pdf document dll in c# : How to add bookmarks on pdf SDK control service wpf azure .net dnn ACROHELP59-part305

Previewing output
The Output Preview dialog box provides a convenient way to use the open Adobe PDF 
document to preview separations, proof colors, view colors by source in addition to ink 
plates, and highlight warning areas for out-of-gamut areas, ink coverage limits, and 
overprinting. The top part of the dialog box has several controls. The Preview pop-up 
menu allows you to switch between previewing separations and previewing color 
warnings. When you select Separations, the bottom half of the dialog box lists all the inks 
in the file, as well as ink warning controls and total area coverage controls. When you 
select Color Warnings, a warnings section replaces the separations section. The preview 
settings you specify in the Output Preview dialog box are reflected directly in the open 
document.
Output Preview also includes access to the complete Ink Manager (as seen in the rest of 
Adobe Creative Suite) for remapping spot-color inks in both printing and previewing, and 
setting line frequencies and screen angles. (See 
Using the Ink Manager.)
Note: Unless you have been using a color management system (CMS) with accurately 
calibrated ICC profiles and have calibrated your monitor, the on-screen separation 
preview colors may not match the final color separation output. (See 
Managing color in 
Acrobat and 
Creating an ICC monitor profile.)
Output Preview dialog box with Separations selected A. Source profile for simulation B. Soft-
proofing options C. Selected color space D. Ink list E. Total ink coverage allowed F. Ink 
coverage per plate G. Warning color
To open the Output Preview dialog box:
Do one of the following:
l
Choose Tools > Print Production > Output Preview.
l
Select the Output Preview tool 
on the Print Production toolbar.
l
Choose Advanced > Output Preview.
To view colors by source color space:
In the Output Preview dialog box, select an option from the Show pop-up menu.
Select all or single plates for previewing.
To change the warning color used in the preview:
1.  In the Output Preview dialog box, select the color swatch next to the warning.
2.  Select a color from the color picker.
Related Subtopics:
Previewing color separations
Viewing color warnings
Soft-proofing colors
How to add bookmarks on pdf - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
convert word pdf bookmarks; creating bookmarks pdf files
How to add bookmarks on pdf - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
create pdf bookmarks online; create bookmarks pdf files
Previewing color separations
You can preview separation plates and ink coverage to ensure that the printed piece meets 
your requirements. Total Area Coverage specifies the total percentage of all inks used. For 
example, 280 means 280% ink coverage, which could be accomplished with 60C, 60M, 
60Y, and 100K. Too much ink can saturate paper and cause drying problems or change 
the expected color characteristics of the document. Ask your prepress service provider for 
the maximum ink coverage of the press you will be printing on. You can then preview the 
document to identify areas where total ink coverage exceeds the press's limit.
Although previewing separations on your monitor can help you detect problems without 
the expense of printing separations, it does not let you preview trapping, emulsion options, 
printer marks, and halftone screens and resolution. Those settings are best verified with 
your prepress service provider using integral or overlay proofs.
Note: Objects on hidden layers are not included in an on-screen preview.
To preview one or more separation plates:
1.  In the Output Preview dialog box, choose Separations from the Preview menu.
2.  Do any of the following:
l
To view one or more separations, select the empty box to the left of each separation name. 
Each separation appears in its assigned color.
l
To hide one or more separations, deselect the box to the left of each separation name.
l
To view all process or spot plates at once, select Process Plates or Spot Plates.
Note: A single process or spot plate appear as a black plate.
To check ink coverage for a specific area:
1.  In the Output Preview dialog box, choose Separations from the Preview menu.
2.  In the document window, use the pointer to hover over that area in the document window. 
Ink coverage percentages appear in the ink list of the Output Preview dialog box next to 
each ink name. 
You can adjust ink coverage by converting some spot colors to process colors. (See 
About separating spot colors as process.)
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. Comments, forms and multimedia. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
add bookmarks to pdf; export pdf bookmarks to excel
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
document file. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview
add bookmark pdf file; pdf bookmark editor
Viewing color warnings
Output problems can occur when a document's colors are not reproducible on a particular 
press, or rich black is used unintentionally on type. To diagnose such color problems 
before handing off an Adobe PDF document for high-end output, you can use the various 
color warnings in the Output Preview dialog box. Pixels in areas that trigger the warning 
are displayed in the warning color, which is identified by the swatch color next to the 
warning type. You can change the warning colors using the swatch's color picker.
Previewing color warnings on your monitor lets you check the following:
l
Show Overprinting indicates how blending, transparency, and overprinting will appear in 
color-separated output. You can also see overprinting effects when you output to a 
composite printing device, if you select Simulate Overprinting in the Output panel of the 
Advanced Print Setup dialog box. This is useful for proofing color separations.
l
Rich Black indicates areas that will print as rich black--process black (K) ink mixed with 
color inks for increased opacity and richer color. Rich-black objects knock out the colors 
beneath, preventing background objects from showing through. This is usually desirable 
only for large, black display type.
Output Preview dialog box configured for viewing color warnings
To view color warnings:
1.  In the Output Preview dialog box, select the profile from the Simulation Profile pop-up 
menu that describes the target output device.
2.  Choose Color Warnings from the Preview pop-up menu.
3.  Select Show Overprinting, or Rich Black to highlight color problems in the open PDF 
page.
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Add necessary references: The following VB.NET codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
copy pdf bookmarks; how to bookmark a page in pdf document
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
create bookmark pdf; adding bookmarks to pdf
Soft-proofing colors
In a traditional publishing workflow, you print a hard proof of your document to preview 
how the document's colors look. In a color-managed workflow, you can use the precision 
of color profiles to soft-proof your document directly on the monitor--to display an on-
screen preview of how your document's colors will look when reproduced on a particular 
output device.
Keep in mind that the reliability of the soft proof is highly dependent upon the quality of 
your monitor, your monitor profile, and the ambient lighting conditions of your 
workstation. (See 
Creating a viewing environment and 
Creating an ICC monitor profile.)
To display a soft proof:
In the Output Preview dialog box, choose the proof profile space you want to simulate:
l
The color profile of a specific output device. You can select None to proof only for ink 
black or paper white simulation, without simulating a different proof file. If you want the 
custom proof setup to be the default proof setup for documents, close all document 
windows before selecting Output Preview. 
l
Simulate Ink Black to preview in the monitor space--the actual dynamic range defined by 
the proof profile. This option is not available for all profiles.
l
Simulate Paper White to preview, in the monitor space, the specific shade of white 
exhibited by the print medium described by the proof profile. Selecting this option 
automatically selects the Simulate Ink Black option. This option is not available for all 
profiles.
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; PDF Text Write & Extract. Insert and add text to any page of PDF document with
create bookmark in pdf automatically; create bookmarks pdf file
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail Convert Word to PDF; Convert Word to HTML5; Convert Add and insert a blank page or multiple
bookmarks pdf file; how to add bookmarks on pdf
Converting colors
If your Adobe PDF document will be output to a high-end output device or incorporated 
in a prepress workflow, you can convert color objects in the document to CMYK or 
another color space. Acrobat uses the source color spaces of objects in an Adobe PDF 
document to determine what (if any) color conversion is required, for example, from RGB 
to CMYK. If a PDF file contains objects with embedded color profiles, Acrobat manages 
the colors using the embedded profiles rather than the default color spaces. You can 
convert the colors of a single page or an entire document.
Convert Colors dialog box A. Document Colors list B. Destination Space color profiles
Related Subtopics:
About embedding color profiles
About embedding color profiles as output intents
About removing embedded color profiles
Converting colors to a destination color space
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and font to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to Add necessary references
copy pdf bookmarks to another pdf; adding bookmarks to a pdf
XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to HTML5; Add a blank page or multiple pages to
excel hyperlink to pdf bookmark; creating bookmarks pdf
About embedding color profiles
You can embed profiles that describe the characteristics of the document's color spaces. 
Acrobat attaches the appropriate profile, as specified in the Destination Space area of the 
Convert Colors dialog box, to the selected color space in the Adobe PDF document. For 
example, a document might contain five objects: one in Grayscale and two each in the 
RGB and CMYK color spaces. In this case, you can specify that Acrobat embed a separate 
color profile to calibrate the color for each color space, for a total of three profiles. This 
might be useful if your RIP performs color management of PDF files or if you are sharing 
PDF files with other users.
About embedding color profiles as output intents
An output intent provides a way to match the color characteristics of an Adobe PDF 
document with those of a target output device or production environment in which the 
document will be produced as a printed product. An output intent describes the color 
reproduction characteristics of a possible output device or condition of production. The 
color spaces in the document will be DeviceGray, DeviceRGB, or DeviceCMYK, 
depending on the color model of the destination profile. This destination profile replaces 
any existing output intent.
About removing embedded color profiles
You can remove embedded profiles altogether or remove them and attach new profiles 
that meet your specifications. Unembedding is useful if the Adobe PDF file contains 
embedded colors profiles and you want to preserve those CMYK and grayscale color 
values.
Converting colors to a destination color space
Depending on the color spaces you select, the Convert Colors command will preserve, 
convert, or map color values from the source color space to the specified destination space 
as follows:
l
Objects with untagged RGB data (DeviceRGB) convert from the working space RGB 
profile to the CMYK gamut of the destination space. The same is done with untagged 
CMYK (DeviceCMYK) and grayscale (DeviceGray) values.
l
Objects in device-independent color spaces (CalGray, CalRGB, or CIE L*a*b) can be 
preserved or converted. If converted, Acrobat uses the device-independent object's 
embedded profile information.
l
Objects set in spot colors (including Separation, DeviceN, and NChannel color spaces) 
can be preserved, converted, or mapped (aliased) to any other ink present in the document. 
Spot colors can also be mapped to a CMYK process color, if the process color model of 
the destination space is CMYK. Spot colors mapped to other inks can be previewed in the 
Output Preview dialog box. (See 
Previewing output.)
To open the Convert Colors dialog box:
Choose Tools > Print Production > Convert Colors, or select the Convert Colors tool 
on the Print Production toolbar.
To convert a document's colors to a different color space:
1.  In the Convert Colors dialog box, select an option from the list of color spaces and 
colorants used in the document.
Color spaces with currently selected actions
2.  Select an option from the Action menu:
l
Preserve keeps objects in the selected color space when outputting the document.
l
Convert uses the destination space profile to convert color objects to a common ICC 
profile for an output device.
l
Decalibrate removes embedded profiles from the color objects in that color space.
Note: Spot colors can be mapped to the destination space by way of another ink, called an 
alias.
3.  Specify the space to which colors will be converted. The destination profile defines the 
target output device for the converted color spaces.
4.  Specify the pages to convert.
5.  Select a conversion option:
l
Embed Profile As Source Color Space tags all images with the destination profile selected 
in the Profile menu.
l
Embed Profile As OutputIntent uses the destination profile as the output intent. 
l
Don't Embed Profile does not tag objects with the profile.
l
Preserve Black Objects preserves the color values of objects drawn in CMYK, RGB, or 
Gray during conversion. This prevents text in RGB black from being converted to rich 
black when converted to CMYK.
Using the Ink Manager
The Ink Manager modifies the way inks are treated while the current PDF document is 
open. Ink Manager settings affect how inks are viewed using Output Preview, and how 
inks print when separations are generated.
Ink Manager options are especially useful for prepress service providers:
l
If a process job includes a spot color, a service provider can open the document and remap 
the spot-color ink to equivalent CMYK process colors. 
l
If a document contains two similar spot colors when only one is required, a service 
provider can create an alias to a different spot or process color. You can see the effects of 
ink aliasing in the printed output, and on-screen if Overprint Preview mode is on. Spot 
colors aliased to other spots or to process colors are reflected directly in the open 
document using the Output Preview dialog box. A spot color aliased to a process color 
appears as that process color in the document.
l
In a trapping workflow, you can associate trapping information with an ink plate. For 
example, you set the ink density for controlling when trapping takes place, and the correct 
number and sequence of inks. (For information on using the trapping options, see 
Adjusting ink neutral density values and 
Specifying trapping sequence.)
Ink Manager A. Process ink B. Spot ink C. Aliased spot ink
To display the Ink Manager:
Do one of the following:
l
Choose Tools > Print Production > Ink Manager.
l
Select the Ink Manager tool 
on the Print Production toolbar.
l
Choose Tools > Print Production > Output Preview, and click the Ink Manager button.
l
Choose File > Print, and click Advanced. In the Output panel of the Advanced Print Setup 
dialog box, click the Ink Manager button.
l
Choose File > Save As, and choose PostScript or Encapsulated PostScript for the file type. 
Click Settings, and then click Ink Manager.
To convert all spot colors to process:
In the Ink Manager, click Convert All Spots To Process. The icon to the left of the color 
on the ink list changes to CMYK color mode. Clicking OK discards any ink aliases you 
have set up.
To restore your spot colors, deselect All Spots To Process.
Note: The process color equivalents may not exactly match the original spot color, which 
can affect overprinting and trap settings in your document.
To convert individual spot colors to process:
In the Ink Manager, click the ink type icon to the left of the spot color or aliased spot 
color. A four-color process icon appears.
To create an ink alias:
1.  In the Ink Manager, select the spot-color ink for which you want an alias.
2.  Choose an option in the Ink Alias menu. The ink type icon and ink description change 
accordingly.
Note: Because the Ink Manager lists all the inks in the file, you may inadvertently create 
an alias for an ink that exists on one page to an ink that exists on a different page. In this 
case, the aliased ink does not print when you print separations for that page. Be sure to 
preview separations to identify any of these types of ink problems. (See 
Previewing color 
separations.)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested