pdf to datatable c# : Delete bookmarks pdf control software system azure windows .net console ebook_manual_en_dive-into-html51-part1819

You are here: 
Home  
Dive Into HTML5 
INTRODUCTION:
INTRODUCTION:
FIVE THINGS YOU SHOULD
FIVE THINGS YOU SHOULD
KNOW ABOUT HTML5
KNOW ABOUT HTML5
show table of contents
1. It’s not one big thing
1. It’s not one big thing
You may well ask: “How can I start using  HTML5 if older
browsers don’t support it?” But the question itself is
misleading. HTML5 is not one big thing; it is a collection
of individual features. So you can’t detect “HTML5
support,” because that doesn’t make any sense. But you can
detect support for individual features, like canvas, video, or
geolocation.
You may think of HTML as tags and angle braets. at’s an important part of it, but it’s
not the whole story. e HTML5 specification also defines how those angle braets interact
with JavaScript, through the Document Object Model (DOM). HTML5 doesn’t just define a
< v i d d e e o >
tag; there is also a corresponding DOM API for video objects in the DOM. You can
use this API to detect support for different video formats, play a video, pause, mute audio,
tra how mu of the video has been downloaded, and everything else you need to build a
ri user experience around the 
< v v i d e e o o >
tag itself.
diveintohtml5.org
FIVE THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT HTML5
Delete bookmarks pdf - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
copy pdf bookmarks; add bookmark pdf file
Delete bookmarks pdf - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
pdf bookmarks; export pdf bookmarks to text file
Chapter 2 and 
Appendix A will tea you how to properly detect support for ea new
HTML5 feature.
2. You don’t need to throw anything
2. You don’t need to throw anything
away
away
Love it or hate it, you can’t deny that  HTML 4 is the most successful
markup format ever. HTML5 builds on that success. You don’t need to
throw away your existing markup. You don’t need to relearn things you
already know. If your web application worked yesterday in HTML 4, it
will still work today in HTML5. Period.
Now, if you want to  improve your web applications, you’ve come to
the right place. Here’s a concrete example: HTML5 supports all the
form controls from HTML 4, but it also includes new input controls.
Some of these are long-overdue additions like sliders and date piers; others are more subtle.
For example, the 
e m a a i i l
input type looks just like a text box, but mobile browsers will
customize their onscreen keyboard to make it easier to type email addresses. Older browsers
that don’t support the 
e m a i i l
input type will treat it as a regular text field, and the form still
works with no markup anges or scripting has. is means you can start improving your
web forms today, even if some of your visitors are stu on IE 6.
Read all the gory details about HTML5 forms in 
Chapter 9.
3. It’s easy to get started
3. It’s easy to get started
“Upgrading” to HTML5 can be as simple as anging your
doctype. e doctype should already be on the first line of
every HTML page. Previous versions of HTML defined a
lot of doctypes, and oosing the right one could be triy.
diveintohtml5.org
FIVE THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT HTML5
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
But it's too complicated to implement this work. Delete unimportant contents: Bookmarks. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
bookmarks in pdf reader; bookmarks in pdf from word
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF file by top level bookmarks. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
copy pdf bookmarks to another pdf; convert word pdf bookmarks
In HTML5, there is only one doctype:
< ! D O O C C T Y P P E  h h t t m m l >
Upgrading to the HTML5 doctype won’t break your
existing markup, because all the tags defined in HTML 4 are still supported in HTML5. But it
will allow you to use — and validate — new semantic elements like 
< a r r t t i c l l e e >
,
< s e c c t t i o n n >
< h h e e a d e e r r >
, and 
< f f o o o t e e r r >
. You’ll learn all about these new elements in
Chapter 3.
4. It already works
4. It already works
Whether you want to draw on a canvas, play video, design
beer forms, or build web applications that work offline,
you’ll find that HTML5 is already well-supported. Firefox,
Safari, Chrome, Opera, and mobile browsers already
support canvas (
Chapter 4), video (
Chapter 5), geolocation
(
Chapter 6), local storage (
Chapter 7), and more. Google
already supports microdata annotations (
Chapter 10). Even
Microso — rarely known for blazing the trail of standards
support — will be supporting most HTML5 features in the
upcoming Internet Explorer 9.
Ea apter of this book includes the all-too-familiar browser
compatibility arts. But more importantly, ea apter includes a frank
discussion of your options if you need to support older browsers.
HTML5 features like geolocation (
Chapter 6) and video (
Chapter 5) were
first provided by browser plugins like Gears or Flash. Other features,
like canvas (
Chapter 4), can be emulated entirely in JavaScript. is book will tea you how
to target the native features of modern browsers, without leaving older browsers behind.
5. It’s here to stay
5. It’s here to stay
diveintohtml5.org
FIVE THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT HTML5
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
But it's too complicated to implement this work. Delete unimportant contents: Bookmarks. Comments, forms and multimedia. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
add bookmarks to pdf preview; create bookmarks pdf files
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Demo Code in VB.NET. The following VB.NET codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
adding bookmarks to pdf; how to bookmark a pdf file in acrobat
Tim Berners-Lee invented the world wide web in the early 1990s. He later founded the W3C
to act as a steward of web standards, whi the organization has done for more than 15 years.
Here is what the W3C had to say about the future of web standards, in July 2009:
Today the Director announces that when the  XHTML 2 Working Group arter
expires as seduled at the end of 2009, the arter will not be renewed. By doing
so, and by increasing resources in the HTML Working Group, W3C hopes to
accelerate the progress of HTML5 and clarify W3C’s position regarding the future
of HTML.
HTML5 is here to stay. 
Let’s dive in.
DID YOU KNOW?
DID YOU KNOW?
In association with Google Press, O’Reilly is
distributing this book in a variety of formats, including
paper, ePub, Mobi, and DRM-free PDF. e paid
edition is called “HTML5: Up & Running,” and it is
available now.
If you liked this introduction and want to show your
appreciation, you can 
buy “HTML5: Up & Running”
with this affiliate link or 
buy an electronic edition
directly from O’Reilly. You’ll get a book, and I’ll get a
bu. I do not currently accept direct donations.
Copyright MMIX–MMX 
Mark Pilgrim
powered by Google™
Search
diveintohtml5.org
FIVE THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT HTML5
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; a blank page or multiple pages to PDF; Allow to delete any current PDF
convert word to pdf with bookmarks; bookmark pdf acrobat
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
by C#.NET PDF to HTML converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and font style that are included in target PDF document file.
creating bookmarks pdf; edit pdf bookmarks
diveintohtml5.org
FIVE THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT HTML5
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail Convert Word to PDF; Convert Word to HTML5; multiple page to Word document; Delete a single
bookmarks pdf; create pdf bookmarks
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
you may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order This class describes bookmarks in a PDF document.
create bookmarks pdf file; export bookmarks from pdf to excel
You are here: 
Home  
Dive Into HTML5 
11
HOW DID WE GET HERE?
HOW DID WE GET HERE?
show table of contents
DIVING IN
DIVING IN
ecently, I stumbled across a quote from a Mozilla developer 
about the tension
inherent in creating standards:
Implementations and specifications have to do a delicate dance together.
You don’t want implementations to happen before the specification is finished,
because people start depending on the details of implementations and that
constrains the specification. However, you also don’t want the specification to be
finished before there are implementations and author experience with those
implementations, because you need the feedba. ere is unavoidable tension here,
but we just have to muddle on through.
Keep this quote in the ba of your mind, and let me explain how  HTML5 came to be.
diveintohtml5.org
HOW DID WE GET HERE?
MIME TYPES
MIME TYPES
is book is about HTML5, not previous versions of HTML, and not any version of XHTML.
But to understand the history of HTML5 and the motivations behind it, you need to
understand a few tenical details first. Specifically, MIME types.
Every time your web browser requests a page, the web server sends “headers” before it sends
the actual page markup. ese headers are normally invisible, although there are web
development tools that will make them visible if you’re interested. But the headers are
important, because they tell your browser how to interpret the page markup that follows. e
most important header is called 
C o o n t e n n t t - T y p p e
, and it looks like this:
C o n t e e n n t - T y y p p e :  t t e e x t / h h t t m l
t e x t t / / h t m l
” is called the “content type” or “ MIME type” of the page. is header is the only
thing that determines what a particular resource truly is, and therefore how it should be
rendered. Images have their own MIME types (
i m a g e e / / j p e g
for JPEG images, 
i m m a g e / p p n n g
for PNG images, and so on). JavaScript files have their own MIME type. CSS stylesheets have
their own MIME type. Everything has its own MIME type. e web runs on MIME types.
Of course, reality is more complicated than that. e first generation of web servers (and I’m
talking web servers from 1993) didn’t send the 
C o n t e e n n t - T y y p p e
header because it didn’t exist
yet. (It wasn’t invented until 1994.) For compatibility reasons that date all the way ba to
1993, some popular web browsers will ignore the 
C o n n t t e n t - - T T y p e
header under certain
circumstances. (is is called “content sniffing.”) But as a general rule of thumb, everything
you’ve ever looked at on the web — HTML pages, images, scripts, videos, PDFs, anything
diveintohtml5.org
HOW DID WE GET HERE?
with a URL — has been served to you with a specific  MIME type in the 
C o o n t e n n t t - T y p p e
header.
Tu that under your hat. We’ll come ba to it.
A LONG DIGRESSION INTO HOW
A LONG DIGRESSION INTO HOW
STANDARDS ARE MADE
STANDARDS ARE MADE
Why do we have an 
< i m g g >
element?
at’s not a question you hear every
day. Obviously someone must have
created it. ese things don’t just appear
out of nowhere. Every element, every
aribute, every feature of HTML that
you’ve ever used — someone created
them, decided how they should work,
and wrote it all down. ese people are
not gods, nor are they flawless. ey’re
just people. Smart people, to be sure. But
just people.
One of the great things about standards
that are developed “out in the open” is
that you can go ba in time and answer
these kinds of questions. Discussions occur on mailing lists, whi are usually arived and
publicly searable. So I decided to do a bit of “email araeology” to try to answer the
question, “Why do we have an 
< i i m m g >
element?” I had to go ba to before there was an
organization called the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). I went ba to the earliest days
of the web, when you could count the number of web servers with both hands and maybe a
couple of toes.
diveintohtml5.org
HOW DID WE GET HERE?
(ere are a number of typographical errors in the following quotes. I have decided to leave
them intact for historical accuracy.)
On February 25, 1993, 
Marc Andreessen wrote:
I’d like to propose a new, optional HTML tag:
IMG
Required argument is 
S R C = = " " u r l "
.
is names a bitmap or pixmap file for the browser to aempt to pull over the
network and interpret as an image, to be embedded in the text at the point of the
tag’s occurrence.
An example is:
< I I M G  S S R R C = " f i i l e : / / / / f o o o b a a r .co o m m / f o o o o / / ba r / / bl l a r g g h h .x bm m " " >
(ere is no closing tag; this is just a standalone tag.)
is tag can be embedded in an anor like anything else; when that happens, it
becomes an icon that’s sensitive to activation just like a regular text anor.
Browsers should be afforded flexibility as to whi image formats they support.
Xbm and Xpm are good ones to support, for example. If a browser cannot interpret
a given format, it can do whatever it wants instead (X Mosaic will pop up a
default bitmap as a placeholder).
is is required functionality for X Mosaic; we have this working, and we’ll at
least be using it internally. I’m certainly open to suggestions as to how this should
be handled within HTML; if you have a beer idea than what I’m presenting now,
please let me know. I know this is hazy wrt image format, but I don’t see an
alternative than to just say “let the browser do what it can” and wait for the
perfect solution to come along (MIME, someday, maybe).
diveintohtml5.org
HOW DID WE GET HERE?
Xbm and 
Xpm were popular graphics formats on Unix systems.
“Mosaic” was one of the earliest web browsers. (“X Mosaic” was the version that ran on Unix
systems.) When he wrote this message in early 1993, 
Marc Andreessen had not yet founded
the company that made him famous, 
Mosaic Communications Corporation, nor had he started
work on that company’s flagship product, “Mosaic Netscape.” (You may know them beer by
their later names, “Netscape Corporation” and “Netscape Navigator.”)
“MIME, someday, maybe” is a reference to 
content negotiation, a feature of HTTP where a
client (like a web browser) tells the server (like a web server) what types of resources it
supports (like 
i m a g g e e / j p e e g
) so the server can return something in the client’s preferred
format. 
e Original HTTP as defined in 1991 (the only version that was implemented in
February 1993) did not have a way for clients to tell servers what kinds of images they
supported, thus the design dilemma that Marc faced.
A few hours later, 
Tony Johnson replied:
I have something very similar in Midas 2.0 (in use here at SLAC, and due for
public release any week now), except that all the names are different, and it has an
extra argument 
NAM E= " n a m m e e "
. It has almost exactly the same functionality as your
proposed 
I M G
tag. e.g.
< I I C ON n n a m e = = " " No En n t t r y "  h h r e f = = " " h t t p p : : / / n o o t t e / f o o o o / ba r r / / No En n t t r y .x x bm m " >
e idea of the name parameter was to allow the browser to have a set of “built
in” images. If the name mates a “built in” image it would use that instead of
having to go out and fet the image. e name could also act as a hint for “line
mode” browsers as to what kind of a symbol to put in place of the image.
I don’t mu care about the parameter or tag names, but it would be sensible if we
used the same things. I don’t mu care for abbreviations, ie why not 
I M AG G E=
and
S OUR R C E=
. I somewhat prefer 
I C ON
since it imlies that the 
I M M AG G E
should be
smallish, but maybe 
I C ON
is an overloaded word?
Midas was another early web browser, a contemporary of X Mosaic. It was cross-platform; it
ran on both Unix and VMS. “SLAC” refers to the 
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, now the
diveintohtml5.org
HOW DID WE GET HERE?
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested