c# force pdf download : Convert word to pdf with bookmarks Library software component .net winforms azure mvc ClaroRead-5.7-en-gb4-part1006

Proofing (ClaroRead Pro only) 
The optional Proofing step in scanning lets you spell check and correct any errors the 
program made in converting the original document to text (recognising or OCR). This 
means that when you read back the scanned document it will be correct. You can edit 
the document, but if you want to do any significant work we recommend that you save 
the document as a Word document and edit it in Word. 
You can turn on Proofing by checking the "Proofread document before saving" checkbox 
on the Scan tab in Settings. Then scan as normal from scanner or PDF or image. After 
Preview the Proofing dialog will appear, accompanied by a Proofing spellcheck window: 
Convert word to pdf with bookmarks - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
split pdf by bookmark; editing bookmarks in pdf
Convert word to pdf with bookmarks - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
bookmark a pdf file; edit pdf bookmarks
The Proofing spellcheck lets to jump from error to error in the document. You can close 
this at any time and restart it from the Tools menu. See Proofreading. 
In the centre of the window is the Text Editor. This shows any detected errors with a 
red underline, just like Microsoft Word. You can use this to correct spelling and 
recognition mistakes in your document. It always shows the page as in the format of the 
original so you can easily match up the text to the original document, but your Keep 
Original Format or Simplify Format setting will be preserved in the final output. 
Above the Text Editor is the Verifier. This shows the actual original image you have 
scanner for where your caret is in the Text Editor. This lets you check the result of 
scanning (in the Text Editor) with the original image (in the Verifier window) 
To the left is the Image Thumbnail View of all the pages in the document. 
Use the Text Editor and Verifier to correct any OCR errors in your document, then click 
one of the buttons on the right to Send to Word or Save as File (as appropriate) when 
you are satisfied with the proofing. 
Image Thumbnail View 
The Image Thumbnail View shows all the pages in the document to be proofed. You can 
click on a page to select it. The Image Thumbnail View is not shown if your document 
only has one page. It also appears in the Preview view. 
The current selected page. 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Bookmarks. Comments, forms and multimedia. Convert smooth lines to curves. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
creating bookmarks pdf; create bookmarks in pdf reader
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF file by top level bookmarks. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
bookmarks pdf files; export pdf bookmarks to excel
Next to this is an icon showing the state of the page:  
o
A page that has not yet been OCR'd. You see this on all the pages in the 
Preview window.  
o
A page that has been recognised (OCR'd) but not otherwise changed by 
you.  
o
A page that has been proofed by this dialog.  
o
A page you've made changes to.  
o
A page you have proofread and made changes to.  
You can delete a page from the document by selecting it and pressing the Delete key (or 
right-clicking and selecting Clear from the popup context menu. 
Status bar, Ruler and Toolbars 
You can turn these on and off in the View menu. By default they are all off. 
The Formatting toolbar has Style, Font, Alignment, Bullets and Show Paragraph 
buttons, just like Word or WordPad. These can be used to edit the text in the 
proofing view so you can get the appearance of your final output just right. 
The Mark text toolbar has Highlight and Strikethrough buttons, which you can use 
to mark up your document. It also has a Redacting tool you can use to mark 
sections of text that you want to appear with black rectangles overlying the text 
(so you can see where the text was). Highlight with the Redacting tool and click 
the Redact Document button, the last button on the toolbar, to redact this 
marked text.  
The Ruler gives you the dimensions of the current page or text area. You can 
change among inches, centimetres, points and picas in the View menu with the 
Measurement units submenu. 
The Status Bar shows you the position of the cursor and the language that 
ClaroRead believes is the writing of the text. This is useful because if it does not 
match the actual language of the text then the text will be incorrectly recognised 
and spell checked. Use the Set Language... option in the Tools menu to change 
the selected language.  
Views 
You can view the current page in one of three ways, selected from the Text Editor views 
submenu of the View menu. 
True page means the page will be displayed on the screen as it was laid out on 
the original paper. This is useful to identify page reading order and to make sense 
of the structure of a page. This is the default. 
Formatted text extracts the text content but keeps font, colour, font and size so it 
is like editing a Word document. This may be simpler. It better represents the 
output of the page if you are creating a re-flowing PDF file. 
Plain text presents only the text content. This is best if you want to work with the 
text content only, for example if you will be converting the text to audio. 
Verifier 
In the Proofing stage you are working with what ClaroRead Pro thinks is the underlying 
page content. If you are scanning from a paper or an image file then this may be 
inaccurate - for example, you may have some damaged area of the paper that has 
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Demo Code in VB.NET. The following VB.NET codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
bookmark pdf documents; how to add bookmarks to pdf document
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. Comments, forms and multimedia. Hidden layer content. Convert smooth lines to curves. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
how to add bookmark in pdf; create bookmark in pdf automatically
confused ClaroRead. It might be hard to correct the text in the Proofing view if you don't 
have sight of the original image.  
The Verifier provides you with a view of the underlying image or paper that ClaroRead is 
processing. This lets you check the text you have got (in the Text Editor) against what 
was on the original page (in the Verifier). Just turn it on in the View menu (Verifier 
submenu, select Show) and click anywhere in the Text Editor text. The Verifier then 
shows the original page at that point so you can check they match. You can zoom this 
original view in and out to check smaller details with the Zoom submenu.  
By default the Verifier is shown at the top of the Text Editor. To make it float (follow the 
cursor) select Dynamic. To change what is shown in the floating Verifier select Line, 
Three words or One word from the Verifier submenu. 
Character Map 
You may have non-standard characters for your current language in your text. For 
example, in a maths textbook you will often have Greek characters like sigma (Σ) or pi 
(Π). This may confuse ClaroRead (if it is scanning English it will try to fit every letter into 
an English character, for example) and produce wrong results. You can solve this and 
improve scanning by adding these non-standard characters to the set of recognised 
characters by using the Character Map. Make the character set you want to use visible 
by selecting it in View, Character Map, Character sets. Then click on the characters to 
add to the recognised set of characters for your scanning. These will be used in 
subsequent scans and remembered, so you only have to do this once. The characters 
you select will be added to the document, so simply delete them.  
Character Training 
You may want to correct some sections of text which have been incorrectly identified, 
like Greek letters used in maths or scanned text from paper. These characters or 
sections will be highlighted in yellow in the Text Editor. Click on the character to place 
the caret on it. Then select "Train character recognition" from the Tools menu. The 
"Train Character" window will open, showing the original text/image and what ClaroRead 
thinks it is. Enter the correct character or characters in the "Correct" box and click Train 
to correct the scanned text. These corrections will be remembered for next time. 
You can review the character training by selecting "Edit character training" from the 
Tools menu. Select and delete any training you do not want to be saved, or right-click 
and edit it.  
You may need to train several characters, for example where ClaroRead has incorrectly 
identified a single letter as several letters. Simple select all the affected letters before 
you click "Train character recognition" and the training and correction will be applied to 
all the letters. 
Format 
You can edit the text in the Proofing dialog, and the Format menu lets you change font, 
paragraph alignment, style and other text attributes. This is useful if you are planning to 
save the document as a PDF file and want to amend how it will look, for example using a 
more readable font to replace what has been used in the original scanned document. 
However, if you are sending the document to Word to read or edit you will probably find 
this easier to do there. 
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
it extremely easy for C# developers to convert and transform document file, converted by C#.NET PDF to HTML all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and font
copy pdf bookmarks to another pdf; delete bookmarks pdf
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
Create Word from PDF; Create Word from OpenOffice (.odt); More about Word SDK Word Export. Convert Word to PDF; Convert Word to HTML5; Convert Word to Tiff; Convert
creating bookmarks pdf files; auto bookmark pdf
Note that if you are saving as PDF the original position and size of text areas will be 
retained. So if you make text bigger it will start to overlap and bits will be missing. If 
you want to edit the document you are scanning we suggest sending it to Microsoft Word 
to edit and correct it, rather than using the Proofing dialogue. 
Proofreading 
Just like Microsoft Word, the Proofing dialog will take you through all the identified 
spelling or OCR errors in the current document. Just select Proofread from the Tools 
menu and the Proofreading process will start. You will be shown the next spelling or OCR 
problem and can decide whether to correct or add it, just like the spell check in Word. 
Changes will be remembered for future scanning sessions. When you have finished with 
a page or document click the Page Ready or Document Ready button and no more errors 
on this page will be identified. When there are no more errors in the document then the 
Proofread option will grey out. 
You can also press F4 or select "Find next suspect" to jump straight to the next identified 
error in the page without opening the Proofreading process.  
Language 
It is vital that ClaroRead has the language of the document correct, or it will not 
recognise (OCR) correctly and it will identify all the words as incorrectly-spelled. The 
Status Bar will show the language of the current text (where the caret is positioned). You 
can select text and identify the correct language by selecting the language from the 
Tools menu.  
C# Word - Convert Word to HTML in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and font C#: Convert Word document to HTML5 files.
convert word to pdf with bookmarks; excel pdf bookmarks
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx); Convert PDF to HTML; Convert PDF to
add bookmarks to pdf; bookmarks in pdf files
Making Accessible PDF files 
PDF files are very common but can be very hard to use. ClaroRead Pro and Plus give you 
ways to make them usable and accessible.  
This is a guide to making accessible PDF files with ClaroRead. For an in-depth discussion 
of PDF accessibility, see PDF and Accessibility. 
Quick approach 
This is suitable for individual users who want to make PDF files for their own use from 
scanning books or documents, or who have a PDF file that they need to read but is 
inaccessible (does not read at all or does not read very well). It works for ClaroRead Plus 
(versions 5.7 or later) or ClaroRead Pro. 
accessible by ClaroRead.  
ClaroRead.  
file for future reference much quicker than scanning it again.  
You can always re-scan the PDF file with ClaroRead Plus or Pro if you want to alter its 
accessibility or format or convert it into Microsoft Word to edit it. 
The ClaroRead scanning process is optimised to produce an accessible PDF file, so even if 
you can read a PDF okay but you have some problems (like jumping around the page), it 
may work better if you scan it and save as a PDF file again. 
Advanced approach 
This is suitable for someone who wants to create a canonical, high-quality accessible PDF 
file, maybe for redistribution or long-term storage. It works for ClaroRead Pro, although 
you can still correct the reading order in the Preview window with ClaroRead Plus. 
1.
Decide on your target audience. The basic split is "screenreader users and people 
with very low vision" versus "mouse users and people with reading problems" Or 
"blind" versus "dyslexic" to simplify. See PDF and Accessibility for a discussion on 
the differences. 
2.
Decide how much work you want to do on the document content. Are you 
essentially making the existing file accessible (for a dyslexic user, for example) or 
are you doing more work to re-purpose the content more fundamentally 
(stripping out extraneous content for screenreader users, for example)? 
3.
ClaroRead Pro settings 
o
a. Turn on Preview and (optionally) Proofing in the ClaroRead Pro settings 
Scanning tab. 
o
b. Set the correct OCR language in the ClaroRead Pro Scanning settings 
tab. 
o
c. For "blind" users consider turning off images and simplifying format. For 
"dyslexic" users turn on images and use the original format.  
4.
Scan in from paper or file using ClaroRead Pro. 
ClaroRead Pro will attempt to determine the correct reading order in the 
document, and remove unwanted images. 
5.
Correct reading order in the Preview window. 
o
a. Delete superfluous content for "blind" users such as headers and 
footers.  
o
b. Remove page numbers and other non-reading content for "dyslexic" 
users.  
ClaroRead now performs OCR, converting all inaccessible content into accessible 
text. 
6.
Correct text content in the Proofing window. 
o
a. Correct spellings and incorrect OCR results.  
o
b. Add full stops at the end of titles and other lines without punctuation.  
7.
Output to your desired format.  
o
a. If you need to make major changes to the document then Send it to 
Word. Word is a far better editing and word processing tool than 
ClaroRead. If you have Word 2010 you can then save the Word document 
as a PDF file directly. Make sure it is tagged (Save As, PDF, Options, check 
"Document structure tags for accessibility".) You can also add contents 
and headings in Word 2010. This may be suitable for "blind" users.  
o
b. If you're okay with the content as it stands (correct reading order, no 
spelling mistakes) then Save it as a File. Make sure it is at least PDF 
version 1.4. Do not optimize for size. Do not show background image 
layers.  
i. If you want the output to look exactly like the original then Save 
it as a ClaroRead PDF. This is the only way to make sure the output 
looks exactly like the original scanned PDF or book, which is very 
helpful for "dyslexic" users.  
ii. If you want the output to be able to be reflowed and zoomed and 
don't mind about it looking identical to the original then Save it as 
PDF Edited or even text. This is useful for "blind" users.  
For PDF output, accessibility information tags are added here  
8.
Read back with ClaroRead (Adobe Reader, Microsoft Word, or use Save to Audio 
or Video) or distribute the accessible file to others. Keep the file safe so you don't 
have to go through the preparation process again.  
PDF and Accessibility 
This is a guide to PDF, how it affects people trying to use assistive technology (A.T.) with 
it, and what can be done. It assumes familiarity with A.T., whether a screenreader or 
magnifier or reading toolbar like ClaroRead, and with Adobe Reader. It is designed for 
organisations producing PDF files and for A.T. practitioners to better-understand the 
issues. It may be of use to Adobe Reader users who want to understand how best to 
approach PDFs.  
Chapter 1 describes PDF, how it fits into business processes, and why it is popular. It 
tells you how you can approach the production of accessible PDF files.  
Chapter 2 describes the specific technical problems with PDF for the “traditional” 
screenreader user, why it can be hard to use, and the solution (tags) that Adobe has 
invented to help.  
Chapter 3 describes how Adobe Reader handles a PDF and the implications for how a 
PDF should be structured.  
Chapter 4 catalogues the visual display options for Adobe Reader and how they interact 
with the accessibility features.  
Chapter 5 provides a set of “best” settings for Adobe Reader or for accessible PDF files. 
Chapter 1: The Adobe Portable Document Format 
(PDF) 
PDF does a great job for what it is designed to do: it describes what should be printed on 
paper. It was invented so that people creating documents on the new desktop publishing 
technology in the 1980s and 1990s could send them to printers and have them appear 
as they intended – font, colours, layout.  
So PDF works in terms of pages, and what images and text goes where on each page. It 
has no idea of things like headings, or columns, or chapters, or words or sentences.  
PDFs fit into traditional business print processes very well, and still does: 
Writers write text in a word processor (Microsoft Word, Pages, OpenOffice). Graphic 
artists create images (Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Inkscape, GNU Image 
Processor).  
Graphic designers and editors lay out the text and images in a desktop publishing 
program to create the brochure or report or book (Adobe InDesign, Microsoft Publisher, 
Quark Express, Scribus). 
The ready-to-print document is exported from the desktop publishing program as a 
PDF file and sent to managers and stakeholders to review. Minor corrections are made 
and the final PDF sent a commercial printer. Because PDF cares about font, and colour, 
and layout, the editor can be confident that the printed document will look just as they 
intended. 
The problems arose when people started trying to use PDFs not for print but for online 
distribution and eBooks and other non-print purposes. There were and are good reasons 
for this. The existing business processes had already produced millions of PDF files and 
continued to produce new PDF files as the final, edited format, so it was no extra work. 
PDF is an open format, so every platform has a PDF reader and they all display 
documents the same – you can’t send a Microsoft Word document to someone on a 
different platform and count on it looking the same. Adobe has always provided a free 
reader, Adobe Reader, for most users. PDFs let you keep your publications in your 
corporate font and colours and style, so your manager is happy. There is an incorrect 
belief that PDF files cannot be edited or changed, so people are confident that their 
documents will always present their intended message. And finally, PDF gives you a way 
to collect images and text together in a single file, which gave it the edge over that other 
ubiquitous format, HTML, when you want to email your report. 
It is likely, then, that any organisation produces PDFs as their main form of content 
production, second only perhaps to their website. Often the substantive content on the 
website itself is in PDF – reports, brochures, newsletters. 
But while PDF is convenient for creators and distributors of content, it is not for some 
consumers of content, notably people who are not in a position to use Adobe Reader to 
display PDF on a standard desktop system (or print the document!) and read the content 
visually off the page. People who use assistive technologies like screenreaders and 
magnifiers have considerable problems with PDF, described in more detail in Chapter 2. 
What can be done? 
There are two options: stop using PDF and make the PDFs you produce accessible.  
For the reasons given above you are probably not in a position to stop producing PDFs. 
You will still be delivering files to printers. You will still be doing your final editing and 
approval in PDF. The final PDF file is your canonical document for distribution. You could 
change your business process: for example, when the text for your documents are 
created in a word processor, before it is laid out, it is in a format that makes sense for 
assistive technology – big lumps of text. But that means duplicating effort in your 
business process. The flow of content from writer and artist to final document has to be 
performed twice, once with PDF as the intended output and once with an alternative 
format in mind. This can be expensive. It could backfire if you choose the “wrong” 
alternative format. And the extra delay to produce the alternative format is likely to be a 
problem.  
So you are probably going to want to keep creating PDF files, and make them accessible 
after the fact. There are several ways of doing this.  
You can take just one step back, to the desktop publishing program that produced the 
PDF, and use its ability to support accessible PDF output. For example, Adobe InDesign 
lets you set reading order and created tagged documents when you output to PDF. 
However, as noted above, this may not be just one step: it may be many steps. This 
probably requires the most in-house investment in time and skills.  
You can use another application to take the PDF and make it accessible. They vary in 
terms of cost, ease-of-use, and the ability to automate the process. This can be easy or 
hard but is quite cost-effective depending on the tool. 
You can send your PDF files to an external agency, which will use one of the afore-
mentioned tools to make the PDF more accessible. This is the easiest but most 
expensive option. Your printer may offer this service, although PDF accessibility is a 
specialised field.  
Whichever approach you take, if you are interested in the accessibility of your PDFs, the 
rest of this document will help you understand the issues
Chapter 2: The basics of PDF Accessibility – Tags 
PDF is a format designed for printing and displaying on the screen, so it often does not 
work well with speech and other assistive technologies. 
These are the problems with PDF in the context of trying to use them with A.T.: 
1.
Images. It can have bitmap images in them - pictures of text, not text itself. This 
means that the content cannot be read at all. This must be solved by OCR - optical 
character recognition - turning the image into text.  
2.
Reading order. It does not know in which order things should be read - so it does not 
understand that you read down columns, then to the top of the next column, for 
example. This means that when you try to read a PDF it reads across columns, or jumps 
about the page, or reads out of order. 
3.
Structure. It does not know anything about content, like "headings" or "lists" or even 
"sentences" and "paragraphs" - so you can't skip to headings and when you try to read 
by sentence the highlighting goes wrong. Not being able to skip around is okay for 
sighted mouse users because they can see the headings and chapters and suchlike, 
scroll around and click where they want to play. It's difficult for blind screenreader users, 
who have no way to skip around the document and make sense of all the text. The lack 
of "sentence" and "paragraph" structure can lead to odd reading for everybody, like 
sentences being split in the wrong place or highlighting not matching the sentence being 
read. (In formal terms this is referred to as “semantics” – PDF files do not have any 
semantic information.) 
4.
Zoom. It does not reflow well. That is, if you are reading text on a mobile 'phone, or 
zooming in because your vision is poor, it is hard to read a page if you have to scroll left 
and right to see the whole of every line. It is much easier if the page reflows - 
rearranges to cope with the larger text size - and you still only have to scroll up and 
down. 
To solve Problem 1 (images) you have to do OCR - there is no way round that. But even 
if all the text in your PDF file is text, not images of text, you still have Problems 2, 3 and 
4 (reading order, structure, zoom) 
To solve these problems Adobe added features called tags. These tell Adobe Reader 
what order should be used for the text and provides chapters, headings and other styles. 
So a tagged document is much more accessible for reading. To be exact, a document 
must have tags to be read. These tags provide the information to allow reading order, 
structure and zooming to work.  
However, most documents are not tagged. Adobe Reader will therefore attempt to work 
out tags when it opens these documents. This has two problems: first, it can take a long 
time. That dialogue that comes up when you open a PDF file, "Preparing document for 
reading" - that is Reader working out the tags. A hundred-page PDF file, which is really 
quite common, can take a few minutes on a fast machine, which is very off-putting if you 
just want to quickly check out a document. Second, it may not be very accurate. 
Columns, textboxes, and captions can all confuse Reader when it tries to create a 
reading order. No attempt at structure is made. Reflowing the PDF file may not work 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested