save pdf in folder c# : Create pdf bookmarks from word Library software component .net winforms asp.net mvc canafricaclaim11-part915

97
ADD RESS ING POV ERTY AND  IN EQ UALITY
Security
S
ECURITY IS IMMENSELY IMPORTANT TO MOST
A
FRICANS
 F
OR
THEM
, life involves hazards that threaten livelihoods and capabil-
ities  (such  as  health).  A  participatory  poverty  assessment  in
Ethiopia investigated this dimension of well-being among both urban
and rural communities. One striking finding was the value Ethiopians
place on peace and the freedom it brings as a source of well-being, quite
apart from its effects on economic opportunities. This message must
resonate across Africa, given the wars and rumors of wars that are rife
in the region.
Ethiopian rural households were asked to identify events in the past
20 years that had caused great losses of income or wealth. Four broad
events were associated with serious household losses: harvest failure,
due mainly to drought; policy failure, highlighting the disastrous effect
on rural areas of the Derg regime; labor problems, such as the death of
a breadwinner; and livestock problems, especially with oxen (table 3.7).
While respondents highlighted the 1984 drought as a catastrophic har-
vest shock, there is continuing concern about harvest failure. Erratic
rainfall is a major preoccupation among the poor. Annual variations in
the agricultural harvest are a source of great uncertainty and seriously
undermine household well-being.
Surveys confirm these fluctuations in well-being. Just 31 percent of
the rural population surveyed was poor in both 1989 and 1995 (table
3.8). But three-quarters of the population experienced poverty in one
or more of the two years.
Table 3.7 Events Causing Hardship in Ethiopia, 1975–95 (percentage of respondents)
Village location
Event
Tigray
Amhara
Oromiya
SEPA
All
War
15
10
3
5
7
Harvest failure 
96
86
66
74
78
Labor problems 
50
29
34
54
40
Land problems 
36
14  
17
14
17
Oxen problems 
73
47
25
33
39
Other livestock 
69
36
30
30
35
Policy 
40
44
35
50
42
Crime/banditry 
5
2
1
4
3
Asset losses 
13
18
15
15
16
Source:Dercon 1998.
Security is a source of
both well-being and
economic opportunity
Create pdf bookmarks from word - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
add bookmark pdf; adding bookmarks to pdf
Create pdf bookmarks from word - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
create bookmarks pdf file; how to bookmark a pdf page
98
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Some of the variation in these data is due to rainfall—1989 was a
bad year for the harvest, and 1995 was a relatively good year. But idio-
syncratic shocks must also have been at work, dragging some house-
holds into poverty and helping other out of it. Similar results have been
found for short panels in Côte d’Ivoire (Grootaert, Kanbur, and Oh
1997).
Year-to-year insecurity in livelihood is only part of the story for an
agrarian economy like Ethiopia. The participatory assessment found
that most communities were also preoccupied with variations in con-
sumption (especially food consumption) within the year. Seasonal fluc-
tuations in food availability and prices are second only to drought as
perceived causes of insecurity in rural communities. Seasonality was
even cited by urban respondents as a problem for most households,
especially the poor. The survey also points to large within-year fluctu-
ations in household consumption, with significant seasonal variations
in poverty.
Households are also concerned about the effects of a death of a
working adult. High burial costs and income losses represent a major
catastrophe for a household. AIDS has obvious and massive implica-
tions for household welfare in communities that have little cushion
above bare survival.
How can  policies  help  households  cope  with  these  unforgiving
uncertainties? Assistance must be based above all on an understanding
of the coping mechanisms employed by the poor, and their limitations
in protecting welfare. Participatory assessments have found that rural
communities reduce consumption during shocks or during lean sea-
sons, or cope by borrowing cash or by generating other income through
migrant work or petty trade.
There are two broad kinds of policies to deal with risk and uncer-
tainty. First, governments can help reduce the risks by providing bet-
ter water storage and management and by assisting with crop research
Assistance must be
based on an
understanding of the
coping mechanisms
employed by the poor,
and their limitations in
protecting welfare
Table 3.8 Movements In and Out of Poverty in Rural Ethiopia, 
1989 and 1995 (percent)
Poor
Nonpoor
All
Category
in 1995
in 1995
households
Poor in 1989
31.1
30.2
61.3
Nonpoor in 1989
14.8
23.9
38.7
All households
45.9
54.1
100.0
Source:Dercon 1998.
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Bookmarks. inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing options
adding bookmarks to pdf reader; copy pdf bookmarks
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF file by top level bookmarks. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
display bookmarks in pdf; bookmarks in pdf reader
99
ADD RESS ING POV ERTY AND  IN EQ UALITY
and diversification. Second, governments can provide a safety net that
is triggered by a shock such as drought or harvest failure. The safety
net can also be designed to smooth consumption within the year.
Community-based public works programs can meet both these safety
net objectives. To the extent that policies enable the rural sector to
recapitalize itself (chapter 6), the poor will also have more assets to
buffer uncertainties. 
Strategies for Reducing Poverty in Africa
W
HATEVER
THE
MEASURE
CONSUMPTION
POVERTY
direct indicators of well-being—the situation in Africa is
serious.  Income  poverty  increased  in  the  1990s.
Malnutrition (wasting) appears to have worsened. Some countries
have  experienced  increased  child  mortality—and  lower  life
expectancy, in part because of AIDS. School enrollments have back-
slid. Growth has not been high or sustained enough to offset the pre-
vious  decline,  and  the  population  has  limited  capacity  to  take
advantage of income opportunities. Given these challenges, what are
the key ingredients of a poverty reduction strategy for Africa?
Growth and Jobs
Macroeconomic and  structural  policies  that  encourage growth
and employment are essential for any poverty reduction strategy.
Raising the growth rates of African economies would have two main
benefits. It would enhance the consumption potential of the popu-
lation, improving food consumption, raising nutrition levels, and
reducing  the  number  of  poor  people.  It  would  also  generate
resources that could be used to increase spending on basic needs such
as health and education—which, if well targeted to the poor, would
enhance their ability to take advantage of better employment oppor-
tunities and contribute to growth. How much growth is required?
More than 5 percent a year seems needed simply to prevent the num-
ber  of  poor  from  rising,  whereas  meeting  the  International
Development Goals for 2015 will require growth of more than 7 per-
cent a year (chapter 1). 
Macroeconomic and
structural policies that
encourage growth and
employment are essential
for any poverty reduction
strategy
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines Valid value for each index: 1 to (Page Count - 1). ' Create output PDF file path
how to add bookmark in pdf; adding bookmarks to pdf document
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing options
export pdf bookmarks to text; how to bookmark a page in pdf document
100
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Inclusive Policies
But growth is  not  enough. Africa’s  high  inequality  increases  the
importance of inclusive policies. High initial inequality implies higher
growth requirements to achieve a given poverty target, and can adversely
affect growth prospects (Alesina and Rodrik 1994; Deininger and Squire
1996). Changes in inequality could have a considerable impact on the
number of Africa’s poor. For example, a 10 percentage point rise or drop
in the region’s Gini coefficients could move 50 million people in or out
of poverty. Such a variation is within the range of historical experience
of countries over a 15-year period. 
Attacking the depth  and severity of poverty, as measured by the
poverty gap and the squared poverty gap, requires attention to sources
of persistent inequality. Different aspects of poverty respond differently
to changes in income and inequality. Changes in the distribution of
income—as measured by the Gini coefficient—are more powerful for
attacking deep poverty, as shown by the response of the poverty gap and
the squared poverty gap (figure 3.3). Geographic targeting of assistance,
including for the construction of essential rural infrastructure, is key for
reducing high rural inequality. And in Southern Africa and a few coun-
tries  elsewhere  in  the  region,  land  redistribution  measures  may  be
required as well. Addressing  constraints to economic diversification,
investments, and job creation will also have to be an essential feature of
any development strategy (chapters 6, 7). 
Better Capabilities
Improving human capital is crucial for Africa, both to reduce income
poverty and to directly improve people’s lives. Accelerating programs to
fight HIV/AIDS is perhaps the most pressing priority for many coun-
tries. But efforts to boost human capital in the region must cover a broad
front. As noted, efforts in one area—such as reducing child mortality or
raising education levels—are often linked to other objectives for well-
being. Not all involve public services and public spending, but many do.
Africa’s fiscal policies have been ineffective in achieving these better
outcomes. Major efforts are needed to ensure that poor and excluded
groups receive a larger share of public spending for essential social ser-
vices and infrastructure, so that better capabilities can help close the
inequality gap. 
Improving human capital
is crucial for Africa, both
to reduce income poverty
and to directly improve
people’s lives
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc.
create bookmarks in pdf from excel; auto bookmark pdf
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
& rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. Word Create. Create Word from PDF; Create Word
bookmarks pdf documents; bookmark pdf reader
101
ADD RESS ING POV ERTY AND  IN EQ UALITY
Delivery Mechanisms and Accountability
Antipoverty programs will not succeed unless delivery systems are
adjusted to deliver more public resources where the need is greatest, to
increase transparency and accountability to beneficiaries, and to build
the capacity of poor communities to help themselves. In highly cen-
tralized  but poorly administered public bureaucracies,  little  public
spending is likely to trickle down to the poor communities where it is
most needed. Effective decentralization has both a governance com-
ponent (chapter 2) and a service delivery component (chapter 4).
Figure 3.3  How African Poverty Responds to Changes in Income 
and Inequality
Elasticity of poverty measures
0
1
2
3
4
5
Headcount ratio
Poverty gap
Squared poverty gap
0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
Headcount ratio
Poverty gap
Squared poverty gap
Change in mean income
Change in income inequality
Urban
Rural
Source: Ali 1999.
Government measures to
help households cope
with uncertainties must
supplement the coping
mechanisms used by the
poor
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
& rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word (docx, doc
create bookmark pdf; add bookmarks to pdf file
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc.
export pdf bookmarks to text file; how to bookmark a pdf file
102
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Stability and Security
Government measures to help households cope with uncertainties
must  supplement  the  coping  mechanisms  used  by  the  poor.
Participatory  assessments are especially  useful in improving under-
standing of these. Macroeconomic instability also hurts the poor dis-
proportionately, because they have fewer mechanisms to cope with the
consequences. Governments can help reduce risks by delivering better
services (water storage and management, crop research and diversifica-
tion) and by providing safety nets against shocks (drought, harvest fail-
ure). A safety net can also smooth consumption. Well-designed public
works programs can meet both these safety net objectives.
103
Investing in People
A
FRICA
SFUTURE LIES IN ITS PEOPLE
. I
NDEED
, A
FRICA
must solve its current human development crisis if it
is to claim the 21
st
century. It can solve the crisis by
replicating the decentralized service delivery mecha-
nisms already in place in some African countries, by
increasing  international  cooperation, by sustaining
political  commitment  to  the  poor,  and by using  the extra  financial
resources  that  will  come from the  enhanced Heavily  Indebted  Poor
Countries initiative (chapter 8). The crisis can be solved in one genera-
tion if countries focus on the basics: basic nutrition, education, health,
and protection against increased vulnerability.
Investment in people is becoming more important for two reasons.
First, Africa’s future economic growth will depend less on its natural
resources, which are being depleted and are subject to long-run price
declines (chapter 1), and more on its labor skills and its ability to accel-
erate a demographic transition. Growth in today’s information-based
world economy depends on a flexible, educated, and healthy workforce
to  take  advantage  of  economic  openness.  Accelerating  the  demo-
graphic transition to reduce population growth will require education,
especially of women, and widely available contraceptive and repro-
ductive health services.
Second, investing in people promotes their individual development
and gives them the ability to escape poverty. This again requires educa-
tion and health care as well as some measure of income security.
Africa’s households and governments have invested heavily in human
development  since independence.  By the  1980s  this investment had
started to pay off in much improved human development indicators. But
in the last 10–15 years of the 20th century these indicators, still lagging
C
HA P T E R
4
Africa must solve its
human development
crisis if it is to claim the
21
st
century
104
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
behind those of other regions, started to stagnate or even decline. Not
only is Africa still well behind the rest of the world, there is also a major
danger the gap will widen unless major changes are introduced.
This chapter makes no claim to be comprehensive. Instead it focuses
on some critical factors that account for this slowdown in progress and
on the major actions needed if progress is to be resumed and, indeed,
accelerated so that Africa’s people can claim the 21
st
century.
Africa’s Human Development Crisis
I
N ONLY A FEW
A
FRICAN COUNTRIES HAS FERTILITY STARTED TO
decline, marking the last stage in the demographic transition, and
they are the ones with higher per capita incomes and, especially, high
health spending and fairly good access to contraception. Overall, how-
ever, Africa’s demographic transition remains slow—and well behind
other poor areas of the world, notably South Asia (figure 4.1). Africa’s
continued high fertility rates result not only in rapidly growing popula-
tions but also in populations with large portions of young people. The
momentum generated by past population growth means that Africa,
including both Sub-Saharan and North Africa, is now the only region
1960–65 1965–70 1970–75 1975–80 1980–85 1985–90 1990–95 1995–00 2000–05 2005–10 2010–15
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Figure 4.1  Fertility Rates by Region, 1960–2015
Source: World Bank 1999d.
Middle East
and North Africa
South
Asia
East Asia
and Pacific
Latin America
and Caribbean
High-Income countries
Africa
Europe and
Central Asia
Africa’s demographic
transition remains slow—
and well behind other
poor areas of the world
105
INVES TING IN PE OPLE
where the absolute number of 6–11 year olds is growing (World Bank
1995).  Coupled with the  impact  of  HIV/AIDS  on  adult  mortality,
Africa’s high fertility is resulting in 1.1 workers per dependent, compared
with 1.4 in South Asia and 2.0 in East Asia (see table 1.1), with deleteri-
ous consequences for savings and investment.
So high has been the growth of the school-age population that African
countries have had trouble keeping enrollment rates constant. Africa is
the only region where primary enrollment rates were lower in 1995 than
in 1980 (figure 4.2). Though there were improvements in the late 1990s,
the primary enrollment rates of 1980 have not been reattained for boys
or girls (table 4.1). Enrollment rates at all levels are far behind those in
other regions (see figure 4.2).
Low primary enrollments seriously undermine economic growth and
poverty reduction. Worldwide, no country has enjoyed sustained eco-
nomic progress without literacy rates well over 50 percent. The conse-
quences of low secondary and tertiary enrollments are harder to analyze
but may be particularly critical in Africa. There is increasing evidence of
positive backward links between secondary and higher education and
other parts of the system, especially teacher education. Only in Africa, for
example, does the correlation between female education and fertility
reduction not kick in until the secondary level (UN 1987; Ainsworth
1996; NRC 1993). Tertiary education levels are so low that they limit the
90
110
Africa
Arab
states
South
Asia
Latin America
and Caribbean
East Asia
Transition
economies
More developed
regions
50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120
Percent
Africa
Arab
states
South
Asia
Latin America
and Caribbean
East Asia
Transition
economies
More developed
regions
10
30
50
70
Percent
Secondary
Africa
Arab
states
1980
1995
1980
1995
1980
1995
South
Asia
Latin America
and Caribbean
East Asia
Transition
economies
More developed
regions
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
Percent
Tertiary
Primary
Figure 4.2  Gross Enrollment Rates by Education Level and Region, 1980 and 1995
Source: UNESCO 1998.
106
development of society’s leaders. Moreover, universities have a potentially
greater role to play in Africa than in many other regions—they are often
the only national institutions with the skills, equipment, and mandate to
generate new knowledge through research or to adapt global knowledge
to help solve local problems.
The content and quality of African education are also in crisis. At the
primary level the regular assessment of student achievement remains rare.
The assessments that exist are not encouraging, however (figure 4.3).
Poor quality not only produces poorly educated students, it also results
in excessive repetition and low completion rates—at enormous cost. In
14 of 32 African countries for which data are available, more than one-
third of school entrants do not complete the primary cycle. In 11 of 33
countries the input-output ratio is more than 1.5—that is, these coun-
tries use 50 percent or more resources than is necessary in an ideal sys-
tem. At the university level religious studies and civil service needs have
resulted in the development of the humanities and the social sciences and
the neglect of natural sciences, applied technology, business-related skills,
and research capabilities. Rapid enrollment growth in higher education,
coupled  with  declining  resources,  has  significantly  lowered  quality
(World Bank 1999c).
Another major factor affecting school performance is the health
and nutrition of students. Their health and nutrition also affect their
future productivity in the workforce. Nutrition trends have yet to
return to the levels of 1975 despite recent improvements in some
countries.  Population  growth  is  causing  a  rapid  increase  in  the
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Table 4.1 Gross Enrollment Rates in Africa, 1960–97 (percent)
Level
1960
1970
1980
1990
1997
Primary total
43.2
52.5
79.5
74.8
76.8
Primary female
32.0
42.8
70.2
67.6
69.4
Primary male
54.4
62.3
88.7
81.9
84.1
Primary female as share of total
37
41
44
45
45
Secondary total
3.1
7.1
17.5
22.4
26.2
Secondary female
2.0
4.6
12.8
19.2
23.3
Secondary male
4.2
9.6
22.2
25.5
29.1
Secondary female as share of total
32
33
36
43
44
Tertiary total
0.2
0.8
1.7
3.0
3.9
Tertiary female
0.1
0.3
0.7
1.9
2.8
Tertiary male
0.4
1.3
2.7
4.1
5.1
Tertiary female as share of total
20
20
22
32
35
Source:UNESCO, Statistical Yearbook, 1978–79 and 1998.
Rapid enrollment growth
in higher education,
coupled with declining
resources, has
significantly lowered
quality 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested