extract table data from pdf c# : Convert word to pdf with bookmarks control software system web page html .net console edc_sri_rtl_peg_home_study_report_20-part1847

Supporting Parent-Child Experiences  
with PEG+CAT Early Math Concepts:
Report to the CPB-PBS Ready To Learn Initiative 
November 2015
Convert word to pdf with bookmarks - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
create bookmarks pdf files; bookmark pdf in preview
Convert word to pdf with bookmarks - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
pdf bookmark; how to bookmark a pdf in reader
© 2015 by Education Development Center and SRI International.
Loulou Bangura, Education Development Center
Danae Kamdar, SRI International
Brita Bookser, SRI International
Andrew Krumm, SRI International
Elizabeth Christiano, SRI International
Breniel Lemley, SRI International
Sarah Gerard, SRI International
Deborah Rosenfeld, Education Development Center
Marion Goldstein, Education Development Center
Elica Sharifnia, SRI International
Jaime Gutierrez, Education Development Center
Sara Vasquez, SRI International
Brianna Hightower, Education Development Center
Michelle Vedar, SRI International
Irene Yelee Jo, Education Development Center
Regan Vidiksis, Education Development Center
Terri Meade, Education Development Center
Report Design
Kate Borelli, SRI International
Contributing Researchers
Authors
Suggested Citation
Pasnik, S., Moorthy, S., Llorente, C., Hupert, N., Dominguez, X., & Silander, M. (2015) Supporting Parent-Child 
Experiences with PEG+CAT Early Math Concepts: Report to the CPB-PBS Ready to Learn Initiative. New York, NY & 
Menlo Park, CA: Education Development Center & SRI International.
Shelley Pasnik, Education Development Center
Savitha Moorthy, SRI International
Naomi Hupert, Education Development Center
Carlin Llorente, SRI International
Megan Silander, Education Development Center
Ximena Dominguez, SRI International
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Bookmarks. Comments, forms and multimedia. Convert smooth lines to curves. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
export pdf bookmarks to text file; bookmark pdf acrobat
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF file by top level bookmarks. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
bookmarks pdf; copy pdf bookmarks to another pdf
Introduction 
1
Research Design  
3
Theory of Change and Existing Research Base 
9
PBS KIDS PEG+CAT Intervention  
13
Implementation 
17
Methods 
21
Analytic Approach 
29
Summary of Results 
33
Results in Detail 
35
Up Close: Media Use in PBS KIDS Homes 
55
Limitations and Constraints 
61
Discussion and Future Research 
63
References 
69
Appendices 
73
Contents
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Demo Code in VB.NET. The following VB.NET codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
pdf create bookmarks; how to add bookmarks to pdf files
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. Comments, forms and multimedia. Hidden layer content. Convert smooth lines to curves. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
creating bookmarks pdf files; add bookmark pdf file
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
it extremely easy for C# developers to convert and transform document file, converted by C#.NET PDF to HTML all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and font
create bookmarks in pdf from excel; how to create bookmark in pdf automatically
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
Create Word from PDF; Create Word from OpenOffice (.odt); More about Word SDK Word Export. Convert Word to PDF; Convert Word to HTML5; Convert Word to Tiff; Convert
create bookmarks pdf file; export bookmarks from pdf to excel
Report to the CPB-PBS Ready To Learn Initiative
1
Deep inequalities in the learning trajectories of students have led to a growing interest in interventions meant for 
young children who are at higher risk for academic difficulties. Children living in communities where there are high 
concentrations of poverty, for example, often do not have access to the financial and social resources that promote 
school readiness but have just as much capacity to develop a broad range of skills as their better-resourced peers. 
In addressing persistent gaps in achievement, some federal programs have focused on children’s formal educational 
experiences calling for greater investments in preschool while others have turned their attention to educational 
supports outside of school and early childcare settings. 
For more than two decades, the U.S. Department of Education’s Ready To Learn Initiative has devoted public 
resources to help improve conditions inside the place where children spend much of their time growing and learning: 
their homes. Families, including families with young children, spend considerable time engaging with digital media and 
technology tools at home (Rideout, 2014; Rideout, Vandewater, & Wartella, 2003), and children with less-educated 
parents tend to spend more time with TV and other screens than do children with more affluent, educated parents 
(Putnam, 2015). Although much of this engagement is with commercial entertainment, young children spend more 
time viewing and playing with educational and non-commercial programming than do other groups (Rideout, 2013), 
creating the potential to use their engagement with media to support learning. And, because media experiences are 
often social—young children and other family members watch and play alongside one another—there is even greater 
potential to create learning experiences that involve children and their parents. When parents are able to engage 
with well-designed transmedia resources, and when they have access to information about how they can use these 
resources to support children’s understanding and engagement, the stage is set for early learning to take place. 
This is consistent with a growing body of research on the need for a two-generation strategy when trying to combat 
poverty and educational challenges that stem from economic stress (DeNevas & Proctor, 2015).
The study presented here addresses the question of how time spent viewing and playing with PBS KIDS educational, 
non-commercial media can benefit young children’s learning, especially those growing up in lower-income 
communities, who typically have limited exposure to experiences that are oriented toward school-readiness. The pair 
of overarching goals of this CPB-PBS Ready To Learn research is to 1) explore how transmedia can support children’s 
early mathematics learning, and 2) substantively address the central role that parents/caregivers play in children’s 
learning lives. This report includes information about shifts in parent/caregiver perceptions of transmedia use, as well 
as how families engage with their children during transmedia viewing and play. 
Introduction
C# Word - Convert Word to HTML in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and font C#: Convert Word document to HTML5 files.
bookmark template pdf; create bookmarks pdf
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx); Convert PDF to HTML; Convert PDF to
convert word to pdf with bookmarks; excel pdf bookmarks
2
Supporting Parent-Child Experiences with PEG+CAT Early Math Concepts
Using a randomized controlled trial design that gathered data on outcomes and implementation, researchers examined 
children’s and families’ home use of PEG+CAT a PBS KIDS transmedia program implemented over a 12-week period. 
Like previous generations of public media preschool programming, PEG+CAT  resources are designed to give young 
children early experiences that support later success with academic tasks. As Peg and Cat, along with their friends 
and adversaries, “find a way to solve the math and save the day” in their animated fictional universe, their adventures 
introduce children to key mathematical skills and provide positive models of social and emotional behaviors, such as 
problem solving and persistence. Because PEG+CAT was designed as a first-generation transmedia property—the 
characters and storylines extend across multiple media platforms—study materials included PEG+CAT full episodes 
and video clips, online games, a tablet-based app, and print activities that allow children and families to engage with 
the same characters, settings, and narratives on multiple devices and with fewer time and location constraints. 
The resources are intended to be fun, and purposefully focus on developmentally appropriate learning goals for 
young children. The study involved approximately 200 children and their families living in lower-income communities 
in the New York Metro and San Francisco Bay Area. Half of these children and families engaged with a curated set 
of PEG+CAT materials at home; the other half, in addition to serving as the business-as-usual comparison condition, 
also helped the research team gain insight into families’ practices around media, including how children and parent/ 
caregivers jointly used media. This report provides new evidence about how an informal experience with a transmedia 
property can influence children’s mathematics learning, and parents’ behaviors and attitudes.
This research is part of the summative evaluation of the CPB-PBS Ready To Learn Initiative, which is supported by the 
U.S. Department of Education and seeks to develop engaging, high-quality educational programming and supports for 
two- to eight-year-old children living in low-income households. During the 2010-2015 grant cycle, Ready To Learn aimed 
to deliver early mathematics resources on both established technologies (computers, video displays, and gaming consoles) 
and emerging digital platforms (tablet computers, interactive whiteboards, and smartphones) to create anytime-anywhere 
learning experiences that leverage the unique capabilities of transmedia for young children’s learning. As the summative 
evaluation team for Ready To Learn, Education Development Center (EDC) and SRI Education (SRI) document and, 
whenever possible, measure the impact of PBS KIDS transmedia mathematics resources on children’s school readiness. 
Prior Ready To Learn evaluation research findings, including context studies and impact studies, focused on the role 
of transmedia in early learning classrooms, more directly with children in a learning lab study environment, and the 
home can be found at pbskids.org/lab/research
PEG+CAT The Play Date 
Problem episode
The study resources are intended 
to be fun, and purposefully focus 
on developmentally appropriate 
learning goals for young children. 
Report to the CPB-PBS Ready To Learn Initiative
3
Research Design 
The goal of this study was to understand the conditions within which public media resources deliver on their promise 
of fostering positive outcomes for children and parents/caregivers. As a result, the study design sought to identify 
and describe (1) how use of PEG+CAT resources influenced children’s knowledge of target mathematics and social 
emotional skills;
1
(2) how use of these resources influenced parent/caregiver attitudes and beliefs; and (3) how children 
and families engaged with selected PEG+CAT resources in their homes. 
Research Questions 
The research team investigated the following research questions related to families’ engagement with media and 
outcomes for parents/caregivers and children. 
Child Learning Outcomes 
•    Did children who engaged with PEG+CAT resources at home improve in target mathematics skills, as measured 
by a researcher-designed assessment, compared to children in a comparison condition?
•    Did children who engaged with PEG+CAT resources at home improve in target approaches to learning (ATL) 
skills, as measured by teacher and/or parent observation, compared to children in a comparison condition?
Parent/Caregiver Outcomes 
•    What role did parents/caregivers play in supporting children’s engagement with PEG+CAT media and, by 
extension, their learning of target mathematics and ATL skills? 
•    In contrast to a comparison group, did parents or caregivers using the PEG+CAT resources change their attitudes, 
beliefs, or knowledge about (1) educational media- and technology-supported learning, (2) early mathematics, 
(3) children’s approaches to learning, and (4) their role in supporting children’s math learning? 
1
Also known as Approaches to Learning (ATL), social-emotional skills include skills such as problem solving, persistence, and 
cognitive flexibility.
4
Supporting Parent-Child Experiences with PEG+CAT Early Math Concepts
Family Engagement
•    What were the experiences of families while using the designed PEG+CAT materials (e.g., videos, games, and 
family support materials) to support learning at home? 
•    What facilitators and barriers did families encounter while using the PEG+CAT materials? What supports, if any, 
helped families overcome the barriers? 
•    What were the contexts in which families engaged with media? What, if any, were the similarities and differences 
between families using the PEG+CAT intervention materials and families in a comparison group with respect to 
engagement and joint engagement with educational media and technology? 
Study Conditions 
The study employed a two-condition design in which participating families were randomly assigned either to (1) a PBS 
KIDS treatment group or (2) a non-treated business as usual comparison group. Families who were assigned to the 
PBS KIDS group were provided with technology resources (an Android tablet and a Chromebook laptop, a curated 
PEG+CAT experience, and supports for joint engagement. The curated PEG+CAT experience and the supports for 
joint engagement are described in the PBS KIDS PEG+CAT Intervention section, below. Participants in the business 
as usual group were asked to continue with their typical home behaviors with regard to children’s technology and 
media use.
The two-group design offers a number of important benefits. First, it provides the strongest possible contrast between 
groups, so as to detect differences in adult and child outcomes between the two groups. Second, the inclusion of a 
business as usual comparison group allows researchers to make stronger claims about implementation and about 
parent and child outcomes. Finally, including a non-treated business as usual comparison group provides a unique 
opportunity to describe how contemporary families are engaging with media and technology. This closer examination 
is a powerful complement and extension of recent survey-based research conducted by Common Sense Media and 
the Joan Ganz Cooney Center (e.g., Rideout, 2014). 
Study Sample 
Researchers worked with local preschools to recruit eligible families to participate in the study. Recruitment teams 
on both coasts collected signed consent forms from families interested in participating. In total, researchers received 
362 consent forms. Of this group, 301 children met study age requirements. Between the collection of consent forms 
and randomization, families of 17 children opted out, indicating they were too busy to participate in study meetings 
and other activities. Researchers randomly assigned the remaining 284 children to either the PBS KIDS (treatment) 
condition or the business as usual (comparison) condition. 
The final study sample included 197 children from families who enrolled in the study by attending study kick-off 
meetings. These children attended 14 preschool centers (10 in the New York metropolitan area and 4 in the San 
Francisco Bay area) serving low-income communities. Table 1 provides information on children’s ages.
Report to the CPB-PBS Ready To Learn Initiative
5
Five families stopped participating during the course of the study (3 CA, 2 NY; 4 business as usual, 1 PBS KIDS). Two 
families withdrew in the first weeks of the study because they were not able to complete required study tasks such as 
completing media diaries; two families moved during the study; and one family dropped out because of parent health 
issues. There was no discernable pattern in attrition.
Study families were predominantly Latino, Asian American, and African American. The majority (53%) of families in 
the sample reported speaking more than one language at home (English/Spanish or English/Mandarin Chinese). The 
remaining 47% of families in the sample were monolingual, with home language of English (21%), Mandarin Chinese 
(10%), Spanish (12%), or Other (Vietnamese or French, 4%). 
In terms of parental education, 33% of mothers had not graduated high school, while approximately 29% had earned 
a high school diploma or GED; 37% of fathers were not high-school graduates, while 28% had earned a high school 
diploma or GED. The total household income (in 2013) was consistent with the low-income sample sought: more than 
half (52%) of families reported an annual household income of less than $25,000, while a little over a third (36%) of 
families reported an annual household income of $25,000–$49,000. Four percent of the children in the sample had an 
Individualized Education Plan (IEP). Table A2. Sample Demographics and Descriptive Statistics by Condition provides 
additional detail about study demographics by condition.  
Media and Technology Use in Participating Families 
To describe the home media ecology of the sample, researchers relied on data gathered from a parent survey 
administered at the beginning of the study. In addition to gathering information about the technology in homes, the 
survey also collected information about how these devices typically were used by families. 
Given a list of 13 devices and services, families reported owning or using an average of five to six items. Figure 1 
shows the percentage of families that reported owning or using particular devices in their homes. 
Condition
N
Mean Age
SD
Minimum
Maximum
Overall
197
4 y 5 mo.
0.28
4 y 0 mo.
5 y 2 mo.
PBS KIDS
101
4 y 6 mo.
0.28
4 y 0 mo.
5 y 1 mo.
Business as usual 
96
4 y 4 mo.
0.28
4 y 0 mo.
5 y 2 mo.
Table 1. Total Sample of Children and Descriptive Statistics for Age by Condition
6
Supporting Parent-Child Experiences with PEG+CAT Early Math Concepts
Television was the most dominant technology platform among participating families, but families 
engaged in a variety of media experiences. Eighty-nine percent of study families reported they had at least 
one TV set in the home; a similar number also reported having a smart phone (85%). Other popular technology 
devices available to families included home desktop or laptop computers, electronic tablets, and DVD, Blu-Ray, or 
VHS players. PBS KIDS families reported owning slightly more types of devices than did business as usual families 
(a statistically significant average of 5.77 devices, compared to 5.05 devices, p<.05). Approximately three-fourths of 
the sample reported subscribing to cable or satellite TV, while about a third of the sample reported using a paid video 
subscription such as Hulu, Netflix, or Amazon Prime. 
At the start of the intervention, nearly half of all parents (40%) reported that their children watch TV, DVDs, online 
videos, or other types of videos every day at home, with 85% reporting that their child did so at least once per week. 
Close to half of the children (46%) read or looked at electronic books at home at least once per week. About one-third 
of the children played games on a video game player, computer, or mobile device (35%) and/or used apps or software 
programs (31%) one to two times per week. Often, children multi-tasked while engaging with media: at least once 
per week, 85% of all children used technology while doing another activity, such as playing with toys, riding in a car/
bus/train, or eating a meal. 
The majority of families (81%) reported having home Internet access, although high-speed broadband 
access was available to fewer than half. Forty-four percent of families reported high-speed broadband access, 
while the remaining families (37%) reported access only through a cell phone, dial-up, or were unsure of the type. 
Notably, more than half of the families in New York (55%) reported broadband access, but a much smaller proportion 
of families in California (35%) reported such access. 
0
20
40
60
80
100
Television set
Smart phone
DVD, Blue-ray,
or VHS player
Laptop or
desktop computer
Tablet device
Video game player that
hooks up to the TV
Digital educational toys
iPod Touch or other type
of video-playing iPod
Basic
electronic reader
11%
19%
23%
37%
47%
53%
57%
85%
89%
Percentage of Families with Device
Devices Available in Family Homes
Figure 1. Media Devices Available in the Homes of Participating Families (n=197)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested