how to download pdf file from folder in asp.net c# : Copy pdf bookmarks control Library platform web page .net asp.net web browser e813841-part1806

Life expectancy is shorter and most diseases are 
more common further down the social ladder in 
each society. Health policy must tackle the social 
and economic determinants of health.
What is known
Poor social and economic circumstances affect 
health throughout life. People further down the 
social ladder usually run at least twice the risk of 
serious illness and premature death as those near 
the top. Nor are the effects confined to the poor: 
the social gradient in health runs right across 
society, so that even among middle-class office 
workers, lower ranking staff suffer much more 
disease and earlier death than higher ranking staff 
(Fig. 1).
Both material and psychosocial causes contribute to 
these differences and their effects extend to most 
diseases and causes of death.
Disadvantage has many forms and may be absolute 
or relative. It can include having few family assets, 
having a poorer education during adolescence, 
having insecure employment, becoming stuck in a 
hazardous or dead-end job, living in poor housing, 
trying to bring up a family in difficult circumstances 
and living on an inadequate retirement pension.
These disadvantages tend to concentrate among 
the same people, and their effects on health 
accumulate during life. The longer people live in 
stressful economic and social circumstances, the 
greater the physiological wear and tear they suffer, 
and the less likely they are to enjoy a healthy old 
age.
Policy implications
If policy fails to address these facts, it not only 
ignores the most powerful determinants of health 
standards in modern societies, it also ignores one 
of the most important social justice issues facing 
modern societies.
•  Life contains a series of critical transitions: 
emotional and material changes in early 
childhood, the move from primary to secondary 
education, starting work, leaving home and 
starting a family, changing jobs and facing 
possible redundancy, and eventually retirement. 
Each of these changes can affect health by 
pushing people onto a more or less advantaged 
path. Because people who have been 
disadvantaged in the past are at the greatest risk 
in each subsequent transition, welfare policies 
need to provide not only safety nets but also 
springboards to offset earlier disadvantage.
10
Professional 
Skilled non-
manual
Managerial 
and technical
64
LIFE EXPECTANCY (YEARS)
Skilled 
manual
Partly skilled 
manual
Unskilled 
manual
Men          Women
66 68
70
72 74
76 78 80
82 84
O
C
C
U
P
A
T
I
O
N
A
L
C
L
A
S
S
1.   T H E   S O C I A L   G R A D I E N T
Fig. 1. Occupational class differences in life 
expectancy, England and Wales, 1997–1999
Copy pdf bookmarks - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
copy pdf bookmarks; how to add bookmark in pdf
Copy pdf bookmarks - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
adding bookmarks to pdf reader; adding bookmarks to a pdf
11
KEY SOURCES
Bartley M, Plewis I. Accumulated labour market disadvantage and 
limiting long-term illness. 
I
n
t
e
r
n
a
t
i
o
n
a
l
J
o
u
r
n
a
l
o
f
E
p
i
d
e
m
i
o
l
o
g
y
,
2002, 31:336–341.
Mitchell R, Blane D, Bartley M. Elevated risk of high blood pressure: 
climate and the inverse housing law. 
I
n
t
e
r
n
a
t
i
o
n
a
l
J
o
u
r
n
a
l
o
f
E
p
i
d
e
m
i
o
l
o
g
y
,
2002, 31:831–838.
Montgomery SM, Berney LR, Blane D. Prepubertal stature and 
blood pressure in early old age. 
A
r
c
h
i
v
e
s
o
f
D
i
s
e
a
s
e
i
n
C
h
i
l
d
h
o
o
d
,
2000, 82:358–363.
Morris JN et al. A minimum income for healthy living. 
J
o
u
r
n
a
l
o
f
E
p
i
d
e
m
i
o
l
o
g
y
a
n
d
C
o
m
m
u
n
i
t
y
H
e
a
l
t
h
,
2000, 54:885–889.
•  Good health involves 
reducing levels of 
educational failure, 
reducing insecurity 
and unemployment 
and improving housing 
standards. Societies that 
enable all citizens to play 
a full and useful role 
in the social, economic 
and cultural life of their 
society will be healthier 
than those where people 
face insecurity, exclusion 
and deprivation.
•  Other chapters of this 
publication cover specific 
policy areas and suggest 
ways of improving health 
that will also reduce the 
social gradient in health.
Programme Committee on Socio-economic Inequalities in Health 
(SEGV-II). 
R
e
d
u
c
i
n
g
s
o
c
i
o
-
e
c
o
n
o
m
i
c
i
n
e
q
u
a
l
i
t
i
e
s
i
n
h
e
a
l
t
h
.
The 
Hague, Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport, 2001.
van de Mheen H et al. Role of childhood health in the explanation 
of socioeconomic inequalities in early adult health. 
J
o
u
r
n
a
l
o
f
E
p
i
d
e
m
i
o
l
o
g
y
a
n
d
C
o
m
m
u
n
i
t
y
H
e
a
l
t
h
,
1998, 52:15–19. 
S
o
u
r
c
e
o
f
F
i
g
.
1
:
Donkin A, Goldblatt P, Lynch K. Inequalities in life 
expectancy by social class 1972–1999. 
H
e
a
l
t
h
S
t
a
t
i
s
t
i
c
s
Q
u
a
r
t
e
r
l
y
2002, 15:5–15.
Poor social and economic circumstances affect health throughout life. 
©
J
O
A
C
H
I
 LADEFOGED/POLFOTO
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
document file. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview
creating bookmarks in pdf documents; bookmark pdf documents
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Demo Code in VB.NET. The following VB.NET codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
add bookmarks to pdf online; creating bookmarks in a pdf document
12
Stressful circumstances, making people feel 
worried, anxious and unable to cope, are 
damaging to health and may lead to premature 
death.
What is known
Social and psychological circumstances can cause 
long-term stress. Continuing anxiety, insecurity, 
low self-esteem, social isolation and lack of control 
over work and home life, have powerful effects on 
health. Such psychosocial risks accumulate during 
life and increase the chances of poor mental health 
and premature death. Long periods of anxiety and 
insecurity and the lack of supportive friendships 
are damaging in whatever area of life they arise. 
The lower people are in the social hierarchy of 
industrialized countries, the more common these 
problems become. 
Why do these psychosocial factors affect physical 
health? In emergencies, our hormones and nervous 
system prepare us to deal with an immediate 
physical threat by triggering the fight or flight 
response: raising the heart rate, mobilizing stored 
energy, diverting blood to muscles and increasing 
alertness. Although the stresses of modern urban 
life rarely demand strenuous or even moderate 
Lack of control 
over work and 
home can have 
powerful effects 
on health. 
©
R
I
K
K
E
S
T
E
E
N
V
I
N
K
E
L
N
O
R
D
E
N
H
O
F
/
P
O
L
F
O
T
O
2.   S T R E S S
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
NET framework. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. C# class demo
create bookmarks pdf; adding bookmarks to pdf
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF file by top level bookmarks. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
pdf export bookmarks; how to add bookmarks to pdf files
13
KEY SOURCES
Brunner EJ. Stress and the biology of inequality. 
B
r
i
t
i
s
h
M
e
d
i
c
a
l
J
o
u
r
n
a
l
,
1997, 314:1472–1476. 
Brunner EJ et al. Adrenocortical, autonomic and inflammatory 
causes of the metabolic syndrome. 
C
i
r
c
u
l
a
t
i
o
n
,
2002, 106:
2659–2665.
Kivimaki M et al. Work stress and risk of cardiovascular 
mortality: prospective cohort study of industrial employees. 
B
r
i
t
i
s
h
M
e
d
i
c
a
l
J
o
u
r
n
a
l
,
2002, 325:857–860.
Marmot MG, Stansfeld SA. 
S
t
r
e
s
s
a
n
d
h
e
a
r
t
d
i
s
e
a
s
e
.
London, 
BMJ Books, 2002.
Marmot MG et al. Contribution of job control and other risk 
factors to social variations in coronary heart disease incidence. 
L
a
n
c
e
t
,
1997, 350:235–239. 
physical activity, turning on the stress response 
diverts energy and resources away from many 
physiological processes important to long-term 
health maintenance. Both the cardiovascular and 
immune systems are affected. For brief periods, this 
does not matter; but if people feel tense too often 
or the tension goes on for too long, they become 
more vulnerable to a wide range of conditions 
including infections, diabetes, high blood pressure, 
heart attack, stroke, depression and aggression.
Policy implications
Although a medical response to the biological 
changes that come with stress may be to try to 
control them with drugs, attention should be 
focused upstream, on reducing the major causes of 
chronic stress.
•  In schools, workplaces and other institutions, the 
quality of the social environment and material 
security are often as important to health as 
the physical environment. Institutions that can 
give people a sense of belonging, participating 
and being valued are likely to be healthier 
places than those where people feel excluded, 
disregarded and used.
•  Governments should recognize that welfare 
programmes need to address both psychosocial 
and material needs: both are sources of anxiety 
and insecurity. In particular, governments should 
support families with young children, encourage 
community activity, combat social isolation, 
reduce material and financial insecurity, 
and promote coping skills in education and 
rehabilitation.
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut This class describes bookmarks in a PDF document.
how to bookmark a page in pdf document; edit pdf bookmarks
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
by C#.NET PDF to HTML converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and font style that are included in target PDF document file.
create bookmarks pdf files; pdf create bookmarks
Important foundations of adult health are laid in early childhood. 
©
F
I
N
N
F
R
A
N
D
S
E
N
/
P
O
L
F
O
T
O
14
A good start in life means supporting mothers 
and young children: the health impact of early 
development and education lasts a lifetime.
What is known
Observational research and intervention studies 
show that the foundations of adult health are laid 
in early childhood and before birth. Slow growth 
and poor emotional support raise the lifetime 
risk of poor physical health and reduce physical, 
cognitive and emotional functioning in adulthood. 
Poor early experience and slow growth become 
embedded in biology during the processes of 
development, and form the basis of the individual’s 
health because of the continued malleability of 
biological systems. As cognitive, emotional and 
sensory inputs programme the brain’s responses, 
insecure emotional attachment and poor 
stimulation can lead to reduced readiness for 
school, low educational attainment, and problem 
behaviour, and the risk of social marginalization 
in adulthood. Good health-related habits, such as 
eating sensibly, exercising and not smoking, are 
associated with parental and peer group examples, 
and with good education. Slow or retarded physical 
growth in infancy is associated with reduced 
cardiovascular, respiratory, pancreatic and kidney 
development and function, which increase the risk 
of illness in adulthood.
3.   E A R L Y   L I F E
biological and human 
capital, which affects 
health throughout 
life.
Poor circumstances 
during pregnancy 
can lead to less 
than optimal fetal 
development via 
a chain that may 
include deficiencies 
in nutrition during 
pregnancy, maternal 
stress, a greater 
likelihood of maternal 
smoking and misuse 
of drugs and alcohol, 
insufficient exercise 
and inadequate 
prenatal care. Poor 
fetal development is a 
risk for health in later 
life (Fig. 2).
Infant experience is 
important to later 
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut This class describes bookmarks in a PDF document.
how to bookmark a pdf page; creating bookmarks pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# page with another PDF page from another PDF file text, images, interactive elements, such as links and bookmarks.
bookmark template pdf; create pdf bookmarks online
15
Policy implications
These risks to the developing child are significantly 
greater among those in poor socioeconomic 
circumstances, and they can best be reduced 
through improved preventive health care before 
the first pregnancy and for mothers and babies in 
pre- and postnatal, infant welfare and school clinics, 
and through improvements in the educational levels 
of parents and children. Such health and education 
programmes have direct benefits. They increase 
parents’ awareness of their children’s needs and 
their receptivity to information about health and 
development, and they increase parental confidence 
in their own effectiveness.
KEY SOURCES
Barker DJP. 
M
o
t
h
e
r
s
,
b
a
b
i
e
s
a
n
d
d
i
s
e
a
s
e
i
n
l
a
t
e
r
l
i
f
e
,
2nd ed. 
Edinburgh, Churchill Livingstone, 1998.
Keating DP, Hertzman C, eds. 
D
e
v
e
l
o
p
m
e
n
t
a
l
h
e
a
l
t
h
a
n
d
t
h
e
w
e
a
l
t
h
o
f
n
a
t
i
o
n
s
.
New York, NY, Guilford Press, 1999.
Mehrotra S, Jolly R, eds. 
D
e
v
e
l
o
p
m
e
n
t
w
i
t
h
a
h
u
m
a
n
f
a
c
e
.
Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2000.
Rutter M, Rutter M. 
D
e
v
e
l
o
p
i
n
g
m
i
n
d
s
:
c
h
a
l
l
e
n
g
e
a
n
d
c
o
n
t
i
n
u
i
t
y
a
c
r
o
s
s
t
h
e
l
i
f
e
s
p
a
n
.
London, Penguin Books, 1993.
Wallace HM, Giri K, Serrano CV, eds. 
H
e
a
l
t
h
c
a
r
e
o
f
w
o
m
e
n
a
n
d
c
h
i
l
d
r
e
n
i
n
d
e
v
e
l
o
p
i
n
g
c
o
u
n
t
r
i
e
s
,
2nd ed. Santa Monica, CA, 
Third Party Publishing, 1995.
S
o
u
r
c
e
o
f
F
i
g
.
2
:
Barker DJP. 
M
o
t
h
e
r
s
,
b
a
b
i
e
s
a
n
d
d
i
s
e
a
s
e
i
n
l
a
t
e
r
l
i
f
e
, 2nd ed. Edinburgh, Churchill Livingstone, 1998.
Policies for improving health in early life should 
aim to:
•  increase the general level of education 
and provide equal opportunity of access to 
education, to improve the health of mothers 
and babies in the long run;
•  provide good nutrition, health education, 
and health and preventive care facilities, and 
adequate social and economic resources, before 
first pregnancies, during pregnancy, and in 
infancy, to improve growth and development 
before birth and throughout infancy, and 
reduce the risk of disease and malnutrition in 
infancy; and
•  ensure that parent–child relations are 
supported from birth, ideally through home 
visiting and the encouragement of good 
parental relations with schools, to increase 
parental knowledge of children’s emotional 
and cognitive needs, to stimulate cognitive 
development and pro-social behaviour in the 
child, and to prevent child abuse.
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
R
I
S
K
O
F
D
I
A
B
E
T
E
S
(
W ITH BIRTH WEIGHT >4.3 KG SET AT 1)
BIRTH WEIGHT (KG)
<2.5 
2.5–2.9  3.0–3.4  3.5–3.9  4.0–4.3 
>4.3
Fig. 2. Risk of diabetes in men aged 64 years by 
birth weight 
Adjusted for body mass index
16
Life is short where its quality is poor. By causing 
hardship and resentment, poverty, social exclusion 
and discrimination cost lives.
What is known
Poverty, relative deprivation and social exclusion 
have a major impact on health and premature 
death, and the chances of living in poverty are 
loaded heavily against some social groups. 
Absolute poverty – a lack of the basic material 
necessities of life – continues to exist, even in the 
richest countries of Europe. The unemployed, many 
ethnic minority groups, guest workers, disabled 
people, refugees and homeless people are at 
4.   S O C I A L   E X C L U S I O N
particular risk. Those living on the streets suffer the 
highest rates of premature death.
Relative poverty means being much poorer than 
most people in society and is often defined as living 
on less than 60% of the national median income. It 
denies people access to decent housing, education, 
transport and other factors vital to full participation 
in life. Being excluded from the life of society and 
treated as less than equal leads to worse health 
and greater risks of premature death. The stresses 
of living in poverty are particularly harmful during 
pregnancy, to babies, children and old people. In 
some countries, as much as one quarter of the total 
population – and a higher proportion of children 
– live in relative poverty (Fig. 3).
People living on the streets suffer the highest rates 
of premature death.
©
J
A
N
G
R
A
R
U
P
/
P
O
L
F
O
T
O
Social exclusion also results from racism, 
discrimination, stigmatization, hostility and 
unemployment. These processes prevent 
people from participating in education or 
training, and gaining access to services and 
citizenship activities. They are socially and 
psychologically damaging, materially costly, 
and harmful to health. People who live in, 
or have left, institutions, such as prisons, 
children’s homes and psychiatric hospitals, 
are particularly vulnerable.
The greater the length of time that people 
live in disadvantaged circumstances, the 
more likely they are to suffer from a range of 
health problems, particularly cardiovascular 
disease. People move in and out of poverty 
during their lives, so the number of people 
who experience poverty and social exclusion 
during their lifetime is far higher than the 
current number of socially excluded people. 
Poverty and social exclusion increase the 
risks of divorce and separation, disability, 
illness, addiction and social isolation and 
17
vice versa, forming vicious circles that deepen the 
predicament people face. 
As well as the direct effects of being poor, health 
can also be compromised indirectly by living in 
neighbourhoods blighted by concentrations of 
deprivation, high unemployment, poor quality 
housing, limited access to services and a poor 
quality environment.
Policy implications
Through policies on taxes, benefits, employment, 
education, economic management, and many 
other areas of activity, no government can avoid 
having a major impact on the distribution of 
income. The indisputable evidence of the effects of 
such policies on rates of death and disease imposes 
a public duty to eliminate absolute poverty and 
reduce material inequalities.
•  All citizens should be protected by minimum 
income guarantees, minimum wages legislation 
and access to services.
•  Interventions to reduce poverty and social 
exclusion are needed at both the individual and 
the neighbourhood levels.
•  Legislation can help protect minority and 
vulnerable groups from discrimination and social 
exclusion.
•  Public health policies should remove barriers 
to health care, social services and affordable 
housing.
•  Labour market, education and family welfare 
policies should aim to reduce social stratification.
Fig. 3. Proportion of children living in poor 
households (below 50% of the national average 
income)
KEY SOURCES
Claussen B, Davey Smith G, Thelle D. Impact of childhood 
and adulthood socio-economic position on cause specific 
mortality: the Oslo Mortality Study. 
J
o
u
r
n
a
l
o
f
E
p
i
d
e
m
i
o
l
o
g
y
a
n
d
C
o
m
m
u
n
i
t
y
H
e
a
l
t
h
,
2003, 57:40–45.
Kawachi I, Berkman L, eds. 
N
e
i
g
h
b
o
r
h
o
o
d
s
a
n
d
h
e
a
l
t
h
.
Oxford, 
Oxford University Press, 2003.
Mackenbach J, Bakker M, eds. 
R
e
d
u
c
i
n
g
i
n
e
q
u
a
l
i
t
i
e
s
i
n
h
e
a
l
t
h
:
a
E
u
r
o
p
e
a
n
p
e
r
s
p
e
c
t
i
v
e
.
London, Routledge, 2002.
Shaw M, Dorling D, Brimblecombe N. Life chances in Britain by 
housing wealth and for the homeless and vulnerably housed. 
E
n
v
i
r
o
n
m
e
n
t
a
n
d
P
l
a
n
n
i
n
g
A
,
1999, 31:2239–2248.
Townsend P, Gordon D. 
W
o
r
l
d
p
o
v
e
r
t
y
:
n
e
w
p
o
l
i
c
i
e
s
t
o
d
e
f
e
a
t
a
n
o
l
d
e
n
e
m
y
.
Bristol, The Policy Press, 2002.
S
o
u
r
c
e
o
f
F
i
g
.
3
:
Bradshaw J. Child poverty in comparative 
perspective. In: Gordon D, Townsend P. 
B
r
e
a
d
l
i
n
e
E
u
r
o
p
e
:
t
h
e
m
e
a
s
u
r
e
m
e
n
t
o
f
p
o
v
e
r
t
y
. Bristol, The Policy Press, 2000.
C zech Republic
S
l
o vakia
F
i
n land
S
w eden
N orway
B elgium
D enmark
N etherlands
H ungary
G ermany
I
t
a ly
I
s
r
a el
C anada
S pain
P oland
U nited Kingdom
R ussian Federation
U SA
P
R
O
P
O
R
T
I
O
N
(
% )
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
18
Stress in the workplace increases the risk of 
disease. People who have more control over their 
work have better health.
What is known
In general, having a job is better for health than 
having no job. But the social organization of work, 
management styles and social relationships in the 
workplace all matter for health. Evidence shows 
that stress at work plays an important role in 
contributing to the large social status differences 
in health, sickness absence and premature death. 
Several European workplace studies show that 
health suffers when people have little opportunity 
to use their skills and low decision-making 
authority.
Having little control over one’s work is particularly 
strongly related to an increased risk of low 
back pain, sickness absence and cardiovascular 
disease (Fig. 4). These risks have been found to be 
independent of the psychological characteristics 
of the people studied. In short, they seem to be 
related to the work environment.
Studies have also examined the role of work 
demands. Some show an interaction between 
demands and control. Jobs with both high demand 
and low control carry special risk. Some evidence 
indicates that social support in the workplace may 
be protective.
Further, receiving inadequate rewards for the 
effort put into work has been found to be 
associated with increased cardiovascular risk. 
Rewards can take the form of money, status and 
self-esteem. Current changes in the labour market 
may change the opportunity structure, and make it 
harder for people to get appropriate rewards.
These results show that the psychosocial 
environment at work is an important determinant 
of health and contributor to the social gradient in 
ill health.
Policy implications
•  There is no trade-off between health and 
productivity at work. A virtuous circle can be 
established: improved conditions of work will 
lead to a healthier work force, which will lead 
to improved productivity, and hence to the 
opportunity to create a still healthier, more 
productive workplace.
•  Appropriate involvement in decision-making 
is likely to benefit employees at all levels of an 
organization. Mechanisms should therefore 
be developed to allow people to influence 
the design and improvement of their work 
Fig. 4. Self-reported level of job control and 
incidence of coronary heart disease in men and 
women
5.   W O R K
Adjusted for 
age, sex, length 
of follow-up, 
effort/reward 
imbalance, 
employment 
grade, coronary 
risk factors 
and negative 
psychological 
disposition
R
I
S
K
O
F
C
O
R
O
N
A
R
Y
H
E
A
R
T
D
I
S
E
A
S
E
(
W
I
T
H
H
I
G
H
J
O
B
C
O
N
T
R
O
L
S
E
T
A
T
1
.
0
)
2.5
2.0
1.5
1.0
JOB CONTROL
High
Intermediate
Low
19
Jobs with both high 
demand and low control 
carry special risk. 
©
F
I
R
S
T
L
I
G
H
T
KEY SOURCES
Bosma H et al. Two alternative job stress models and risk of 
coronary heart disease.  
A
m
e
r
i
c
a
n
J
o
u
r
n
a
l
o
f
P
u
b
l
i
c
H
e
a
l
t
h
,
1998, 
88:68–74.
Hemingway H, Kuper K, Marmot MG. Psychosocial factors in the 
primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease: an 
updated systematic review of prospective cohort studies. In: 
Yusuf S et al., eds. 
E
v
i
d
e
n
c
e
-
b
a
s
e
d
c
a
r
d
i
o
l
o
g
y
,
2nd ed. London, 
BMJ Books, 2003:181–217. 
Marmot MG et al. Contribution of job control to social gradient in 
coronary heart disease incidence. 
L
a
n
c
e
t
,
1997, 350:235–240. 
Peter R et al. and the SHEEP Study Group. Psychosocial work 
environment and myocardial infarction: improving risk estimation 
•  Good management involves ensuring 
appropriate rewards – in terms of money, status 
and self-esteem – for all employees.
by combining two complementary job stress models in the SHEEP 
Study. 
J
o
u
r
n
a
l
o
f
E
p
i
d
e
m
i
o
l
o
g
y
a
n
d
C
o
m
m
u
n
i
t
y
H
e
a
l
t
h
,
2002, 
56(4):294–300. 
Schnall P et al. Why the workplace and cardiovascular disease? 
O
c
c
u
p
a
t
i
o
n
a
l
M
e
d
i
c
i
n
e
,
S
t
a
t
e
o
f
t
h
e
A
r
t
R
e
v
i
e
w
s
,
2000, 15:126. 
Theorell T, Karasek R. The demand-control-support model and CVD. 
In: Schnall PL et al., eds. 
T
h
e
w
o
r
k
p
l
a
c
e
a
n
d
c
a
r
d
i
o
v
a
s
c
u
l
a
r
d
i
s
e
a
s
e
.
O
c
c
u
p
a
t
i
o
n
a
l
m
e
d
i
c
i
n
e
.
Philadelphia, Hanley and Belfus Inc., 2000:
78–83. 
S
o
u
r
c
e
o
f
F
i
g
.
4
:
Bosma H et al. Two alternative job stress models 
and risk of coronary heart disease. 
A
m
e
r
i
c
a
n
J
o
u
r
n
a
l
o
f
P
u
b
l
i
c
H
e
a
l
t
h
, 1998, 88:68–74.
environment, thus enabling employees to 
have more control, greater variety and more 
opportunities for development at work.
•  To reduce the burden 
of musculoskeletal 
disorders, workplaces 
must be ergonomically 
appropriate.
•  As well as requiring an 
effective infrastructure 
with legal controls and 
powers of inspection, 
workplace health 
protection should also 
include workplace health 
services with people 
trained in the early 
detection of mental health 
problems and appropriate 
interventions.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested