c# pdf viewer open source : Add bookmarks to pdf file application SDK utility html wpf windows visual studio DevPro%20HTML5%20PDF0-part1483

5:
Jump Start
HTML
Authors: 
Richard Campbell
Daniel Egan
Wallace McClure
Michael Palermo
Dan Wahlin
Add bookmarks to pdf file - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
export bookmarks from pdf to excel; add bookmark to pdf reader
Add bookmarks to pdf file - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
how to add bookmarks on pdf; create pdf bookmarks from word
About the Authors
Richard Campbell is an architecture and infrastructure consultant, as well as a Microsoft Regional 
Director and MVP. He hosts  RunAs Radio, and he cohosts .NET Rocks and The Tablet Show. Follow 
him on Twitter: @richcampbell.
Daniel Egan is a Microsoft Developer Evangelist based in Los Angeles and the man behind the award-
winning Windows Phone 7 Unleashed events. Learn more about Daniel at his blog www.TheSocia-
bleGeek.com, or follow him on Twitter @danielegan.
Wallace “Wally” B. McClure (wallym@scalabledevelopment.com) is a Microsoft MVP, ASPInsider, 
member of the national INETA Speakers Bureau, author of seven programming books, and a partner 
in Scalable Development. He blogs at www.morewally.com and co-hosts the ASP.NET Podcast (www.
aspnetpodcast.com). Follow Wally on twitter: @wbm.
J. Michael Palermo IVis a Microsoft Developer Evangelist based in Phoenix. Michael’s current passion 
is all things HTML5. You can find Michael blogging at www.palermo4.com, or follow him on Twitter 
at @palermo4.
Dan Wahlin is a Microsoft MVP and founded The Wahlin Group, which specializes in ASP.NET MVC, 
jQuery, Silverlight, and SharePoint consulting and training solutions. Dan has written several books on 
.NET and writes for several different technical magazines. He blogs at weblogs.asp.net/dwahlin.
About the Authors 
1
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Compress & decompress PDF document file while maintaining original content of target PDF document file. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels
creating bookmarks pdf; add bookmarks pdf
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. Comments, forms and multimedia. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
adding bookmarks to pdf reader; convert excel to pdf with bookmarks
Contents
About the Authors ..............................................................................................1
Introduction .......................................................................................................3
Chapter 1: The Past, Present, and Future of HTML5 ...........................................5
Chapter 2: Three of the Most Important Basic Elements in HTML5 ..................15
Chapter Three: HTML5 Is in Style: Working with CSS3 and HTML5 .................20
Chapter 4: HTML5 Form Input Enhancements:  
Form Validation, CSS3, and JavaScript ............................................................32
Chapter 5: HTML5 Syntax and Semantics: Why They Matter ...........................38
Chapter 6: Introduction to HTML5 for Mobile App Development ...................50
Chapter 7: HTML5 for the ASP.NET Developer ................................................63
Chapter 8: Getting Started Using HTML5 Boilerplate ......................................74
Chapter 9: Start Using HTML5 
in Your Web Apps—Today! ..............................................................................82
Chapter 10: Ease HTML5 Web Development 
with jQuery, Knockout, and Modernizr Libraries ...........................................95
Chapter 11: Build a jQuery  
HTML5 Web Application:  
The Account at a Glance App ...........................................................................97
Chapter 12: How to Build a jQuery HTML5 Web Application  
with Client-Side Coding ...............................................................................106
2
Contents
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic. Codec.dll. Split PDF File by Top Level Bookmarks Demo Code in VB.NET.
bookmarks pdf file; how to bookmark a pdf file
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references: Split PDF file by top level bookmarks.
create bookmark pdf file; split pdf by bookmark
Chapter 13: Explore the New World of JavaScript 
Focused Client-Side Web Development ........................................................116
Chapter 14:  
Storing Your Data in HTML5 ..........................................................................124
Chapter 15:  
Using the HTML5 Canvas Tag .........................................................................130
Chapter 16:  HTML5 Tutorial: Build a Chart with JavaScript  
and the HTML5 Canvas ................................................................................139
Contents 
3
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail Insert and add text to any page of PDF Delete and remove text from PDF file using accurate
pdf create bookmarks; copy pdf bookmarks
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures metadata adding control, you can add some additional information to generated PDF file.
delete bookmarks pdf; bookmark pdf acrobat
Introduction
This is an exciting time to be a web developer! Whether you are building public-facing website 
applications or creating internal sites for your company, HTML5 has much to offer in providing sorely 
needed features that are native to the browser. With growing support among all the major browsers 
and with new sites emerging that consistently use it, HTML5 is a must-visit technology for any serious 
web developer today.
This eBook, with chapters written by five HTML5 experts, is designed to jump start you into using 
HTML5. Not only will you learn the history of HTML and web development, you’ll find tutorials, boil-
erplates, and detailed discussions that will help shorten your HTML5 learning curve.
4
Introduction
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and font to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to Add necessary references
export pdf bookmarks to text; adding bookmarks to pdf document
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail Convert Word to PDF; Convert Word to HTML5; Convert Add and insert a blank page or multiple
create bookmarks in pdf from excel; add bookmark pdf file
Chapter 1: The Past, Present,  
and Future of HTML5
Ready, set, start your HTML5 learning with a look at the evolution  
of HTML and basic HTML5 coding 
By Michael Palermo and Daniel Egan
Stop and think for a moment about how long you’ve been a developer. For some of you, that journey 
started recently. For others, it has been years. However long it’s been, do you realize that less than a 
decade ago, the .NET revolution had not officially started? Classic ASP was the primary way we devel-
oped for the web, and HTML was at version—wait a minute—is still at version 4.01!
Despite sluggish transformations regarding HTML overall, small to very dramatic changes in technolo-
gies that are based on HTML have occurred. Think of the changes that have occurred in web browsers, 
JavaScript, and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). Think of how AJAX has changed the way many web devel-
opers approach communications between the browser and server-side resources. The web has seen 
many changes but with virtually no change to its core language, HTML. However, that logjam is about 
to bust with HTML5.
A Brief History of HTML5
Before we discuss what HTML5 has to offer, we should note that attempts have been made to change 
HTML. Note the word ischange, notupgradeorrevise. But what does that mean? Why is it important 
to consider the failed attempts to change HTML? So that you can appreciate why HTML5 is worth 
investigating and why it is here to stay. For these reasons, let’s take a brief journey down memory lane 
and consider the series of events that led to where we are today. Then we’ll discuss where we’ll be 
tomorrow.
You probably already know who Tim Berners-Lee is and that HTML came into existence as far back 
as 1989. You also probably know that the Internet took off in the 1990s, and so on. So instead of 
strolling through a step-by-step timeline, let’s focus on the attempts to replace HTML with something 
else.
Fast-forward to January 2000. The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) recommended Extensible 
HyperText Markup Language (XHTML) 1.0. For an XHTML document to be served correctly, the 
Chapter 1: The Past, Present,  and Future of HTML5 
5
author had to use the new application/xhtml+xml MIME type. However, Appendix C of W3C’s 
XHTML 1.0 specification made provision for pages to be served by using the common text/html 
MIME type.
More than a year later, in May 2001, the W3C recommended XHTML 1.1. The abstract of the rec-
ommendation stated, “The purpose of this document type is to serve as the basis for future extended 
XHTML ‘family’ document types, and to provide a consistent, forward-looking document type cleanly 
separated from the deprecated, legacy functionality of HTML 4 that was brought forward into the 
XHTML 1.0 document types.”
According to the abstract, XHTML was prepped to be the future of the web. The abstract boldly 
referred to HTML 4 as “deprecated, legacy functionality.” And version 1.1 of XHTML removed the 
Appendix C version 1.0 provision that allowed a page to be served with the text/html MIME type. So 
why didn’t this recommended standard replace HTML altogether? The answer is simple: Developers 
didn’t implement it.
To be sure, many developers tried to implement XHTML in their websites. XHTML mandated a well-
formed XML document using the classic HTML tags. To be well-formed, a web page would need to 
be served with no overlapping tags and no missing end tags, and the values of all attributes had to be 
enclosed in quotation marks. The notion of cleaning up our web pages wasn’t unpopular, but it wasn’t 
strictly enforced either. And even if a web developer created a well-formed web document, was it 
served with the application/xhtml+xml MIME type? Likely not. In fact, it is estimated that 99 percent 
of web pages on the Internet today contain at least one violation of the XHTML standard, which, if 
enforced, would cause the page to stop rendering and post an error to the end user. Ouch!
So now what? Exactly. WHAT was born. The Web Hypertext Applications Technology (WHAT) 
Working Group, actually known as WHATWG, came into existence in 2004 to put life back into 
HTML. This group’s intent was to move forward in a manner consistent with how the web was actu-
ally being used and to spearhead innovations in HTML while maintaining backward compatibility. 
Instead of breaking 99 percent of the web, why not embrace the way in which web pages are actually 
served? Browsers have been forgiving. Why make page-breaking changes?
Therefore, the WHATWG came up with Web Applications 1.0 while the W3C worked toward ver-
sion 2.0 of XHTML. However, near the end of 2006, it was clear that the WHATWG was gaining 
momentum while XHTML 2.0 was lacking support by any major browser. Thus, the W3C announced 
it would collaborate with the WHATWG. One of the outcomes of this union was to rename Web 
Applications 1.0 as HTML5.
Is there a lesson in this for us? Absolutely. Despite noble aims and grand ambitions, whatever the 
masses choose to adopt wins. The growing adoption of HTML5 makes it the winner. HTML5 cannot 
be ignored. Our brief history lesson demonstrates that HTML5 is here because we willed it to be here. 
(For more in-depth coverage of the history leading up to HTML5, check out Mark Pilgrim’s Dive into 
HTML5.) 
Start Using HTML5
HTML5 is not an official specification yet, but it will likely have a prominent place in website devel-
opment, given that the major browsers are gradually incorporating HTML5 features and Microsoft’s 
6
Chapter 1: The Past, Present, and Future of HTML5 
recently stated intention to incorporate “native” HTML5 in Windows. So it’s a good idea to start get-
ting familiar with HTML5 now—and you can do so without making dramatic changes to the pages 
you already have. Let’s consider a minimalistic HTML5 document, such as in Figure 1.
Figure 1: Minimalistic HTML5 document
<!DOCTYPE html> 
<title>A relatively minimal HTML document</title> 
<p>Hello World!</p>
Notice the omission of the <html> and <head> tags. According to the current specs, this is still a valid 
document. If these tags are omitted, the browser will still parse the document, and the tags will be 
implied. This represents a shift from the strict conformity imposed by the current HTML standard.
Here is another example of how easy it is to adapt to HTML5:
<!DOCTYPE html>
The doctype syntax has been simplified. Compare this to examples of what we have been accus-
tomed to, shown in Figure 2.
Figure 2: Doctype examples
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC “-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.1//EN”           
“http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml11/DTD/xhtml11.dtd”>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC “-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN” “http://www.
w3.org/TR/1999/REC-html401-19991224/loose.dtd”>
The doctype declaration is required. Although it is clearly easier to type the normal HTML5 doctype, 
the deprecated doctypes in Figure 2 are still accepted formats. By the way, the doctype declaration is 
not case sensitive, so any of the following are acceptable:
<!doctype html> 
<!doctype HTML> 
<!DOCTYPE HTML>
Now take a look at Figure 3 to see a more realistic starting point for an HTML5 document.
Figure 3: Simple HTML5 document
 <!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang=”en”> 
<head> 
<meta charset=”UTF-8”> 
<title>Getting Started With HTML5</title> 
</head> 
<body> 
Chapter 1: The Past, Present, and Future of HTML5  
7
<p>Simple text.</p> 
</body> 
</html>
You might find slight differences in this HTML5 document compared to what you are used to. Apart 
from the doctype, you might notice the attribute on the <html> tag and the contents of the <meta> 
tag. Let’s focus first on the <html> tag:
<html lang=”en”>
The lang=”en” attribute informs the browser that the contents of this document are in English. This is 
much simpler than the following:
<html xmlns=http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml 
lang=”en” 
xml:lang=”en”>
Look at how much was removed. There is no longer any need to specify the namespace of the docu-
ment because all elements in HTML5 (unless otherwise noted) belong to the http://www.w3.org/1999/
xhtml namespace. The xml:lang attribute is left over from the XHTML era. So, once again, HTML5 
presents a simpler way to do things, but for what it is worth, the older syntax is still acceptable.
Now, how about that <meta> tag? This is how we used to handle it:
<meta http-equiv=”Content-Type” content=”text/html; charset=utf-8”>
And as you have noticed, it is now this simple:
<meta charset=”UTF-8”>
Of course if you want to use the old style, that’s still okay. It’s a good practice to make this meta 
charset tag the first child of the <head> tag because the specification states that the character 
encoding declaration must appear within the first 1024 bytes of the document. Why set the encoding 
for the document? Failing to do so can cause security vulnerabilities. Although the encoding can also 
be set in the HTTP headers, it’s still a good practice to declare the encoding in the document.
These subtle differences clearly confirm the WHATWG’s commitment to maintaining backward com-
patibility while allowing changes that simplify or enhance HTML. However, not everything from the 
past is preserved in HTML5. For good reason, some tags, such as those in Figure 4, have been given a 
proper burial.
8
Chapter 1: The Past, Present, and Future of HTML5 
Figure 4: Elements absent from HTML5
Tags such as <basefont>, <big>, <center>, <font>, <strike>, <tt>, and <u> are purely presentational 
in their function and are better handled through CSS. In addition to these retired elements, a number 
of attributes have been removed for similar reasons. All absent or removed items in HTML5 can be 
found at www.w3.org/TR/html5-diff.
New Features in HTML5
But what about the changes that give us new features in HTML5? Let’s briefly consider some of the 
more popular additions that you can start using today.
First are the new elements that are in line with how the web works today. These new tags, shown in 
Figure 5, are structural or semantic in nature.
Figure 5: Semantic elements in HTML5
A good number of websites today have very similar structures. Think of footers, for example: Many 
sites display footers, which usually contain author information, links, and copyright information. A 
typical approach to footers would look something like this:
<div id=”footer”>&copy; Copyright 2011 Egan &amp; Palermo</div>
Chapter 1: The Past, Present, and Future of HTML5  
9
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested