how to upload and download pdf file in asp net c# : Add email link to pdf Library SDK component .net asp.net wpf mvc wcms_0920549-part967

Skills and productivity in the workplace and along value chains 
Box 3.12 
Organizing employers and workers in small enterprises  
The  ILO’s  programme  on  boosting  employment  through  small  enterprise 
development  (SEED)  helps  entrepreneurs  and  their  workers  to  increase  their 
representation in employers' associations and trade unions, and assists them in building 
their own democratic and representative organizations. It helps them become recognized 
interlocutors with government authorities at various levels so as to increase their access 
to economic opportunities and to negotiate fair returns for their labour. 
ɽ
An employers’ toolkit was designed with the International Organisation of Employers 
(IOE)  for  use  by  managers  and  staff  of  employers’  organizations  (and  other 
business  associations)  wishing  to  augment  representation  in  their  respective 
countries. The toolkit was part of a broader effort to strengthen the capacities and 
expand the activities of employers’ organizations around the world, but notably in 
developing and transition countries. The toolkit contains guides, manuals and other 
aids  that  can  help  organizations  analyse  the  policy  environment  for  small 
enterprises, plan a recruitment strategy or offer training that improves productivity 
through better employee relations. Half of the tools are training materials that an 
employers’ organization may consider  offering  to improve the performance  of its 
smaller members. 
ɽ
Research on  the  representational gap of  workers in small enterprises  has  been 
undertaken by SEED and the ILO Bureau for Workers' Activities (ACTRAV) as part 
of the follow-up to the debate in the Committee on Employment and Social Policy of 
the Governing Body in November 2006 on business environment, labour law and 
micro-  and  small  enterprises.  The  overall  aim  of  the  research  is  to  document 
associative strategies of workers’ organizations that have successfully reached out 
to small enterprises (formal and informal), their strengths and weaknesses, and how 
and  under  what  legal  and  institutional  framework,  representational  functions are 
more effectively performed. Fifteen country case studies and a synthesis report are 
being prepared for publication in 2008. 
ɽ
The SYNDICOOP programme was launched in 2002 following discussions among 
representatives of the International Confederation of  Free Trade  Unions  (ICFTU) 
and the International Co-operative Alliance (ICA), facilitated by ACTRAV and the 
ILO’s  Cooperative  Branch  (COOP).  This  programme  supported  organizing 
unprotected  workers  in  the  informal  economy  through  cooperative–trade  union 
collaboration in Rwanda, the United Republic of Tanzania and Uganda. Its overall 
objective was to reduce poverty among unprotected informal economy workers by 
improving  their  working  and  living  conditions,  and  enhancing  employment  and 
incomes. Trade unions and cooperatives collaborated in joint working committees to 
organize informal workers. A handbook was developed jointly by the ILO, the ICFTU 
and the ICA explaining  the SYNDICOOP  approach  to  organizing  workers in the 
informal  economy  and  to  working  together  in  giving  a  voice  to  workers  in  the 
informal economy. Efforts are being made to expand the SYNDICOOP approach 
worldwide into a global programme between the ICFTU, the ICA and the ILO. 
Source: ILO, 2006l; ILO, 2008d. 
3.5.  How governments and the social partners 
can support enterprise-level training 
and skills development 
195.  Governments have a crucial role to play in ensuring that the basic conditions for 
sustainable  enterprise  development  are  in  place  (see  box  3.1  above),  which  includes 
policies and programmes that affect an enterprise’s decision to train its workforce. 
75
Add email link to pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf link open in new window; adding hyperlinks to pdf
Add email link to pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf link to attached file; add links to pdf file
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
196.  One of  the  key  factors  influencing an enterprise’s decision  to train  is the basic 
education level of its workforce. This raises a major public policy issue. If workers enter 
the labour force with poor education, they will be less likely to get the training needed to 
increase their wages and could get caught in the vicious cycle of the “low-skill, bad job” 
trap (Snower, 1996). Thus governments  have the important  responsibility of  ensuring 
that  high-quality systems of  education, training and a lifelong  learning culture are in 
place.  Furthermore, they play a role in targeting skills training for disadvantaged and 
unskilled workers – a subject further developed in Chapter 4 of this report. 
197.  Governments can also provide financial incentives to advance private sector and 
individual  investment  in  training.  The  most  common  include  levy  grant  schemes 
(compulsory or voluntary taxes on payroll or outcome); levy rebate schemes, in which 
employers  are  partially  reimbursed  for  approved  training;  levy  exemption  schemes, 
where  employers  are  exempt  from  levy  payments  if  they  spend  a  percentage  (upper 
bounded) of their payroll; tax incentives for approved training; and also training credits, 
training awards and individual training accounts. The success of such schemes largely 
depends  on  transparent  management  (often  tripartite),  the  availability  of  qualified 
training providers and effective monitoring and quality assurance mechanisms. 
198. Promoting the application of principles underpinning international labour 
standards  and  international  management  standards is also an important means of 
encouraging enterprises to train. The reference to the Human Resources Development 
Recommendation,  2004  (No.  195),  at  the  beginning  of  this  chapter  articulated  the 
different, but  shared responsibilities  for training between  government,  employers and 
workers.  The  ILO  Tripartite  Declaration  of  Principles  concerning  Multinational 
Enterprises and Social Policy (MNE Declaration) (ILO, 2006d) and the Guidelines for 
multinational enterprises of the OECD provide guidance  on training local workforces 
and other matters in respect of good corporate behaviour and citizenship (acquiring new 
knowledge from MNEs through foreign direct investment (FDI) is explored in Chapter 5 
below). 
199.  National and local governments can also provide leadership in bringing together 
the  various  local  resources such as universities, technical institutes, business 
development and financial service providers and organizations of workers and employers 
to provide the specialized business services and training that may be beyond the means 
of local enterprises, and to assist new and growing firms in clusters and value chains 
(box 3.13). 
76 
RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
copy and email the secure download link to the assistance, please contact us via email (support@rasteredge & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
pdf hyperlinks; add links to pdf online
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Create PDF file from PowerPoint free online without email. Add necessary references
add hyperlink pdf document; adding a link to a pdf in preview
Skills and productivity in the workplace and along value chains 
Box 3.13 
Workforce innovation in regional economic development 
The US Department of Labor (DOL) Employment and Training Administration (ETA) 
has  undertaken  an  initiative  called  Workforce  Innovation  in  Regional  Economic 
Development  (WIRED)  to  integrate  economic  and  workforce  development  activities, 
demonstrating  that  talent  development  can  drive economic  transformation  in regional 
economies across the United States.  
The  WIRED initiative applies the  following six-step  conceptual framework to  the 
activities taking place in each of the regions where investments have been made: 
(1)  Define the regional economy by identifying the surrounding communities that share 
common characteristics, looking beyond traditional political boundaries. 
(2)  Create a leadership group that represents the major assets of a region and provides 
a forum for regional economic decision-making. 
(3)  Conduct  a  regional  assessment  to  fully  map  the  area’s  assets  and  identify  the 
strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and risks based on those assets. 
(4)  Develop an economic vision based on those strengths and assets and gain support 
for that vision from the broad-based regional partnership. 
(5)  Build a strategy and corresponding implementation plan that identifies specific goals 
and tasks and provides a blueprint for how to achieve the region’s economic vision. 
(6)  Identify resources –  both to support the region’s plan and  invest in the region’s 
economy – from a wide range of sources including foundations, angel and venture 
capital networks, and federal, state and local governments. 
The initiative supports innovative approaches to education, economic development 
and workforce development that go beyond traditional strategies, preparing workers to 
compete and succeed both within the United States and around the world. It is expected 
that WIRED will demonstrate how talent development can drive economic transformation 
and enable regions to compete in the global economy. 
Source: http://www.doleta.gov/wired/files/WIRED_Fact_Sheet.pdf. 
200.  Employers,  workers  and  their  organizations  also  have  a  vital  role  to  play  in 
promoting enterprise-level training, including: 
ɽ
Advocacy: The social partners can document and disseminate examples of good 
practice  and  advocate  the  design  of  appropriate  policies  to  encourage 
enterprise-level training for improved productivity and competitiveness. 
ɽ
Representation: The social partners can reach out to workers and owners of 
enterprises,  and  in  particular  those  of  small  enterprises  and  the  informal 
economy, to increase the representation of their membership to ensure deeper 
and broader benefits of association, representation and leadership. 
ɽ
Services: The social partners provide a variety of important services to their 
members that  could potentially impact on the  decision to provide  enterprise-
level  training, including knowledge  management, training, awareness  raising, 
advice  and  guidance  on  how  to  access  public  and  private  services,  links  to 
research and  consultancy resources and  advice on innovative practices  at  the 
workplace (box 3.14). 
77
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Free online Word to PDF converter without email. Add necessary references:
clickable links in pdf files; pdf links
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Convert Excel to PDF document free online without email. Add necessary references:
pdf email link; add url link to pdf
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
78 
Box 3.14 
Improving workplace learning in Mauritius 
In 2005 the ILO, jointly with the Mauritian Employers’ Federation (MEF), initiated a 
programme to  enhance workplace learning practices. The two main objectives of the 
programme were to: (i) strengthen the capacity of the MEF and its members to plan, 
design  and  implement  innovative  workplace  learning  programmes;  and  (ii)  facilitate 
social dialogue on workplace learning between the Government and the social partners 
with a view to assisting in the effective implementation of the national skills strategy. As a 
first step, a survey of enterprises was conducted to benchmark the state of workplace 
learning in Mauritian enterprises. In recent years enterprises had faced an increasingly 
competitive  environment – particularly in  textiles,  a  mainstay  of  the  Mauritian  export 
market  –  and  the  Government  had  identified  the  most  effective  way  of  enhancing 
competitiveness  as  developing  higher  value  added  forms  of  production  with  specific 
focus on key sectors, including ICT, financial services and tourism. Almost two-thirds of 
enterprises surveyed viewed improved workplace learning as key to complying with new 
market demands and to adding value to their products and services, and almost three-
quarters responded that they had witnessed significant changes in recent years in their 
skills requirements. A tripartite national workshop (2007) solicited the views of the social 
partners  on  ways  to  improve  workplace  learning,  emphasizing  the  importance  of 
information exchange in establishing learning networks that might promote best practice 
and improve overall competitiveness. 
Source: ILO, 2006i. 
201.  Finally, in  view of the  important  and  complementary  roles  of governments  and 
workers’  and  employers’  organizations  in  the  development  and  implementation  of 
policies  to promote  sustainable enterprises, as noted  in the  general discussion  on  the 
promotion of sustainable enterprises (ILO, 2007e), tripartite productivity organizations, 
institutions  and  programmes  at  the  national,  local  and  industry  sector  levels  are 
increasingly prevalent (box 3.15). 
Box 3.15 
New Zealand national workplace productivity programme 
The  Government  of  New  Zealand  follows  a  tripartite  approach  to  increasing 
workplace productivity through partnership between the Government, the employers and 
the unions. It has identified seven key drivers of workplace productivity in the country, 
namely: building better leadership and management; investing in skills and knowledge; 
using technology and encouraging innovation to get ahead; organizing work; creating a 
productive  workplace  culture;  networking  and  collaborating;  and  measuring  what 
matters. 
The  programme  reaches  a  large  number  of  workplaces  and  provides  practical 
support for employers and workers to raise performance in the workplace, the value of 
the work done and the rewards for both employers and workers. 
The Government and the social partners are working with the ILO to document the 
approach and resources so that they can be adapted  and replicated in  neighbouring 
Pacific island countries. 
Source: New Zealand Department of Labour, 2004. 
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Create editable Word file online without email. C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
add hyperlink pdf; add links to pdf in acrobat
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. In order to convert PDF document to Word file using VB.NET programming code, you have to Add necessary references
add links to pdf acrobat; convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks
Chapter 4 
Target groups 
Members should … promote access to education, training and lifelong learning for people 
with  nationally  identified  special  needs,  such  as  youth,  low-skilled  people,  people  with 
disabilities, migrants, older workers, indigenous people, ethnic minority groups and the socially 
excluded; and for workers in small and medium-sized enterprises, in the informal economy, in 
the  rural  sector  and in  self-employment  (Human Resources  Development  Recommendation, 
2004 (No. 195), Paragraph 5(h)). 
202.  This chapter examines ways to overcome barriers that keep some parts of society 
from participating in the benefits of economic growth. Their lack of access to education 
and training or the low quality or relevance of the training that is available traps them in 
the vicious circle of low skills and low productivity employment. While it is not possible 
to cover all groups in need of specific policy attention, this chapter focuses on enabling 
persons in rural communities, disadvantaged young people, persons with disabilities and 
migrant  workers  to  more  fully  realize  their  potential  for  productive  work  and  for 
contributing more substantially to economic and social development. 
203.  Gender often compounds and further exacerbates existing patterns of disadvantage 
or  discrimination.  Within  potentially  marginalized  groups  women  are  usually  more 
vulnerable  to  social  exclusion,  as  compared  to  their  male  counterparts.  Despite 
significant progress achieved in many areas, gender stereotypes still significantly shape 
women’s  and  men’s  opportunities,  especially  among  groups  facing  other  substantial 
disadvantages.  Under  various circumstances,  efforts to  mainstream  gender  in  policies 
and programmes or efforts to implement women-targeted policies and programmes may 
be effective. Examples of both approaches are highlighted throughout the sections of this 
chapter.  
4.1. Rural communities 
204.  The World Development Report 2008 estimates that three out of every four poor 
persons in the world live in rural areas (World Bank, 2007). Some 2.1 billion people in 
rural  areas  live  on  less  than  US$2  per  day.  Most  depend  on  agriculture  for  their 
livelihoods, but it is agriculture of such low productivity that their work does not lead 
them out of poverty. The World Employment Report 2004–05 (ILO, 2005a) showed that 
poverty  was  reduced  most  in  countries  which  increased  both  labour  productivity  in 
agriculture and overall employment. 
205.  In  the poorest regions of  the world,  the majority  of  employed  women  work in 
agriculture: 60 per cent of employed women in South Asia, compared to 43 per cent of 
men; 68 per cent of employed women in sub-Saharan Africa, compared to 62 per cent of 
men (ILO, 2007o). High concentrations of women in low-productivity work results in 
high proportions of women living in poverty. 
79
RasterEdge Product Renewal and Update
VB.NET Write: Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value 4. Order email. Our support team will send you the purchase link.
pdf link to specific page; pdf reader link
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Free online PowerPoint to PDF converter without email. C#.NET Demo Code: Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET Application. Add necessary references:
add a link to a pdf in acrobat; add links pdf document
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
206.  The  complex  relationships  between  growth,  productivity  and  employment  in 
agriculture, and between agriculture and other sectors, are explored in the report for the 
general discussion on the promotion of rural employment for poverty reduction (ILO, 
2008a). That report identifies a set of factors required to raise agricultural and off-farm 
productivity, and thereby to increase incomes in rural areas. These requirements, which 
are  similar  to  the  set  of  interrelated  factors  for  productivity  in  general  identified  in 
Chapter  1  of  the  present  report,  relate  to  infrastructure  (especially  roads,  irrigation 
systems, flood control and storage facilities), clarity with regard to land and water rights 
(without  which  smallholders  have  little  incentive  or  available  collateral  to  invest  in 
increasing the productivity of their land), good governance (especially tax regimes and 
efficient  public  services),  institutions  to  provide  timely  information  on  prices  and 
markets, access to microfinance and effective means of learning about new technologies, 
production techniques, products and markets. 
207.  It is this last factor of productivity that is the focus of this section: how to improve 
access to  quality  and  relevant  skills training  throughout  rural  areas  in  order  to raise 
productivity and incomes. Two main points are covered: (1) rural areas’ needs for better 
quality  learning  and  training  linked  to  opportunities  for  better  livelihoods  and 
employment; and (2) options to make training more widely available so that people in 
rural areas are better able to take advantage of these opportunities. 
4.1.1. Linking skills to rural productivity and employment growth 
208.  It is impossible to overstate the importance of extending basic education to boys 
and girls so that they are able later to learn the skills necessary for working productively 
in agriculture or to prepare themselves  for  alternative employment opportunities. 
1
parallel imperative is to provide literacy and numeracy training along with skills training 
for young people and adults, especially women, who  did  not have the opportunity to 
learn at a younger age. 
209.  Lack  of  basic  education  also  impacts  on  wider  social objectives  for  stable  and 
democratic  societies,  gender  equality  and  overall  poverty  reduction.  As  reported  in 
Chapter  2  of  this  report,  UNESCO  estimates  the  average  literacy  rate  across  least 
developed  countries  at  about  50  per  cent,  and  even  lower  for  women  (43  per  cent). 
Hidden within these national averages is the huge divergence in literacy rates between 
urban and rural areas. According to UNESCO country studies, in the most extreme cases 
there is a 50 to 60 percentage point difference in literacy rates between urban men and 
rural women (figure 4.1). 
210.  The  sobering  statistics  on  literacy  motivate  countries  and  UN  agencies  to  join 
together  in  the  Education  for  All  campaign,  spearheaded  by  UNESCO,  to  enable 
countries to meet MDG 2: universal primary education by 2015. The 2006 MDGs report 
explained urban/rural disparities as being due to high rates of poverty in rural areas that 
“limit educational opportunities because of demands for children’s labour, low levels of 
parental education and lack of access to good quality schooling” (United Nations, 2006c, 
1
See,  for  example,  the  impact  of  schooling  on  choice  of  non-farm  jobs  and  income  levels,  household 
investments in schooling and the effect on those children’s later access to non-farm jobs or urban employment in 
the Philippines and Thailand (Otsuka and Yamano, 2006); the impact on rural wages and non-farm employment 
from  increased  government  spending  on  rural  education  in  India  (Shenggen  et  al.,  1999);  and  the  strong 
relationship between the acquisition of literacy and numeracy and productivity gains in agriculture (Godfrey, 
2003, pp. 44–45). 
80 
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
to PDF converter without email. Quick integrate online C# source code into .NET class. C# Demo Code: Convert Excel to PDF in Visual C# .NET Project. Add necessary
adding a link to a pdf; chrome pdf from link
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Free online Word to PDF converter without email. C#.NET Sample Code: Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks; accessible links in pdf
Target groups 
p. 7). Progress in extending primary education raises demand for better access to quality 
secondary education and vocational training, as well as for higher level education. 
2
Figure 4.1.  Urban/rural disparities in literacy: Selected countries 
Niger
Sierra Leone
Comoros
Côte d'Ivoire
Burundi
Rwanda
Cameroon
Equat. Guine
a
Madagascar
S. Tome & Princip
e
Chad
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
Literacy rates (%)
Urban male (small triangle)
Urban female (small square)
Rural male (large triangle)
Rural female (large square)
Central African Rep.
Source: UNESCO, 2004.
211.  Beyond  basic  education  and  core  skills,  the  question  is  “skills  for  what?” 
Vocational training should equip young people and older adults with the skills they need 
to  improve  agricultural  productivity  or  to  meet  off-farm  labour  demand.  Training 
provision  should  be coordinated  with  the  priorities  set  for  rural  development,  which 
affect  the  opportunities  available  to  young  people  and  adults.  For  example,  skills 
development could be linked to policies aiming to diversify agricultural production or 
markets,  expand  services  or  manufacturing  in  rural  areas,  promote  private  sector 
development and entrepreneurship or improve small-scale agricultural productivity. 
212.  Although  rural  households  may  derive  a  large  share  of  their  livelihoods  from 
agriculture, their income-generating activities, and opportunities, are quite diverse. Non-
farm rural activities are an important source of rural income and an important means of 
managing the seasonal fluctuations which prevail within the agricultural sector. In Latin 
America,  for  example,  a  recent  study  found  that  off-farm  work  was  relatively  more 
important for women, accounting for 65 to 93 per cent of rural women’s employment in 
2
For further details, see http://www.unesco.org/education/index.shtml. 
81
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
nine  out  of  11  countries  studied,  while  agriculture  remained  the  major  source  of 
employment for men (Atchoarena and Gasperini, 2003). Technical training needs to be 
linked  to  opportunities  and  needs  in  both  agriculture  and  non-agriculture,  for  both 
women and men. 
213.  Increasing the productivity and sustainability of small-scale agricultural producers 
can increase both incomes  and  employment.  Improved  production  practices  and  new 
technologies, alternative crops that increase yields, labour-intensive speciality crops and 
other  non-traditional  activities  can  have  positive  income  and  employment  effects for 
small landholdings. Substituting low-value with high-value products (whether for local 
or  international  markets)  can  generate  on-farm  employment  and  raise  incomes 
(box 4.1). 
3
Box 4.1 
Supporting agricultural productivity and employment  
through alternative products 
In Liberia, research undertaken jointly by the Government, the ILO and the Food 
and Agriculture Organization (FAO) identified the technology and technical skills needed 
to  revive  production  and  jobs  in  agriculture,  particularly  in  rubber  plantations,  crop 
production, horticulture and livestock. The objective was to identify crops and livestock 
which enhance employment opportunities for young people and give them an alternative 
to migrating to the informal urban economy. This objective is part of a broad strategy for 
realizing  the  potential  of  a  restored  agriculture  sector  to  contribute  to  national 
employment objectives. Findings show that rice production and cultivation of seedlings 
for tree crops and vegetable production could generate a larger number of jobs per acre 
at higher probable incomes than traditional crops. The research highlighted the need for 
investments in many areas to facilitate a transition to alternative crops, including training 
in these products and production, processing and marketing, as well as investments in 
physical infrastructure.  
Source: ILO, FAO and Liberia Ministry of Agriculture, 2007. 
214.  Innovations that increase the productivity of land or labour in agriculture require 
flexibility and adaptability on the part of rural economies, and thus alter training needs. 
Changes in trade regimes, competition or consumer preferences, as well as shifts in the 
surplus or scarcity of labour due to economic growth elsewhere in the economy, affect 
what products are produced where, and thus affect what skills are valued. The emerging 
threat to rural livelihoods from environmental degradation and climate changes creates a 
need for new technologies, alternative crops or growing processes – all of which, in turn, 
create new demands for skills development (box 4.2). 
3
For a discussion of food security issues as part of sustainable agricultural development, see Henry, 2008. 
82 
Target groups 
Box 4.2 
Biofuels in Mozambique: A promise and a challenge 
In mid-2007, Brazil and Mozambique signed a bilateral agreement to join forces in 
the production of  biofuels.  The initiative aims at  tapping  Mozambique’s  considerable 
potential  for  the  production  of  biomass.  Biofuels  production  is  seen  as  a  means  of 
generating  income  and  employment  for  the  Mozambican  population,  and  also  of 
improving energy security and countering global climate change. The framework to help 
the  country  create  internal  and  export  markets  for  biofuels  includes  training  of 
Mozambican engineers and technicians. 
The goal is to replicate Brazil's sustainable biofuel production model in the African 
country. Biofuel production targets unutilized or underutilized land, often in areas having 
a high incidence of rural poverty. On the basis of Brazil’s experience, the industry can 
generate  jobs  for  low-income  rural  households.  Ensuring  the  quality  of  these  jobs, 
however,  will require targeted  skills development and  other  forms of  support  to rural 
communities.  Raising  the  standards  of  new  jobs  will  depend  on  improving  industry 
efficiency and the productivity of rural workers, as well as broadening the skill base to 
respond to demand for accelerated rural activities.  
Source: Biopact web site (http://www.biopact.com); Von Braun and Pachauri, 2006. 
4.1.2.  Delivering skills development in rural areas  
215.  Countries are employing a variety of means to extend relevant training services in 
rural  areas.  Expanding  the  outreach  of  national  training  institutions  and  upgrading 
apprenticeships were two methods of skills delivery that were examined in Chapter 2. 
The  remainder of  this section considers  three  additional  channels of increasing  skills 
provision in rural areas: extension services, community-based training and embedding 
skills development in rural infrastructure investments. Each of these approaches places 
great importance on decentralizing resources and responsibility and on improving inter-
ministerial coordination, in particular among rural development, agriculture, education, 
public works and labour ministries. 
216.  Agricultural  and  rural  extension  services  supply  information,  knowledge  and 
training in how to use that knowledge, to farmers and rural businesses. Innovation in 
delivering agricultural  extension  services has led to an  expanded choice of providers, 
refinement in appraising those who should be targeted and for what, and combinations of 
formal and non-formal approaches. 
4
Interventions to improve agricultural productivity 
focus on the adoption of new technologies and accessing new markets: 
5
ɽ
Technology options, particularly linked to timely information (market). 
ɽ
Value adding  techniques  in processing,  packaging and  marketing of  agricultural 
products. 
ɽ
Improved production practices using upgraded inputs and techniques. 
ɽ
Introduction of new speciality products – non-food staples. 
ɽ
Environmentally sustainable practices. 
217.  National  and  international  approaches  to  rural  extension  services  have  changed 
considerably  over  the  past  two  decades.  Until  the  early  1990s,  publicly  financed 
extension networks were typically maintained to provide training and site visits to small 
farmers  and  farmers’  groups,  through  rural-based  government  extension  agents.  The 
4
For additional information and examples, see Johanson and Adams, 2004. 
5
For an expanded discussion, see Rivera, 2001. 
83
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
approach was top-down with little farmer involvement in deciding content and delivery, 
and also considered costly in relation to the quality and quantity of services provided. By 
the mid-1990s, international donors and many national governments were paring down 
their  support  for  publicly  financed  rural  extension,  and  instead  promoting  provision 
through private providers or public–private partnerships. There was a keen interest in 
finding better means of extending know-how to improve agricultural productivity. Since 
then,  demand-driven  partnership  approaches  have  been  tested  with  mixed  results 
(box 4.3). While there is clear evidence of viable alternative services, problems largely 
persist in serving the rural poor, whose more marginal landholdings, subsistence crops 
and  remote  locations  often  prevent  inclusion  in  more  business-oriented  approaches 
(Avila and Gasperini, 2005; World Bank, 2007). 
Box 4.3 
Measuring the cost and performance of paid  
agricultural extension services 
Paid extension services, as opposed to free public services, differ considerably and 
each case needs to respond to local conditions. In general they are designed to meet the 
capacity  of  farmers  to  co-finance  the  costs  of  the  service.  Arrangements  for  paid 
extension  can  include  direct  contracts  between  governments  or  municipalities  and 
private providers to provide extension for a limited period, adjustable payment based on 
farmer  incomes  or  share  of  a  crop’s  profits,  tradable  extension  vouchers  that  are 
awarded to low-income producers by government, as well as various services negotiated 
through agricultural associations on behalf of members.  
 study  of  paid  agricultural  extension  services  in  Nicaragua  has  analysed  the 
performance of extension services contracted directly between extensionists and their 
clients, with producers paying small fees directly to the technician for agreed services. 
Findings indicated that even poor farmers were willing to pay if the service was seen to 
increase their productivity.  
In Ghana,  recent  agricultural  growth  has  not  been  accompanied  by  comparable 
improvements  in  agricultural  productivity.  Improving  technical  skills  was  seen  as  a 
means  to  improving  productivity  and  this  has  stimulated  the  development  of 
decentralized  private  sector  advisory  services  systems.  These  services  combine 
technology  development  with  communication  and  information  services  and  links  to 
markets. The initiative is spurring interest in opening up contracting to more institutions in 
order to further diversify delivery mechanisms.  
Feedback from similar cases elsewhere, however, has highlighted risks related to 
private or fee-based public extension. First, without specific efforts, women and small-
scale and marginal farmers are likely to be missed by such programmes. Monitoring of 
quality of service and accountability for cost-effectiveness is also called for, as is formal 
registration of providers. An environment creating and maintaining healthy competition 
between  providers  is  needed.  Finally,  public  and  private  extension  must  work  in 
partnership, without one constraining the other.  
Source: Alex and Rivera, 2004.  
218.  Extension  systems  have  also  become  more  participatory,  in  part  prompted  by 
initiatives  based  on  cost  recovery  and  contracting  out  of  delivery,  where  funding  is 
linked to the demand for services. A simplified typology of approaches being used is 
provided in table 4.1, although in reality many approaches coexist and complement each 
other. 
84 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested