117
INVES TING IN PE OPLE
build societies more generally, which involves an important role for other
parts of the education system, including higher education. Balancing
these priorities would not be easy even in the absence of problems of polit-
ical economy.
In two areas, however, political commitment remains severely lacking:
fighting HIV/AIDS and reducing fertility. Not all African leaders are con-
vinced of the seriousness of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, nor do they real-
ize the potential impact it will have on their countries. Because of this,
not all have made HIV/AIDS a high priority. Strong political commit-
ment to fighting AIDS is crucial to provide the resources, leadership, and
enabling environment needed to control the epidemic’s spread and care
for the nation. Accurate and relevant data are a powerful tool for con-
vincing leaders to increase their commitment to confronting HIV/AIDS
(World Bank 1999b). Where there is political commitment, AIDS can
be met head on—as in Uganda, where high infection rates have been
brought down, and in Senegal (box 4.2).
Are Service Delivery Mechanisms Appropriate?
If Africa’s households and communities want to invest in human devel-
opment and if there is political will, why has the human development
record been so poor in recent years? Mention has already been made of
the difficulty of  moving simultaneously on many  fronts. But this  is
mainly true at the national rather than the local level. Africa’s public insti-
tutions are relatively weak at the national level. Yet its communities,
except in areas torn by war and conflict, are among the strongest in the
world—especially in West Africa, as evidenced by their response to the
availability of social funds and other community-based investment funds.
Almost all human development programs, however, have been national
U
NLIKE THOSE IN
MANY
A
FRICAN
COUNTRIES
,
Senegal’s leaders chose not to deny the existence of the
HIV/AIDS epidemic, but to face the challenge from
the start. Enlisting all key actors as allies in a timely and
aggressive prevention campaign has helped the coun-
try maintain one of the lowest HIV infection rates in
Africa (1.8 percent). The small number of HIV posi-
tive individuals allows  the government to consider
using treatment schedules that otherwise would not
have been affordable.
Source:World Bank 1999b.
Box 4.2 Senegal Confronts AIDS
Political commitment
remains severely lacking
in two areas: fighting
HIV/AIDS and reducing
fertility
Pdf bookmark - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
export pdf bookmarks to excel; bookmark pdf acrobat
Pdf bookmark - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
how to create bookmark in pdf automatically; pdf bookmark
118
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
programs, implemented by weak institutions and ignoring strong com-
munities. External donors have exacerbated this pattern of excessively
top-down delivery. A recent review of completed World Bank education
projects in Africa, for instance, found that only 8 percent had resulted in
institutional strengthening.
Centralized control often results in a focus on the wrong issues, on
inputs to programs rather than on results. Centralized recruitment and
deployment of teachers, for example, leads ministries of education and
health to focus on teacher and health worker interests and diverts them
from education and health results in individual schools and clinics. It also
diverts attention from delivering services to dealing with central public
employees—who, as noted, tend to be predominantly education and
health workers. It leads teachers to spend days away from their schools
attempting to receive their pay, which is still rarely handled at the school
level. Centralized procurement of drugs, contraceptives, and textbooks
can lead to the all-too-common phenomenon of supplies stored in cen-
tral warehouses long after clinics and schools needed them and to exten-
sive inefficiency in the use of funds (see box 4.1). In social protection,
centralized programs focus on coping with shocks, not mitigating or
averting them. 
Overly centralized management has resulted in human development
programs that are perceived as distant by their beneficiaries, with low
transparency and limited accountability (chapter 1). Around the world,
there is a trend toward decentralized delivery of human development ser-
vices, partly in response to the global growth of democracy and civil soci-
ety. The jury is still out on whether decentralized programs are more
effective and efficient in societies where institutions are relatively strong.
But in Africa, where institutions tend to be weak, service delivery is supe-
rior when it is controlled by beneficiaries and implemented by them or
by autonomous agencies (Frigenti, Hasth, and Haque 1998). This find-
ing is increasingly confirmed by the World Bank’s assessments of its pro-
jects: those based on community-driven delivery mechanisms have fewer
problems than others. 
Until recently autonomous local control of service delivery represented
a political threat to central governments and elites in Africa. That is
changing rapidly as civil society and democratic political institutions
grow. Indeed, Africa is poised to adopt service delivery mechanisms more
attuned to its political development, as has already happened in some
countries (chapter 2).
Centralized control often
results in a focus on the
wrong issues, on inputs
rather than on results
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit
create pdf bookmarks; display bookmarks in pdf
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
export pdf bookmarks; how to add bookmarks to pdf document
119
INVES TING IN PE OPLE
Is There Enough International Cooperation?
International cooperation takes many forms. This section concen-
trates on partnerships among African countries and between them and
their  development  partners.  International  cooperation  is particularly
important in human development—and above all in health, because dis-
ease knows no boundaries.
In education there is a vibrant partnership among African countries and
external aid agencies through the Association for the Development of
African Education. There are also other important forums, such as the
United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization and
the Organization of African Unity, in which African governments meet
and share experiences. Yet something is lacking. Francophone education
systems have been little influenced by anglophone ones, and vice versa.
Similarly, in health there are various organizational forums, notably AFRO
(the  World  Health  Organization  regional  office  for  Africa)  and  the
Organization of African Unity again. Particularly noteworthy has been the
shared experience of implementing the Bamako Initiative, with its empha-
sis on community involvement in basic health delivery. But in health, as
in education, something is lacking in the sharing of ideas and experience,
probably because of the lack of forums for such exchanges to  occur.
Maternal mortality halved in three years in Inganga, Uganda, when tradi-
tional birth attendants were partnered with public health centers using
modern communications. How can such innovations be replicated?
External partners can supply knowledge, finance, and research. Much
aid  to  Africa  is  focused  on  human  development.  For  example,  the
International Development Association, the World Bank’s soft-loan win-
dow, targets 50 percent of its funding to Africa and 40 percent of that to
the social sectors. Many bilateral donors have similar priorities. The mul-
tilateral Heavily Indebted Poor Countries initiative (chapter 8) will free
resources for education and health programs in countries now saddled with
high debt service obligations. External finance is available. Indeed, institu-
tions such as the International Development Association have found it hard
to use all their funding because of limited absorptive capacities resulting
from weak institutions and inappropriate delivery mechanisms.
In knowledge and research, however, much remains to be done. The
onus lies on African countries in terms of knowledge and on them and
their OECD partners in terms of research. There is resistance in Africa,
perhaps understandably derived from the struggle against colonialism, to
Africa is poised to adopt
service delivery
mechanisms more
attuned to its political
development
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF document by PDF bookmark and outlines in VB.NET. Independent component for splitting PDF document in preview without using external PDF control.
export pdf bookmarks to text file; bookmark a pdf file
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
create bookmarks in pdf; acrobat split pdf bookmark
121
INVES TING IN PE OPLE
In others, such as child mortality, trends are worsening—largely because
of HIV/AIDS. Achieving these goals will require resources, political
commitment, appropriate service delivery, and increased international
cooperation. Elements of all four are already partly in place throughout
Africa, and they are yielding results. What is urgently needed now is to
replicate them throughout the continent, adapting them to national and
local circumstances.
O
NCHOCERCIASIS IS A PARASITIC DISEASE
ENDEMIC IN
West Africa, that causes debilitation, eye damage, and
(eventually) “river blindness.” The disease is caused by
a parasitic worm and transmitted by the bite of the
female blackfly, which breeds in rapidly flowing rivers.
Two onchocerciasis programs are the essence of effective
development  partnerships:  results-oriented,  compre-
hensive, widely representative, international, instilling
ownership, capitalizing on a diverse range of compara-
tive advantages, and focusing on poverty reduction.
These successful programs have seen nearly 100 partners
come together with the sole purpose of providing a
global public good: eliminating a disease that devastates
the poorest in Africa.
The Onchocerciasis Control Program, begun in
1974, has halted transmission of the disease in 95 per-
cent of the 11-country, 34-million-people program
area by destroying the blackfly larvae in its river breed-
ing sites using insecticides sprayed from the air. To
complement vector control, the program also collabo-
rated with a pharmaceutical company, Merck and Co.,
to develop a drug called ivermectin. Ivermectin has
revolutionized  the  treatment  and  prevention  of
onchocerciasis by providing a safe and effective drug
that, when dosed once a year, prevents the blinding
and itching caused by the parasite. Merck announced
in 1987 that it would donate as much ivermectin as
needed for as long as necessary to eliminate onchocer-
ciasis in Africa.
The Onchocerciasis Control Program has been sus-
tained  by  a  unique  partnership  involving  11  West
African  governments,  sponsoring  agencies  (United
Nations  Development  Programme,  Food  and  Agri-
culture Organization, World Bank), bilateral donors, the
private sector, and an international technical staff headed
by  the  implementing  agency,  the  World  Health
Organization. The parasite is dying out in the human
population. People previously infected are recovering.
More than 12 million children born in the program area
since the program began are growing up without risk of
contracting the disease. An estimated 25 million hectares
of arable land have been freed from onchocerciasis and
are being resettled. New villages are being established,
and agricultural production is increasing. The cost: just
$0.57 a person per year in 1987 constant dollars.
 second  program,  the  African  Program  for
Onchocerciasis Control, has extended the benefits of
onchocerciasis control to all affected African countries.
It further recognized that the efficacy of ivermectin in
preventing onchocerciasis allowed for a control pro-
gram based entirely on its mass distribution. At the
launch of the program in 1995, the river blindness
partnership was widened to include two important
partners: nongovernmental organizations (now num-
bering more than 40), who help acquire and distribute
the donated ivermectin, and local communities, whose
ownership of the program is essential for the program’s
long-term sustainability. There are currently 57 pro-
jects under way in 12 countries, with 32 million peo-
ple under annual ivermectin treatment. The program
already reaches nearly 70 percent of the population tar-
geted for treatment by 2007.
Box 4.3 The Successful International Partnership against Onchocerciasis
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit
export excel to pdf with bookmarks; add bookmarks to pdf file
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Ability to get word count of PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
export pdf bookmarks to text; how to add bookmarks on pdf
122
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Resources
We have seen that there are serious inefficiencies in the allocation of
resources for human development in Africa. Nevertheless, extra resources
are needed now, for four reasons. First, some countries are so poor that
they simply do not have sufficient domestic resources, regardless of effi-
ciency considerations. These are generally the lowest-income countries,
like Burundi and Guinea-Bissau.
Second,  many  countries  have  embarked  on  structural  reforms
designed to reduce inefficiencies and reallocate resources, but the reforms
will take time and often will be slow to yield savings. The adoption of
volontaire primary school teachers, paid less than public service teachers,
in many Sahel countries is a good example. Over time this reform will
lower unit and total costs. But in the short term, by reducing the student-
teacher ratio while not displacing existing teachers, it increases the teacher
salary bill.
Third, new programs and service delivery mechanisms are needed to
combat HIV/AIDS and malaria. Effective programs against HIV/AIDS
may cost 1.5–2.0 percent of GDP a year in a typical African country, and
more in those with high HIV infection rates. Malaria program costs may
run 0.3–0.5 percent of GDP a year.
Finally, as service coverage increases, the unit costs of delivering ser-
vices to the previously unserved are higher than those to the previously
served. These beneficiaries tend to be the rural poor, the poorest of the
poor, living in dispersed areas without good transport and other infra-
structure. So, proportionately more resources are needed to achieve goals
for health and universal primary education.
Moreover, an important barrier to serving such beneficiaries has been
the need for them to pay for services. Though the poor are willing to pay
for human development investments, their resources are limited. User
fees have deterred primary school enrollment and health center use. Fees
have been advocated because they generate revenue and increase alloca-
tive efficiency—and there is merit to both arguments.  Anecdotally, mod-
est user fees seem to improve the quality of health services. In Madagascar,
for instance, the ability of health facilities to charge fees—and to retain
them—has kept drugs in stock and increased patient demand because
quality is perceived as having improved. But the effect of such fees on ser-
vice use has likely been severely underestimated, especially in education,
and most especially for the poor. In Uganda, for example, primary enroll-
More resources are
needed to achieve goals
for health and education
123
INVES TING IN PE OPLE
ments doubled in one year, from 2.6 million to 5.2 million, when par-
ent-teacher association dues were eliminated (box 4.4).
Revenue generation can be effective when the revenues are held and
used at the community level. The impact of fees on resource allocation
has not been sufficiently studied for there to be clear results in Africa; we
simply do not know if higher charges at hospitals than at health centers,
D
URING THE
1990
S
U
GANDA EMBARKEDON ASWEEP
-
ing national program to achieve universal primary edu-
cation. This program, probably the most ambitious in
Africa, has the following elements:
Massive political commitment. Education was the
principal  electoral  platform  of  President  Yoweri
Museveni in his successful 1996 campaign and is the
most talked-about topic in Uganda today. Basic edu-
cation is Uganda’s top priority.
Elimination of barriers to access. Until 1996 educa-
tion was not free. Fees were minor, but parent-teacher
association dues amounted to $6–8 a child—a major
burden  for  most  Ugandan  families.  In  1997  free
schooling was introduced for up to four children a
household. Primary enrollments immediately doubled
from 2.6 million to 5.2 million, and in 1999 reached
6.5 million.
Sustained budget commitment.The government has
dramatically increased the share of the national budget
going to education, from 22 percent in 1995 to 31 per-
cent in 1999. Two-thirds of this goes to primary edu-
cation, allocated  to  districts  on  a  capitation  basis.
Waste has been eliminated with the elimination of
ghost teachers, cutting payroll numbers by a third.
Moreover, the government is committed to concen-
trating future increases in spending—including from
the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries initiative—on
education.
Decentralization with central support. All primary
education is now run by Uganda’s 45 districts. Each
district deploys and pays teachers, though they remain
centrally  financed.  Classroom  construction  is  also
managed  at  the  district  level  using  a  community
demand approach, which has resulted in faster and bet-
ter construction. Multigrade teaching is being piloted
in sparsely populated areas. Support to schools and
teachers  is provided  by a cascading system linking
teacher training colleges to district coordinating cen-
ters and then to schools. Nationally, 560 tutors are in
place, each responsible for supporting 20 schools, a
large  but  manageable  responsibility.  Schools  select
textbooks from a nationally approved list.
Accountability. Districts and schools are held ac-
countable for results and funds are used transparently.
Curriculum reform.The curriculum has been mod-
ernized for the core subjects of mathematics, English,
social science, and natural science. Books and materi-
als have been developed and are being deployed. An
assessment system is being put in place to measure stu-
dent achievement.
Teacher support. Teacher pay has been increased
to provide a living wage. Competency tests have
been administered to all uncertified teachers, and an 
in-service  training  program  introduced  for  those
deemed trainable. There are still not enough teachers,
given the massive increase in enrollments, but the gov-
ernment  is  committed  to  reducing  student-teacher
ratios from about 60:1 (and as high as 100:1 in the first
two years of primary school) to 40:1 as soon as is finan-
cially feasible. Budget increases to fund more teachers
and build classrooms are the government’s spending
priority for the next decade, and resources released
through the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries initia-
tive will be used for these purposes. 
Box 4.4 Uganda’s Commitment to Basic Education
124
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
for instance, increase the portion of people initially seeking care at the
centers. We do know that modest fees for drugs at health centers seem to
improve both quality and use.
The extra resources that are needed should be made available. Africa
remains a principal beneficiary of much multilateral and bilateral aid and
of the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries initiative (chapter 8). It will be
necessary to finance fiscal deficits that may seem large in conventional
GDP terms, but this will be justified so long as the macroeconomic con-
sequences are funded by grants or highly concessional loans and so long
as the programs the deficits finance expand access to and improve human
development services. This may entail large deficits, with continued aid
dependence over an extended period (chapter 8). But these funds need
to enhance programs, not simply finance them. Special programs may be
needed for countries not eligible for the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries
initiative or for which the terms of the expanded initiative do not free sig-
nificant resources.
Political Commitment
General political commitment to human development is already in
place in most African countries. What is needed for effective investment
in human development is sustained and specific political commitment.
This involves focus, sustained resources, and active involvement.
Focus can come from a commitment to the poor, especially poor chil-
dren. Poor children require political commitment because they are voice-
less in society, even though those under 15 typically account for 45
percent of African populations—a portion unlike that anywhere else in
the world. Children represent these societies’ futures as well as half their
present. A commitment to poor children is also a commitment to equity.
Closing  urban-rural  and  male-female  gaps  is  a  central challenge  for
human development, above all in education. Primary enrollment rates in
Niamey (90 percent), Addis Ababa (85), and Bamako (80) are more than
four times those in the rural areas of Niger, Ethiopia, and Mali (World
Bank 1999c). Girls’ enrollment rates lag boys’ in most countries but can
be increased rapidly with sustained political commitment, as happened
in Guinea, Mauritania, and Uganda in the 1990s. 
Resources for human development must be sustained over time, as
with education in Uganda (see box 4.4) and nutrition in Madagascar (box
4.5). Commitment also involves continued involvement in human devel-
Sustained and specific
political commitment is
needed for effective
investment in human
development
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested