ASP.NET Web Pages Using The Razor Syntax 
Chapter 1 – Getting Started with WebMatrix and ASP.NET Web Pages 
After you click Create Password, a security-check page that looks like the following screen shot 
prompts you to rename the password file for security reasons. If this is your first time to see this 
page, do not try to rename the file yet. Proceed to the next step and follow the directions there.  
4.
Leave the browser open on the security-check page, return to WebMatrix, and click the Files 
workspace.  
5.
Right-click the Hello World folder for your site and then click Refresh. The list of files and folders 
now displays an App_Data folder. Open that and you see an Admin folder. The newly created 
password file (_Password.config) is displayed in the ./App_Data/Admin/ folder. The following 
illustration shows the updated file structure with the password file selected: 
6.
Rename the file to Password.config by removing the leading underscore (_) character.  
7.
Return to the security-check page in the browser, and click the Click Here link near the end of 
the message about renaming the password file.  
Create pdf bookmarks - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
how to create bookmarks in pdf file; excel print to pdf with bookmarks
Create pdf bookmarks - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
how to add bookmarks to pdf files; creating bookmarks in pdf files
ASP.NET Web Pages Using The Razor Syntax 
Chapter 1 – Getting Started with WebMatrix and ASP.NET Web Pages 
8.
Log into the Administration page using the password you created. The page displays the Package 
Manager, which contains a list of add-on packages.  
If you ever want to display other feed locations, click the Manage Package Sources link to add, 
change, or remove feeds. 
9.
Find the ASP.NET Web Helpers Library 1.1 package, click the Install button, and then install the 
package as directed. When you install the ASP.NET Web Helpers library, the Package Manager 
also installs the FaceBook.Helper 1.0 library. You'll use helpers from these libraries in this 
tutorial and later ones. After the package is installed, the Package Manager displays the result:  
This page also lets you uninstall packages, and you can use the page to update packages when 
newer versions are available. You can go to the Show drop-down list and click Installed to 
display the packages you have installed, or click Updates to display available updates for the 
installed packages. 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Bookmarks. inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing options
add bookmarks to pdf preview; how to bookmark a pdf page
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines Valid value for each index: 1 to (Page Count - 1). ' Create output PDF file path
adding bookmarks to a pdf; convert excel to pdf with bookmarks
ASP.NET Web Pages Using The Razor Syntax 
Chapter 1 – Getting Started with WebMatrix and ASP.NET Web Pages 
In the next section, you'll see how easy is it is to add code to the default.cshtml page in order to 
create a dynamic page. 
Using ASP.NET Web Pages Code 
In this procedure, you'll create a page that uses simple code to display the server date and time on the 
page. The example here will introduce you to the Razor syntax that lets you embed code into the HTML 
on ASP.NET Web Pages. (You can read more about this in the next chapter.) The code introduces one of 
the helpers that you read about earlier in the chapter. 
1.
Open your default.cshtml file. 
2.
Add markup to the page so that it looks like the following example:  
<!DOCTYPE html> 
<html lang="en"> 
<head> 
<meta charset="utf-8" /> 
<title>Hello World Page</title> 
</head> 
<body> 
<h1>Hello World Page</h1> 
<p>Hello World!</p> 
<p>The time is @DateTime.Now</p> 
</body> 
</html> 
The page contains ordinary HTML markup, with one addition: the 
@
character marks ASP.NET 
program code. 
3.
Save the page and run it in the browser. You now see the current date and time on the page.  
The single line of code you've added does all the work of determining the current time on the 
server, formatting it for display, and sending it to the browser. (You can specify formatting 
options; this is just the default.) 
Suppose you want to do something more complex, such as displaying a scrolling list of tweets from a 
Twitter user that you select. You can use a helper for that; as noted earlier, a helper is a component that 
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF file by top level bookmarks. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
export bookmarks from pdf to excel; create bookmarks in pdf from excel
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing options
adding bookmarks to pdf reader; bookmarks pdf documents
ASP.NET Web Pages Using The Razor Syntax 
Chapter 1 – Getting Started with WebMatrix and ASP.NET Web Pages 
10 
simplifies common tasks. In this case, all the work you'd otherwise have to do fetch and display a Twitter 
feed. 
1.
Create a new CSHTML file and name it TwitterFeed.cshtml. 
2.
In the page, replace the existing code with the following code:  
<!DOCTYPE html> 
<html lang="en"> 
<head> 
<meta charset="utf-8" /> 
<title>Twitter Feed</title> 
</head> 
<body> 
<h1>Twitter Feed</h1> 
<form action="" method="POST"> 
<div> 
Enter the name of another Twitter feed to display: 
&nbsp; 
<input type="text" name="TwitterUser" value=""/> 
&nbsp; 
<input type="submit" value="Submit" /> 
</div> 
<div> 
@if (Request["TwitterUser"].IsEmpty()) { 
@Twitter.Search("microsoft") 
else { 
@Twitter.Profile(Request["TwitterUser"]) 
    
</div> 
</form> 
</body> 
</html> 
This HTML creates a form that displays a text box for entering a user name, plus a Submit 
button. These are between the first set of 
<div>
tags. 
Between the second set of 
<div>
tags there's some code. (As you saw earlier, to mark code in 
ASP.NET Web pages, you use the 
@
character.) The first time this page is displayed, or if the user 
clicks Submit but leaves the text box blank, the conditional expression 
Request["TwitterUser"].IsEmpty
will be true. In that case, the page shows a Twitter feed that 
searches for the term "microsoft". Otherwise, the page shows a Twitter feed for whatever user 
name you entered in the text box. 
3.
Run the page in the browser. The Twitter feed displays tweets with "microsoft" in them.  
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
file. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Create fillable PDF document with fields.
pdf bookmarks; export pdf bookmarks to text file
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. PDF Create.
create bookmarks pdf files; create pdf bookmarks from word
ASP.NET Web Pages Using The Razor Syntax 
Chapter 1 – Getting Started with WebMatrix and ASP.NET Web Pages 
11 
4.
Enter a Twitter user name and then click Submit. The new feed is displayed. (If you enter a 
nonexistent name, a Twitter feed is still displayed, it's just blank.)  
This example has shown you a little bit about how you can use WebMatrix and how you can 
program dynamic web pages using simple ASP.NET code using the Razor syntax. The next 
chapter examines code in more depth. The subsequent chapters then show you how to use 
code for many different types of website tasks. 
Programming ASP.NET Razor Pages in Visual Studio 
Besides using WebMatrix to program ASP.NET Razor pages, you can also use Visual Studio 2010, either 
one of the full editions or the free Visual Web Developer Express edition. If you use Visual Studio or 
Visual Web Developer to edit ASP.NET Razor pages, you get two programming tools that can enhance 
your productivity—IntelliSense and the debugger. IntelliSense works in the editor by displaying context-
appropriate choices. For example, as you enter an HTML element, IntelliSense shows you a list of 
attributes that the element can have, and it even can show you what values you can set those attributes 
for. IntelliSense works for HTML, JavaScript, and C# and Visual Basic (the programming languages you 
use for ASP.NET Razor pages.) 
The debugger lets you stop a program while it's running. You can then examine things like the values of 
variables, and you can step line by line through the program to see how it runs. 
To work with ASP.NET Razor Pages in Visual Studio, you need the following software installed on your 
computer: 
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic .NET application.
copy pdf bookmarks; add bookmarks to pdf
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
& rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. Word Create. Create Word from PDF; Create Word
editing bookmarks in pdf; bookmarks pdf reader
ASP.NET Web Pages Using The Razor Syntax 
Chapter 1 – Getting Started with WebMatrix and ASP.NET Web Pages 
12 
Visual Studio 2010 or Visual Web Developer 2010 Express 
ASP.NET MVC 3 RTM. 
Note   You can install both Visual Web Developer 2010 Express and ASP.NET MVC 3 using the Web 
Platform Installer. 
If you have Visual Studio installed, when you are editing a website in WebMatrix, you can launch the site 
in Visual Studio to take advantage of IntelliSense and the debugger.  
1.
Open the site that you created in this chapter and then click the Files workspace. 
2.
In the ribbon, click the Visual Studio Launch button.  
After the site opens in Visual Studio, you can see the site structure in Visual Studio in the 
Solution Explorer pane. The following illustration shows the website opened in Visual Web 
Developer 2010 Express:  
For an overview of how to use IntelliSense and the debugger with ASP.NET Razor pages in Visual 
Studio, see the appendix Programming ASP.NET Web Pages in Visual Studio
ASP.NET Web Pages Using The Razor Syntax 
Chapter 1 – Getting Started with WebMatrix and ASP.NET Web Pages 
13 
Creating and Testing ASP.NET Pages Using Your Own Text Editor 
You don't have to use the WebMatrix editor to create and test an ASP.NET Web page. To create the 
page, you can use any text editor, including Notepad. Just be sure to save pages using the .cshtml 
filename extension. (Or .vbhtml if you want to use Visual Basic) 
The easiest way to test .cshtml pages is to start the web server (IIS Express) using the WebMatrix Run 
button. If you don’t want to use the WebMatrix tool, however, you can run the web server from the 
command line and associate it with a specific port number. You then specify that port when you request 
.cshtml files in your browser. 
In Windows, open a command prompt with administrator privileges and change to the following folder: 
C:\Program Files\IIS Express 
For 64-bit systems, use this folder: 
C:\Program Files (x86)\IIS Express 
Enter the following command, using the actual path to your site: 
iisexpress.exe /port:35896 /path:C:\BasicWebSite
It doesn't matter what port number you use, as long as the port isn't already reserved by some other 
process. (Port numbers above 1024 are typically free.) 
For the path value, use the path of the website where the .cshtml files are that you want to test. 
After this command runs, you can open a browser and browse to a .cshtml file, like this: 
http://localhost:35896/default.cshtml 
For help with IIS Express command line options, enter 
iisexpress.exe /?
at the command line. 
ASP.NET Web Pages Using The Razor Syntax 
Chapter 2 – Introduction to ASP.NET Web Programming Using the Razor Syntax 
14 
Chapter 2 
Introduction to ASP.NET Web Programming 
Using the Razor Syntax 
This chapter gives you an overview of programming with ASP.NET Web Pages using the Razor syntax. 
ASP.NET is Microsoft's technology for running dynamic web pages on web servers. 
What you'll learn: 
The top 8 programming tips for getting started with programming ASP.NET Web Pages using 
Razor syntax. 
Basic programming concepts you'll need for this book. 
What ASP.NET server code and the Razor syntax is all about. 
The Top 8 Programming Tips 
This section lists a few tips that you absolutely need to know as you start writing ASP.NET server code 
using the Razor syntax.  
Note   The Razor syntax is based on the C# programming language, and that's the language used 
throughout this book. However, the Razor syntax also supports the Visual Basic language, and 
everything you see in this book you can also do in Visual Basic. For details, see the appendix ASP.NET 
Web Pages Visual Basic
You can find more details about most of these programming techniques later in the chapter. 
1. You add code to a page using the @ character 
The 
@
character starts inline expressions, single statement blocks, and multi-statement blocks: 
<!-- Single statement blocks  --> 
@{ var total = 7; } 
@{ var myMessage = "Hello World"; } 
<!-- Inline expressions --> 
<p>The value of your account is: @total </p> 
<p>The value of myMessage is: @myMessage</p> 
<!-- Multi-statement block --> 
@{ 
var greeting = "Welcome to our site!"; 
var weekDay = DateTime.Now.DayOfWeek; 
var greetingMessage = greeting + " Today is: " + weekDay; 
<p>The greeting is: @greetingMessage</p> 
This is what these statements look like when the page runs in a browser: 
ASP.NET Web Pages Using The Razor Syntax 
Chapter 2 – Introduction to ASP.NET Web Programming Using the Razor Syntax 
15 
HTML Encoding 
When you display content in a page using the 
@
character, as in the preceding examples, ASP.NET HTML-
encodes the output. This replaces reserved HTML characters (such as 
<
and 
>
and 
&
) with codes that 
enable the characters to be displayed as characters in a web page instead of being interpreted as HTML 
tags or entities. Without HTML encoding, the output from your server code might not display correctly, 
and could expose a page to security risks.  
If your goal is to output HTML markup that renders tags as markup (for example 
<p></p>
for a paragraph 
or 
<em></em>
to emphasize text), see the section Combining Text, Markup, and Code in Code Blocks later 
in this chapter. 
You can read more about HTML encoding in Chapter 4 - Working with Forms
2. You enclose code blocks in braces 
A code block includes one or more code statements and is enclosed in braces. 
<!-- Single statement block.  --> 
@{ var theMonth = DateTime.Now.Month; } 
<p>The numeric value of the current month: @theMonth</p> 
<!-- Multi-statement block. --> 
@{ 
var outsideTemp = 79; 
var weatherMessage = "Hello, it is " + outsideTemp + " degrees."; 
<p>Today's weather: @weatherMessage</p> 
The result displayed in a browser: 
ASP.NET Web Pages Using The Razor Syntax 
Chapter 2 – Introduction to ASP.NET Web Programming Using the Razor Syntax 
16 
3. Inside a block, you end each code statement with a semicolon 
Inside a code block, each complete code statement must end with a semicolon. Inline expressions don't 
end with a semicolon. 
<!-- Single-statement block --> 
@{ var theMonth = DateTime.Now.Month; } 
<!-- Multi-statement block --> 
@{ 
var outsideTemp = 79; 
var weatherMessage = "Hello, it is " + outsideTemp + " degrees."; 
<!-- Inline expression, so no semicolon --> 
<p>Today's weather: @weatherMessage</p> 
4. You use variables to store values 
You can store values in a variable, including strings, numbers, and dates, etc. You create a new variable 
using the 
var
keyword. You can insert variable values directly in a page using 
@
<!-- Storing a string --> 
@{ var welcomeMessage = "Welcome, new members!"; } 
<p>@welcomeMessage</p> 
<!-- Storing a date --> 
@{ var year = DateTime.Now.Year; } 
<!-- Displaying a variable --> 
<p>Welcome to our new members who joined in @year!</p> 
The result displayed in a browser: 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested