how to upload and download pdf file in asp net c# : C# read pdf from url Library software class asp.net windows html ajax wcms_0920548-part966

Skills and productivity in the workplace and along value chains 
ɽ
Employment levels in the garment sector have increased by 28 per cent.
ɽ
Both volume and value of imports to the United States have increased in seasonally 
adjusted terms. 
ɽ
Buyers strongly engaged with Better Factories Cambodia increased their purchase 
volumes at twice the industry average in 2005. 
Better  Factories  Cambodia  has  achieved  this  by  implementing  a  three-pronged 
strategy. Firstly, it monitors and reports on working conditions in Cambodian garment 
factories according to national law and core international labour standards. Secondly, it 
helps  factories  to  improve  working  conditions  and  productivity  through  workplace 
cooperation on remediation and training. Thirdly, it facilitates dialogue between the social 
partners and international buyers to ensure a rigorous, transparent and continuous cycle 
of improvement and to establish cross-border cooperation. 
The ILO, with other international partners, is responding to the enormous interest in 
the possibilities of applying the tools and lessons learnt from this project implemented 
with employers, trade unions and the Government to other countries. 
Source: ILO, 2005c. 
173.  Within some value chains, the lead firm may act more as a coordinator or integrator 
of collaborative product development than as a product developer. New sets of skills are 
required,  from  technical  (hard)  skills  to people management (soft)  skills. The  greater 
interdependency among supplier firms is based on human capital development and so 
creates a need for new skills by themselves. Skills in relationship management, inter-
organizational  teamwork  and  joint  problem  solving  may  all  be  required.  Business 
management skills are vitally important  for  bringing together the skills  of  workers to 
achieve enterprise efficiency. 
174.  An ILO Symposium on Labour and Social Aspects of Global Production Systems 
(October  2007) 
6
acknowledged that  under  some  conditions  organizing work  in  such 
value  chains  is  “a  door  through  which  developing  countries  can  access  modern 
technologies,  acquire  new  technical  and  organizational  skills  and  obtain  higher 
productivity leading to better incomes”. 
175.  The development of new knowledge and skill along supply chains can occur in a 
number of ways: 
ɽ
Skill development through  lead  firm  arrangements.  In some  cases  the pace  and 
extent of skill development in firms down the supply chain is set by the lead firm in 
the chain. The lead firm establishes policies and procedures for suppliers to follow 
and  directly  engages  suppliers  in  their implementation  through the  exchange  of 
personnel  between  firms  and  through  the  development  of  network  activities. 
Supplier  clubs  and  associations  may  be  created  and  a  key  focus  of  these 
organizations  is  the  implementation  of  production  practices,  work  practices  and 
management systems that are established by the lead firm (Lincoln et al., 1998). 
Not only are the requirements for skill development often driven by the needs of 
the lead firm, but these firms are often large  firms with  the resources to  supply 
training internally. Small and medium-sized firms down the supply chain often lack 
these resources and so the lead firm becomes central to skill development in the 
whole  supply  chain.  The  lead  firm  sets  the  standards  for  skill  development, 
develops the  curriculum  and  training  materials,  and in  some  cases  provides the 
facilities and personnel to actually deliver the training. Such arrangements have the 
potential  to  provide  a  higher  quality  of  workplace  training  as  knowledge 
acquisition and skill development are more closely linked to the requirements of 
6
For more information, see www.ilo.org/public/english/dialogue/actemp/. 
65
C# read pdf from url - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add email link to pdf; add links in pdf
C# read pdf from url - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding hyperlinks to pdf documents; pdf hyperlink
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
the  production  system.  Box  3.8  provides  an  illustration  of  such  “collaborative 
education”. 
Box 3.8 
John Deere: Collaborative education and training for suppliers 
John  Deere,  an  agricultural  and  construction  equipment  manufacturer,  provides 
collaborative education and training for its suppliers. Its global learning and development 
unit  is  responsible  for  supplier  education.  The  education  programme  ranges  across 
many areas such as quality control, management systems, cost analysis and technical 
skills. In running this programme, John Deere also partners with public sector institutions 
such  as  technical  colleges  to  develop  and  deliver  programmes.  This  cost-effective 
approach to upgrading supplier skills results in stronger and more profitable suppliers. 
Source: Stegnar et al., 2002. 
Lead  firms  are  also  often  involved  in  monitoring  or  auditing  the  conditions  of 
employment within their value chains. Recent studies of Mexican factories show 
that  skills  are transferable through  the  “social capital” that  is  built  between  the 
buyer and supplier as a result of repeat visits. This has led to improvements in work 
organization, productivity and ultimately also in working conditions (Locke et al., 
2006). 
ɽ
Skill development through network agents. In some cases lead firms in a supply 
chain  take  a  direct  role  in  supplier  development,  while  in  other  cases  they 
delegate this role to third-party network agents. Consultants, advisers, industry 
associations  and  providers  of  new  technology  may  all  be  used  to  help 
synchronize production activities and provide the human capital  development 
needed to do this. Joint  training  may  be  organized by  the  network  agents  or 
similar training may be supplied to firms in the network by these agents. Here 
the level  of integration achieved may not be  comparable to that  in  lead  firm 
arrangements, but the need for skill development and training still exists and is 
met through common supply to firms in the network. New skills and knowledge 
are developed through the use of common agents, rather than through the close 
integration  of  firms.  Some  companies  use  this  type  of  development  to  align 
goals and business objectives amongst member firms of a supply chain (Maylett 
and Vitasek, 2007). 
ɽ
Learning by doing. Development of knowledge and skills by supplier firms 
occurs  where  buyer  firms  set  clear  performance  requirements  but  leave  the 
supplier firms to find their own ways of responding to those requirements. Here 
training  and  skill  development  takes  on  more  the  form  of  stand-alone  firm 
development, except that the performance outcomes of the firm are not decided 
by  the  firm  itself. The use of  supplier  rating schemes and  supplier  audits by 
buyer  firms  may  force  suppliers  to  review  and  upgrade  their  production 
practices,  work  practices,  management  systems,  technology  and  their 
investments in  human  capital,  but this  upgrading is  decided  internally by  the 
supplier  firm  with  no  direct  assistance  or  intervention  from  the  buyer  firm 
(Beaumont et al., 1996). 
66 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
change link in pdf file; add hyperlinks to pdf online
C#: How to Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP) in HTML5 Viewer
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB.NET Twain, VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET C# HTML5 Viewer: Open a File from a URL.
pdf link to email; add a link to a pdf
Skills and productivity in the workplace and along value chains 
3.2.2. Workplace skills development in clusters 
176.  The growth of local and regional production clusters is another growing form of 
inter-firm  arrangement  that  has  implications  for  enterprise-level  training.  The 
interdependencies between firms in clusters and regions are based less on the kind of 
synchronized integration of production that is seen in value chains and more on the need 
for firms with specialized sets of competencies to work together. Workforce skills are a 
fundamental condition for the emergence of clusters. Knowledge sharing and problem 
solving, in particular, are aided by the development of close working relationships in the 
cluster. Specialized competencies are developed both within firms and between firms, 
and it is the specialized competence of the cluster as a whole that defines the ability of 
firms within the cluster to compete (Wilk and Fensterseifer, 2003). 
177.  As was the case with firms linked through integrated value chains, innovations and 
improvements in products and business processes are driven by the acquisition of new 
knowledge,  and  clusters  provide  new  possibilities  for  knowledge  search,  knowledge 
acquisition and knowledge use. 
178.  Within clusters, firms may  undertake joint action to share experiences  and learn 
from each other or they may develop business relationships specifically to leverage new 
knowledge  (Keeble  et  al.,  1999).  Firms  may  also  undertake  joint  action  in  specific 
business activities where the specialized knowledge of one firm in the cluster is essential 
for  success (Belussi,  1996; Crouch  et al.,  2001).  A producer firm, for  example,  may 
undertake joint marketing and distribution with another firm because it lacks specialized 
knowledge of niche markets or of global distribution, sales and service. 
179.  Clusters and regions also provide access to specialized business services, enabling 
firms  within  the  cluster  or  region  to  focus  upon  investments  in  specific  core 
competencies. This access to “local competition goods” is essential for firms to be able 
to access global markets (Blair and Gereffi, 2001). Specialized local resources can play 
an important role in the development of clusters and regions. Not only do institutions 
such  as  universities,  technical  institutes  and  research  laboratories  provide  access  to 
advanced  technical  knowledge,  they  also  act as  incubators  for  new  firms  seeking  to 
develop new products based upon that knowledge. Institutions such as universities may 
also act as a source of highly skilled employees in new and emerging technologies and 
this skill may not be generally available from the labour market (Hendry et al., 1999). 
For example, in Brazil a garment cluster has been the target of sector-focused technical 
and entrepreneurial skills enhancement efforts (see box 3.9). 
67
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer, Create Web Doc & Image Viewer in C#.NET
Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB.NET Twain, VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET C# Demo Codes for PDF Conversions. 2. Add web document viewer into your C# project aspx web page.
clickable links in pdf from word; adding an email link to a pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
VB.NET OCR, VB.NET Twain, VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET C# PDF - View PDF Online with C#.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Able to load PDF document from file formats and url.
clickable pdf links; adding links to pdf document
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
Box 3.9 
Clothing cluster upgrading in Brazil 
The clothing cluster in the state of Pernambuco, north-east Brazil, employs 80,000 
people.  Most  establishments  are  small,  informal  businesses that  produce  low-quality 
products and pollute the local water supply. Many of these businesses are managed by 
“housewives” and set up in their homes. The active efforts of a local cluster association, 
SINDIVEST  (Sindicato das Indústrias  do  Vestuário, Tecelagem  e  Fiação  de MS), in 
partnership  with  organizations  in  Germany,  have  helped  to  reduce  environmental 
problems,  initiate  policy  change,  formalize  the  sector  and  raise  quality.  Few 
seamstresses had any formal training, resulting in low-quality work and little innovation in 
design.  SINDIVEST,  with  its  partners,  organized  study  visits  to  training  colleges  in 
Germany, short missions to Brazil for textiles engineering staff of a German college to 
train trainers  for courses offered by the Serviço Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial 
(SENAI) and the University of Recife, training courses for textiles engineering and other 
issues, visits to international trade fairs to learn about quality, and three new training 
schools for technicians set up by SENAI. By 2002, about 1,000 workers had been trained 
in  a  variety  of  areas,  including  garment  production,  general  management,  human 
resources, logistics, fashion and design. Many courses are now offered, from one-day 
seminars to more  in-depth programmes lasting 18 months. A  fashion committee has 
been established in Pernambuco to provide leadership on design issues and efforts are 
being made to develop a local brand.  
Source: Wahl and Meier, 2005. 
180.  Specialized  service  centres  providing  particular  business  services  may  also  be 
important local resources. New business incubators, groupings of specialized consulting 
firms, technology and business parks, and industry centres may all supply specialized 
business services to new and growing firms (Leiponen, 2005). 
7
181.  A study of five clusters in India, Brazil and several African countries (Sakamoto 
and Marchese, 2005) suggested that workforce skills are a necessary precondition for the 
emergence  of  clusters.  Furthermore,  the  examples  showed  that  the  skills  base  was 
usually present within a locality long before the cluster effectively blossomed. The study 
highlighted the role of the State in skills upgrading for cluster development in providing 
basic skills and demand-driven vocational training, in addition to creating an enabling 
business  environment  to  attract  and  retain  firms.  Governments’  proactive  role  in 
establishing  linkages  with  multinational  companies  for  cluster  development  and  in 
supporting cooperation among firms within the cluster was also found to be important, 
particularly  in  stimulating  the  adoption  of  technologies  and  programmes  to  upgrade 
skills within the clusters. 
3.3.  Training in high-performance workplaces 
182.  The factors contributing to high-performance workplaces (HPWs), and in particular 
the role of training, have attracted considerable attention in recent years. 
8
This attention 
is  primarily  driven  by  a  recognition  that  creating  an  enabling  policy  and  regulatory 
environment  is  essential,  but  not  sufficient  to  ensure  high  productivity  and 
competitiveness. Organizational issues at the workplace are also critical. 
7
Since 2003, the ILO  has been collaborating with the United Nations Industrial  Development  Organization 
(UNIDO) in running a  cluster development  course  at  the  International  Training Centre of the ILO  that has 
targeted change agents in local institutions and taught them ways to improve value addition and competitiveness. 
8
There is no single agreed-upon definition or consensus on these work methods (Gephardt and Van Buren, 
1996), although common themes have been identified that focus on enhancing the skill base of employees and 
employee involvement (Wright and Snell, 1998). 
68 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. A powerful C#.NET PDF control compatible with windows operating system and built on .NET framework.
add hyperlinks pdf file; add hyperlinks to pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Text. C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. Best C#.NET PDF text extraction library and component for free download.
adding links to pdf; clickable links in pdf
Skills and productivity in the workplace and along value chains 
183.  The  term  “high-performance  workplace”  is  both  a  descriptor  of  the  desired 
outcomes of innovative work organization and shorthand for a set of human resource 
practices,  summarized  below  under  three  headings:  how  work  is  organized,  how 
employees  share  the  benefits  of  improved  productivity  and  how  they  participate  in 
decisions on how to improve productivity. The HPW concept is about managing in a 
way  that  enables  and  encourages  people  to  maximize  their  potential  –  in  their  own 
interests and in the interests of business performance (Ashton and Sung, 2002). 
184.  HPW practices are recognized as being good for employers, as they contribute to 
achieving good, successful businesses with high turnover and solid profit margins. They 
can also benefit employees, thanks to a high degree of investment in skills development 
and  training,  combined  with  open  communication  channels  between  managers  and 
workers,  flexible  working  policies  and  the  involvement  of  employees.  Furthermore, 
there  is  expectation  that  a  HPW  culture  can  contribute  to  economic  success  in 
increasingly competitive global markets. 
185.  Training is an essential prerequisite for, and one of the integral parts of HPWs. As 
shown throughout this chapter, human resources affect productivity and competitiveness 
and are a key part of innovation. Most of the studies suggest a positive effect of training 
on productivity, wage levels and wage growth, as  basic human capital models would 
predict. There is less evidence of the effect of training on worker well-being but, in so 
far as this can be captured by job security and higher wages, it would seem that there are 
real  benefits  for workers. 
9
One recent  meta-analysis  of HPW  identified  training and 
skills as among the most important aspects of such systems (Combs et al., 2006). 
186. Work organization refers to the division of labour, within  the firm and between 
firms, and how work is organized in terms of product and service delivery. In HPWs, 
workers exercise relatively broader discretionary decision-making responsibilities, rather 
than  suspending  their  individual  judgement  while  implementing  managerial  or 
operational commands. Typically management rotates workers across a broad range of 
tasks rather than narrowly constraining the range of tasks done by individual workers. 
Operators have more responsibility for quality assurance from their workstation rather 
than  passing  on  that  responsibility  to  others.  These  workplace  features  –  worker 
discretion, responsibility for quality control and cross-functional flexibility – each have 
implications for the breadth of technical training and development of core work skills 
required to implement an HPW strategy (Hunter and Hitt, 2001; Doeringer et al., 2002). 
187. Gain sharing. If skills training and work organization are two essential elements of 
HPWs, then this raises two important corollary questions. First, how are workers, once 
trained to higher levels and deployed in more elaborate work systems, to be rewarded? 
Are  there  gender  differences  in  work-related  rewards?  In  other  words,  is  there  a 
tendency for women workers to be treated differently from men in terms of gain sharing? 
Second, if performance and productivity are higher, how are the gains from this to be 
shared with workers? Gain sharing is an essential part of HPWs. “Workers need to be 
able to participate in the success of enterprises and to gain a fair share in the benefits of 
economic  activities  and  increased  productivity.  This  helps  to  contribute  to  a  more 
equitable distribution of income and wealth. Important vehicles for achieving this are 
through collective bargaining and social dialogue” (ILO, 2007e, para. 13(4)). 
9
Research findings on the impact of HPW can be found in Brown, 1990; Barrett and O’Connell, 2001; Lynch 
and Black, 1998; Hill, 1995; Greenberg et al., 2003; Krueger and Rouse, 1998; and Osterman, 1995. 
69
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit
add page number to pdf hyperlink; pdf link
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add hyperlink in pdf; adding hyperlinks to pdf files
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
188.  Employee participation and social dialogue . This relates both to direct forms of 
participation via employee participation arrangements of various kinds and indirect or 
representative forms of voice in decision-making within enterprises and the workplace 
by  means of  joint consultation via works councils and collective bargaining via trade 
unions. One European study found that new pay systems have proven more viable when 
they have been introduced with high employee involvement, with workers’ organizations 
participating  in  their  administration  and  with  extensive  training  (Dell’Aringa  et  al., 
2003). 
189.  The elements of the HPW – training and skills, work organization, gain sharing and 
worker  participation  and  dialogue –  are complementary.  They  need to  be applied in 
combination  or  “bundled”  in  order  to  produce  significant  productivity  and  other 
beneficial outcomes (Doeringer et al., 2002). Box 3.10 provides an illustration of an ILO 
programme  that  takes  a  bundled  approach  to  promoting  decent  and  productive 
workplace practices. 
Box 3.10 
Factory Improvement Programme 
The ILO’s Factory Improvement Programme, operating in Viet Nam, Sri Lanka and 
India, assists  participating  enterprises in implementing productive workplace practices 
based on good labour–management relations and respect for workers’ rights as effective 
means of increasing the enterprises’ capacity and competitiveness. The programme is 
based around the delivery of seven programme modules: workplace cooperation; quality; 
productivity;  cleaner  production  and  continuous  improvement;  human  resource 
management; health and safety; and workplace relations. 
An independent evaluation in 12 enterprises in Viet Nam reported that: 
ɽ
Each  factory  had  established  factory  improvement  teams.  These  generally 
comprised an equal mix  of managers and  workers and all were still in operation 
some 14 months after the programme had ended. 
ɽ
There  had  been  a  reduction  in  end-line  production  defects  of  67  per  cent  on 
average. In some workshops, reductions of over 90 per cent had been achieved. 
ɽ
Awareness  had  been  raised  across  all  levels  of  the  factories  of  quality  and 
productivity issues (as demonstrated by the widespread continuing use of tools and 
techniques introduced under the programme). 
ɽ
Reports  had  been  provided  by  the  factories  themselves,  indicating  productivity 
improvements. 
ɽ
Alterations  had  been  made  to  working  areas  to  ensure  efficiency  gains  in 
production, enhanced worker safety and an improved working environment overall.  
ɽ
There was heightened awareness of occupational health and safety issues in the 
participating  factories and subsequent  action had been  taken to reduce hazards, 
such as the provision of safety equipment, the establishment of accident response 
procedures and the reconfiguration of work areas. 
Source: ILO, 2006f. 
70 
Skills and productivity in the workplace and along value chains 
3.4.  Improving skills and productivity in small enterprises 
190.  The objectives of improved productivity, employment growth and development in 
small  enterprises  require  special  attention.  Such enterprises  constitute  the majority  of 
enterprises  in  both  developed  and  developing  countries 
10
and  they  present  special 
development challenges as far as improving skills, productivity and competitiveness is 
concerned. The main issues include: 
ɽ
Productivity, incomes and working conditions tend to deteriorate as the size of the 
enterprise decreases (Vandenberg, 2004). Training and skills development are 
important  factors  in  improving  the  conditions  of  employment  for  the  vast 
majority  of  workers.  Furthermore,  for  enterprises  in  the  informal  economy, 
training  and  increased  productivity  are  important  strategies  for  making  the 
transition to the formal economy. 
ɽ
Small enterprises have specific skill development needs. Small enterprise owners 
often need training in a number of entrepreneurial skills. They also need workers 
who are multiskilled. For example, a small retailer serving a local market cannot 
afford a  marketing  specialist  but  may  need  workers  trained  in  many  aspects  of 
work, such as answering the telephone, keeping records, replacing sold stock and 
displaying  products,  with  particular  knowledge  of  the  shop’s  products.  Small 
enterprise owners and managers therefore need skills that can be of immediate use 
and are relevant to their particular scale of operations. 
ɽ
Small enterprises face many constraints in training entrepreneurs and workers. 
They are disadvantaged in the labour market in recruiting skilled workers, thus 
increasing  the  need  for  in-house  training.  However,  smaller  enterprises  are 
much less likely than larger enterprises to engage in formal training (Ashton et 
al., 2008; Spilsbury, 2003; World Bank, 1997). Smaller enterprises often cannot 
meet the costs of training, particularly if workers who are trained move quickly 
to  other  employers;  they  lose  time  and  may  face  disruption  in  enterprise 
operations  if  entrepreneurs  and workers attend training courses.  Courses that 
they may need might not exist; those that are available on relevant topics may 
be  poorly  adapted  to  their  particular  needs.  In  a  survey  of  ten  clusters  in 
northern  India carried  out in 2000–01,  workers in small enterprises  indicated 
that their lack of knowledge about training opportunities, rather than the cost of 
training, had prevented them from upgrading their skills (Joshi, 2005). 
ɽ
Women-headed small enterprises face different constraints to those owned and 
managed by men. Generally speaking, women-headed enterprises tend to start 
smaller,  face  discrimination  in finance and product  markets,  and  grow more 
slowly. Under-capitalized business prevents expansion and threatens business 
viability.  The  absence  of  collateral  to  secure  credit  is  a  common  problem 
(Murray and Boros, 2002). Women tend to be more averse to risk, use family 
members  rather  than  hired labour  and  base  their  business  in  the  home  in an 
effort to balance business with household and caring duties. The gender-based 
10
Data on  20 OECD countries,  for example, shows that  the  share of  enterprises employing fewer  than  ten 
persons ranges from 57 per cent for the United States up to 95 per cent for Turkey. For 19 of the 20 countries, 
over 90 per cent of enterprises employ less than 50 (OECD, 2002). In developing countries the proportion of 
micro- and small enterprises is even higher, with large numbers being in the unregulated informal sector. In 
Colombia  in  2005  micro-,  small  and  medium-sized  enterprises  together  accounted for  99.9  per cent  of  all 
enterprises (Pineda, 2007). 
71
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
differences  between  men  and  women  in  small  enterprises  must  be 
acknowledged  so  that  skills  providers  can  take  these  differences  into 
consideration in terms of entrepreneurship training. 
11
ɽ
Small enterprises and their workers tend to be under-represented in employers’ 
and workers’ organizations, particularly in developing countries. This means that 
their views and needs are not always adequately reflected in skills development 
tripartite  advocacy  and  advisory  mechanisms  (for  example,  in  tripartite 
productivity councils, national skills development and accreditation authorities, 
etc.). 
3.4.1. How training and skills development is  
provided in small enterprises  
191.  Although  less  engaged  in  formal  training,  small  enterprises  do  take  steps  to 
develop  workforce skills.  Much  of  their  effort goes unnoticed because  it  takes  place 
informally, at the workplace (see box 3.11 for examples of informal training). 
Box 3.11 
Examples of informal training and learning in small enterprises 
ɽ
Working alongside a skilled worker, observing his or her work and gradually taking 
over the job; the skilled worker provides advice and guidance. 
ɽ
Working through learning packages and experimenting through trial and error until 
the new skills are mastered. 
ɽ
A skilled worker instructs and passes on, or cascades, the skills to colleagues. For 
example,  this  method  can  be used  when  new  equipment is  introduced  and  the 
equipment installer trains one employee, who then trains her or his colleagues. This 
can be an important way of achieving improvements in product quality. 
ɽ
Rotating workers between jobs to ensure that they are multiskilled and can step in 
and take over a colleague’s job if she or he is absent. 
ɽ
Designating one  employee,  e.g.  an informal mentor, to  whom  others  can  go for 
advice. 
ɽ
Using  informal  seminars  where  skilled  workers,  suppliers  or  outside  specialists 
provide advice, information or instruction to groups of employees in the workplace. 
Source: Ashton et al., 2008. 
192.  There  are  widespread  inadequacies in  the  provision  of  formal  training to  small 
enterprises. Attempts to make training provision more accessible to smaller enterprises 
include decentralizing training – moving it closer to enterprises, offering courses outside 
working  hours  –  while  also  taking  into  account  household  responsibilities,  and 
encouraging cost sharing. Efforts to ensure that the training is relevant to the needs of 
workers and employers in the small enterprise sector include surveying skill shortages 
and  entrepreneurial  opportunities,  providing  sector  or  cluster-specific  training  and 
including entrepreneurial and  trade union organizations on the management  boards of 
training institutions. 
193.  Informal enterprise-level training can be cost effective, as it ensures that workers 
learn  exactly  what  is  relevant  to  their  particular  work  and  it  can  provide  workers 
excluded from formal training opportunities with a chance to acquire new skills. They 
11
Many guides have been developed by the ILO and others on how to conduct feasibility studies for women’s 
entrepreneurship and to develop strategies to match the skills supply with market demand. See, for example, 
Finnegan and Haspels, “GET ahead for women in enterprise training package and resource kit” (Bauer et al., 
2006) or “A guide for training women economic groups” (ILO, 2003a). 
72 
Skills and productivity in the workplace and along value chains 
may also  gain  an insight  into  broader  business  functions  and  acquire  entrepreneurial 
skills and knowledge useful for establishing their own enterprises. However, such skills 
acquisition  depends  on  the  (possibly  weak)  knowledge  and  practices  of  the  existing 
workforce and their ability to transmit what they know effectively. 
3.4.2. Other crucial factors affecting productivity in small enterprises 
194.  As  highlighted  throughout  this  chapter,  training  alone  is  insufficient  to  ensure 
productivity gains. In order to have an impact on the productivity of small enterprises, 
skills  development  initiatives  invariably  need  to  be  integrated  with  other  crucial 
measures that influence productivity and competitiveness. These include, for example: 
ɽ
The provision of an enabling business policy, regulatory and social environment. 
As  indicated  in  the  conclusions  concerning  the  promotion  of  sustainable 
enterprises (ILO, 2007e, para. 10), “[a]n environment conducive to the creation 
and growth or transformation of enterprises on a sustainable basis combines the 
legitimate quest for profit – one of the key drivers of economic growth – with 
the  need  for  development  that  respects  human  dignity,  environmental 
sustainability and decent work”. The conclusions also stressed the need to place 
particular emphasis on supporting the transition of informal economy operators 
to  the  formal  economy  and  ensuring  that  laws  and  regulations  cover  all 
enterprises and workers. 
ɽ
Access to financial services. Small enterprises have particular difficulty gaining 
access to finance from formal institutions because of banks’ avoidance of risk, 
high transaction costs, complicated procedures and a lack of suitable collateral. 
These  general  constraints  on raising investment  and  operating  capital  restrict 
investment in training and other investments that could improve productivity or 
lead to the uptake of  new technologies  or advances into new markets. These 
general constraints can be particularly severe for women entrepreneurs. Small 
enterprises are more attractive to lenders if the owners or  managers  undergo 
training in various  basic entrepreneurial  skills.  Peru’s Financiera  Solución, a 
large  financial  institution,  offered  management  training  to  small  enterprise 
clients  to  reward  their  loyalty  and  also  to  strengthen  their  management 
capabilities and therefore loan repayment rates. In three years, more than 1,800 
of  the  institution’s  entrepreneur-clients  received  Improve  Your  Business 
training,  thereby  strengthening  the  viability  and  competitiveness  of  their 
enterprises (Sievers and Vandenberg, 2004). 
ɽ
Access to business development services (BDS). International experience has 
validated  policies  to  favour  the  development  of  markets  in  which  small 
enterprises  can  access  training  and  related  services.  Locally  available  and 
affordable  BDS  can  help  small  enterprises  train  their  workers,  improve 
entrepreneurship  and  business  management  skills,  and  raise  productivity. 
Quality testing and accreditation services that allow enterprises to demonstrate 
that  their  products  or  manufacturing  processes  meet  certain  standards,  for 
example in terms of durability, hygiene or adherence to core labour standards, 
can  help  them  gain  access  to  formal  markets.  The  general  principle  is  that 
services available to small enterprises are more relevant over longer periods of 
time and are more cost effective if the enterprises themselves pay for, or share 
the payment of, the service (Committee of Donor Agencies for Small Enterprise 
Development, 2000). 
73
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
Public policies to encourage the market development of business services targeting 
smaller  enterprises need to assess and respond to the constraints women face in 
starting and growing their businesses and in taking advantage of training and other 
services.  Lessons  from  ILO  programmes  to  support  women’s  entrepreneurship, 
particularly in East Africa and South-East Asia, support a coherent approach that 
includes the following elements: 
–  developing a local knowledge base on women entrepreneurs; 
–  supporting voice and representation in local organizations and associations; 
–  helping  business service providers  at the community level  develop support 
services that target women entrepreneurs; 
–  developing local and external partnerships to boost marketing and 
representation; 
– providing women with disabilities with the space and opportunities to 
organize, thus enabling them to become successful entrepreneurs (ILO, 
2006g). 
ɽ
Provision of social protection. Social protection schemes (providing insurance to 
employers  and  workers  alike  against  illness  and  unemployment  and  to 
entrepreneurs against flood or fire) are important enabling factors for business 
and work. Where such schemes do not yet exist, or are not accessible to smaller 
enterprises, practical  strategies for  workplace  improvement suitable  for  small 
enterprises can be implemented based on participatory training methods. These 
schemes  target  improved  occupational safety  and health as  well  as  enhanced 
productivity. 
12
ɽ
Employers’ and workers’ organizations have important roles to play in promoting 
upgrading  amongst small  enterprises. In  developing countries,  in particular,  the 
small  enterprise  sector  is  inadequately  represented,  implying  the  need  for 
determined efforts to extend representation to this sector and to build the capacity 
of existing and new representative organizations to help them carry out their work. 
Employers’ and workers’ organizations can engage, on behalf of their members, in 
promoting an appropriate legal and regulatory environment and sound macro and 
fiscal economic policies that do not  discriminate against small enterprises. They 
can advocate adherence to core labour standards, the rule of law and respect for 
property  rights.  They  can  promote  productivity-raising  measures  –  including 
expanding  availability  of  training  and  learning  services  –  that  target  the  small 
enterprise sector. Box  3.12  outlines examples  of ILO support  to constituents to 
increase representation and productivity in small enterprises. 
12
For examples and impact assessment of such schemes supported by the ILO, see ILO: Labour and social 
trends in ASEAN 2007: Integration, challenges and opportunities, ILO, 2007g; and T. Kawakami, S. Arphorn 
and  Y.  Ujita:  Work  improvement  for  safe  home;  Action  manual  for  improving  safety,  health  and  working 
conditions of home workers, ILO, 2006. 
74 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested