selectpdf c# : Bookmarks in pdf from word software control dll winforms web page .net web forms dive_into_html56-part1543

Your browser does not support the HTML5
microdata API. :(
for autofocused form fields.
check for autofocus support
check for autofocus support
i f  (
Mo d d e e r n i z r r .i n n p p u t .a u t o f o o c u s s ) {
//  a a u t o o f o o c u s  w w o r r ks s !
} e e l l s e  {
//  n n o  a a u u t o f o o c c u s  s s u p p p o o r t  :(
//  f a a l l  b a a c k t t o  a  s s c c r r i p t e e d  s s o o l l u t i o o n
}
MICRODATA
MICRODATA
Microdata is a standardized way to provide
additional semantics in your web pages. For
example, you can use microdata to declare that a
photograph is available under a specific Creative
Commons license. As you’ll see in 
the
distributed extensibility apter, you can use
microdata to mark up an “About Me” page.
Browsers, browser extensions, and sear engines
can convert your HTML5 microdata markup into
vCard, a standard format for sharing contact
information. You can also define your own
microdata vocabularies.
e HTML5 microdata standard includes both HTML markup (primarily for sear engines)
and a set of DOM functions (primarily for browsers). ere’s no harm in including microdata
markup in your web pages. It’s nothing more than a few well-placed aributes, and sear
engines that don’t understand the microdata aributes will just ignore them. But if you need
to access or manipulate microdata through the DOM, you’ll need to e whether the
diveintohtml5.org
DETECTING HTML5 FEATURES
Bookmarks in pdf from word - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
pdf create bookmarks; how to create bookmark in pdf with
Bookmarks in pdf from word - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
create bookmarks in pdf; how to bookmark a pdf file in acrobat
browser supports the microdata DOM API.
Cheing for HTML5 microdata API support uses 
detection tenique #1. If your browser
supports the HTML5 microdata API, there will be a 
g e e t It t e e m s ( )
function on the global
d o c u u m m e n t
object. If your browser doesn’t support microdata, the 
g e t t It t e m s s ( )
function will
be undefined.
fu n n c c t i o o n  s s u p p p p o r t t s s _ m m i i c c r o d a a t t a _ a a p p i ( ) {
r e t t u u r n  ! ! ! d o c c u u m e n n t t .g e e t t It e m m s s ;
}
Modernizr does not yet support eing for the microdata  API, so you’ll need to use the
function like the one listed above.
FURTHER READING
FURTHER READING
Specifications and standards:
the 
< c c a a n v a a s s >
element
the 
< v v i i d e o o >
element
< i n p p u u t >
types
the 
< i i n n p u t  p p l a a c c e h o l l d d e r >
aribute
the 
< i i n n p u t  a a u t t o o f o o c u u s s >
aribute
HTML5 storage
Web Workers
Offline web applications
Geolocation API
JavaScript libraries:
Modernizr, an HTML5 detection library
geo.js, a geolocation API wrapper
Other articles and tutorials:
diveintohtml5.org
DETECTING HTML5 FEATURES
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
document file. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview
create pdf bookmarks; how to create bookmark in pdf automatically
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF file by top level bookmarks. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
convert word to pdf with bookmarks; add bookmarks pdf
Video for Everybody!
A gentle introduction to video encoding
Video type parameters
e All-In-One Almost-Alphabetical No-Bullshit Guide to Detecting Everything
is has been “Detecting  HTML5 Features.” e 
full table of contents has more if you’d like to
keep reading.
DID YOU KNOW?
DID YOU KNOW?
In association with Google Press, O’Reilly is
distributing this book in a variety of formats, including
paper, ePub, Mobi, and DRM-free PDF. e paid
edition is called “HTML5: Up & Running,” and it is
available now. is apter is included in the paid
edition.
If you liked this apter and want to show your
appreciation, you can 
buy “HTML5: Up & Running”
with this affiliate link or 
buy an electronic edition
directly from O’Reilly. You’ll get a book, and I’ll get a
bu. I do not currently accept direct donations.
Copyright MMIX–MMX 
Mark Pilgrim
powered by Google™
Search
diveintohtml5.org
DETECTING HTML5 FEATURES
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Demo Code in VB.NET. The following VB.NET codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
bookmarks in pdf from word; how to add bookmarks to pdf document
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
NET framework. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. C# class demo
bookmarks pdf documents; bookmarks pdf reader
You are here: 
Home  
Dive Into HTML5 
33
WHAT DOES IT ALL MEAN?
WHAT DOES IT ALL MEAN?
show table of contents
DIVING IN
DIVING IN
his apter will take an HTML page that has absolutely nothing wrong with it,
and improve it. Parts of it will become shorter. Parts will become longer. All of
it will become more semantic. It’ll be awesome.
Here is the page in question. Learn it. Live it. Love it. Open it in a new tab and don’t come
ba until you’ve hit “View Source” at least once.
THE DOCTYPE
THE DOCTYPE
From the top:
< ! ! D D O C T T Y Y P E  h h t t m l
diveintohtml5.org
WHAT DOES IT ALL MEAN?
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
& rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. Word Create. Create Word from PDF; Create Word
copy bookmarks from one pdf to another; how to add a bookmark in pdf
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
& rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word (docx, doc
adding bookmarks to pdf; add bookmark pdf
P U U B B L I C  " " - / / / W W 3 C / / / / D T D  X X H T T M M L  1 1 . . 0  S S t t r i c t t / / E N "
" h h t t t p:/ / www. w3 . . or r g / / T T R / / x h h t m l l 1 1 / D T T D D / x h h t t m l 1 - - st t r i c t t . dt d" >
is is called the “doctype.” ere’s a long history — and a bla art — behind the doctype.
While working on Internet Explorer 5 for Mac, the developers at Microso found themselves
with a surprising problem. e upcoming version of their browser had improved its standards
support so mu, older pages no longer rendered properly. Or rather, they rendered properly
(according to specifications), but people expected them to render improperly. e pages
themselves had been authored based on the quirks of the dominant browsers of the day,
primarily Netscape 4 and Internet Explorer 4. IE5/Mac was so advanced, it actually broke the
web.
Microso came up with a novel solution. Before rendering a page, IE5/Mac looked at the
“doctype,” whi is typically the first line of the HTML source (even before the 
< h t t m m l >
element). Older pages (that relied on the rendering quirks of older browsers) generally didn’t
have a doctype at all. IE5/Mac rendered these pages like older browsers did. In order to
“activate” the new standards support, web page authors had to opt in, by supplying the right
doctype before the 
< h h t t m l >
element.
is idea spread like wildfire, and soon all major browsers had two modes: “quirks mode” and
“standards mode.” Of course, this being the web, things quily got out of hand. When
Mozilla tried to ship version 1.1 of their browser, they discovered that there were pages being
rendered in “standards mode” that were actually relying on one specific quirk. Mozilla had
just fixed its rendering engine to eliminate this quirk, and thousands of pages broke all at
once. us was created — and I am not making this up — “
almost standards mode.”
In his seminal work, 
Activating Browser Modes with Doctype, Henri Sivonen summarizes the
different modes:
irks Mode
In the irks mode, browsers violate contemporary Web format specifications
in order to avoid “breaking” pages authored according to practices that were
prevalent in the late 1990s.
Standards Mode
In the Standards mode, browsers try to give conforming documents the
specification-wise correct treatment to the extent implemented in a particular
diveintohtml5.org
WHAT DOES IT ALL MEAN?
XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
& rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. PowerPoint Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert
export pdf bookmarks; create bookmarks in pdf from excel
XDoc.Excel for .NET, Comprehensive .NET Excel Imaging Features
zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Excel Convert. Convert Excel to PDF; Convert Excel
creating bookmarks in a pdf document; excel hyperlink to pdf bookmark
browser. HTML5 calls this mode the “no quirks mode.”
Almost Standards Mode
Firefox, Safari, Chrome, Opera (since 7.5) and IE8 also have a mode known as
“Almost Standards mode,” that implements the vertical sizing of table cells
traditionally and not rigorously according to the CSS2 specification. HTML5
calls this mode the “limited quirks mode.”
(You should read the rest of Henri’s article, because I’m simplifying immensely here. Even in
IE5/Mac, there were a few older doctypes that didn’t count as far as opting into standards
support. Over time, the list of quirks grew, and so did the list of doctypes that triggered
“quirks mode.” e last time I tried to count, there were 5 doctypes that triggered “almost
standards mode,” and 73 that triggered “quirks mode.” But I probably missed some, and I’m
not even going to talk about the crazy shit that Internet Explorer 8 does to swit between its
four — four! — different rendering modes. 
Here’s a flowart. Kill it. Kill it with fire.)
Now then. Where were we? Ah yes, the doctype:
< ! ! D D O C T T Y Y P E  h h t t m l
P U U B B L I C  " " - / / / W W 3 C / / / / D T D  X X H T T M M L  1 1 . . 0  S S t t r i c t t / / E N "
" h h t t t p:/ / www. w3 . . or r g / / T T R / / x h h t m l l 1 1 / D T T D D / x h h t t m l 1 - - st t r i c t t . dt d" >
at happens to be one of the 15 doctypes that trigger “standards mode” in all modern
browsers. ere is nothing wrong with it. If you like it, you can keep it. Or you can ange it
to the HTML5 doctype, whi is shorter and sweeter and also triggers “standards mode” in all
modern browsers.
is is the HTML5 doctype:
< ! ! D D O C T T Y Y P E  h h t t m l >
at’s it. Just 15 aracters. It’s so easy, you can type it by hand and not screw it up.
diveintohtml5.org
WHAT DOES IT ALL MEAN?
THE ROOT ELEMENT
THE ROOT ELEMENT
An HTML page is a series of nested elements. e
entire structure of the page is like a tree. Some
elements are “siblings,” like two branes that extend
from the same tree trunk. Some elements can be
“ildren” of other elements, like a smaller bran
that extends from a larger bran. (It works the
other way too; an element that contains other
elements is called the “parent” node of its immediate
ild elements, and the “ancestor” of its
grandildren.) Elements that have no ildren are
called “leaf” nodes. e outer-most element, whi is
the ancestor of all other elements on the page, is
called the “root element.” e root element of an
HTML page is always 
< h h t t m l >
.
In 
this example page, the root element looks like
this:
< h h t t m l  x m m l n s= " " h h t t t p:/ / / / www. w3 . . or r g / / 1 1 9 9 9 / / x h h t t m m l "
l an g = " " en "
xm l l :l an g = " " en " " >
ere is nothing wrong with this markup. Again, if you like it, you can keep it. It is valid
HTML5. But parts of it are no longer necessary in  HTML5, so you can save a few bytes by
removing them.
e first thing to discuss is the 
xm l n s
aribute. is is a vestige of 
XHTML 1.0. It says that
elements in this page are in the XHTML namespace, 
h t t t t p:/ / / / www. w3 . . or r g / / 1 1 9 9 9 / / x h h t t m m l
.
But elements in HTML5 
are always in this namespace, so you no longer need to declare it
explicitly. Your HTML5 page will work exactly the same in all browsers, whether this aribute
is present or not.
diveintohtml5.org
WHAT DOES IT ALL MEAN?
Dropping the 
xm l l n s
aribute leaves us with this root element:
< h h t t m l  l l an g = " " en "  x m m l l :l l an g = " " en " " >
e two aributes here, 
l an g
and 
xm l l :l l an g
, both define the language of this HTML page.
(
en
stands for “English.” Not writing in English? 
Find your language code.) Why two
aributes for the same thing? Again, this is a vestige of XHTML. Only the 
l an g
aribute has
any effect in HTML5. You can keep the 
xm l l :l l an g
aribute if you like, but if you do, you
need to ensure that it 
contains the same value as the 
l an g
aribute.
To ease migration to and from XHTML, authors may specify an aribute in no
namespace with no prefix and with the literal localname "xml:lang" on HTML
elements in HTML documents, but su aributes must only be specified if a 
l an g
aribute in no namespace is also specified, and both aributes must have the same
value when compared in an ASCII case-insensitive manner. e aribute in no
namespace with no prefix and with the literal localname "xml:lang" has no effect on
language processing.
Are you ready to drop it? It’s OK, just let it go. Going, going… gone! at leaves us with this
root element:
< h h t t m l  l l an g = " " en " " >
And that’s all I have to say about that.
THE <HEAD> ELEMENT
THE <HEAD> ELEMENT
diveintohtml5.org
WHAT DOES IT ALL MEAN?
e first ild of the root element is usually the 
< h h ead>
element. e 
< h h ead>
element
contains metadata — information about the page, rather than the body of the page itself. (e
body of the page is, unsurprisingly, contained in the 
< body>
element.) e 
< h h ead>
element
itself is rather boring, and it hasn’t anged in any interesting way in HTML5. e good stuff
is what’s inside the 
< h h ead>
element. And for that, we turn once again to 
our example page:
< h h ead>
< m m et t a h h t t p- - equi v= " " C C on t t en t t - T T ype"  c on t t en t t = " " t ex t t / h t t m m l ; c h h ar r set t = ut t f-
8"  / / >
< t t i t t l e> M M y W W ebl l og < < / t t i t t l e>
< l l i n k  r r el = " " st t yl l esh h eet "  t t ype= " " t ex t t / c ss"  h h r r ef= " " st yl e- or i g i n al l . . c ss"
/ >
< l l i n k  r r el = " " al l t er n at t e"  t t ype= " " appl i c at t i on / / at t om m + x m m l l "
t i t t l e= " " M y W W ebl l og  feed"
h r r ef= " " / / feed/ "  / / >
< l l i n k  r r el = " " sear c h h "  t t ype= " " appl i c at t i on / / open sear r c h h desc r r i pt t i on + x m m l "
t i t t l e= " " M y W W ebl l og  sear r c h h "
h r r ef= " " open sear r c h h . x m m l l "  / / >
< l l i n k  r r el = " " sh h or r t t c ut  i c on "  h h r r ef= " " / favi c on . . i c o"  / / >
< / / h h ead>
First up: the 
< m et a>
element.
CHARACTER ENCODING
CHARACTER ENCODING
diveintohtml5.org
WHAT DOES IT ALL MEAN?
When you think of “text,” you probably think of “aracters and symbols I see on my
computer screen.” But computers don’t deal in aracters and symbols; they deal in bits and
bytes. Every piece of text you’ve ever seen on a computer screen is actually stored in a
particular aracter encoding. ere are 
hundreds of different aracter encodings, some
optimized for particular languages like Russian or Chinese or English, and others that can be
used for multiple languages. Roughly speaking, the aracter encoding provides a mapping
between the stuff you see on your screen and the stuff your computer actually stores in
memory and on disk.
In reality, it’s more complicated than that. e same aracter might appear in more than one
encoding, but ea encoding might use a different sequence of bytes to actually store the
aracter in memory or on disk. So, you can think of the aracter encoding as a kind of
decryption key for the text. Whenever someone gives you a sequence of bytes and claims it’s
“text,” you need to know what aracter encoding they used so you can decode the bytes into
aracters and display them (or process them, or whatever).
So, how does your browser actually determine the aracter encoding of the stream of bytes
that a web server sends? I’m glad you asked. If you’re familiar with HTTP headers, you may
have seen a header like this:
C on t t en t t - - T T ype: t t ex t t / h t t m m l ; c h h ar r set t = " " ut f- 8"
Briefly, this says that the web server thinks it’s sending you an  HTML document, and that it
thinks the document uses the 
U T F- 8
aracter encoding. Unfortunately, in the whole
magnificent soup of the World Wide Web, few authors actually have control over their HTTP
server. ink 
Blogger: the content is provided by individuals, but the servers are run by
Google. So HTML 4 provided a way to specify the aracter encoding in the  HTML document
itself. You’ve probably seen this too:
< m et t a h h t t t t p- equi v= " " C on t t en t t - - T ype"  c on t t en t t = " " t t ex t t / / h t m m l l ;
ch ar r set t = ut t f- - 8" " >
Briefly, this says that the web author thinks they have authored an  HTML document using the
U T F- - 8
aracter encoding.
Both of these teniques still work in  HTML5. e HTTP header is the preferred method, and
diveintohtml5.org
WHAT DOES IT ALL MEAN?
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested