c# web api pdf : Add bookmarks to pdf reader software Library project winforms asp.net windows UWP Best_Available_Techniques_for_the_Management_of_the_Generation_and_Disposal_of_Radioactive_Wastes_-_NICoP0-part716

Best Available Techniques 
(BAT) for the Management 
of the Generation and 
Disposal of Radioactive 
Wastes 
A Nuclear Industry Code of 
Practice 
This Nuclear Industry Code of Practice on Identifying and 
Implementing Best Available Techniques (BAT) was prepared on 
behalf of the Nuclear Industry Safety Directors Forum 
Issue 1 
December 2010 
Add bookmarks to pdf reader - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
pdf create bookmarks; bookmark a pdf file
Add bookmarks to pdf reader - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
display bookmarks in pdf; creating bookmarks in a pdf document
This Code of Practice is issued for use and guidance. 
Questions or comments about this Code of Practice should be sent to the Best 
Available Techniques Working Group: c/o Lise Stoyell, 
BAT.BPM@awe.co.uk
Comments will be taken for consideration by the Nuclear Industry Safety 
Directors’ Forum 
Disclaimer 
This Code of Practice has been prepared on behalf of the Nuclear Industry Safety 
Directors Forum by a Technical Working Group.  Statements and technical information 
contained in this Code of Practice are believed to be accurate at the time of writing.  
However, it may not be accurate, complete, up to date or applicable to the circumstances 
of any particular case and this Code of Practice does not constitute a standard, 
specification or regulation.  We shall not be liable for any direct, indirect, special, punitive 
or consequential damages or loss whether in statute, contract, negligence or otherwise, 
arising out of or in connection with the use of information within this Code of Practice. 
Information within this Code of Practice may be cited or reproduced freely providing that 
acknowledgement of the source of such material is made. 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. Comments, forms and multimedia. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
adding bookmarks in pdf; export pdf bookmarks to excel
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
document file. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview
export pdf bookmarks to text file; convert excel to pdf with bookmarks
This Code of Practice details the principles, processes and practices that may be used 
when identifying and implementing Best Available Techniques (BAT) for the disposal of 
radioactive waste under an environmental permit. 
The optimisation of processes and implementation measures to reduce industrial 
discharges has a long history in the UK.  The use of Best Practicable Means (BPM) to 
abate smoke and other stack discharges can be traced back to the mid-nineteenth 
century.  Use of BPM became a regulatory requirement in various fields and was 
eventually integrated within the permitting process for managing radioactive wastes.  
BPM has always implied a choice of technology providing a cost-benefit. 
More recently, the Royal Commission formulated the concept of the Best Practicable 
Environmental Option (BPEO) to minimise total environmental impact in the context of 
multi-media discharges. 
Whilst the concept of optimisation has been adopted globally, the use of the BPM/BPEO 
terminology has not been used outside the UK; and within the UK has not been widely 
used outside of the nuclear sector for some years. 
The introduction of the Environmental Permitting Regulations (EPR) in England and 
Wales is part of a major initiative to simplify and reduce the costs of permitting activities.  
In parallel with this, there has been a shift in regulation of the nuclear sector to adopt a 
more uniform approach consistent with other industry sectors. 
In England and Wales the use of BPM terminology has been discontinued and replaced 
with use of BAT.  In Scotland and Northern Ireland the use of BPM as an authorising tool 
will continue in the context of radioactive waste management and other areas, as 
appropriate. 
The provision of a Code of Practice for the assessment of BAT will have a direct 
application in England and Wales.  As optimisation is the key principle, for which BAT, 
BPM and BPEO are all evidence-based methods to demonstrate compliance, much of the 
guidance will also be applicable within Scotland and Northern Ireland. 
This Code of Practice is produced by the Nuclear Industry.  It is aimed at those 
responsible for formulating organisational policy and developing working level 
procedures, as well as practitioners of BAT and BPM.  The Code of Practice is not 
prescriptive but offers guidance on compliance with regulatory requirements and 
approaches. 
Nuclear Industry Safety Directors Forum 
December 2010 
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Add necessary references: The following VB.NET codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
copy pdf bookmarks; how to create bookmark in pdf automatically
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
pdf export bookmarks; bookmarks pdf reader
Best Available Techniques 
Code of Practice 
Issue 1 
December 2010 
i
Executive Summary 
Introduction 
Permits to dispose of radioactive wastes require the operator to keep all exposures to the 
public As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA), having regard to relevant factors such 
as protection of the environment and other social or economic impacts – the ‘optimisation 
requirement’.  In England and Wales the application of Best Available Techniques (BAT) is 
the means to demonstrate compliance with the optimisation requirement.  This has 
replaced the previous requirement to employ Best Practicable Means (BPM). 
This Code of Practice presents the principles, processes and practices that should be used 
when identifying and implementing BAT for the management of radioactive waste. 
The use of BPM continues to be required by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency 
(SEPA) and the Northern Ireland Environment Agency.  The Environment Agency and 
SEPA consider that the requirements to use BPM are equivalent to the requirements to use 
BAT and that the obligations on waste producers are the same.  Consequently, much of 
the guidance will be applicable within Scotland and Northern Ireland (see Section 1). 
What is BAT 
Section 2 outlines the history and application of BAT.  In broad terms, "best available 
techniques" means the latest stage of development of processes, facilities or methods of 
operation which is practicable and suitable to limit waste arisings and disposals (Section 
2.2).  BAT applies throughout the lifetime of a process, from design to implementation, 
operation, maintenance and decommissioning. 
Identification and implementation of BAT implies a balanced judgement of the benefit 
derived from a measure and the cost or effort of its introduction.  The level of effort 
expended to resolve an issue, and to record the selection process, should be proportional 
to the scale of the challenge, the range of options available and the extent to which 
established good practice can be used to assist in the decision making process.  
Nonetheless, guidance and precedent make clear that practicable measures to further 
reduce health, safety and environmental impacts can be ruled out as not reasonable only if 
the money, time, trouble or other costs involved would be “grossly disproportionate” to the 
benefit (Section 2.2; expanded in Section 4).  The following principles should also be taken 
into account (Section 4): 
sustainable development; 
waste hierarchy and waste form; 
the precautionary principle; 
the proximity principle. 
Subject to meeting regulatory obligations, the identification and application of BAT takes 
into account all relevant circumstances. 
Identifying and Implementing BAT 
Management Arrangements
It is a requirement within the terms of permits issued under the Environmental Permitting 
Regulations 2010 (EPR2010) and the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 (RSA93) that an 
Operator shall have a management system, organisational structure and resources 
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
provided by this .NET Imaging PDF Reader Add-on Able to convert PDF documents into other formats Include extraction of text, hyperlinks, bookmarks and metadata;
bookmark pdf reader; add bookmarks to pdf file
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; PDF Text Write & Extract. Insert and add text to any page of PDF document with
bookmarks in pdf; add bookmark pdf
Best Available Techniques 
Code of Practice 
Issue 1 
December 2010 
ii
sufficient to comply with limitations and conditions stipulated within the permit (Section 5.1).  
The principle of applying ‘best practice’ should be explicit in all site strategies, whether 
construction and operation or decommissioning programmes and activities. 
How to Identify BAT
It is emphasised (Section 5) that there is no single ‘right way’ to identify BAT; although all 
studies will be based on information, verified where practicable, and documented for 
transparency.  BAT may be established by reference to previous studies, or as an 
independent comparison of detriments and benefits.  The general rule is that the level of 
effort expended to identify and implement BAT should be proportionate to the scale of the 
issue to be resolved (Section 5.2). 
In many cases, studies will be constrained by one or more factors, depending upon the 
assessment context.  A number of assumptions may also be required, particularly where 
long timescales are considered (Section 5.5). 
Whichever approach is adopted the process, and any underpinning constraints or 
assumptions, must be documented and justified (Section 5.7). 
Simplified approach to determining, implementing and maintaining BAT 
Identify 
Issue
Assemble delivery 
team
Identify & 
Characterise Options
Document project 
constraints and 
assumptions
Screen out non-viable 
options
Determine relevant 
approach for 
remaining options
Qualitative assessment 
(based on good 
practice and precedent)
Quantitative 
assessment (numerical 
comparison of options)
Identify uncertainty 
and knowledge gaps
Characterise Options
Identify
BAT
Decision Making
Review Performance
Is information important to 
demonstration of BAT?
Report study findings
Apply 
proportionality
N
Y
obtain further 
information
Implement & Maintain
Key to a robust BAT assessment is to demonstrate a thorough consideration of available 
options (Section 5.4).  Once all options have been identified, a high-level screening should 
be applied to identify non-viable options and thus, by elimination, identify a short-list of 
options that can credibly satisfy the objective (Section 5.6).  Stakeholder input, broadening 
the basis of experience available, may be helpful where larger projects are involved 
(Section 5.3). 
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail Convert Word to PDF; Convert Word to HTML5; Convert Add and insert a blank page or multiple
how to add bookmarks to a pdf; add bookmarks to pdf online
XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to HTML5; Add a blank page or multiple pages to
export bookmarks from pdf to excel; how to add bookmarks to pdf files
Best Available Techniques 
Code of Practice 
Issue 1 
December 2010 
iii
Qualitative Assessments 
Where previous appraisals have been undertaken, or good practice established, it may be 
possible to demonstrate BAT without the need for more detailed consideration of options 
(Section 5.8).  This requires that the precedent is fully applicable to the facility in question.  
In such instances, it may be sufficient for a short report to be produced comparing the 
advantages and disadvantages of any alternative technologies or management practices 
with those currently in use, together with a description of any improvements that will be 
implemented following the study. 
Such an approach must be reasoned, logical and transparent.  It must contain sufficient 
information to allow an informed review to be undertaken. 
Quantitative Assessments 
The purpose of a quantitative or semi-quantitative appraisal is to inform and assist in 
identifying the best practicable option (Section 5.9).  Assessments: 
♦ 
must be carried out in a systematic, consistent manner, including analysis of options 
and assessment criteria, and identification of the best option; 
♦ 
require data on radiological impacts to workers and the public (under accident 
conditions and normal operations); 
♦ 
need to consider non-radiological impacts and all relevant legal and policy, societal and 
economic factors; 
♦ 
need to document all relevant risks and uncertainties. 
For each short-listed option, underpinning technical and economic data should be collated 
to support the selection of a preferred option (or options). 
Implementation and Maintenance of BAT
Once BAT has been established it needs to be reviewed at appropriate intervals (Section 
7).  The requirement to implement and maintain BAT embraces: 
♦ 
proportionality of effort; 
♦ 
the provision, maintenance, and operation of relevant plant, machinery or equipment; 
♦ 
the supervision of any relevant operation; 
♦ 
taking samples and conducting measurements, tests, surveys, analyses and 
calculations, to demonstrate compliance with limits and conditions. 
Failure to operate equipment as intended, to inspect or maintain equipment such that it 
remains in good working order, to train and supervise staff, or to monitor the effectiveness 
of systems may be interpreted as a failure to apply BAT (Section 7.1). 
Decision Taking 
The identification of BAT is an important element within the decision making process, but 
does not necessarily represent the final decision (Section 6).  For instance, a study may be 
inconclusive, in that more than one approach may be regarded as essentially equivalent.  
In such a case, an element of judgement is required.  Likewise, a decision may be 
influenced by other factors, either known at the time of the initial assessment or emerging 
subsequently.  For instance, there may be reasons for implementing a disproportionate 
response.  Where this is the case, the specific drivers need to be identified to avoid setting 
this as a new benchmark.  This reinforces the need to document information, including 
constraints and assumptions, throughout the assessment process (Sections 5.11 and 7.8).  
Subject to meeting regulatory obligations at all times, there may also be a balance to be 
Best Available Techniques 
Code of Practice 
Issue 1 
December 2010 
iv
reached across site-wide initiatives, recognising that the balance of priorities may lie with 
achieving the biggest benefit or detriment reduction within a finite pool of resources. 
Within this Code of Practice it is stressed that adopting an evidence-based approach is 
fundamental to identifying BAT; rather than implying that a numerical comparison of 
options is a necessary or sufficient basis to determine the way forward.  An ‘aide memoire’ 
is presented (Section 8), to assist in determining that an appropriate and proportionate 
approach to identifying and implementing BAT has been adopted. 
The legal framework and context around the use of BAT is outlined in Appendix 1, and an 
illustrative approach to conducting a BAT study (based on a Multi-Attribute Assessment) is 
presented in Appendix 2.  Complementary approaches adopted within Central Government 
and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority are illustrated in Appendix 3. 
Best Available Techniques 
Code of Practice 
Issue 1 
December 2010 
v
Table of Contents 
E
XECUTIVE 
S
UMMARY
I
 
1
 
I
NTRODUCTION
1
 
1.1
 
A
IM OF THIS 
C
ODE OF 
P
RACTICE
2
 
1.2
 
S
COPE AND 
A
PPLICATION OF THIS 
C
ODE OF 
P
RACTICE
2
 
2
 
I
NTRODUCTION TO 
BAT 
3
 
2.1
 
B
RIEF 
H
ISTORY
3
 
2.1.1
 
Use of Best Practicable Means 
3
 
2.1.2
 
Introduction of Best Available Techniques 
3
 
2.1.3
 
The Adoption of BAT in Place of BPM in England and Wales 
4
 
2.2
 
D
EFINITION OF 
BAT 
4
 
2.2.1
 
Meaning of Available 
5
 
2.2.2
 
Meaning of Best 
5
 
2.2.3
 
Techniques 
5
 
2.2.4
 
Proportionality of Approach 
5
 
2.3
 
A
PPLICATION OF 
BAT
IN 
E
NGLAND AND 
W
ALES
6
 
2.4
 
A
PPLICATION OF 
BPM
IN 
S
COTLAND
6
 
2.5
 
P
ROTECTING 
P
EOPLE AND THE 
E
NVIRONMENT
7
 
2.6
 
R
OLE OF 
C
OLLECTIVE 
D
OSE IN 
O
PTIMISATION
7
 
3
 
D
RIVERS FOR 
BAT
B
EYOND 
P
ERMIT 
C
ONDITIONS
9
 
4
 
G
UIDING 
P
RINCIPLES
11
 
4.1
 
S
USTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
11
 
4.2
 
W
ASTE 
H
IERARCHY AND 
W
ASTE 
F
ORM
11
 
4.3
 
P
RECAUTIONARY 
P
RINCIPLE
12
 
4.4
 
P
ROXIMITY 
P
RINCIPLE
13
 
4.5
 
P
ROPORTIONALITY
13
 
4.5.1
 
Comparing dissimilar properties 
15
 
4.5.2
 
Proportionality as Applied to Documentation 
16
 
4.6
 
A
PPLICATION OF 
R
ELEVANT 
G
OOD 
P
RACTICE
17
 
4.6.1
 
Identifying Relevant Good Practice 
17
 
4.6.2
 
Applying Relevant Good Practice to New and Existing Plant 
17
 
5
 
H
OW TO 
I
DENTIFY 
BAT 
18
 
5.1
 
M
ANAGEMENT 
A
RRANGEMENTS
18
 
5.1.1
 
Management System 
19
 
5.1.2
 
Team Composition 
19
 
5.1.3
 
Action Management 
20
 
5.1.4
 
Provision of Written Instructions 
20
 
5.2
 
D
EMONSTRATION OF 
B
EST 
A
VAILABLE 
T
ECHNIQUES
20
 
5.3
 
P
REPARATION
22
 
5.3.1
 
Identifying the scope and process 
23
 
5.3.2
 
Involving stakeholders 
24
 
5.3.3
 
Documenting the study 
24
 
5.4
 
I
DENTIFY 
O
PTIONS
25
 
5.5
 
C
ONSTRAINTS AND 
A
SSUMPTIONS
26
 
5.6
 
S
CREENING
26
 
5.7
 
O
PTIONS 
A
PPRAISAL
27
 
5.7.1
 
Qualitative Assessments 
27
 
5.7.2
 
Quantitative Assessments 
28
 
5.8
 
D
EALING WITH 
U
NCERTAINTY AND 
E
VIDENCE 
G
APS
29
 
5.9
 
R
EPORTING AND 
D
ISSEMINATION
30
 
Best Available Techniques 
Code of Practice 
Issue 1 
December 2010 
vi
6
 
D
ECISION 
M
AKING 
/
D
ECISION 
T
AKING
31
 
7
 
I
MPLEMENTING AND 
S
USTAINING THE 
BAT
C
ASE
32
 
7.1
 
M
ANAGEMENT 
A
RRANGEMENTS
33
 
7.2
 
I
MPLEMENTATION
33
 
7.3
 
O
PERATION
34
 
7.4
 
T
RAINING AND 
S
UPERVISION
34
 
7.5
 
M
AINTENANCE
35
 
7.6
 
M
ONITORING
35
 
7.7
 
D
ECOMMISSIONING
36
 
7.8
 
S
HARING OF 
I
NFORMATION
36
 
7.8.1
 
Regulatory Engagement 
36
 
7.8.2
 
Environment Case 
36
 
7.8.3
 
External communications 
37
 
7.8.4
 
Reporting Progress and Outcomes 
37
 
7.8.5
 
Record Keeping 
37
 
7.9
 
Q
UALITY 
A
SSURANCE
38
 
7.10
 
R
EVIEW
38
 
8
 
C
HECKLIST
40
 
9
 
R
EFERENCES
42
 
10
 
G
LOSSARY AND 
D
EFINITIONS
45
 
Appendices 
A
PPENDIX 
1.
 
L
EGAL 
F
RAMEWORK AND 
C
ONTEXT
48
 
A
PPENDIX 
2.
 
I
LLUSTRATIVE 
M
ULTI
-A
TTRIBUTE 
A
NALYSIS TO 
I
DENTIFY 
BAT  53
 
A
PPENDIX 
3.
 
C
OST 
B
ENEFIT 
A
PPROACH 
-
A
PPRAISAL AND 
E
VALUATION IN 
C
ENTRAL 
G
OVERNMENT
58
 
A
PPENDIX 
4.
 
M
EMBERSHIP OF THE 
BAT
W
ORKING 
G
ROUP
59
 
Best Available Techniques 
Code of Practice 
Issue 1 
December 2010 
vii
List of Tables and Figures 
Table 1
  Advantages and disadvantages of CBA and MAA assessment 
approaches 
28 
Table 2
  Checklist for undertaking a BAT study 
40 
Figure 1.    Document structure 
Figure 2.    Interactions with BAT: strategy, principles and needs 
Figure 3.    BAT and Waste Management Principles 
12 
Figure 4.    Illustrative approach to identifying disproportionality 
14 
Figure 5.    Management structure and responsibilities for delivering BAT 
18 
Figure 6.    Guide to selecting the appropriate process to identify BAT 
22 
Figure 7.    Example flow chart for identifying and delivering BAT 
23 
Figure 8.    Guide to addressing uncertainty 
29 
List of Text Boxes 
T
EXT 
B
OX 
1.
 
J
USTIFICATION
,
O
PTIMISATION AND 
L
IMITATION
3
 
T
EXT 
B
OX 
2.
 
D
EFINITION OF 
BAT 
4
 
T
EXT 
B
OX 
3.
 
T
HRESHOLD TO 
O
PTIMISATION
6
 
T
EXT 
B
OX 
4.
 
B
ASIS FOR 
P
ROTECTING 
P
EOPLE AND THE 
E
NVIRONMENT
7
 
T
EXT 
B
OX 
5.
 
W
HAT IS 
GROSS DISPROPORTION
’ 
14
 
T
EXT 
B
OX 
6.
 
A
C
ASE 
S
TUDY ON 
P
ROPORTIONALITY
15
 
T
EXT 
B
OX 
7.
 
C
OMPARING 
C
OSTS OF 
D
ISSIMILAR 
P
ROPERTIES
16
 
T
EXT 
B
OX 
8.
 
RSR
P
ERMIT 
C
ONDITIONS 
R
EQUIRING THE 
U
SE OF 
BAT
TO 
D
EMONSTRATE 
O
PTIMISATION
21
 
T
EXT 
B
OX 
9.
 
O
PTIMISATION AND 
BAT 
21
 
T
EXT 
B
OX 
10.
 
W
HEN IS A NEW 
BAT
STUDY REQUIRED
23
 
T
EXT 
B
OX 
11.
 
E
XAMPLE OF IMPLEMENTING 
BAT
OVER A PROJECT LIFETIME
32
 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested