selectpdf c# : Create pdf bookmarks online Library SDK class asp.net .net web page ajax dive_into_html52-part1534

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, that hosted the first web server in the United States (in
fact 
the first web server outside Europe). When 
Tony wrote this message, SLAC was an old-
timer on the WWW, having hosted 
five pages on its web server for a whopping 441 days.
Tony continued:
While we are on the subject of new tags, I have another, somewhat similar tag,
whi I would like to support in Midas 2.0. In principle it is:
< I I NC L U DE HR R EF = = " ..." >
e intention here would be that the second document is to be included into the
first document at the place where the tag occured. In principle the referenced
document could be anything, but the main purpose was to allow images (in this
case arbitrary sized) to be embedded into documents. Again the intention would be
that when HTTP2 comes along the format of the included document would be up
for separate negotiation.
“HTTP2” is a reference to 
Basic HTTP as defined in 1992. At this point, in early 1993, it was
still largely unimplemented. e dra known as “HTTP2” evolved and was eventually
standardized as “HTTP 1.0” (albeit 
not for another three years). HTTP 1.0 did include 
request
headers for content negotiation, a.k.a. “MIME, someday, maybe.”
Tony continued:
An alternative I was considering was:
< A HR R EF = = " ..."  I I NC L U DE> > S e e  p p h o t o o < < / A>
I don’t mu like adding more functionality to the 
< A>
tag, but the idea here is to
maintain compatibility with browsers that can not honour the 
I NC L U DE
parameter.
e intention is that browsers whi do understand 
I NC C L U DE
, replace the anor
text (in this case “See photo”) with the included document (picture), while older or
dumber browsers ignore the 
I NC L U DE
tag completely.
is proposal was never implemented, although the idea of providing text if an image is
diveintohtml5.org
HOW DID WE GET HERE?
Create pdf bookmarks online - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
bookmark pdf acrobat; pdf bookmark editor
Create pdf bookmarks online - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
bookmarks pdf file; how to bookmark a pdf page
missing is 
an important accessibility tenique that was missing from Marc’s initial 
< I M M G G >
proposal. Years later, this feature was bolted on as the 
< i m g  a a l t >
aribute, whi Netscape
promptly broke by 
erroneously treating it as a tooltip.
A few hours aer Tony posted his message, 
Tim Berners-Lee responded:
I had imagined that figues would be reprented as
< a  n n a m m e e = f i i g g 1  h h r e e f = = " f g g h h j k d f g g h j "  R R EL = = " " EM M BED, PR R ES ENT " " > > F i i g u u r r e
< / / a >
where the relation ship values mean
EM BED Em m b e e d  t t h i i s h h e r r e  wh h e e n  p p r e e se e n t i i n n g  i i t
PR ES ENT  Pr r e e se n t  t t h i s wh h e n n e e ve r  t t h e  so o u r ce  d o o cu u m m e n t  i i s
p r e se e n n t e d
Note that you can have various combinations of these, and if the browser doesn’t
support either one, it doesn’t break.
[I] see that using this as a method for selectable icons means nesting anors.
Hmmm. But I hadn’t wanted a special tag.
is proposal was never implemented, but the 
r e l
aribute is 
still around.
Jim Davis added:
It would be nice if there was a way to specify the content type, e.g.
< I I M G  HR R EF = = " " h h t t p : : / / / n sa a .g g o v/ / p p u b / / so u n d s/ / g o r b y y .a u "  C C O NT T ENT T -
T YPE= = a a u u d i i o / / b a a si c>
But I am completely willing to live with the requirement that I specify the content
type by file extension.
is proposal was never implemented, but Netscape did later add support for embedding of
diveintohtml5.org
HOW DID WE GET HERE?
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Bookmarks. inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing options
how to create bookmark in pdf with; creating bookmarks in pdf from word
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines Valid value for each index: 1 to (Page Count - 1). ' Create output PDF file path
convert word to pdf with bookmarks; how to add bookmarks to pdf document
media objects with the 
< e m m b e e d >
element.
Jay C. Weber asked:
While images are at the top of my list of desired medium types in a WWW
browser, I don’t think we should add idiosyncratic hooks for media one at a time.
Whatever happened to the enthusiasm for using the MIME typing meanism?
Marc Andreessen replied:
is isn’t a substitute for the upcoming use of MIME as a standard document
meanism; this provides a necessary and simple implementation of functionality
that’s needed independently from MIME.
Jay C. Weber responded:
Let’s temporarily forget about MIME, if it clouds the issue. My objection was to
the discussion of “how are we going to support embedded images” rather than
“how are we going to support embedded objections in various media”.
Otherwise, next week someone is going to suggest ‘lets put in a new tag 
< AU D
S R R C = " f i i l e : / / / / f o o o b a a r .co o m m / f o o o o / / b a a r / / b l l a r g g h h .sn d " " >
‘ for audio.
ere shouldn’t be mu cost in going with something that generalizes.
With the benefit of hindsight, it appears that Jay’s concerns were well founded. It took a lile
more than a week, but HTML5 did finally add new 
< vi d e e o >
and 
< a a u d i i o o >
elements.
Responding to Jay’s original message, 
Dave Ragge said:
True indeed! I want to consider a whole range of possible image/line art types,
along with the possibility of format negotiation. Tim’s note on supporting cliable
areas within images is also important.
Later in 1993, 
Dave Ragge proposed 
HTML+ as an evolution of the HTML standard. e
proposal was never implemented, and it was superseded by 
HTML 2.0. HTML 2.0 was a
diveintohtml5.org
HOW DID WE GET HERE?
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Free download library and use online C# class source codes in .NET framework 2.0 explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines
add bookmarks to pdf; create bookmarks in pdf from excel
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing options
copy pdf bookmarks to another pdf; how to bookmark a pdf file in acrobat
“retro-spec,” whi means it formalized features already in common use. “
is specification
brings together, clarifies, and formalizes a set of features that roughly corresponds to the
capabilities of HTML in common use prior to June 1994.”
Dave later wrote 
HTML 3.0, based on his earlier HTML+ dra. Outside of the W3C’s own
reference implementation, 
Arena), HTML 3.0 was never implemented, and it was superseded
by 
HTML 3.2, another “retro-spec”: “
HTML 3.2 adds widely deployed features su as tables,
applets and text flow around images, while providing full bawards compatibility with the
existing standard HTML 2.0.”
Dave later co-authored 
HTML 4.0, developed 
HTML Tidy, and went on to help with XHTML,
XForms, MathML, and other modern W3C specifications.
Geing ba to 1993, 
Marc replied to Dave:
Actually, maybe we should think about a general-purpose procedural graphics
language within whi we can embed arbitrary hyperlinks aaed to icons,
images, or text, or anything. Has anyone else seen Intermedia’s capabilities wrt
this?
Intermedia was a hypertext project from Brown University. It was developed from 1985 to
1991 and ran on 
A/UX, a Unix-like operating system for early Macintosh computers.
e idea of a “general-purpose procedural graphics language” did eventually cat on. Modern
browsers support both 
SVG (declarative markup with embedded scripting) and 
< ca n va s>
(a
procedural direct-mode graphics API), although the laer 
started as a proprietary extension
before being “retro-specced” by the 
WHATWG.
Bill Janssen replied:
Other systems to look at whi have this (fairly valuable) notion are Andrew and
Slate. Andrew is built with _insets_, ea of whi has some interesting type, su
as text, bitmap, drawing, animation, message, spreadsheet, etc. e notion of
arbitrary recursive embedding is present, so that an inset of any kind can be
embedded in any other kind whi supports embedding. For example, an inset can
be embedded at any point in the text of the text widget, or in any rectangular area
diveintohtml5.org
HOW DID WE GET HERE?
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures Create fillable PDF document with fields. Preview PDF documents without other plug-ins.
bookmarks in pdf reader; bookmark page in pdf
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Download Free Trial View Online Demo Purchase Now. Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Conversion. PDF Create.
export pdf bookmarks to text; adding bookmarks to pdf reader
in the drawing widget, or in any cell of the spreadsheet.
“Andrew” is a reference to the 
Andrew User Interface System (although at that time it was
simply known as the 
Andrew Project).
Meanwhile, 
omas Fine had a different idea:
Here’s my opinion. e best way to do images in WWW is by using MIME. I’m
sure postscript is already a supported subtype in MIME, and it deals very nicely
with mixing text and graphics.
But it isn’t cliable, you say? Yes your right. I suspect there is already an answer
to this in display postscript. Even if there isn’t the addition to standard postscript is
trivial. Define an anor command whi specifies the URL and uses the current
path as a closed region for the buon. Since postscript deals so well with paths,
this makes arbitrary buon shapes trivial.
Display Postscript was an on-screen rendering tenology co-developed by Adobe and NeXT.
is proposal was never implemented, but the idea that the best way to fix HTML is to
replace it with something else altogether 
still pops up from time to time.
Tim Berners-Lee, Mar 2, 1993:
HTTP2 allows a document to contain any type whi the user has said he can
handle, not just registered MIME types. So one can experiment. Yes I think there is
a case for postscript with hypertext. I don’t know whether display postcript has
enough. I know Adobe are trying to establish their own postscript-based “PDF”
whi will have links, and be readable by their proprietory brand of viewers.
I thought that a generic overlaying language for anors (Hytime based?) would
allow the hypertext and the graphics/video standards to evolve separately, whi
would help both.
Let the 
I M G
tag be 
I NC C L U DE
and let it refer to an arbitrary document type. Or
EM BED
if 
I NC C L U DE
sounds like a cpp include whi people will expect to provide
diveintohtml5.org
HOW DID WE GET HERE?
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Load PDF from stream programmatically in VB.NET.
excel pdf bookmarks; split pdf by bookmark
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
& rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. Word Create. Create Word from PDF; Create Word
create pdf with bookmarks from word; export pdf bookmarks
SGML source code to be parsed inline — not what was intended.
HyTime was an early, SGML-based hypertext document system. It loomed large in early
discussions of HTML, and later XML.
Tim’s proposal for an 
< I NC L U DE>
tag was never implemented, although you can see eoes
of it in 
< o b j j e e ct >
< e m b e e d >
, and the 
< i i f r r a m m e e >
element.
Finally, on Mar 12, 1993, 
Marc Andreessen revisited the thread:
Ba to the inlined image thread again — I’m geing close to releasing Mosaic
v0.10, whi will support inlined GIF and XBM images/bitmaps, as mentioned
previously. …
We’re not prepared to support 
I NC C L U DE
/
EM BED
at this point. … So we’re probably
going to go with 
< I M M G  S S R C C = = " u r l l " " >
(not 
I C O N
, since not all inlined images can
be meaningfully called icons). For the time being, inlined images won’t be
explicitly content-type’d; down the road, we plan to support that (along with the
general adaptation of MIME). Actually, the image reading routines we’re currently
using figure out the image format on the fly, so the filename extension won’t even
be significant.
AN UNBROKEN LINE
AN UNBROKEN LINE
I am extraordinarily fascinated with all aspects of this almost-17-year-old conversation that led
to the creation of an HTML element that has been used on virtually every web page ever
published. Consider:
diveintohtml5.org
HOW DID WE GET HERE?
HTTP still exists. HTTP successfully evolved from 0.9
into 1.0 and later 1.1. 
And still it evolves.
HTML still exists. at rudimentary data format — it
didn’t even support inline images! — successfully
evolved into 2.0, 3.2, 4.0. HTML is an unbroken line. A
twisted, knoed, snarled line, to be sure. ere were
plenty of “dead branes” in the evolutionary tree,
places where standards-minded people got ahead of
themselves (and ahead of authors and implementors).
But still. Here we are, in 2010, and 
web pages from
1990 still render in modern browsers. I just loaded one
up in the browser of my state-of-the-art Android
mobile phone, and I didn’t even get prompted to
“please wait while importing legacy format…”
HTML has always been a conversation between
browser makers, authors, standards wonks, and other
people who just showed up and liked to talk about angle braets. Most of the
successful versions of HTML have been “retro-specs,” cating up to the world while
simultaneously trying to nudge it in the right direction. Anyone who tells you that
HTML should be kept “pure” (presumably by ignoring browser makers, or ignoring
authors, or both) is simply misinformed. HTML has never been pure, and all aempts to
purify it have been spectacular failures, mated only by the aempts to replace it.
None of the browsers from 1993 still exist in any recognizable form. Netscape Navigator
was 
abandoned in 1998 and 
rewrien from scrat to create the Mozilla Suite, whi was
then 
forked to create Firefox. Internet Explorer had its humble “beginnings” in “Microso
Plus! for Windows 95,” where it was bundled with some desktop themes and a pinball
game. (But of course that browser 
can be traced ba further too.)
Some of the operating systems from 1993 still exist, but none of them are relevant to the
modern web. Most people today who “experience” the web do so on a PC running
Windows 2000 or later, a Mac running Mac OS X, a PC running some flavor of Linux,
or a handheld device like an iPhone. In 1993, Windows was at version 3.1 (and
competing with OS/2), Macs were running System 7, and Linux was distributed via
Usenet. (Want to have some fun? Find a graybeard and whisper “Trumpet Winso” or
“MacPPP.”)
Some of the same people are still around and still involved in what we now simply call
“web standards.” at’s aer almost 20 years. And some were involved in predecessors
diveintohtml5.org
HOW DID WE GET HERE?
of HTML, going ba into the 1980s and before.
Speaking of predecessors… With the eventual popularity of HTML and the web, it is
easy to forget the contemporary formats and systems that informed its design. Andrew?
Intermedia? HyTime? And HyTime was not some rinky-dink academic resear project; 
it
was an ISO standard. It was approved for military use. It was Big Business. And you can
read about it yourself… 
on this HTML page, in your web browser.
But none of this answers the original question: why do we have an 
< i m g >
element? Why not
an 
< i i co o n >
element? Or an 
< i n cl u d e e >
element? Why not a hyperlink with an 
i n cl u u d e
aribute, or some combination of 
r e l
values? Why an 
< i m g g >
element? ite simply, because
Marc Andreessen shipped one, and shipping code wins.
at’s not to say that all shipping code wins; aer all, Andrew and Intermedia and HyTime
shipped code too. Code is necessary but not sufficient for success. And I certainly don’t mean
to say that shipping code before a standard will produce the best solution. Marc’s 
< i m g >
element didn’t mandate a common graphics format; it didn’t define how text flowed around
it; it didn’t support text alternatives or fallba content for older browsers. And 17 years later,
we’re still struggling with content sniffing, and it’s still 
a source of crazy security
vulnerabilities. And you can trace that all the way ba, 17 years, through the 
Great Browser
Wars, all the way ba to February 25, 1993, when Marc Andreessen oandedly remarked,
“MIME, someday, maybe,” and then shipped his code anyway.
e ones that win are the ones that ship.
A TIMELINE OF HTML DEVELOPMENT
A TIMELINE OF HTML DEVELOPMENT
FROM 1997 TO 2004
FROM 1997 TO 2004
In December 1997, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) published 
HTML 4.0 and
promptly shut down the HTML Working Group. Less than two months later, a separate W3C
Working Group published 
XML 1.0. A mere three months aer that, the people who ran the
W3C held a workshop called “
Shaping the Future of HTML” to answer the question, “Has
diveintohtml5.org
HOW DID WE GET HERE?
W3C given up on HTML?” is was their answer:
In discussions, it was agreed that further extending  HTML 4.0 would be difficult, as
would converting 4.0 to be an XML application. e proposed way to break free of
these restrictions is to make a fresh start with the next generation of HTML based
upon a suite of XML tag-sets.
e W3C re-artered the HTML Working Group to create this “suite of XML tag-sets.” eir
first step, in December 1998, was a dra of an interim specification that simply 
reformulated
HTML in XML without adding any new elements or aributes. is specification later became
known as “
XHTML 1.0.” It defined a new MIME type for XHTML documents,
a p p l i i ca a t i o o n n / x h t t m m l +x m m l
. However, to ease the migration of existing HTML 4 pages, it
also included 
Appendix C, that “summarizes design guidelines for authors who wish their
XHTML documents to render on existing HTML user agents.” Appendix C said you were
allowed to author so-called “XHTML” pages but still serve them with the 
t e x t / / h h t m l
MIME
type.
eir next target was web forms. In August 1999, the same  HTML Working Group published
a first dra of 
XHTML Extended Forms. ey set the expectations 
in the first paragraph:
Aer careful consideration, the HTML Working Group has decided that the goals
for the next generation of forms are incompatible with preserving bawards
compatibility with browsers designed for earlier versions of HTML. It is our
objective to provide a clean new forms model (“XHTML Extended Forms”) based
on a set of well-defined requirements. e requirements described in this document
are based on experience with a very broad spectrum of form applications.
A few months later, “XHTML Extended Forms” was renamed “XForms” and 
moved to its own
Working Group. at group worked in parallel with the HTML Working Group and finally
published 
the first edition of XForms 1.0 in October 2003.
Meanwhile, with the transition to XML complete, the HTML Working Group set their sights
on creating “the next generation of HTML.” In May 2001, they published 
the first edition of
XHTML 1.1, that added 
only a few minor features on top of XHTML 1.0, but also eliminated
the “Appendix C” loophole. Starting with version 1.1, all XHTML documents were to be
served with a MIME type of 
a p p p l l i ca t t i i o n / x x h h t m l +x m l
.
diveintohtml5.org
HOW DID WE GET HERE?
EVERYTHING YOU KNOW ABOUT
EVERYTHING YOU KNOW ABOUT
XHTML IS WRONG
XHTML IS WRONG
Why are MIME types important? Why do I keep coming ba to them? ree words: 
draconian
error handling. Browsers have always been “forgiving” with HTML. If you create an HTML
page but forget the 
< / h e a a d >
tag, browsers will display the page anyway. (Certain tags
implicitly trigger the end of the 
< h h e a d >
and the start of the 
< b o o d y y >
.) You are supposed to
nest tags hierarically — closing them in last-in-first-out order — but if you create markup
like 
< b > > < i > > < < / b > > < < / / i >
, browsers will just deal with it (somehow) and move on without
displaying an error message.
As you might expect, the fact that “broken”  HTML markup still
worked in web browsers led authors to create broken HTML
pages. A lot of broken pages. By some estimates, over 99% of
HTML pages on the web today have at least one error in them.
But because these errors don’t cause browsers to display visible
error messages, nobody ever fixes them.
e W3C saw this as a fundamental problem with the web, and
they set out to correct it. XML, published in 1997, broke from
the tradition of forgiving clients and mandated that all programs
that consumed XML must treat so-called “well-formedness”
errors as fatal. is concept of failing on the first error became
known as “draconian error handling,” aer the Greek leader
Draco who instituted the death penalty for relatively minor
infractions of his laws. When the W3C reformulated HTML as
an XML vocabulary, they mandated that all documents served
with the new 
a p p l l i i ca t i o o n n / x h t t m m l +x m m l
MIME type would be subject to draconian error
handling. If there was even a single well-formedness error in your XHTML page — su as
forgeing the 
< / h e e a a d >
tag or improperly nesting start and end tags — web browsers would
diveintohtml5.org
HOW DID WE GET HERE?
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested