c# web api pdf : Create pdf bookmarks from word application control cloud windows azure web page class Best_Available_Techniques_for_the_Management_of_the_Generation_and_Disposal_of_Radioactive_Wastes_-_NICoP1-part717

Best Available Techniques 
Code of Practice 
Issue 1 
December 2010 
1
 Introduction 
The Environment Agency is responsible  under the Environmental Permitting  (England  & 
Wales)  Regulations  2010 (EPR)  for regulating all disposals  of radioactive  waste  on and 
from nuclear licensed sites in England and Wales
1
, where “disposals” include discharges 
into the atmosphere, discharges into the sea, rivers, drains or groundwater, disposals to 
land,  and  disposals  by  transfer  to  another  site.    In  Scotland  and  Northern  Ireland  the 
management  and  disposal  of  radioactive  waste  is  regulated  under  the  Radioactive 
Substances Act 1993 (RSA 93). 
With  respect  to  radioactive  waste  disposal,  the  key  regulatory  requirement  is  to 
demonstrate optimisation, maintaining doses to people As Low As Reasonably Achievable 
(ALARA).    The  optimisation  requirement  covers  all  aspects  of  activities  leading  to  the 
generation and disposal of radioactive waste.  Optimisation is achieved through the use of 
specific permit  conditions  requiring  the  application  of  Best  Available  Techniques  (BAT), 
where  BAT  means  both  the  technology  used  and  the  way  in  which  the  installation  is 
designed,  built,  maintained,  operated  and  dismantled.    Therefore,  in  principle,  the 
regulation of radioactive waste disposal embraces all aspects of nuclear site processes - 
not just waste management - which have a bearing on radioactive waste production and 
which relate to the foreseeable disposal of those wastes at some stage.  It follows that BAT 
should be identified early in any process and implemented throughout its lifetime. 
In Scotland, optimisation is achieved through the use of authorisation conditions requiring 
the application of  Best  Practicable  Means (BPM).   The Environment Agency  and  SEPA 
consider that the requirements to use BPM are equivalent to the requirements to use BAT 
and that the obligations on waste producers are the same.  
This document is presented in three component parts (Figure 1): an Executive Summary, 
the  Main  Report  and  separate  Appendices  providing  illustrative  approaches  and  other 
information too detailed to go into the main report. 
Figure 1. 
Document structure 
Create pdf bookmarks from word - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
how to bookmark a pdf in reader; bookmarks pdf
Create pdf bookmarks from word - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
convert word pdf bookmarks; creating bookmarks pdf files
Best Available Techniques 
Code of Practice 
Issue 1 
December 2010 
2
1.1  Aim of this Code of Practice 
This Code of Practice aims to present the principles, processes and practices that should 
be used when identifying and implementing BAT for the management of radioactive waste 
in compliance with regulatory conditions. 
1.2  Scope and Application of this Code of Practice 
This  Code  of  Practice  is  intended  to  provide  guidance  for  practitioners  for  the 
demonstration and implementation of BAT and to assist those responsible for formulating 
organisational policy and developing working level procedures applicable to operators  of 
nuclear licensed sites.  The Code of Practice draws on examples of good practice within 
the nuclear industry, offering points of comparison and presenting brief case studies.  At 
the same time, it is not intended to restrict the choice of methods for demonstrating BAT, or 
to constrain organisational policy. 
The  provision  of  a  Code  of  Practice  for  the  assessment  of  BAT  will  have  a  direct 
application in England and Wales.  As BAT and BPM both demonstrate compliance with 
optimisation, much of the  guidance  will also be applicable within Scotland  and  Northern 
Ireland. 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Bookmarks. inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing options
copy pdf bookmarks to another pdf; adding bookmarks to pdf reader
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF file by top level bookmarks. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
how to create bookmark in pdf with; how to bookmark a pdf document
Best Available Techniques 
Code of Practice 
Issue 1 
December 2010 
3
 Introduction to BAT 
2.1  Brief History 
2.1.1  Use of Best Practicable Means 
Use of Best Practicable Means to control discharges and impacts is a concept with a long 
pedigree in the UK.  It was first used in UK legislation in the Alkali Act (Amendment) 1874, 
which required that “
the owner of every alkali work shall use the best practicable means of 
preventing the discharge into the atmosphere of all other noxious gases arising from such 
work, or of rendering such gases harmless when discharged.
”  The related concept of Best 
Practicable  Environmental Option (BPEO)  was introduced  by  the  Royal  Commission on 
Environmental  Pollution  in  1976
2
as,  “
the  outcome  of  a  systematic  and  consultative 
decision-making  procedure  which  emphasises  the  protection  and  conservation  of  the 
environment across land, air and water
3
.  Over a number of years, BPEO and BPM have 
been applied as a sequential process, the former identifying ‘what to do’ and the latter ‘how 
to do it’, although the concept of BPM was always intended to cover both aspects. 
2.1.2  Introduction of Best Available Techniques 
The Treaty of the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) gave the European 
Community  the  task  of  establishing  uniform  safety  standards  to  protect  the  health  of 
workers and the general public in all Member States from exposure to radiation.  In 1996 
the  European  Council  issued  a  Directive
4
laying  down  basic  safety  standards  for  the 
protection  of  the  health  of  workers  and  the  general  public  from  exposure  to  ionising 
radiation.  This Directive, which took account of the recommendations of the International 
Commission  on  Radiological  Protection  (ICRP)
5
,  has  been  enshrined  in  UK  legislation.  
The  most  recent  recommendations  of  the  ICRP
6
for  practices  involving  radioactive 
substances retain the principles of: 
♦ 
justification of a practice; 
♦ 
optimisation of protection; 
♦ 
application of individual dose and risk limits. 
Text Box 1.  Justification, Optimisation and Limitation 
Justification aims to ensure that no practice is adopted which involves exposure to ionising radiation 
unless it produces a nett benefit to the exposed individuals, or to society as a whole.  Justification is 
not an obligation on the operator. 
Optimisation is the process whereby an operator selects the technical or management option that 
best meets the full range of relevant health, safety, environmental and security objectives, taking 
into account factors such as  social and  economic considerations.  With respect to  optimisation, 
ICRP
5,6
state that, “
in relation to any particular source within a practice, the magnitude of individual 
doses, the number of people exposed, and the likelihood of incurring exposures where these are not 
certain to be received should  be  kept As Low As  Reasonably Achievable, economic and social 
factors  being  taken  into  account
”  (the  ALARA  principle).    In  addition,  all  exposures  should  be 
constrained to minimise inequalities arising from risks to any individual or part of society. 
Limitation provides a mechanism of dose limits which ensure that no individual shall be exposed to 
ionising radiation leading to an unacceptable risk under normal circumstances. 
The  requirement  to  keep  all  exposure  to  radiation  ALARA  was  given  effect  within 
authorisations  issued  under  RSA93  by  the  inclusion  of  conditions  requiring  the 
authorisation holder to use the BPM to minimise the production of waste that will require 
disposal as radioactive waste and to minimise the impact of such disposals, for example by 
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines Valid value for each index: 1 to (Page Count - 1). ' Create output PDF file path
pdf bookmark editor; export excel to pdf with bookmarks
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing options
auto bookmark pdf; how to add a bookmark in pdf
Best Available Techniques 
Code of Practice 
Issue 1 
December 2010 
4
considering  the  physical  and  chemical  form  of  the  waste  and  the  disposal  route  (see 
Section 4.2).
The  2009  UK  strategy  on  radioactive  discharges  signified  the  adoption  in  England  and 
Wales of ‘Best Available Techniques’ (BAT), in place of the previous requirement to employ 
BPM, to minimise radioactive waste arisings and disposals
7
.  BERR
8
also stated that BAT 
would be used in considering plans for new build nuclear power stations.  In parallel, the 
Environment Agency released proposals for the implementation of environmental principles 
to radioactive substances regulation, including the application of BAT
9
2.1.3  The Adoption of BAT in Place of BPM in England and Wales 
Regulatory  guidance  is  that  BAT  and  BPM  represent  essentially  the  same  assessment 
processes
9
,  both  having  the  aim  of  “
balancing  costs  against  environmental  benefits  by 
means  of  a  logical  and  transparent  approach  to  identifying  and  selecting  processes, 
operations and management systems to reduce discharges
10
and the effect of discharges. 
2.2  Definition of BAT 
There  is  a  long-standing  commitment  under  the  OSPAR  Convention
11
to  apply  BAT  at 
nuclear  facilities,  “
to  minimize  and,  as  appropriate,  eliminate  any  pollution  caused  by 
radioactive  discharges  from  all  nuclear  industries  …  into  the  marine  environment.”
12
DECC
7
has  adopted  the  OSPAR  definition  of  BAT  for  the  regulation  of  radioactive 
substances. 
Text Box 2.  Definition of BAT 
Best  Available Techniques  (BAT) means the  latest  stage  of  development of processes, 
facilities  or  methods  of  operation  which  indicate  the  practical  suitability  of  a  particular 
measure for limiting waste arisings and disposal
11
 In determining what constitutes BAT 
consideration shall be given to: 
1.  comparable processes, facilities or methods which have been tried out successfully; 
2.  technological advances and changes in scientific knowledge and understanding; 
3.  the economic feasibility of such techniques; 
4.  time limits for installation in both new and existing plants; 
5.  the nature and volume of the disposals concerned. 
It follows that BAT will change with time in the light of technological advances, economic 
and social factors, and changes in scientific understanding.
The requirement to use BAT has been part of the regulatory framework for non-radioactive 
Pollution Prevention and Control (PPC) for many years
13,14,15
(see Appendix 1).  Statutory 
Guidance
18
indicates that ministers consider the PPC and OSPAR definitions of BAT to be 
similar.  Nonetheless, the Environment Agency
1
has made clear that the adoption of BAT in 
RSR does not
mean that: 
♦ 
in general, the requirements of the PPC Directive have been applied to RSR; 
♦ 
specifically, the approach to BAT is the same in both regimes.  
There  are  differences  between  the  legal  and  policy  requirements  of  PPC  and  RSR.  
Adoption  of  BAT  is  not  intended  to  change  practices  within  RSR.    Consequently, 
differences will remain between RSR and PPC in demonstrating application of BAT. 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc.
convert word to pdf with bookmarks; add bookmark to pdf reader
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
& rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. Word Create. Create Word from PDF; Create Word
bookmarks in pdf from word; bookmark pdf acrobat
Best Available Techniques 
Code of Practice 
Issue 1 
December 2010 
5
2.2.1  Meaning of Available 
“Available” requires consideration of
9
♦ 
whether the techniques  under  consideration have  been  developed  on  a scale which 
allows implementation in the relevant industrial sector; 
♦ 
whether the conditions mean that techniques are economically and technically viable, 
taking into consideration both the benefits and detriments. 
Defra Guidance on BAT
16
makes clear that a technique does not have to be in general use; 
it only needs to have been developed to such a level that it can be introduced 
confidently
.  
There does not need to be a competitive market, nor does it matter whether a technique is 
used  or  produced  within  the UK  or the  EU,  as  long  as  it  is reasonably  accessible  and 
meets UK legislation requirements.  Conversely, the fact that a technique is available does 
not mean that it represents BAT. 
The  second  test  is  common  to  duties  under  Health  and  Safety  legislation,  as  well  as 
radiation protection
16
and requires the operator to establish an appropriate balance of cost 
and benefit. 
2.2.2  Meaning of Best 
"Best" means the most effective in achieving a high level of protection of the public from 
exposure to ionising radiation
assessed against the full range of detriments and benefits of 
further reductions. 
2.2.3  Techniques 
"Techniques" includes both  the technology used and the way in which the  installation is 
designed, built, maintained, operated and decommissioned.
9
As set out within discharge permits, the application of BAT includes management regimes 
to  ensure  competence,  maintenance,  inspection,  supervision  and  monitoring  across  all 
stages in the lifecycle of a facility. 
2.2.4  Proportionality of Approach 
In relation to reducing radioactive discharges, some flexibility is needed to safeguard other 
Government objectives. 
Looking at the selection of the most appropriate abatement technology to reduce disposals 
shows how the environmental, social and  economic aspects of sustainable development 
need to be balanced.  For example, there would be no overall benefit to the environment if, 
as a result of a new abatement process, a plant emitted large quantities of carbon dioxide 
or toxic (but non-radioactive) substances into the environment, resulting in environmental 
harm equal to or greater than that avoided by abating the radioactive discharges. 
Likewise, while affordability is not a justification for applying lower levels of environmental 
protection, if the burden of installing abatement equipment was so great that other activities 
were to become uneconomic, the social and economic impact could be judged to outweigh 
the  environmental  benefit  of  the  proposed  abatement  technology.    In  this  context,  the 
Courts
*
have  set  a  precedent  for  judging  whether  duty-holders  have  done  enough  to 
reduce  risks.    In  effect,  practicable  measures  to  reduce  risk  can  be  ruled  out  as  not 
*
 Notably Edwards v. National Coal Board (1949: 1 All ER 743) 
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
& rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word (docx, doc
create pdf bookmark; adding bookmarks to pdf
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc.
create bookmarks in pdf reader; bookmarks pdf file
Best Available Techniques 
Code of Practice 
Issue 1 
December 2010 
6
‘reasonable’ only if the money, time, trouble or other costs involved in taking them would be 
“grossly disproportionate” to the risk. 
At this time, there is no authoritative guidance as to when cost is grossly disproportionate.  
Hence, the judgment must be made on a case by case basis.  Both Environment Agency 
and HSE guidance on the topic of gross disproportion make clear that cost cannot form the 
sole argument of a  BAT,  nor  can  it be used  to undermine  existing standards and  good 
practice.  It is also important to note that, should a technique be adopted by an operator 
even though it is clearly disproportionate, it would not determine BAT for other operators 
(see Section 4). 
2.3  Application of BAT in England and Wales 
The Government
17
has stated that it will maintain, and continue to develop, a policy and 
regulatory framework which ensures that radioactive wastes are not created unnecessarily.  
Where such wastes are created, they are to be managed, treated and disposed of safely, 
at appropriate times and in appropriate ways. 
In 2009, DECC and the Welsh Assembly Government issued Statutory  Guidance to the 
Environment Agency for England and Wales
18
, laying down a requirement that regulators 
set limits on radioactive discharges based on BAT.  This includes the guidance that, “
where 
the  prospective  dose  to  the  most  exposed  group  of  members  of  the  public  is  below  
10 µSv/y from overall discharges … the Environment Agency should not seek to reduce 
further the discharge limits in place, provided that the holder of the authorisation applies 
and continues to apply BAT”.
*
Text Box 3.  Threshold to Optimisation 
The term ‘threshold to optimisation’ may be misunderstood.  The key provision is that there is no
threshold in terms of dose to the public at which the techniques in place can be presumed to be 
BAT simply because of their resulting impact
1
.  The 10 μSv per year figure is not
a dose target, or a 
dose limit, or a threshold, or a radiation standard.  It merely represents an appropriate level of dose, 
below which discharge limits need not be reduced further if the operator is continuing to apply BAT.  
The onus remains with the operator under all
circumstances to demonstrate that BAT has been 
applied.  If any benefit or reduction in detriment, however small, can be achieved using little or no 
additional resources then it should
be secured.
Guidance from the Environment Agency
9
states that BAT is the point when the detriments 
from  implementing  further  techniques  become  grossly  disproportionate  to  the  benefits 
gained.  Even then, if the reduction of disposals resulting from the use of BAT does not 
lead to environmentally acceptable results, additional measures have to be applied. 
2.4  Application of BPM in Scotland 
The use of BPM continues to be required by SEPA in authorisations issued under RSA 93.  
BPM  was defined  in  Command  2919
17
in relation  to the release  of radioactivity into the 
environment.  However, SEPA uses BPM in the wider context of keeping ionising radiation 
exposures to the public ALARA.  Therefore BPM is not restricted to minimising the release 
of radioactivity to the environment.  With this in mind SEPA has redefined BPM so that it 
can be applied in a fashion which is consistent with BAT. 
*
 In England and Wales, this value supersedes the ‘threshold to optimisation’ of 20 µSv/y set out in Cmnd 
2919, although this will continue to be used in Scotland.  In all other respects, the requirements as laid out 
for application of BAT are essentially identical to those currently identified for the demonstration of BPM. 
Best Available Techniques 
Code of Practice 
Issue 1 
December 2010 
7
In  order  to  satisfy  the  requirement  to  keep  public  exposures  ALARA,  SEPA  requires 
radioactive substances users to use BPM to minimise: 
1.  the activity and volume of radioactive waste generated
2.  the total activity of radioactive waste that is discharged
to the environment; 
3.  the radiological effects 
of such discharges on the environment and members of the 
public. 
Although  it  is  individual  exposures  that  should  be  minimised,  the  optimisation  process 
should  take  account  of  such  factors  as  the  availability  and  cost  of  relevant  measures, 
operator safety, the benefits of reduced disposals and other social and economic factors, 
as appropriate.  As with BAT applied in England and Wales, it is important to recognise that 
selecting  BPM  to  achieve  the  given  objectives  is  not  a  one-off  process.    The  users  of 
radioactive substances should keep their operations under review to ensure that they are 
continuing to use BPM. 
2.5  Protecting People and the Environment 
There  is  a  distinction  between  the  requirement  to 
optimise
impacts  to  people  (that  is, 
keeping exposures ALARA, having regard to social, economic and other factors) and the 
requirement to 
protect
the  environment 
e.g.  5
  Impacts  on  non-human biota  are  typically 
assessed  at  the  population  level,  based  on  reference  organism  types,  although  for 
protected species or habitats, more detailed impact assessments may be required. 
Text Box 4.  Basis for Protecting People and the Environment 
The Environment Agency
1
offers the following guidance  on the regulation of radioactive 
substance activities on nuclear licensed sites under the EPR. 
Dose limits for people are set at a level intended to prevent those radiation effects in humans which 
are known to occur above a certain level or threshold of dose (deterministic effects) and to ensure 
that the incidence of those radiation effects for which it is assumed that there is no threshold and 
that the risk of causing the effect increases with the level of the radiation dose (stochastic effects) is 
not at an unacceptable level.  Application of the optimisation principle and the use of constraints, 
which are set below dose limits, further reduces this risk to as low as reasonably achievable
.” 
With respect to protection of non-human species, a full framework for radiological protection is still 
under development.  In the meantime, an interim assessment approach has been developed
19,20
This  uses  models  of  the  behaviour  and  transfer  of  radionuclides  within  ecosystems  to  predict 
environmental  concentrations,  from  which  the  radiation  doses  to  reference  organisms  can  be 
estimated.  These doses can then be compared to 'guideline values' to assess the level of risk. 
In a discussion document, the IAEA
21
recognised that definitions of, and attitudes to protecting, the 
environment are culturally based.  Thus, the introduction of radioactivity or any other material, or 
change  in  property  of  the  physical environment  may  be  deemed  intrusive;  even  if  there  is  no 
perceptible resultant change  in any part of  the  living environment.   Similarly, the UK Discharge 
Strategy
7
states that introduction of radioactivity to the environment is ‘undesirable’.
Advice from the  ICRP
6
applies  optimisation  both  to  the protection of people  and of the 
broader  environment.    Whilst  the  recommendations  of  the  ICRP  in  this  respect  may 
influence assessments undertaken by site operators, it is not a regulatory requirement. 
2.6  Role of Collective Dose in Optimisation 
Permit  conditions  principally  require  that  individual  exposures  should  be  optimised.  
However,  the  Basic  Safety  Standards  Directive
4
places  a  duty  on  Member  States  to 
minimise the exposure risks faced by the general public, both individually and collectively.  
Best Available Techniques 
Code of Practice 
Issue 1 
December 2010 
8
Consideration of exposure to the population as a whole is typically expressed through the 
concept of collective dose. 
Use  of  collective  dose  is  not  without  its  pitfalls,  as  it  may  aggregate  very  small  doses 
expressed  over  long  periods  of  time  in  such  a  way  as  to  exaggerate  perceptions  of 
detriment
6
   As  collective  dose  is  highly  dependent  on  the  selection  of  an  exposed 
population  and  the  timeframe  over  which  exposures  are  received,  the  concept  is  best 
suited  to  comparing  options  as  part  of  an  optimisation  exercise.    Guidance  on  the 
determination and application of collective dose has been offered by the Health Protection 
Agency
41
 In summary, the HPA favours the truncation of collective doses to a period of 
500  years,  with  identification  of  specific  populations  and  geographic  regions  (e.g.  UK, 
Europe, World). 
Best Available Techniques 
Code of Practice 
Issue 1 
December 2010 
9
 Drivers for BAT Beyond Permit Conditions 
Site  Permit  Conditions  specifically  require  the  application  of  BAT  as  a  means  to 
demonstrate optimisation
*
(Section  2 and Text  Box 8,  Section 5).   In addition, there are 
other  drivers  which  use  similar  processes  (see  Figure  2  below  and  Appendix  1  for  a 
summary of legislative drivers). 
Figure 2. 
Interactions with BAT: strategy, principles and needs 
Strategies and policies requiring a BAT (or equivalent) assessment include the following. 
♦ 
UK Discharge Strategy
 The UK strategy for radioactive discharges
7
sets out how the 
UK intends to implement the OSPAR Radioactive Substances Strategy.  The Strategy, 
which  calls for  continuous reductions in  the  discharges  and emissions of  radioactive 
materials to the environment, requires operators to demonstrate the application of BAT 
or BPM to manage any discharges during operations. 
♦ 
Waste Strategy
.  Government policy requires a Waste Strategy for the management 
and  disposal  of  radioactive  wastes,  including  consideration  of  the  non-radioactive 
properties  of  the  wastes.    The  NDA,  for  example,  has  established  a  specification 
supporting  the  development of  such  documents
22
  It  is  considered good  practice to 
cover non-radioactive wastes in a similar way. 
♦ 
Business Case and Options Appraisal
.  The production of business cases to support 
projects is a fundamental requirement placed on the NDA by government.  The NDA 
has produced guidance
23
supporting the production of business cases.  Business cases 
must be underpinned by options appraisal (Appendix 3). 
♦ 
Radioactive Waste Management Case.  
A RWMC is a mechanism to demonstrate the 
long-term safety and environmental performance of the management of specific wastes 
from their generation to their conditioning into the form in which they will be suitable for 
storage and (in England and Wales) eventual disposal.  The RWMC should detail the 
*
 In Scotland, equivalent requirements within Site Authorisations under RSA require the application of BPM 
as a means to demonstrate optimisation. 
Best Available Techniques 
Code of Practice 
Issue 1 
December 2010 
10
available options and processes considered and any reasons and assumptions used to 
reject  options.    Preferred  options  should  be  identified  on  the  basis  of  safety  and 
environmental performance.  Proposed packaging and conditioning  strategies  should 
be fully underpinned by BAT assessment to minimise long-term environmental impact 
and ensure associated doses are ALARA
24
There are also a number of policies and strategies relating to environmental management 
which do not  explicitly require that BAT studies  are undertaken, but  where the  need  for 
BAT assessments may be identified.  
♦ 
Environmental  Management  Systems.   
The  majority  of  nuclear  sites  operate  an 
EMS.  Such systems provide a framework for managing environmental responsibilities, 
maintenance arrangements, etc. 
♦ 
Environmental  Impact  Assessments.   
Throughout  the  UK  there  is  a  statutory 
requirement for the preparation of an EIA for a range of planning applications, in order 
to ensure that the likely effects (both positive and negative) of a proposed development 
on the environment are fully understood and taken into account.  A key initial stage in 
an  EIA  is  an  options  appraisal,  encompassing  site  selection  and  project  design.    A 
planning applicant is required to identify the alternatives considered and reasoning for 
the  choices  made.    Measures  to  prevent,  reduce  or  offset  any  significant  adverse 
effects must be described.  
♦ 
Strategic Environmental Assessment.  
Public sector plans and programmes that are 
likely to have significant effects on the environment must have an SEA when they are 
being prepared
25
.  The SEA process requires that all reasonable alternatives to the plan 
are  identified  and  that  all  likely  effects  on  the  environment  are  assessed.    Where 
significant adverse effects are identified, information must be given as to how these will 
be  prevented,  reduced  or  offset.    The  SEA  process
26
requires  objective  definition, 
context setting, options identification and evaluation. 
♦ 
HAZOP
.    A  Hazard  and  Operability  (HAZOP)  study  is  a  structured  and  systematic 
examination  of  a  planned  or  existing  process  or  operation  in  order  to  identify  and 
evaluate  problems  that  may  represent  risks  to  personnel  or  equipment,  or  prevent 
efficient operation.  Typically, a HAZOP is a qualitative technique carried out by a multi-
disciplinary  team  during  a  set  of  meetings.    Individual  components  within a HAZOP 
study may be underpinned by identification  of BAT  or, 
vice versa
,  a BAT  study may 
require a HAZOP analysis. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested