137
LOWE RING INFRASTRUC TURE, INFORM ATION, AN D FINANCE  BARRIERS
call is lower in Africa ($0.09) than in Europe ($0.11). But averages are
misleading. Electricity tariffs, for example, ranged from $0.001 per 
kilowatt-hour in Burundi and $0.022 in Ghana to $0.31 in Guinea-
Bissau in the  mid-1990s. (The  typical  cost  in  OECD  countries is
$0.06.) This variation reflects both real cost differences and policy dif-
ferences. Ghana, for example, is blessed with one of the world’s lowest-
cost sources of hydropower. In other cases high charges may reflect
much higher costs (or monopoly profits), while low charges may not
cover costs. Paradoxically, very low electricity prices may be as undesir-
able as very high prices. If prices are low but costs are not, subsidies will
be needed, creating macroeconomic imbalances, or the supplier will
have less money to expand supply or improve quality—which may be
more important than price for competitiveness or access.
Access to infrastructure services is more unequal in Africa than in any
other part of the world. Less than one African in five has access to elec-
tricity, and less than half have access to sanitation or safe water. The dis-
tribution of services is skewed—urban areas receive more than 80 percent
of services, while rural areas, with more than 70 percent of the popula-
tion, get 20 percent. About two-thirds of rural Africa lacks access to ade-
quate water supplies, and three-quarters is without proper sanitation
facilities.
Consequences of Lagging Infrastructure Development
Why does Africa’s low infrastructure development matter? Production
of all goods and services lags in Africa. Does infrastructure have a signif-
icance beyond that of any other type of production? Yes, because the value
of infrastructure for growth and development lies in its consumption, not
its production. Infrastructure is an input to all other production. This is
clear in the case of economic infrastructure such as power and transport.
But even social or household infrastructure, such as sanitation facilities,
affects people’s productivity and so indirectly affects production. Africa
pays a high price for its inadequate infrastructure in lost opportunities for
growth,  for poverty  reduction,  and for  access  to  services  that  could
improve people’s lives.
Low competitiveness.
Poor infrastructure is one of the main causes of
Africa’s low competitiveness. This is not just a matter of inadequate
quantity. Cost, quality, and access are all important determinants of
competitiveness.
Access to infrastructure
services is more unequal
in Africa than in any other
part of the world
Pdf create bookmarks - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
create bookmarks in pdf reader; how to bookmark a pdf page
Pdf create bookmarks - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
convert excel to pdf with bookmarks; add bookmark pdf file
138
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Africa’s high transport costs are a major burden on competitiveness and
growth. Amjadi and Yeats (1995) conclude that transport costs are a higher
trade barrier than tariffs in Africa. Limão and Venables (1999) conclude
that weak infrastructure accounts for most of Africa’s poor trade perfor-
mance. The volume of trade is very sensitive to transport costs—a 10 per-
cent drop in transport costs increases trade by 25 percent. And transport
costs are sensitive to the quality of infrastructure, as measured by such vari-
ables as the density of the road network, the paved road network, and the
rail network, or the number of telephones per person. Improving a coun-
try’s worldwide rank in infrastructure quality from the 75
th
percentile to
the 50
th
(median) increases the volume of trade by 50 percent. 
Unreliable service can be even more damaging to competitiveness than
high costs. Production stoppages, missed delivery dates, or an inability to
communicate reliably preclude the development of higher value-added
products that depend on timely delivery. About 25 percent of the decline
in Africa’s share of world exports can be attributed to weak price com-
petitiveness. The rest is due to nonprice factors, including infrastructure
services and the flow of trade information (Oshikoya and others 1999).
In newly industrialized countries successful exporters exhibit persistent
export growth even in the face of falling world income. They are able to
do so partly because they are in close contact with foreign customers, hav-
ing established “insider” relationships with them. The quality of transac-
tional infrastructure, as represented by the number of telephone lines per
capita, is a statistically significant variable in explaining the success of
insider countries (Mody and Yilmaz 1994).
Given its inadequate infrastructure and service levels, it is no surprise
that Africa is considered a bad business address. This makes it hard for Africa
to compete for private capital flows as public flows decline. Infrastructure
plays an important role in determining the destination and size of private
capital flows. African firms feel strongly about the importance of infra-
structure in their business decisions and operations, ranking it high on their
list of complaints (WEF and HIID 1998).
Not all African countries are badly placed. But even the better per-
formers may be dragged down by bad neighbors. As much as 1 percent-
age  point  of  Africa’s  lackluster  growth  performance  may  be  due  to
neighborhood effects (Easterly and Levine 1997). In some cases this is
merely reputational—guilt by association. But costly or unreliable infra-
structure in neighboring countries can be nearly as important as a coun-
try’s own (Limão and Venables 1999).
Infrastructure plays an
important role in
determining the
destination and size of
private capital flows
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Bookmarks. inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing options
adding bookmarks to pdf document; create bookmark pdf file
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines Valid value for each index: 1 to (Page Count - 1). ' Create output PDF file path
bookmarks in pdf from word; how to add a bookmark in pdf
139
LOWE RING INFRASTRUC TURE, INFORM ATION, AN D FINANCE  BARRIERS
Weak market integration.
Inadequate infrastructure also impedes the inte-
gration of domestic markets. Though less visible than the barrier to global
competitiveness, the barrier to market integration is just as damaging to
growth—and even worse for broadly based growth and poverty reduc-
tion. The lack of all-weather rural roads, in particular, condemns rural
areas to isolation, subsistence production, and high risk.
High transport and other transactions costs, and the possibility of
being cut off from markets and supply sources at critical times, limit
the  attractiveness  of  specializing  in  high-value  crops  (UNCTAD
1999). Though specialization might bring higher average returns in
the long run, there would be no long run if there were one catastrophic
year in the short run. Better roads and other infrastructure reduce risk
and create opportunities for high-value production—including nona-
gricultural activities, the classic path out of poverty for rural house-
holds the world over. Falling transport costs also expand markets for
urban production, lower food costs in urban areas, and create oppor-
tunities for people and investment to move back and forth between
rural and urban  areas. Deregulation  of transport  in Kenya in  the
1970s, for example, set in motion a virtuous circle of growth between
Nairobi  and  smallholder  agricultural  areas  for  100  miles  around
(World Bank 1980).
Slower growth.
Many studies have found a link between infrastructure
development and growth. The World Bank’s Word Development Report
1994 found that a 1 percent increase in infrastructure stock was associ-
ated with a 1 percent increase in GDP. Easterly and Levine (1997) found
that inadequate telecommunications infrastructure caused a 1 percentage
point drop in Africa’s growth rate.
What is harder to see is whether growth causes infrastructure or infra-
structure causes growth. But it is generally recognized that the link works
both ways. Despite the ambiguity about causality, it seems clear that
inadequate infrastructure is a major barrier to growth and poverty reduc-
tion, particularly because it lessens competitiveness and impedes market
integration.
Poverty and inequality.
Some infrastructure services—such as sanitation
and safe water—contribute directly to poverty reduction. But the provi-
sion of infrastructure services does  not automatically reduce poverty.
Poorly designed infrastructure could have more costs than benefits for
poor people because of inadequate targeting or adverse social, health,
financial, and environmental effects (DBSA 1998).
Inadequate infrastructure
is a major barrier to
growth and poverty
reduction
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing options
how to add bookmark in pdf; create bookmarks pdf file
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF file by top level bookmarks. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
bookmarks pdf files; bookmarks pdf reader
141
LOWE RING INFRASTRUC TURE, INFORM ATION, AN D FINANCE  BARRIERS
cific problems: Africa’s distance from major markets in Europe and North
America, the barrier imposed by the Sahara Desert, Africa’s small coast-
line relative to total area, a shortage of natural ports along the coastline,
the fact that only 19 percent of Africans live within 100 kilometers of the
coast, the large proportion of landlocked states, and the small number of
navigable rivers. 
Widespread poverty and low urbanization.
Large markets lower infrastructure
costs by allowing economies of scale and by broadening competition. But
infrastructure costs are also affected by per capita income and urbanization.
Many indicators of lagging infrastructure development reflect low demand
rather than inadequate supply. If basic household telephone service cost 5
percent  of  household  income,  for  example,  less  than  10  percent  of
Tanzanian households could afford telephone service (Mariki 1999).
Africa’s GNP is only slightly larger than that of Belgium, and it has
less than one-fiftieth the per capita income and one-twelfth the popula-
tion density. Even if Africa were a single market, this would not offset the
disadvantages for infrastructure development of low income relative to
area. In this respect it is interesting to compare Africa with India. Total
and per capita GDP are comparable, but India has two important advan-
tages when it comes to infrastructure development: it is a single country,
and its population density is nearly 13 times that of Africa.
Small states.
The division of Africa into many small states also affects
infrastructure development. Sometimes there are physical incompatibil-
ities between infrastructure systems: rail lines may be of different gauges
or may not link up at borders. More generally, border crossings entail high
transactions  costs.  Even  if  rail  systems  are  compatible,  coordination
between independent systems entails long delays and high costs that lead
to a disproportionate share of bulky items being transported by road
rather than rail in East and Southern Africa.
For truck transport, border delays of 10 hours are common, while taxes,
licenses, and insurance requirements raise the direct costs of transport.
Protection of domestic transport and tour operators further raises costs,
impedes  the  development  of  cross-border  tourist  circuits, and  greatly
reduces competition and service in air transport. Finally, and most impor-
tant,  potential sources  of low-cost energy and water resources  remain
untapped because of the lack of regional cooperation. World-class, low-cost
sources of hydropower have not been exploited because of the difficulties,
rivalries, and uncertainties attached to producing energy in one country for
consumption in another—often with transmission across a third.
Many indicators of lagging
infrastructure
development reflect low
demand rather than
inadequate supply
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. PDF Create.
how to create bookmarks in pdf file; export bookmarks from pdf to excel
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
& rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. Word Create. Create Word from PDF; Create Word
pdf bookmark editor; how to bookmark a pdf document
142
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
More disturbing is the enormous amount of energy wasted through
gas flaring, particularly in West Africa. Africa flares gas equivalent to 12
times the energy it uses. Because of the distances involved, not all this
energy can be used commercially. But a significant amount could be har-
nessed, to the benefit of producers and consumers, if the countries with
these resources demonstrated a commitment to developing regional solu-
tions to energy shortages.
Inadequate investment.
UNCTAD (1999) argues that Africa’s poor infra-
structure performance is mainly explained by a collapse in investment
over the past 20 years. Most estimates suggest that Africa requires infra-
structure investment of 5–6 percent of GDP a year, with most coming
from the public sector. Yet total public investment more than halved in
Africa between the early 1970s (12.6 percent of GDP) and the early
1990s (5.6 percent of GDP). Moreover, official development assistance
fell in the 1990s, and the share going to infrastructure fell even more.
This decline has not been offset by higher domestic or foreign private
investment in infrastructure except in Côte d’Ivoire and South Africa,
which have attracted foreign private investment. This investment squeeze
contributes to the deterioration in infrastructure, especially in road trans-
port. Insufficient funding for maintenance has also been a binding con-
straint.  In  nine  East  African  countries  maintenance  spending  was
sufficient for only 20 percent of current networks (Sylte 1996, cited in
UNCTAD 1999).
Bad policies.
While structural factors and low investment help explain
the current state of infrastructure in Africa, institutions, incentives, and
policies are the main barriers to its provision. Almost without exception,
infrastructure services have been provided exclusively by governments,
which own, finance, and manage nearly all infrastructure projects. Public
provision typically leads to low efficiency and high costs, with more atten-
tion paid to creating jobs than to providing services. High subsidies to
insolvent  utilities  undermine  macroeconomic  stability  and  growth.
Although data for Africa are scanty, the World Bank recently estimated
that energy subsidies for all developing countries total $100 billion a year,
equivalent to two-thirds of sector investment requirements. 
Governments have often controlled prices with little regard for com-
mercial objectives, including cost recovery. Most prices are far below what
is required to operate, maintain, and rehabilitate facilities. In response to
the resulting supply shortages, many businesses and households resort to
self-provision, often at high cost. In Nigeria as much as half of public elec-
Institutions, incentives,
and policies are the main
barriers to the provision
of infrastructure
143
tricity capacity may be inoperable at a given time, mostly because of inad-
equate maintenance of transmission and distribution networks. As a result
more than 90 percent of manufacturing firms have bought their own gen-
erators. For firms with 50 or more employees, the extra cost of private power
generation was 10 percent of the machinery and equipment budget. For
smaller firms the burden was as high as 29 percent (Lee and Anas 1992).
Public policy toward the private sector also impedes infrastructure
development. Licensing and other restrictions prevent private firms from
competing with state firms and with each other. Restrictions on compe-
tition are often defended on the grounds that they conserve scarce capi-
tal because utilities are natural monopolies. More often, the effect is to
raise the cost and lower the quality of service, thereby restricting growth.
More generally, administrative barriers and high taxes impede the pro-
vision and use of infrastructure by the private sector. The high transac-
tions  costs  arising from  government  restrictions  deter  private sector
development and breed corruption, further undermining development.
Kickbacks on construction contracts, pilferage in ports, corruption in
customs services, and organized extortion of truckers all raise the cost of
doing business and reduce competitiveness.
The Way Forward
Geography and other structural factors impose constraints on what can
be done to solve Africa’s infrastructure problems. But geography need not
be destiny, and much can be done within existing constraints. Countries
elsewhere have overcome isolation and landlockedness. Moreover, new
technology creates new opportunities for Africa—even the potential for
leapfrogging stages of development. To move forward, Africa must boost
investment,  develop private-public  partnerships,  improve  government
credibility, increase cross-border and regional cooperation, and widen
access.
Boost investment.
There is no doubt that Africa’s weak and often worsen-
ing infrastructure performance is linked to low spending on investment and
maintenance. The question is the extent to which low spending is an inde-
pendent cause or the consequence of other factors—bad policies, lack of
regional cooperation, structural features of geography and poverty—that
lower the rate of return and, hence, the incentive for investment. In par-
ticular, lack of accountability to communities and inadequate commercial
orientation may have reduced the incentive to invest in infrastructure.
Geography need not be
destiny, and much can be
done within existing
constraints
LOWE RING INFRASTRUC TURE, INFORM ATION, AN D FINANCE  BARRIERS
146
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Public-private partnerships can take many forms. African countries
have used a variety of approaches to attract private participation in rail-
ways, airports, and seaports (table 5.3). Introducing competition and pri-
vate involvement in maritime transport in Côte d’Ivoire generated many
benefits for consumers (box 5.3).
Improve government credibility.
There are many obstacles to increasing pri-
vate participation in African infrastructure. The main sources of capital
are  likely  to be  foreigners  or  local  European,  Asian, or other ethnic
minorities, and many governments do not want to cede control to either
group. Governments also worry about private investors exercising mon-
opoly power in small markets. Privatization may lead to higher prices for
basic services such as electricity and water.
Moreover, foreigners may be reluctant to invest. Political uncertainty
is high in Africa, and in traditional utilities the capital costs are high, the
expected lifetime of the investment is long, and returns will be in local
rather than foreign currency. Thus investment appears quite risky, and if
foreign investors are willing to invest at all, they may demand a high risk
premium. 
To attract foreign investment on acceptable terms, governments need
to create a favorable climate for business by providing macroeconomic
stability, competitive taxes, freedom to repatriate  capital, and all the
aspects of governance that affect willingness to invest—including con-
tract enforcement, low corruption, and adherence to transparent rules,
Table 5.2 Private Investment in Infrastructure in Various Countries, 1995 (percentage of total)
Weighted
Income group/country
Telecommunications
Power
Transport
Sewerage
private share
High income
France
0
0
10
36
13
Germany
0
67
0
20
9
Japan
35
96
3
0
14
Netherlands
100
23
50
46
United Kingdom
100
100
21
100
71
United States
100
81
13
22
47
Middle and low income
Chile
100
99
7
4
54
Côte d’Ivoire
0
30
0
25
10
Hungary
98
100
53
0
76
Philippines
87
49
25
0
32
Thailand
31
30
20
0
17
Source:DBSA 1998.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested