pdf parser c# : Create bookmark pdf control Library system azure .net windows console cloudsearch-dg11-part1020

Searching for a Date Range
To search for a range of dates (or times) in a date field, you use the same bracketed range syntax that
you use for numeric values, but you must enclose the date string in single quotes. For example, the
following request searches the movie data for all movies with a release date of January 1, 2013 or later:
release_date:['2013-01-01T00:00:00Z',}
Searching for a Location Range
You can perform a bounding box search by searching for a range of locations.To search for a range of
locations in a latlon field, you use the same bracketed range syntax that you use for numeric values,
but you must enclose the latitude/longitude pair in single quotes.
For example, if you include a location field in each document, you could specify your bounding box
filter as location:['nn.n,nn.n','nn.n,nn.n']. In the following example, the matches for restaurant
are filtered so that only matches within the downtown area of Paso Robles, CA are included in the results.
q='restaurant'&fq=location:['35.628611,-120.694152','35.621966,-
120.686706']&q.parser=structured
For more information, see Searching and Ranking Results by Geographic Location in Amazon
CloudSearch (p.105).
Searching for a Text Range
You can also search a text or literal field for a range of values using the bracketed range syntax. Like
dates, the text strings must be enclosed in single quotes. For example, the following request searches
the movie data for a range of document IDs.To reference a document's ID, you use the special field
name _id.
_id:['tt1000000','tt1005000']
Searching and Ranking Results by Geographic
Location in Amazon CloudSearch
If you store locations in your document data using a latlon field, you can use the haversin function
in an Amazon CloudSearch expression to compute the distance between two locations. Storing locations
with your document data also enables you to easily search within particular areas.
Topics
• Searching Within an Area in Amazon CloudSearch (p.105)
• Sorting Results by Distance in Amazon CloudSearch (p.106)
Searching Within an Area in Amazon CloudSearch
To associate a location with a search document, you can store the location's latitude and longitude in a
latlon field using decimal degree notation.The values are specified as a comma-separated list,
API Version 2013-01-01
105
Amazon CloudSearch Developer Guide
Searching for a Date Range
Create bookmark pdf - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
add bookmarks to pdf; adding bookmarks to a pdf
Create bookmark pdf - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
create pdf bookmarks from word; bookmark a pdf file
lat,lon—for example 35.628611,-120.694152. Associating a location with a document enables you
to easily constrain search hits to a particular area with the fq parameter.
To use a bounding box to constrain results to a particular area
1. Determine the latitude and longitude of the upper-left and lower-right corners of the area you are
interested in.
2. Use the fq parameter to filter the matching documents using those bounding box coordinates. For
example, if you include a location field in each document, you could specify your bounding box
filter as fq=location:['nn.n,nn.n','nn.n,nn.n'] . In the following example, the matches
for restaurant are filtered so that only matches within the downtown area of Paso Robles, CA are
included in the results.
q='restaurant'&fq=location:['35.628611,-120.694152','35.621966,-
120.686706']&q.parser=structured
Sorting Results by Distance in Amazon
CloudSearch
You can define an expression as part of your search request to sort results by distance. Amazon
CloudSearch expressions support the haversin function, which computes the great-circle distance
between two points on a sphere using the latitude and longitude of each point. (For more information,
see Haversine formula.) The resulting distance is returned in kilometers.
To calculate the distance between each matching document and the user, you pass the user's location
into the haversin function and reference the document locations stored in a latlon field.You specify
the user latitude and longitude in decimal degree notation and access the latitude and longitude stored
in a latlon as FIELD.latitude and FIELD.longitude. For example,
expr.distance=haversin(userlat,userlon, location.latitude,location.longitude).
To use the expression to sort the search results, you specify the sort parameter.
For example, the following query searches for restaurants and sorts the results by distance from the user.
q=restaurant&expr.distance=haversin(35.621966,-120.686706,location.latitude,loc 
ation.longitude)&sort=distance asc
Note that you must explicitly specify the sort direction, asc or desc.
You can include the distance calculated for each document in the search results by specifying the name
of the expression with the return parameter. For example, return=distance.
You can also use the distance value in more complex expressions to take other characteristics into
account, such as a document's relevance _score. In the following example, a second rank expression
uses both the document's calculated distance and its relevance _score.
expr.distance=haversin(38.958687,-77.343149,latitude,longitude)&ex 
pr.myrank=_score/log(distance)&sort=-myrank
For more information about using expressions to sort search results, see Controlling Search Results (p.129).
API Version 2013-01-01
106
Amazon CloudSearch Developer Guide
Sorting Results by Distance
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
C#, C#.NET PDF Reading, C#.NET Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET
creating bookmarks in pdf from word; copy pdf bookmarks to another pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Ability to get word count of PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
bookmark pdf acrobat; how to create bookmark in pdf with
Searching DynamoDB Data with Amazon
CloudSearch
You can specify a DynamoDB table as a source when configuring indexing options or uploading data to
a search domain through the console or command line tools.This enables you to quickly set up a search
domain to experiment with searching data stored in DynamoDB database tables.
To keep your search domain in sync with changes to the table, you can send updates to both your table
and your search domain, or you can periodically load the entire table into a new search domain.
Topics
• Configuring an Amazon CloudSearch Domain to Search DynamoDB Data (p.107)
• Uploading Data to Amazon CloudSearch from DynamoDB (p.109)
• Synchronizing a Search Domain with a DynamoDB Table  (p.111)
Configuring an Amazon CloudSearch Domain to
Search DynamoDB Data
The easiest way to configure a search domain to search DynamoDB data is to use the Amazon
CloudSearch console.The console's configuration wizard analyzes your table data and suggests indexing
options based on the attributes in the table.You can modify the suggested configuration to control which
table attributes are indexed.
You can also use the command line tools to generate document batches from your table and automatically
configure your domain, or you can configure indexing options manually. For general information about
configuring indexing options, see Configuring Index Fields (p.64).
Note
To upload data from DynamoDB, you must have permission to access both the service and the
resources you want to upload. For more information, see Using IAM to Control Access to
DynamoDB Resources.
When you automatically configure a search domain from a DynamoDB table, a maximum of 200 unique
attributes can be mapped to index fields. (You cannot configure more than 200 fields for a search domain,
so you can only upload data from DynamoDB tables with 200 or fewer attributes.) When Amazon
CloudSearch detects an attribute that has a small number of distinct values, the field is facet enabled in
the suggested configuration.
Important
When you use a DynamoDB table to configure a domain, the data is not automatically uploaded
to the domain for indexing.You must upload the data for indexing as a separate step after you
configure the domain.
Configuring a Domain to Search DynamoDB using the
Amazon CloudSearch Console
You can use the Amazon CloudSearch console to analyze data from a DynamoDB table to configure a
search domain. A maximum of 5 MB is read from the table regardless of the table size. By default, Amazon
CloudSearch reads from the beginning of the table.You can specify a start key to begin reading from a
particular item.
API Version 2013-01-01
107
Amazon CloudSearch Developer Guide
Searching DynamoDB Data
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
create bookmark pdf file; bookmarks in pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Qualified Tiff files are exported with high resolution in VB.NET. Create multipage Tiff image files from PDF in VB.NET project. Support
convert word to pdf with bookmarks; add bookmarks pdf
To configure a search domain using a DynamoDB table
1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the Amazon CloudSearch console at https://
console.aws.amazon.com/cloudsearch/home.
2. In the Navigation pane, click the name of the domain, and then click the domain's Indexing Options
link.
3. At the top of the Indexing Options pane, click the configuration wizard link.
4. In the Choose Source step, select Analyze sample item(s) from DynamoDB.
5. From the DynamoDB Table list, select the DynamoDB table that you want to analyze.
• To limit the read capacity units that can be consumed while reading from the table, enter the
maximum percentage of read capacity units you want to use.
• To start reading from a particular item, specify a Start Hash Key. If the table uses a hash and
range type primary key, specify both the hash attribute and the range attribute for the item.
6. When you finish specifying the table options, click Continue.
7. In the Review Configuration step, review the suggested configuration.You can edit these fields
and add additional fields.
8. When you finish, click Apply Configuration.
9. In the Apply Configuration step, you can choose to run indexing when you exit the configuration
wizard. If you haven't uploaded data to your domain yet, clear the Run Indexing Now checkbox to
exit without indexing. If you are done making configuration changes and are ready to index your data
with the new configuration, make sure Run Indexing Now is selected.When you are ready to apply
the changes, click Finish.
You can also use a DynamoDB table to configure indexing options when you first create a domain. In the
Configure Index step, select Analyze sample item(s) from DynamoDB and select the table to analyze.
Configuring a Domain to Search a DynamoDB Table Using
the Amazon CloudSearch Command Line Tools
You can use the cs-import-documents  (p.145) and cs-configure-from-batches  (p.144) commands to
configure a domain based on the data in a DynamoDB table.
To configure a search domain using a DynamoDB table
1. Run the cs-import-documents command and specify the --source and --output options.The
source is the name of a DynamoDB table.The output is the local directory or Amazon S3 bucket
where you want to save the generated document batches.
cs-import-documents --source ddb://myDDBTable --output c:\myddbdata
Note
You can make changes to the generated document data before you use it to configure your
domain. For more information about mapping your data to index fields, see Preparing Your
Data (p.58). For information about customizing your domain configuration, see Configuring
Index Fields (p.64).
2. Run the cs-configure-from-batches command and specify the --domain and --source
options.The domain is the name of the search domain you are configuring.The source specifies the
document batch (or batches) to use to configure the domain.
API Version 2013-01-01
108
Amazon CloudSearch Developer Guide
Configuring a Domain to Search DynamoDB Data
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Create PDF from Tiff. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Create PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from Tiff in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET application.
bookmarks pdf files; bookmarks pdf
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
C#.NET PDF SDK- Create PDF from Word in Visual C#. Online C#.NET Tutorial for Create PDF from Microsoft Office Excel Spreadsheet Using .NET XDoc.PDF Library.
copy bookmarks from one pdf to another; bookmarks in pdf files
cs-configure-from-batches --domain ddb-cs-search --source c:\myddbdata\*
Uploading Data to Amazon CloudSearch from
DynamoDB
You can upload DynamoDB data to a search domain through the Amazon CloudSearch console or with
the Amazon CloudSearch command line tools.When you upload data from a DynamoDB table, Amazon
CloudSearch converts it to document batches so it can be indexed.You select define index fields for
each of the attributes in your domain configuration. For more information, see Configuring an Amazon
CloudSearch Domain to Search DynamoDB Data (p.107).
You can upload data from more than one DynamoDB table to the same Amazon CloudSearch domain.
However, keep in mind that you can upload a maximum of 200 attributes from all tables combined. If an
item with the same key appears in more than one uploaded table, the last-applied item overwrites all
previous versions.
When converting table data to document batches, Amazon CloudSearch generates a document for each
item it reads from the table, and represents each item attribute as a document field.The unique ID for
each document is either read from the docid item attribute (if it exists) or assigned an alphanumeric
value based on the primary key.
When Amazon CloudSearch generates documents for table items:
• Sets of strings and sets of numbers are represented as multi-value fields. If a DynamoDB set contains
more than 100 values, only the first 100 values are added to the multi-value field.
• DynamoDB binary attributes are ignored.
• Attribute names are modified to conform to the Amazon CloudSearch naming conventions for field
names:
• All uppercase letters are converted to lowercase.
• If the DynamoDB attribute name does not begin with a letter, the field name is prefixed with f_.
• Any characters other than a-z, 0-9, and _ (underscore) are replaced by an underscore. If this
transformation results in a duplicate field name, a number is appended to make the field name unique.
For example, the attribute names håth-t, hát would be mapped to h_t, h_t1, and h_t2
respectively.
• If the DynamoDB attribute name exceeds 64 characters, the first 56 characters of the attribute name
are concatenated with the 8-character MD5 hash of the full attribute name to form the field name.
• If the attribute name is body, it is mapped to the field name f_body.
• If the attribute name is  _score it is mapped to the field name  f_ _score.
• Number attributes are mapped to Amazon CloudSearch int fields and the values are transformed to
32-bit unsigned integers:
• If a number attribute contains a decimal value, only the integral part of the value is stored. Everything
to the right of the decimal point is dropped.
• If the value is larger than can be stored as an unsigned integer, the value is truncated.
• Negative integers are treated as unsigned positive integers.
API Version 2013-01-01
109
Amazon CloudSearch Developer Guide
Uploading Data from DynamoDB
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
C#.NET PDF SDK- Create PDF from PowerPoint in C#. How to Use C#.NET PDF Control to Create PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation in .NET Project.
how to create bookmark in pdf automatically; how to create bookmarks in pdf file
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#, C#.NET PDF Reading, C#.NET Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET
export pdf bookmarks to excel; how to add bookmarks to a pdf
Uploading DynamoDB Data to a Domain through the Amazon
CloudSearch Console
You can use the Amazon CloudSearch console to upload up to 5 MB of data from a DynamoDB table to
a search domain.To upload a larger amount of data from a DynamoDB table, use the command line
tools (p.110).
To upload DynamoDB data using the console
1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the Amazon CloudSearch console at https://
console.aws.amazon.com/cloudsearch/home.
2. In the Navigation pane, click the name of the domain.
3. At the top of the domain dashboard, click Upload Documents.
4. In the Document Source step, select Item(s) from DynamoDB.
5. In the DynamoDB Table list, select the DynamoDB table that contains your data.
• To limit the read capacity units that can be consumed while reading from the table, enter the
maximum percentage of read capacity units.
• To start reading from a particular item, specify a Start Hash Key. If the table uses a hash and
range type primary key, specify both the hash attribute and the range attribute for the item.
6. When you finish specifying the table options, click Continue.
7. In the Review Documents step, review the items that will be uploaded. (You can also save the
generated document batch by clicking Download the generated document batch.) When you
finish, click Upload Documents.
8. In the Document Summary step, click Finish to exit the upload documents wizard.
Uploading DynamoDB Data to a Domain Using the Amazon
CloudSearch Command Line Tools
You can use the cs-import-documents  (p.145) command to process and upload items in a DynamoDB
table.
To upload DynamoDB data using the command line tools
Run the cs-import-documents command and specify the --source and --domain options.The
source is the name of the DynamoDB table that contains your data.The domain is the name of the
search domain you want to use to search the data.
cs-import-documents --domain ddb-cs-search --source ddb://myDDBTable 
Note
You can save the generated document batches to your local file system or an Amazon S3
bucket by specifying the --output option instead of the --domain option.This enables
you to review and modify the document data before uploading it with the cs-import-documents
(p.145) command.
API Version 2013-01-01
110
Amazon CloudSearch Developer Guide
Uploading Data from DynamoDB
Synchronizing a Search Domain with a DynamoDB
Table
To keep your search domain in sync with updates to your DynamoDB table, you can either programmatically
track and apply updates to your domain, or periodically create a new domain and upload the entire table
again. If you have a large amount of data, it's best to track and apply updates programmatically.
Programmatically Synchronizing Updates
To synchronize changes and additions to your DynamoDB table, you can create a separate update table
to track the changes to the table you are searching and periodically upload the contents of the update
table to the corresponding search domain.
To remove documents from the search domain, you must generate and upload document batches that
contain a delete operation for each deleted document. One option is to use a separate DynamoDB table
to track deleted items, periodically process the table to generate a batch of delete operations, and upload
the batch to your search domain.
To make sure that you don't lose any changes that are made during the initial data upload, you must
begin collecting tracking changes before the initial data upload.While you might update some Amazon
CloudSearch documents with identical data, you ensure that no changes are lost and your search domain
contains an up-to-date version of every document.
How often you synchronize updates depends on the volume of changes and your update latency tolerance.
One approach is to accumulate changes over a fixed time period and at the end of the time period upload
the changes and delete the period's tracking tables.
For example, to synchronize changes and additions once a day, at the beginning of each day you could
create a table called updates_YYYY_MM_DD to collect the daily updates. At the end of the day, you
upload the updates_YYYY_MM_DD table to your search domain. (If the update table is larger than 5 MB,
you must use the command line tools.) After the upload is complete, you can delete the update table and
create a new one for the next day.
Switching to a New Search Domain
If you don't want to track and apply individual updates to your table, you can periodically load the entire
table into a new search domain and then switch your query traffic over to the new domain.
To switch to a new search domain
1. Create a new search domain and copy the configuration from your existing domain.
2. Upload the entire DynamoDB table to the new domain. (If the table is larger than 5 MB, you must
use the command line tools to upload it.) For more information, see Uploading Data to Amazon
CloudSearch from DynamoDB (p.109).
3. After the new domain is active, update the DNS entry that directs query traffic to the old search
domain to point to the new domain. For example, if you use Amazon Route 53, you can simply update
the recordset with your new search service endpoint.
4. Delete the old domain.
API Version 2013-01-01
111
Amazon CloudSearch Developer Guide
Synchronizing a Search Domain with a DynamoDB Table
Filtering Matching Documents in Amazon
CloudSearch
You use the fq parameter to filter the documents that match the search criteria specified with the q
parameter without affecting the relevance scores of the documents included in the search results. Specifying
a filter just controls which matching documents are included in the results, it has no effect on how they
are scored and sorted.
The fq parameter supports the structured query syntax described in Search API Reference (p.240).
For example, you could add an available field to your documents to indicate whether or not an item is
in stock, and filter on that field to limit the results to in-stock items:
search?q=star+wars&fq=available:'true'&return=title
Tuning Search Request Performance in Amazon
CloudSearch
Search requests can become very resource intensive to process, which can have an impact on the
performance and cost of running your search domain. In general, searches that return a large volume of
hits and complex structured queries are more resource intensive than simple text queries that match a
small percentage of the documents in your search domain.
If you experience slow response times, frequently encounter internal server errors (typically 507 or 509
errors), or see the number of instance hours your search domain consumes increase without a substantial
increase in the volume of data you're searching, you can fine-tune your search requests to help reduce
the processing overhead.This section reviews what to look for and steps you can take to tune your search
requests.
Analyzing Query Latency
Before you can tune your requests, you must analyze your current search performance. Log your search
requests and response times so that you can see which requests take the longest to process. Slow
searches can disproportionally affect overall performance by tying up your search domain's resources.
Optimizing the slowest search requests speeds up all of your searches.
Topics
• Reducing the Number of Hits (p.112)
• Simplifying Structured Queries (p.113)
Reducing the Number of Hits
Query latency is directly proportional to the number of matching documents. Searches that match the
most documents are generally the slowest.
Eliminating two types of searches that commonly result in a huge number of matching documents can
significantly improve overall performance:
API Version 2013-01-01
112
Amazon CloudSearch Developer Guide
Filtering Matching Documents
• Queries that match every document in your corpus (matchall).While this can be a convenient way
to list all the documents in your domain, it's a resource intensive query. If you have a lot of documents,
not only can it cause other requests to time out, it's likely to time out itself.
• Prefix (wildcard) searches with only one or two characters specified. If you're using this type of search
to provide instant results as the user types, wait until the user has entered at least two characters before
you start submitting requests and displaying the possible matches.
To reduce the number of documents that match your requests, you can also do the following:
• Eliminate irrelevant words from your corpus so they aren't using for matching.The easiest way to do
this is to add them to the stopwords list dictionary for the analysis scheme(s) you're using. Alternatively,
you can preprocess your data to strip out irrelevant words. Eliminating irrelevant words also has the
benefit of reducing the size of your index, which can help reduce costs.
• Explicitly filter the results based on the value of a particular field using the fq parameter.
If you still have requests that match a lot of documents, you can reduce latency by minimizing the amount
of processing to be done on the result set:
• Minimize the facet information that you request. Generating the facet counts adds to the time it takes
to process the request and increases the likelihood that other requests will time out. If you do request
facet information, keep in mind that the more facets you specify, the longer it takes to process the
request.
• Avoid using your own expressions for sorting.The additional processing required to sort the results
increases the likelihood that requests will time out. If you must customize how the results are sorted,
it is generally faster to use a field than to use an expression.
Keep in mind that returning a large amount of data in the search results can increase the transport time
and affect query latency. Minimize the number of return fields you use to improve performance and reduce
the size of your index.
Simplifying Structured Queries
The more clauses there are in the query criteria, the longer it takes to process the query.
If you have complex structured queries that don't perform well, you need to find a way to reduce the
number of clauses. In some cases, you might simply be able to set a limit or reformulate the query. In
others, you might need to modify your domain configuration to accommodate simpler queries.
API Version 2013-01-01
113
Amazon CloudSearch Developer Guide
Analyzing Query Latency
Querying Your Search Domain for
More Information in Amazon
CloudSearch
When you submit a search request, Amazon CloudSearch returns a collection of the documents that
match your search criteria.You can also retrieve:
• The contents of selected fields
• Facet information that enables you to categorize the results
• Statistics for the values contained in numeric fields
• Highlights that show the search hits in the field data
• Autocomplete suggestions
Topics
• Retrieving Data from Index Fields in Amazon CloudSearch (p.114)
• Getting Statistics for Numeric Fields in Amazon CloudSearch (p.115)
• Getting and Using Facet Information in Amazon CloudSearch (p.116)
• Highlighting Search Hits in Amazon CloudSearch (p.123)
• Getting Autocomplete Suggestions in Amazon CloudSearch (p.124)
Retrieving Data from Index Fields in Amazon
CloudSearch
By default, the search results include all return enabled fields.To return a subset of the return enabled
fields or return expression values for the matching documents, you can specify the return parameter.
To return only the document IDs for the matching documents, specify return=_no_fields.To retrieve
the relevance score calculated for each document, specify return=_score.You specify multiple return
fields as a comma separated list. For example, return=title,_score returns just the title and relevance
score of each matching document.
API Version 2013-01-01
114
Amazon CloudSearch Developer Guide
Retrieving Data from Index Fields
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested