and areas) 
Least developed countries
Afghanistan 
Angola 
Bangladesh 
Benin 
Bhutan 
Burkina Faso 
Burundi 
Cambodia 
Cape Verde 
Central African Republic 
Chad 
Comoros 
Congo, Dem. Rep. of the 
Djibouti 
Equatorial Guinea 
Eritrea 
Ethiopia 
Gambia 
Guinea 
Guinea-Bissau 
Haiti 
Kiribati 
Lao PDR 
Lesotho 
Liberia 
Madagascar 
Malawi 
Maldives 
Mali 
Mauritania 
Mozambique 
Myanmar 
Nepal 
Niger 
Rwanda 
Samoa (Western) 
Sao Tomé and Principe 
Senegal 
Sierra Leone 
Solomon Islands 
Somalia 
Sudan 
Tanzania, United Republic of
Timor-Leste 
Togo 
Tuvalu 
Uganda 
Vanuatu 
Yemen 
Zambia 
(50 countries and areas) 
Source: UNDP, 2006. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested