save pdf in folder c# : Create pdf bookmark control SDK platform web page .net winforms web browser canafricaclaim10-part914

87
ing; this indicates low recent nutrition levels. Children with low height
for their age are considered stunted, a condition resulting from longer-
term malnutrition. The overall picture is mixed (table 3.1). In some
countries there have been improvements in urban populations but
deterioration  in  rural  ones.  In  other  countries,  notably  Mali  and
Senegal, nutrition levels appear to have deteriorated overall. 
The poorest 20 percent of the population has been the most affected
by this deterioration. Among the eight countries in table 3.1, stunting
has  worsened  among  the  poorest  in  four  (Ghana,  Mali,  Senegal,
Tanzania). But wasting has worsened among the poorest in six (Ghana,
Madagascar, Mali, Senegal, Uganda, Zimbabwe).
Education.
Outside Africa, most of the developing world has achieved
almost universal primary enrollments, though with significant dropout
rates. But in Africa primary enrollments dropped between 1980 and
1993, from 80 to 72 percent. Moreover, less than a quarter of secondary
school-age  children  were  enrolled in  secondary  school.  And  many
adults have little or no education. This is important because in Africa
ADD RESS ING POV ERTY AND  IN EQ UALITY
0
25
50
75
100
125
150
175
0
500
1,000
1,500
2,000
2,500
3,000
3,500
Figure 3.1  Under-5 Mortality by GNP Per Capita and Region, 1995
Under-5 mortality 
(per 1,000 live births)
GNP per capita (dollars)
Source: Demery and Walton 1998.
South Asia
Africa
East Asia
and Pacific
Middle East
Latin America
Europe and
Central Asia
Mortality in Africa is
high, even considering its
low income
Create pdf bookmark - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
split pdf by bookmark; pdf bookmarks
Create pdf bookmark - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
create bookmarks in pdf reader; editing bookmarks in pdf
88
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Table 3.1 Nutrition Measures for Children in Eight African Countries (percent)
Change
First year
Second year
(percentage points)
Low weight Low height
Low weight Low height
Low weight Low height
Region/country (years)
for height
for age
for height
for age
for height
for age
Urban
Ghana (1988 and 1993)
7.3
24.6
9.1
17.0
1.8
–7.6
Madagascar (1992 and 1997)
3.8
40.5
5.3
44.8
1.5
4.3
Mali (1987 and 1995)
9.9
19.6
24.9
23.9
15.0
4.3
Senegal (1986 and 1992)
3.5
17.5
8.8
15.2
5.3
–2.3
Tanzania (1991 and 1996)
5.1
38.0
8.1
32.6
3.0
–5.5
Uganda (1988 and 1995)
0.6
24.8
1.4
22.7
0.7
–2.1
Zambia (1992 and 1996)
5.4
32.8
3.3
32.9
–2.1
0.1
Zimbabwe (1988 and 1994)
1.4
16.0
6.5
19.0
5.0
3.0
Rural
Ghana (1988 and 1993)
8.5
31.4
13.1
32.3
4.6
0.9
Madagascar (1992 and 1997)
6.0
50.6
8.3
49.5
2.3
–1.1
Mali (1987 and 1995)
12.3
26.2
24.4
36.2
12.2
10.0
Senegal (1986 and 1992)
7.1
26.5
13.4
32.7
6.3
6.3
Tanzania (1991 and 1996)
6.4
45.0
7.3
46.1
0.9
1.2
Uganda (1988 and 1995)
2.0
45.2
3.2
40.7
1.3
–4.5
Zambia (1992 and 1996)
5.0
46.5
4.9
48.9
–0.1
2.4
Zimbabwe (1988 and 1994)
1.1
34.3
5.6
25.0
4.5
–9.3
Source:Sahn, Dorosh, and Younger 1999.
parents’ education is an important determinant of whether their children
attend school. 
Income, region, and gender also help determine whether children are
enrolled. Primary enrollments are low overall, but particularly among poor
rural females—in the 1990s only 24 percent of this group was enrolled
among  16  countries  surveyed  (table  3.2).  In  Ethiopia,  The  Gambia,
Guinea, Mali, and Niger enrollments were less than 10 percent; only in
Ghana, Kenya, and Zambia were more than 50 percent of primary school-
age children enrolled.
Secondary enrollments were almost uniformly low. On average only 7
percent  of  the  poorest  rural  group  (male  and  female  combined)  was
enrolled, and in 13 of the 16 countries enrollment was negligible for this
group (3 percent or less). This compared with an average secondary enroll-
ment of 44 percent among the urban upper-income quintile. 
Judged by these measures, the capabilities of African populations have
shown little improvement in recent years—and in some cases have deteri-
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work Barcode Read. Barcode Create. OCR. Twain. Create
add bookmark to pdf reader; delete bookmarks pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Ability to get word count of PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
bookmarks pdf; add bookmarks pdf
89
orated considerably. Poorer parts of the population are largely excluded
from acquiring the capabilities they need to partake in and contribute
to the growth of a modern economy. Low female enrollment is also
slowing the demographic transition, reducing the prospect that African
countries will move toward a virtuous circle of growth, demographic
transition, and savings (chapter 1).
Measures of Poverty 
There is no single measure of poverty, and all choices have their
advantages and weaknesses. For welfare levels, consumption is the pre-
ferred criterion. But many surveys—especially those outside Africa—
measure income. 
Poverty lines.
The choice of a poverty line is always arbitrary. Two
options are available. One is to set an absolute standard common across
all countries, such as $1 a day per person adjusted for purchasing power
parity (PPP). This approach facilitates cross-country comparisons of
poverty, although the conversion from national currencies into PPP
dollars is subject to error. A second option is to define the poor as those
falling below the poverty lines of their countries. This relative approach
allows for differences in poverty lines depending on a country’s level of
development. But it also makes it harder to compare countries.
A choice must also be made on how to show the prevalence and
depth of poverty. The headcount ratio, or percentage of the population
falling below the poverty line, is a widely used measure of the preva-
lence of poverty. The poverty gap takes into account the extent to
which the consumption of the poor falls below the poverty line. It is a
measure of the depth of poverty, as well as its prevalence. The squared
ADD RESS ING POV ERTY AND  IN EQ UALITY
Table 3.2 Net Enrollments in 16 African Countries by Region, Consumption Quintile, and Gender, 1990s (percent)
Rural areas
Urban areas
Poorest quintile
Richest quintile
Poorest quintile
Richest quintile
Level
Male
Female
Male
Female
All
Male
Female
Male
Female
All
All
Primary
32
24
50
42
36
53
48
75
70
63
40
Rural areas
Urban areas
Poorest quintile
Richest quintile
All
Poorest quintile
Richest quintile
All
All
Secondary
7
15
11
21
44
33
19
Source:Demery 1999.
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
creating bookmarks in pdf from word; create bookmarks pdf files
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Qualified Tiff files are exported with high resolution in VB.NET. Create multipage Tiff image files from PDF in VB.NET project. Support
bookmark pdf acrobat; how to create bookmark in pdf with
90
poverty gap weights more heavily the poverty of the poorest parts of
the population and so emphasizes extreme deprivation.
Analysis using an absolute poverty line of $1 a day shows that almost
half of Africans live below this level and that the number of poor has
been steadily increasing. The vast majority of Africans consume less
than $2 a day. This is a reflection of the desperately poor conditions
prevailing in the continent and indicates how vulnerable entire soci-
eties are to falling into poverty, with large tracts of the population just
a little over the $1 a day poverty line. Dealing with poverty in the region
must involve expanding the income opportunities of whole groups. 
The second approach, using relative poverty lines, yields a similar
picture. In 21 countries surveyed in the 1990s, more then half of the
rural populations lived below the national poverty lines (table 3.3).
Rural poverty is both deep and severe. The average income of the rural
poor is just $163 a year, barely half the average regional poverty line
for rural areas. Ghana recorded the lowest rural poverty, with a head-
count ratio of 29 percent. But nine countries had rural headcounts
above 60 percent. 
Urban poverty is also high, as judged by national poverty lines, and
is moderately deep. More than 40 percent of the urban population is
poor according to national criteria, and the average income of this
group is only $352 a year. More than half of the urban population is
poor in Ethiopia, Guinea-Bissau, Tanzania, Swaziland, and Zambia.
With  the  rapid  growth  of  Africa’s  urban  populations,  high  urban
poverty threatens political and economic stability.
Trends in poverty and growth.
For some countries it is possible to trace
recent trends in consumption poverty based on household data. These
reveal a mixed pattern (table 3.4). Some countries, notably Nigeria and
Zimbabwe, have experienced significant increases in poverty. Ethiopia,
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Table 3.3 Poverty in 21 African Countries Using National Poverty Lines,
1990s
Indicator
Rural
Urban
Overall
Headcount ratio (percent)
56
43
52
Poverty gap (percent)
23
16
22
Squared poverty gap (percent)
13
8
12
Mean expenditure (dollars a person per year)
409
959
551
Mean poverty line (dollars a person per year)
325
558
Source:Ali 1999.
Dealing with poverty in
the region must involve
expanding the income
opportunities of whole
groups
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Create PDF from Tiff. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Create PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from Tiff in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET application.
pdf bookmark; how to add bookmarks to pdf files
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
C#.NET PDF SDK- Create PDF from Word in Visual C#. Online C#.NET Tutorial for Create PDF from Microsoft Office Excel Spreadsheet Using .NET XDoc.PDF Library.
how to bookmark a pdf document; adding bookmarks in pdf
91
Mauritania, and Uganda have experienced widespread improvements
in economic well-being that have filtered down to the poor. Ghana
shows a mixed picture for 1987–96. Poverty rose in urban areas (espe-
cially Accra) but fell in rural areas, apparently reflecting distributional
shifts due to reform programs. More recent trends appear to have
changed this pattern, causing urban poverty to decline. 
How do these poverty trends relate to overall growth? On average,
a 1 percent increase in consumption is associated with almost a 1 per-
cent drop in the poverty headcount ratio (figure 3.2). Growth that
translates into rising consumption is thus essential for poverty reduc-
tion. But growth is not sufficient, given Africa’s low incomes and high
inequality and exclusion, which result in the world’s largest poverty
gaps. 
ADD RESS ING POV ERTY AND  IN EQ UALITY
Table 3.4 Consumption Poverty in Various African Countries
Headcount ratio
Squared poverty gap
First
Second
First
Second
Change in per capita
Country, years
year 
year 
year
year
consumption (percent)
Ethiopia
Rural, 1989 and 1995
61.3
45.9
17.4
9.9
8.2
Urban, 1994 and 1997
40.9
38.7
8.3
7.8
5.1
Ghana, 1987 and 1996
31.9
27.4
2.5
Rural
37.5
30.2
Urban
19.0
20.6
Mauritania, 1992 and 1996
59.5
41.3
17.5
7.5
11.5
Rural
72.1
58.9
27.4
11.9
Urban
43.5
19.0
9.7
2.1
Nigeria, 1992 and 1996
42.8
65.6
14.2
25.1
–16.3
Rural
45.1
67.8
15.9
25.6
Urban
29.6
57.5
12.4
24.9
Uganda, 1992 and 1997
55.6
44.0
9.9
5.9
22.4
Rural
59.4
48.2
10.9
6.56
Urban
29.4
16.3
3.5
1.65
Zambia, 1991 and 1996
57.0
60.0
25.5
16.6
–1.4
Rural
79.6
74.9
39.1
23.2
Urban
31.0
34.0
9.7
5.4
Zimbabwe, 1991 and 1996
37.5
47.2
7.2
9.3
–1.8
Rural
51.5
62.8
10.2
13.0
Urban
6.2
14.9
0.5
1.4
Note:Headcount ratio and squared poverty gap are based on national (nutritionally based) poverty lines. Comparisons between countries are not
valid. Ethiopia data are based on small samples. Nigeria data are provisional. 
Source:World Bank data.
Africa has perhaps the
world’s highest income
inequality…
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
C#.NET PDF SDK- Create PDF from PowerPoint in C#. How to Use C#.NET PDF Control to Create PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation in .NET Project.
pdf export bookmarks; how to add a bookmark in pdf
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Create PDF from Images. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Create PDF from Images. C#.NET PDF - Create PDF from Images in C# with XDoc.NET PDF Control.
excel print to pdf with bookmarks; convert word pdf bookmarks
92
Inequality and Its Implications 
A
FRICA HAS PERHAPS THE WORLD
SHIGHEST INCOME INEQUAL
-
ity. Both rural and urban incomes are unequally distributed.
There is also considerable inequity in the distribution of social
spending, with more going to higher-income groups than to the poor.
To be effective in fighting the depth of African poverty, development
strategies have to address inequality and exclusion. With current fiscal
policies and service delivery systems, inequalities in capabilities will not
soon be alleviated.
A Profile of Income Inequality 
As conventionally measured, Africa has the world’s second highest
inequality after Latin America (table 3.5). But most of Africa’s house-
hold  surveys measure inequality using consumption,  whereas most
other  surveys  use  income.  Adjusting  for  this  difference,  Africa’s
inequality is as high as or higher than that in any other region. The
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Figure 3.2  Changes in Headcount Ratios and Per Capita Consumption 
in Selected Countries and Periods
–30
–20
–10
0
10
20
30
40
–20
–15
–10
–5
0
5
10
15
20
25
Headcount ratio = 2.59 – 0.67
Per capita consumption R
2
= 0.74
Change in headcount ratio (percent)
Change in per capita consumption (percent)
Source: Table 3.4.
…but growth is still
essential for poverty
reduction
93
poorest 20 percent of Africans account for just 5.2 percent of total
household consumption, or about 4 percent of GDP. This is equiva-
lent to less than half the foreign aid to a typical poor African country
in the 1990s. At 58 percent, South Africa boasts the region’s highest
Gini coefficient (box 3.2).
Africa’s inequality has two distinctive features. First, rural inequal-
ity is almost as high as urban inequality, with the poorest 20 percent
of the population accounting for less than 6 percent of consumption
in both cases (Ali 1999). Because most land is held communally in
Africa,  in  most  cases  rural  inequality  does  not  stem  from  severe
inequality in landholdings. Rather, it reflects geographic differences in
the quality of land, in climatic conditions, and in access to markets
and to  remittances  from  urban  areas.  (The exception is  Southern
Africa, where in addition to the above factors, inequality in land hold-
ings is a major determinant of rural inequality.) Africa’s poor, sparse
economies are not well integrated, and communities far from roads are
typically far poorer than others. Spatial factors, including those relat-
ing to inadequate rural capital and infrastructure, therefore need to be
taken into account in designing antipoverty policies (chapters 5, 6). In
urban  areas  job  creation  and  economic  diversification  are  crucial
challenges (chapter 7). 
A second feature of African inequality is its high level despite low
average income. A stylized (though debated) feature of development
is the Kuznets hypothesis—that income distribution tends to become
more unequal as countries develop, before tending to equalize again
at relatively high income levels. Ali and Elbadawi (1999) suggest that
the income at which African income inequality will naturally start to
ADD RESS ING POV ERTY AND  IN EQ UALITY
Table 3.5 Income Inequality by Region (percent)
Gini
Share of top
Share of Share of bottom
Region
coefficient
20 percent
middle
20 percent
Africa
45.0
50.6
34.4
5.2
East Asia and Pacific
38.1
44.3 
37.5
6.8
South Asia
31.9
39.9 
38.4 
8.8
Latin America 
49.3
52.9
33.8
4.5
Industrial countries
33.8
39.8
41.8
6.3
Note: Data for Africa are calculated on a consumption basis. Adjustment to an income basis
(as is common in other regions) involves raising the Gini coefficient by 6 percentage points,
making Africa’s Gini 51 percent.
Source:Deininger and Squire 1996.
Rural inequality is almost
as high as urban
inequality
94
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
decline  is  $1,566  (in  1985  PPP  dollars)—several  times  average
income today. This implies that pronounced inequality is likely to be
a feature of African economies for a long time, and reinforces the
importance of including distributional elements in development pro-
grams.
The Distributional Impact of Reform
Income distribution reflects deep structural features of an economy
and so usually does not change much over time. Yet some African
countries have experienced substantial changes—whether toward or
away from equality—over short periods. Some of these changes may
reflect  changes  in macroeconomic  policy,  which  has  considerable
potential to shift incomes between social and economic groups.
A
LONG WITH
B
RAZIL
, S
OUTH
A
FRICA IS PERHAPS THE
world’s most unequal economy. The poorest 20 per-
cent of the population disposes of just 3 percent of
income, while the richest 20 percent disposes of 42
percent. What underlies this high inequality?
Inequality within racial groups accounts for about 60
percent of overall inequality, but inequalities between
racial groups account for 40 percent—a great deal relative
to other countries. (In Malaysia, for example, inequalities
between racial groups account for just 13 percent of over-
all inequality.) The share of income held by white house-
holds fell from 72 percent in 1960 to 60 percent in 1991,
but some of the decline was due to slower population
growth among whites. The average per capita income of
Africans, 9.1 percent of that of whites in 1917, had risen
to just 13.5 percent in 1995. For any poverty line, the frac-
tion of African workers below it is far greater than the frac-
tion of white workers. For example, if the line is set equal
to monthly adult equivalent poverty income, 4 percent of
the white labor force is poor—but more than half of the
African workforce is.
But other factors are important as well. The unem-
ployed, household domestic workers, and farm work-
ers are the poorest and most vulnerable groups. The
poor,  especially  the poorest, are disproportionately
found in rural areas. Labor market factors are also cen-
tral. Many Africans are unemployed, so many house-
holds do not have access to wage income. Age and
education are also factors. New entrants to the labor
market have trouble finding jobs, while lower educa-
tion means far lower probability of finding work and
almost no chance of finding well-paid work.
How  can  this  situation  be  remedied?  Policies
should follow two broad strategies. The first is to nar-
row the mismatch between the supply of unskilled
labor and the demand for skilled labor. This involves
changes in both labor market policy and education:
younger cohorts need to have better access to sec-
ondary education and higher-quality education, with
a focus on technical and vocational training. The sec-
ond strategy is to strengthen safety nets and poverty
alleviation efforts for people—especially in poor rural
areas—with few prospects for long-term sustainable
employment. Both planks will require robust growth
to create new jobs and fund the social safety net.
Source: African Economic Research Consortium, comparative
research project on poverty and inequality in Africa.
Box 3.2 Inequality in South Africa
95
ADD RESS ING POV ERTY AND  IN EQ UALITY
Until recently little evidence was available of the impact on income
distribution of policy reform, but that is beginning to change. Many
poor groups—those linked to markets and public services—have ben-
efited from the reforms and economic recovery of the 1990s (box 3.3).
But other poor households, notably those in remote locations and rely-
ing on subsistence crops, as well as those without work, have fared
badly. Reforms can lift many out of poverty. But there is a danger that
many of the very poor will be left behind. 
M
ANY
A
FRICAN COUNTRIES EXPERIENCED ECONOMIC
recovery in the 1990s, partly because of major eco-
nomic reforms. How these reforms affect poverty and
inequality is of massive significance for the long-run
sustainability of growth. In Ghana and Uganda reform
and recovery led  to  surprisingly similar  results for
households and their living standards. In Uganda real
GDP per capita grew by some 5 percent a year in
1992–97,  and real private consumption  per capita
grew by just over 4 per cent a year. Real GDP and pri-
vate  consumption  growth  rates  were  also  high  in
Ghana in 1992–98. Who were the main beneficiaries
of this growth, and did the poor benefit? 
In both countries GDP growth appears to have sig-
nificantly lowered consumption poverty. Mean house-
hold  consumption  per  adult  equivalent  in  Uganda
increased markedly in the 1990s, causing the poverty
headcount ratio to fall from 56 percent in 1992 to 44
percent in 1997. In Ghana the headcount ratio dropped
from 51 percent in 1991/92 to 43 percent in 1998/99.
The declines in poverty in both countries are robust with
respect to the choice of poverty line (and poverty index).
Income distribution also improved in both coun-
tries. In Uganda decreases in inequality explain 10 per-
cent  of  the decline  in  the headcount index.  (The
remainder came from an increase in mean household
consumption.) Similarly, in Ghana an improvement
in income distribution explains just under a quarter of
the decline in the headcount index for the country as
a whole. Inequality did not fall in all parts of these
countries, however—and in some areas it rose. 
Trends in consumption and poverty were also not
even across all groups and regions. Central Uganda
gained  the  most,  while  the  eastern  region  lagged
behind. In Ghana the declines in poverty were con-
centrated in the west, Greater Accra, Volta, and Brong
Ahafo, while the poorest ecological zones (the center,
north, upper east) saw poverty increase. How house-
holds fared also depended on the main source of liveli-
hood. In Uganda there were sharp falls in consumption
poverty among households engaged in cash-crop pro-
duction,  noncrop  agriculture,  and  manufacturing.
The higher living standards of those growing cash
crops accounted for more than half of the observed fall
in poverty. But poverty among food-crop farmers (rep-
resenting more than half  of consumption  poverty)
declined only marginally. And poverty actually in-
creased  among those  in miscellaneous services and
those  not  working.  A  similar  picture  emerges  for
Ghana: economic well-being improved significantly
for export farmers and those in formal and nonformal
wage  employment,  but  much  less  for  nonexport
(mainly food) farmers. And as in Uganda, poverty
increased in Ghanaian households where the head was
not working.
Thus in both countries many poor groups benefited
from the reforms and economic recovery of the 1990s.
But other poor households—notably those in remote
locations, those relying mainly on subsistence food crop
production, and those not working—fared badly.
Source: Appleton 1999; Ghana Statistical Service 1999.
Box 3.3 Winners and Losers from Reform and Recovery in Ghana and Uganda
96
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Unequal Access: Public Spending and the Poor
Improving the human capital and capabilities of Africans, partic-
ularly the poor, is crucial to reduce poverty and to improve people’s
lives. Actions to develop human capital must be seen across a broad
front. Reducing child mortality might require, in addition to higher
incomes, increased food consumption, cleaner water, more female
education, reduced disease-bearing vectors, better immunization pro-
grams and postnatal care, and more widespread basic clinical services.
Not all of these objectives involve public services and public spend-
ing, but many do. Chapter 4 discusses the need for better delivery sys-
tems for public services and offers examples of effective interventions.
The question here is the degree to which current budget allocations
and fiscal policies are focused on benefiting the poor.
The evidence is not encouraging. Health spending, for example, is
not well targeted to the poorest (table 3.6). In seven countries for
which data are available, the poorest 20 percent of the population
receives only 12 percent of the subsidy—compared with more than
30 percent for the richest 20 percent of the population. The only
exception is South Africa, where the richest 20 percent of the popu-
lation mainly uses private health care. The overall picture for educa-
tion is similar to that for health. Africa’s poor, particularly its women,
have less access to fiscal resources directed toward enhancing their
capabilities. This gender dimension to inequality hinders growth and
contributes to poverty and inequality (chapter 1). 
Table 3.6. Benefit Incidence of Public Health Spending in Various African Countries (percent)
Primary facilities
Hospital outpatient
Hospital inpatient
All
Poorest Richest
Poorest Richest
Poorest Richest
Poorest Richest
Country, year
quintile  quintile
quintile quintile
quintile quintile
quintile quintile
Côte d’Ivoire, 1995
14
22
8
a
39
a
11
32
Ghana, 1992
10
31
13
35
11
32
12
33
Guinea, 1994
10
36
1a
55a
4
48
Kenya, 1992
b
22
14
13
a
26
a
14
24
Madagascar, 1993
10
29
14
a
30
a
12
30
Tanzania, 1992/93
18
21
11
37
20
36
17
29
South Africa, 1994
18
10
15
a
17
a
16
17
a. Includes inpatient spending.
b. Rural only.
Source:Castro-Leal and others 1999.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested