107
absolute number of underweight children, from 23 million in 1975
to 35 million in 1995.
Ill health in Africa results much more from infectious diseases and
nutrition  deficiencies  than  it  does  elsewhere  (Feacham and  Jamison
1991). This pattern affects Africans in their youth, when they may be too
weak to attend school or to learn when they do attend, and remains with
them as they grow up. The potential income loss from adult illness in
Africa is about 6.5 percent, two to three times that in other regions, con-
firming cross-country evidence that poor health is associated with slow
growth (chapter 1).
1
Indeed, the burden of disease is dramatically higher in Africa than else-
where  (figure  4.4).  And the disease  pattern is different (figure  4.5).
Malaria, onchocerciasis (river blindness), trypanosomiasis (sleeping sick-
ness), and HIV/AIDS occur elsewhere in the world but are concentrated
in Africa. Malaria, for which 80 percent of the world’s cases occur in
Africa, accounts for 11 percent of the disease burden in Africa and is esti-
mated to cost many African countries more than 1 percent of their GDP
(Leighton and Foster 1993; Gallup and Sachs 1998; Shepard and others
1991). (One estimate for Kenya puts it at 2–6 percent.). Onchocerciasis
affects 18 million people, 99 percent of them in Africa. Trypanosomiasis
INVES TING IN PE OPLE
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
Zimbabwe
Zanzibar
Mauritius
Namibia
Figure 4.3  Mean Scores of Primary Students on Three Dimensions of
Reading Comprehension in Four African Countries, 1998
Percent correct
Source: SACMEQ 1998.
Narrative prose
Expository prose
Documents
Average
Ill health in Africa results
much more from
infectious diseases and
nutrition deficiencies
than it does elsewhere
Pdf bookmark editor - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
create pdf with bookmarks from word; how to add bookmarks to pdf document
Pdf bookmark editor - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
how to create bookmark in pdf automatically; how to add bookmarks to a pdf
108
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Disability-adjusted life-years lost (millions)
Low- and
middle-
income
Western
Pacific
(excl. China)
High-
income
Western
Pacific
Western
Europe
Southeast
Asia
Eastern
Mediterranean
Latin America
North
America
Europe
and
Central
Asia
Burden of Infectious Diseases in Africa, 1998
Disability-adjusted life-years lost (millions)
Diarrheal
diseases
Acute
lower
respiratory
infections
Measles
Tuberculosis
Pertussis
Malaria
HIV/AIDS
Sexually
transmitted
diseases
(excl. HIV)
Tropical
diseases
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
An advanced PDF editor enable C# users to edit PDF text, image and pages in Visual Studio .NET project. Use HTML5 PDF Editor to Edit PDF Document in ASP.NET.
pdf bookmark editor; add bookmarks to pdf reader
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
ASP.NET PDF Viewer; VB.NET: ASP.NET PDF Editor; VB.NET to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
add bookmarks to pdf preview; how to create bookmarks in pdf file
109
occurs in 36 African countries and has recently surged. Two-thirds of the
world’s HIV/AIDS cases are in Africa. 
Every three seconds an African child dies—in most cases from an
infectious disease. In some countries one in five children die before their
fifth birthday. Almost 90 percent of deaths from infectious disease are
caused by a handful of diseases: acute respiratory infections, diarrheal dis-
eases, HIV/AIDS, malaria, measles, tuberculosis, and sexually transmit-
ted infections (see figure  4.5). These diseases account for half  of all
premature deaths, killing mostly children and young adults. Every day
3,000 people die from malaria—three out of four of them children. Every
year 1.5 million people die from tuberculosis and another 8 million are
newly infected. AIDS alone has orphaned more than 8 million children.
Life expectancy in Africa increased between 1950 and 1990, though
at a lower rate than elsewhere. Since 1990, however, life expectancy has
stagnated in the region, largely because of HIV/AIDS—and has dropped
sharply in countries with a high adult prevalence of HIV/AIDS (figure
4.6). In 1982 only one African country, Uganda, had an adult HIV
prevalence rate above 2 percent. Today there are 21 countries where
more than 7 percent of adults live with HIV/AIDS. It is estimated that
only 10 percent of the illness and death that HIV/AIDS will bring have
been seen—despite more than 11 million deaths and 23 million cases
INVES TING IN PE OPLE
35
40
45
50
55
60
65
Kenya
Botswana
Zimbabwe
Zambia
Uganda
Malawi
1955
1960
1965
1970
1975
1980
1985
1990
1995
2000
Source: UN 1999.
Figure 4.6 Estimated Life Expectancy at Birth in Selected African 
Countries, 1955–2000
Years
Since 1990 life
expectancy has
stagnated in the region—
and has dropped sharply
in countries with a high
adult prevalence of
HIV/AIDS
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
C#.NET: WPF PDF Viewer & Editor. PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
copy bookmarks from one pdf to another; how to bookmark a pdf in reader
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
copy pdf bookmarks to another pdf; creating bookmarks pdf
110
among Africa’s 600 million people. HIV is increasing child mortality
(more than 1 million children are infected) and affects adolescents and
women disproportionately, with half of new infections occurring among
those 15–24 and six women infected for every five men in a number of
the hardest-hit countries. HIV thus hits people in their prime produc-
tive years, profoundly disrupting the economic and social bases of fam-
ilies and dramatically reducing national income.
As noted, there are more than 8 million orphans in Africa as a result of
HIV/AIDS, 1 million in Uganda alone. Dependency ratios are shooting
up and economic insecurity is increasing. At the national and even the
continental level, the illness and impending death of up to one in four
adults in some countries will have an enormous impact on national pro-
ductivity, earnings, and savings (World Bank 1999b). This impact will be
strongest in Southern Africa, where HIV is most widespread and where
much of Africa’s GDP is located. The combination of HIV infection and
malaria infection is especially insidious, weakening in a mutually destruc-
tive action the immune systems of both the pregnant mother and the fetus.
Though perhaps the  most  dramatic element undermining  family
structures and threatening income security, HIV/AIDS is not the only
one. War and civil conflict became more common in the 1990s, and 28
percent of the world’s 12 million refugees are now in Africa (UNHCR
1998). Increasing numbers of refugees and migrants, coupled with high
urbanization, will exacerbate the spread of HIV/AIDS. As the new cen-
tury opens, there is hope that the main recent conflicts are being resolved.
But much peace is fragile, and the consequences for Africa’s families are
profound. Furthermore, many conflicts remain.
War and conflict come on top of other external shocks for many peo-
ple, such as more than 30 years of drought in the Sahel. Indeed, 60 per-
cent of Africa is vulnerable to drought, and 30 percent is extremely
vulnerable. In addition, much of the poor’s consumption is seasonal
(chapter 3), and macroeconomic shocks have a greater impact on the
poor than on others. Moreover, in Africa as elsewhere, urbanization,
while generally promoting development through the concentration of
populations, weakens traditional family structures. And in Africa par-
ticularly, employment  growth appears  to  have  stagnated along  with
economies more generally. Coupled with massive poverty, family struc-
tures and income security are severely threatened by the increased vul-
nerability brought by HIV/AIDS, conflict, drought, and urbanization
(World Bank 1999a).
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Family structures and
income security are
severely threatened by
the increased
vulnerability brought by
HIV/AIDS, conflict,
drought, and urbanization 
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
creating bookmarks in pdf files; adding bookmarks to pdf
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Convert PDF to HTML. |. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to HTML in C#.NET. How to Use C# .NET XDoc.PDF SDK to Convert PDF to HTML Webpage in C# .NET Program.
add bookmarks to pdf preview; bookmarks pdf file
111
Why the Human Development Crisis?
I
F
A
FRICAISTO CLAIM THE
21
ST
CENTURY
ITMUST REVERSETHISLATE
20th century pattern of rapid population growth, stagnating primary
enrollments, declining health, poor nutrition, and growing income
insecurity, all affecting children and women disproportionately as a result
of poverty and deteriorating family  structures.  Reversing the pattern
means  understanding  its causes. This section explores  some possible
explanations.
Do Africans Value Investments in Human Development?
It is sometimes suggested that African households do not invest in
human development, especially education, because the private returns to
that investment are not high enough to justify it. The evidence on pri-
vate returns to education in Africa is mixed and somewhat dated. But it
appears that market wage returns are usually high, as elsewhere in the
world, especially for postprimary education.
There is considerable controversy about the absolute size of the returns
to education in Africa. Psacharopoulos (1994), for instance, aggregates
the private returns to primary education at 41 percent, to secondary edu-
cation at 27 percent, and to higher education at 28 percent. Mingat and
Suchaut (forthcoming) put them at 30, 21, and 28 percent. Others think
that these estimates overestimate the returns to schooling. And indeed,
issues of omitted variable bias and selection complicate the interpretation
of wage-education gradients in Africa (as elsewhere).
Even studies that control for bias, however, find substantial private
returns to education in Africa, on the order of an 8–10 percent increase
in wages per year of schooling (van der Gaag and Vijverberg 1987). These
data are largely static. Unresearched in modern Africa is the key question
of whether returns to skills are rising because of increasing demand or
declining  because  of  increasing  supply  (Knight  and  Sabot  1990).
Whatever the precise numbers, the private returns to schooling are sig-
nificant in Africa—suggesting that households should want to invest.
This quantitative evidence is strongly supported by anecdotal evi-
dence. In many countries the buildings erected through voluntary effort
for primary and secondary education, for local training centers, and for
health clinics attest to the willingness of households and communities
to invest in the future of their children. Outlays on school fees, uni-
INVES TING IN PE OPLE
Households and
communities are willing
to invest in the future of
their children
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
create pdf with bookmarks from word; create bookmarks pdf files
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to TIFF in C#.NET. Online C# Tutorial for How to Convert PDF File to Tiff Image File with .NET XDoc.PDF Control in C#.NET Class.
creating bookmarks pdf files; bookmarks pdf
112
forms, and the like account for a substantial claim on households’ cash
income (Fine and others 1999). Given the poor and declining quality
of education offered to many poor households, their continued will-
ingness to forgo a considerable share of current consumption provides
unambiguous evidence of a strong desire to invest in their children’s
future. In Mauritania and other countries, parents fund private tutor-
ing  (often by  the same  teachers)  to  supplement low-quality public
schooling.  Offered  timely,  comprehensible,  and appropriate  advice,
African mothers will take appropriate measures to provide for their chil-
dren’s  nutrition  and  development.  Entire  communities  have  often
banded together to support a gifted child’s secondary and university
education.
Strauss (2000) has summarized the evidence on household and com-
munity factors affecting investment in human development in Africa.
Household investment is largely determined by the education of the par-
ents, by household income, and by income responses (at least for health
care). There is almost no evidence on the response of households to school
choice in Africa, but evidence from elsewhere indicates that there will
likely be an income response. The implication of all this is that public,
rather than private, health and education services are becoming more tar-
geted at low-income populations.
At the community level there is considerable evidence that health and
school facilities are more likely to be used when they are close to the com-
munity. The impact of distance on use seems to be greater than that of
user fees, though there is not as much evidence on user fees in Africa
(Strauss and Thomas 1988).
While households demand investments in education and health, and
invest their own funds in these areas, a disturbing recent development is
the inability of the poorest of the poor to cope with increased vulnera-
bility. Traditionally, the poor have had diverse mechanisms for protect-
ing  themselves  against  vulnerability—joining  labor-sharing  clubs  in
Togo,  taking  children  out  of  school  to  work  in  the  household  in
Swaziland, selling cattle in Zimbabwe. But these traditional mechanisms
have become less effective at managing household risks as the risks, and
household vulnerability, have increased. In Burkina Faso, for example,
cattle  sales  by households  during  the  most  extreme  drought  period
finance only 20–30 percent of the village-level income shortfall.
In  addition,  Africa’s  traditional  system  of  social  protection—the
extended family—is under extreme stress because of conflict, HIV/AIDS,
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Extremely poor
households have fewer
mechanisms for coping
with increased
vulnerability
113
drought, and migration, and can no longer provide the economic and
social protection to households that it once did. This, in turn, is begin-
ning to affect households’ abilities to enroll their children in school, as in
Côte d’Ivoire, Kenya, and Zambia. This increased vulnerability is not just
a rural phenomenon: the primary enrollment rate in Nairobi (Kenya), for
instance, has dropped to 61 percent from 103 percent in 1980. The
increased attraction of education programs that include meals attests to
this increased vulnerability.
Are Resources Used Efficiently?
Because of its young population, Africa’s human development invest-
ment needs are great. Yet its resources are limited, even with external aid.
Thus it might seem that Africa simply does not have enough resources to
invest in its people.
But the reality is more complicated. In 1993 public investment in edu-
cation averaged 3.8 percent of GDP in Africa compared with 2.7 percent
in Asia and 2.8 percent in Latin America (table 4.2). In general, private
spending adds another 50 percent to public spending. Health spending
in Africa averages 5.6 percent of GDP, the same as the global average for
low-  and  middle-income  countries  and  significantly  more  than  the
3.5–4.1 percent for Asia (table 4.3). Public spending accounts for about
half of Africa’s health spending.
Of course, these spending data refer to the continent as a whole. One
of the most remarkable features of human development investments in
Africa is their differentiation across countries. Public spending on edu-
cation in francophone West African countries amounts to 5.5 percent of
GDP; that in anglophone East African countries is 2.3 percent of GDP.
Median  per  capita public  spending  on  health is about  $6 a  year  in
INVES TING IN PE OPLE
Table 4.2 Public Spending on Education in Africa, Asia, and Latin America,
1975 and 1993 (percentage of GDP)
Region
1975
1993
Africa
4.0
3.8
Asia
2.6
2.7
Latin America
2.9
2.8
Memorandum item
All countries with GDP below $2,000
3.6
3.6
Source:Mingat and Suchaut forthcoming.
Relative to GDP, Africa
spends as much—or
more—on education and
health as other regions
116
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
African countries have developed national “education for all” programs.
And most have subscribed to the International Development Goals for
2015, which include targets for education and health along with those
for poverty reduction, gender equality, and environmental sustainability
(chapter 1; OECD 1996).
The problem is not necessarily a lack of political commitment but
rather the wide range of actions needed and the intensely political nature
of the reforms required to create effective service delivery systems. In
recent years most governments have been preoccupied with improving
macroeconomic policy (chapter 1). Political commitment is now needed
not just to boosting human development in general but to improving
nutrition, to implementing major health and education reforms, to con-
fronting HIV/AIDS, to protecting the vulnerable, and so on. It is diffi-
cult for governments, however committed, to move simultaneously on
many fronts, each of which is vastly more complicated than macroeco-
nomic reform. 
This difficulty is compounded by the political nature of the reforms.
They involve overcoming massive vested interests, which requires stead-
fast political will and is not always feasible—especially given the new
democratic climate and frequent elections in many countries and the polit-
ical weakness of rural populations. Teachers tend to be heavily unionized,
university students often represent a powerful political force though a tiny
numerical minority, hospitals have more influence than clinics, and so on.
Taken together, public education and health labor forces usually represent
the bulk of the nonmilitary public service in African countries. 
Despite these complex issues of political economy, many countries
have made a major start. Burkina Faso, Guinea, and Senegal, for exam-
ple, are making teacher salaries more flexible, partly by permitting the
recruitment of community-based teachers who are off the civil service pay
scales. More progress can be expected, linked to the growth of civil soci-
ety throughout Africa and to the power of information. As Africans bet-
ter understand what is at stake, they will increasingly demand better
services through standard political channels and through civil society
organizations.
At the same time, reform is always a lot easier when economies are
growing  and  transition  costs  can  be  more  easily  absorbed  through
increased resources. Not only must vested interests be overcome, but
human development programs must simultaneously focus on the needs
of the poorest, through basic health and education, and on the need to
It is difficult—but not
impossible—for
governments to move
forward on the many
fronts needed to create
effective service delivery
systems
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested