save pdf in folder c# : Create bookmarks pdf application Library tool html asp.net web page online canafricaclaim16-part920

147
LOWE RING INFRASTRUC TURE, INFORM ATION, AN D FINANCE  BARRIERS
including for privatization (Ayogu 1999). At the same time, to protect
against exploitation of a monopoly position, governments should develop
regulations that conform to international good practice for governance
and pricing. An even better way to prevent abuse of monopoly power is
to permit free entry and open competition where this is compatible with
market size and technology. New technology such as cellular phones and
small-scale generating plants offer new scope for competition. In brief,
governments need to enhance their credibility and the rule of law to
attract  private  finance  and  to  protect  both  property  rights  and  the 
public interest.
The appropriate form of public-private partnership depends on tech-
nology and market structure. The key to deciding the structure of own-
ership—whether a public-private partnership or full privatization—is
whether the market can be made contestable, that is, potentially com-
petitive even if only one firm is active. A starting point is the recognition
that infrastructure services can often be unbundled into standalone ser-
vices with distinct market structures.
The electric power sector, for example, can be unbundled into gen-
eration, transmission, and distribution. The technology for power gen-
T
ELECOMMUNICATIONS IS A STRIKING EXAMPLE OF
how new ways of doing business could both cut bud-
get costs and improve business services. Malawi, with
very poor telecommunications services, illustrates the
potential. There are 0.31 telephones per 100 people,
compared with 0.5 in Sub-Saharan Africa and 50 in
high-income countries. The average wait for a phone
line exceeds 10 years. The new, single-provider cellu-
lar phone service is expensive ($1,000 to sign on) and
has  chronic service problems. Many  services—data
transmission, paging, Internet—are limited or nonex-
istent. And the monopoly public provider, Malawi
Posts and Telecommunications Corporation, cannot
afford investments that could improve service.
Telecommunications is the core of the information
infrastructure needed for countries to compete in the
global economy. With such poor and costly services,
Malawi has little chance of attracting foreign (or local)
investment for export production. Worse, many other
African countries have taken steps to attract foreign
investment  and  technology  that  will  lower  their
telecommunications costs and enhance their competi-
tive advantage.
Malawi could attract new service providers and pri-
vate investment that could increase the number of tele-
phone lines sixfold within five years, vastly improve
other services, and lower prices—and it could secure
almost all of the required $300 million in financing
from private sources. Without such a program, includ-
ing regulatory and other changes, Malawi has little
hope of financing the service improvements needed to
compete with its neighbors.
Source:World Bank 1997.
Box 5.2 Harnessing the Potential of Telecommunications
Create bookmarks pdf - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
add bookmark to pdf reader; excel hyperlink to pdf bookmark
Create bookmarks pdf - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
pdf bookmarks; create bookmarks in pdf from excel
148
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Table 5.3 Selected Forms of Private Participation in Africa’s Railways, Airports, and Seaports
Form
Sector
Country
Year
Management contract
Railways
Cameroon
Pre-1996
Togo
Pre-1996
Malawi
1993
Burkina Faso
1997
Congo, Dem. Rep.
1998
Airports
Guinea
Pre-1996
Madagascar
Pre-1996
Togo
Pre-1996
Seaports
Cameroon
Pre-1996
Sierra Leone
Pre-1996
Lease
Railways
Côte d’Ivoire
Pre-1996
Gabon
1997
Cameroon
1998
Airports
Mauritania
Pre-1996
Côte d’Ivoire
1996
Seaports
Mozambique
Pre-1996
Zambia
1998
Concession/build-operate-transfer
Railways
Malawi
1993
Mozambique
1998
Airports
Senegal
1996
Seaports
Mali
Pre-1996
Demonopolization/build-own-operate
Seaports
South Africa
Pre-1996
Divestiture
Airports
South Africa
1997
Source:ADB 1999.
R
ESTRICTIVEPRACTICESFAVORINGTHESTATE
-
OWNED
shipping line, SITRAM, resulted in high costs and
poor services for Ivorian exporters of major crops and
importers of essential goods. These restrictions were
first  eroded  in  1993,  when  the  banana-pineapple
exporters association chartered its own vessels at much
lower costs, halving freight rates for banana exports to
Europe and cutting those for cocoa exports to the
United States by  one-quarter.  Given the increased
competitiveness of Ivorian products, the government
agreed to liberalize maritime transport in stages.
In 1995 SITRAM was liquidated and a new carrier
with majority private Ivorian ownership, COMARCO,
was set up. COMARCO and other domestic shipping
lines benefited from a reservation of 50 percent of bulk
and refrigerated traffic for the three product groups that
had been handled by SITRAM (bananas and pineapple,
palm oil, wine) until December 1996, when all non-
conference traffic was formally liberalized. These mea-
sures substantially lowered import prices for consumers
and shipping costs for exporters, increasing the compet-
itiveness of Ivorian exports
Box 5.3 Private Involvement in Maritime Transport in Côte d’Ivoire
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Bookmarks. inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing options
pdf reader with bookmarks; how to bookmark a pdf file in acrobat
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim outputFileName 1 to (Page Count - 1). ' Create output PDF
add bookmarks pdf; bookmark pdf reader
149
LOWE RING INFRASTRUC TURE, INFORM ATION, AN D FINANCE  BARRIERS
eration is diverse, ranging from small diesel generators to large hydro
installations. Installed capacity can be varied to suit demand. Thus it is
possible to rely on the market to deliver an efficient industry configura-
tion—provided the transmission sector is capable of switching between
generating plants. If switching capability is limited, competitive disci-
pline is weakened and regulation will be needed to offset this handicap.
In principle, however, power generation offers considerable scope for full
privatization. Cross-border partnership can extend the range of options
outside national boundaries.
Power transmission and distribution networks, on the other hand, are
costly and uneconomic to duplicate. Thus territorial exclusivity is war-
ranted. But public-private partnerships are possible through “competi-
tion for the market,” in which competitors bid for the right to serve a
territory—implying continued public ownership but private service pro-
vision. In a state with a credible rule of law, contracts can blend deci-
sionmaking and control rights that confer the advantages traditionally
associated with ownership.
In addition to financing, partnerships can involve institutional inno-
vation. One promising institutional innovation has been road funds to
improve  road maintenance.  Learning from  mistakes  made  in  earlier
attempts, second-generation road funds are being used to contract out
maintenance and are funded by user charges, normally a fuel levy plus
vehicle licensing fees. The funds are overseen by public-private boards
with broad representation, including road users, with an independent
chairman and subject to external audit. Boards recommend charges to
the legislature. Evidence suggests that users are willing to pay charges if
these go toward efficient road maintenance. Well-managed road funds
can increase private participation in road maintenance and boost the
growth of business.
In Ghana the revenue mobilized for road maintenance doubled in
real terms between 1995 and 1997, and the share of roads rated as good
or fair rose from 41 to 80 percent between 1995 and 1998. Road funds
have also been successful in Zambia. They work best when users can
see that the charges they pay are spent on maintenance, and when gov-
ernance mechanisms ensure that stakeholders have an adequate voice
in management. There  is a  danger,  however,  that  road  funds  will
reduce fiscal flexibility. Thus they should be viewed as a provisional
solution  for  underfunding  of  road  maintenance,  to  eventually  be
replaced by reintegration into a reformed and well-functioning bud-
Well-managed road funds
can increase private
participation in road
maintenance and boost
the growth of business
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing options
add bookmark pdf; convert word pdf bookmarks
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF file by top level bookmarks. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
how to add bookmarks to a pdf; how to add bookmarks to pdf files
150
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
get process or by a commercially operated road agency (Gwilliam and
Shalizi 1999).
Increase  cross-border  and  regional  cooperation.
Regional  cooperation
could also improve the infrastructure linking African states with each
other and with the rest of the world. There are two approaches to
regional cooperation: a program approach and a project approach. A
recent example of the program approach is the Transport Protocol for
Southern African, a promising effort to harmonize transport policies
and procedures in the region. Another is a resolution from a November
1999 conference  of air  transport ministers  in  Yamoussoukro (Côte
d’Ivoire) under which 23 states agreed to liberalize air transport in West
and Central Africa within  two years. The  Yaounde Treaty of 1961
assigns to one company (Air Afrique) the traffic rights of 11 West and
Central African countries and allows national carriers to service only
local  markets.  Schedules  are  inconvenient,  do  not  reflect  market
demand, and are changed for political reasons. Air safety and security
are deficient. Prices are high and services limited—Burkinabe fruit and
vegetable producers could sell more than 10 tons of produce a week to
Gabon but are offered only 3 tons of capacity. And transport and han-
dling charges total as much as 71 percent of costs for products sold on
the Rungis market in Paris. It is hoped that liberalization will increase
competition, lower air transport costs, modernize safety equipment and
navigation systems, and promote tourism and trade. 
An example of the project approach is the initiative to develop the
Maputo Corridor between Mozambique and South Africa, with the full
support of the Southern Africa Development Community. This effort
combines cross-border cooperation with private participation to rehabil-
itate and upgrade transport infrastructure—including roads, rail lines,
ports, and harbors—and promote broad economic development. The
project also aims to streamline border crossings and involves large indus-
trial investments, including a $1.4 billion aluminum smelter and a $2 bil-
lion steel plant using Mozambican gas. The project is an example of
infrastructure leading rather than following growth, the rationale being
that the uncertainties for such a cross-border project would simply be too
great without the public sector taking a lead and, in this case, involving
international organizations as well.
Regional cooperation could significantly cut the cost of power and
water in some countries. By exchanging electricity with its neighbors,
South Africa could save $80 million a year in operating costs. And with
Regional cooperation
could improve the
infrastructure linking
African states with each
other and with the rest
of the world
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
file. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Create fillable PDF document with fields.
create bookmarks pdf; delete bookmarks pdf
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic .NET application.
pdf create bookmarks; creating bookmarks in pdf from word
151
LOWE RING INFRASTRUC TURE, INFORM ATION, AN D FINANCE  BARRIERS
coordinated construction rather than national plans, it could save $700
million in expansion costs over the next 20 years (Sparrow and Masters
1999). Such cooperation requires institutions or agreements that build
trust—users have to abandon costly policies of self-sufficiency, and pro-
ducers have to risk heavy investment for export production. International
organizations and other outside agencies may be able to facilitate such
agreements by providing finance or, just as important, by acting as medi-
ators or guarantors of projects.
A successful example of this approach is the Lesotho Highlands Water
Project, in which South Africa guaranteed repayment of a World Bank
loan used to build a dam in Lesotho that provides water to South Africa.
Another promising approach is the Southern Africa Power Pool, an asso-
ciation of national power companies that meets regularly to coordinate
power system planning, including regional production. Though no new
large regional project has been launched, the power pool is laying the
groundwork. West Africa would benefit from a similar mechanism to
export the natural gas now being flared (see above). Investment in a
pipeline would be needed, but the potential return is high.
Widen access.
Widening access to infrastructure services, especially for
rural residents, requires more resources and more innovative approaches.
Paradoxically, efforts to ensure equal access for rural and urban areas have
often proven counterproductive. Rural residents are generally willing to
pay considerably more than the actual costs for services such as electric-
ity and clean water. Yet attempts to provide services below cost, along
with political pressures not to collect fees, have limited funds for main-
tenance and expansion—creating a vicious circle of poor maintenance
and low payments.
One  promising  way  around  this  is  being  tried  in  Mozambique.
Electricity can be produced from small diesel generators for about $0.18
a kilowatt-hour, excluding capital costs. This is more than twice the aver-
age price of electricity in urban areas, but still well below the $0.25–0.35
a kilowatt-hour that rural users are willing to pay for high-value uses of
electricity. The government has set up utility companies using diesel gen-
erators that have then been sold to private investors below cost (a capital
subsidy) for continued commercial operation. Innovative schemes such
as this could greatly expand access to infrastructure services at modest
public expense while providing incentives for efficient operations and
maintenance—while also providing opportunities for small business to
both provide and use the services.
Widening access to
infrastructure services,
especially for rural
residents, requires more
resources and more
innovative approaches
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. PDF Create.
pdf export bookmarks; how to bookmark a pdf file
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
& rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. Word Create. Create Word from PDF; Create Word
create pdf bookmarks from word; copy pdf bookmarks
152
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Community and  user involvement in infrastructure  construction,
maintenance, and management is the most effective way to improve and
expand infrastructure services in rural areas. Infrastructure projects with
user participation are generally more successful than those without—
especially for rural roads and water supply, where an inability to exploit
economies of scale and lower technical efficiency make implementation
difficult. For example, water systems in Kenya built as part of self-help
efforts proved far more reliable than those installed by the water ministry,
which were hampered by lack of funds, poor organization, and failure to
design according to community needs. 
Many  governments, usually in association  with nongovernmental
organizations or donors, have set up social funds to provide supple-
mentary resources for small community projects. There are many vari-
ants, but most such schemes allow communities to choose projects (for
example, road, water system, or school) and require a substantial com-
munity contribution to construction, maintenance, or both. Such par-
ticipation  increases  efficiency,  strengthens  community ownership  of
projects, ensures transparency and accountability in project planning
and implementation, and empowers the users or beneficiaries of the pro-
ject. To be effective, local participation should incorporate all users of
infrastructure services to ensure that the project meets local require-
ments, uses local materials and technology, and is provided and main-
tained at lower costs. 
Faced with undersupplied and poorly maintained infrastructure ser-
vices, many African governments have taken steps to devolve responsi-
bility for management, especially in sectors with direct local benefits
(water supply, irrigation, rural roads). In water supply, governments are
devolving management and maintenance to water associations, which
ensure that decisions on supply are consistent with the local environment
and the requirements of farmers.
Decentralized planning and local participation requires that commu-
nities be granted greater autonomy and be held accountable, and that
there be functioning channels of coordination. Greater autonomy can
come by making central funds available to implement local priorities in
education, health, welfare, and poverty reduction. Local implementing
agencies should also be given some financial independence in charging
and collecting fees for services. Greater autonomy should be comple-
mented by a system of accountability that enables local governments and
community groups monitor the implementation of projects.
To be effective, local
participation should
incorporate all users of
infrastructure services
153
LOWE RING INFRASTRUC TURE, INFORM ATION, AN D FINANCE  BARRIERS
Exploiting Information and Communications
Technology
I
NTHE EMERGING KNOWLEDGE
-
BASED ECONOMY OF THE
21
ST
CEN
-
tury, information and communications technology will likely assume
an importance that dwarfs other types of infrastructure. This shift
offers Africa a chance to leapfrog intermediate stages of development by
avoiding costly investments in time, resources, and the generation and
use of knowledge. Africa has a chance to benefit not only as a consumer
in the new knowledge economy, but also as a producer. It cannot afford
to miss this opportunity.
Politics and institutions, not technology or economics, are the biggest
hindrance to the development of Africa’s information and communica-
tions technology. Africa’s leaders must have a better understanding of the
benefits of information and communications technology in order to fos-
ter the political, legal, and institutional conditions under which it will
flourish. This involves developing the knowledge to apply the technol-
ogy to local settings, improving relevant infrastructure, promoting equi-
table access, and creating enabling environments for the development
and flow of the necessary content and knowledge. Above all, African gov-
ernments must promote a competitive telecommunications industry and
educate their people in information and communications technology.
Where Do Things Stand?
Broadcast infrastructure.
Broadcast technology, mainly radio, is the dom-
inant mass medium in Africa. In 1996 Africa had more than 104 million
radios, or 19.8 per 100 people, compared with 3.6 televisions and 0.3
personal computers per 100 people (Okigbo 1999). More than three in
five Africans can be reached by radio transmitter networks, while televi-
sion coverage is largely  confined to major  towns.  Most information
resources are widely shared—one copy of a newspaper may be read by
more than 10 people, and there are usually three users per Internet dialup
account. It is not uncommon to find most of a small village crowded
around the only television, which is often powered by a car battery or
small generator. 
Broadcast technology will continue to dominate the region. Thus
African countries must integrate traditional broadcast technology with
new Internet tools in a way that meets social, economic, and political
Politics and institutions
are the biggest hindrance
to the development of
Africa’s information and
communications
technology
154
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
needs. Africa requires both high-tech solutions such as satellites and
low-tech solutions such as wind-up radios and low-cost community
telecenters where poor people can make telephone calls and receive
faxes or email. 
Telecommunications infrastructure.
Telecommunications is a core compo-
nent of the economy, a primary form of infrastructure, and the basis for
the  development  of  the  information  society  (Adam  1998).  The
International Telecommunication Union estimates that in 1998 global
sales of telecommunications equipment and services exceeded $1 tril-
lion—five to six times Africa’s GNP.  Africa has the world’s least developed
information and communications infrastructure, with just 2 percent of
the world’s telephones and fewer than 2 telephones per 100 inhabitants.
On average there is one telephone line for every 200 people—and in Mali,
Niger, and Zaire there is one line for every 1,000 people (Jensen 1999).
Some African countries, however, have made telecommunications a
priority and are installing digital switches with fiber-optic intercity back-
bones and the newest cellular and mobile technology. For example, some
of the world’s most sophisticated national networks are in Botswana and
Rwanda, where 100 percent of the mainlines are digital. 
Mobile cellular telephony has grown rapidly in Africa, from reaching
just 6 countries in the early 1990s to 42 countries serving more than
250,000 customers (excluding 2 million in South Africa). Although cel-
lular phones are expensive, they are the only viable alternative to long
waits for a standard phone—and more than 1 million Africans are on
waiting lists for a phone. Operators provide access mainly in capital cities
but also in some secondary towns and along major trunk routes.
The use of fiber-optic cable for international traffic is still in its infancy
in Africa, and most international connections are carried by satellite.
Although it is improving, Africa’s terrestrial network is still analog in some
countries and prone to faults caused by changing weather and poor main-
tenance. But the low base of the infrastructure is a blessing for the instal-
lation of digital circuits. In 1996 the portion of digital lines in Africa was
69 percent—close to the world average of 79 percent. Overall, however,
the region averaged 116 faults a year per 100 lines, compared with a world
average of 22 and a high-income country level of 7. 
Although  telecommunications  infrastructure  is  spreading,  few
Africans can afford their own telephone. In 1996 the average business
connection cost $112 to install, $6 a month to rent, and $0.11 for a three-
minute local call. But installation charges were above $200 in some coun-
Although
telecommunications
infrastructure is
spreading, few Africans
can afford their own
telephone
155
LOWE RING INFRASTRUC TURE, INFORM ATION, AN D FINANCE  BARRIERS
tries (Benin, Mauritania, Nigeria, Togo), line rentals ranged from $0.80
to $20 a month, and call charges varied from $0.60 an hour to more than
$5 an hour. The cost of renting a connection averaged almost 20 percent
of 1995 GDP per capita, compared with a world average of 9 percent and
an average for high-income countries of just 1 percent.
There is a strong correlation between the liberalization of telecom-
munications, increased access, and lower costs. In Africa liberalization has
promoted a bottom-up approach in the form of short-term, low-risk
investment in cellular services, trunk radio technology, very small aper-
ture terminals  (VSATs),  and  other value added services (such  as the
Internet). 
The need for universal service and increasingly complex technical
standards, interconnectivity arrangements, and traffic and frequency
management and monitoring have created pressure for better telecom-
munications regulation. For example, the proliferation of broadcast and
communication applications has made radio spectrum scarce in Africa.
New policies are required to develop national information systems and
harmonize national and international frequency plans (Struzak 1997).
Many African governments have created regulatory bodies, drafted
legislation, and sought technical assistance for telecommunications. But
getting down to business has often been difficult. Some countries have
established regulatory bodies simply to meet World Trade Organization
or World Bank requirements. These bodies vary considerably in terms of
scope, design, function, staffing, and separation from the parent ministry.
Improving information and communications infrastructure, especially in
deploying the Internet in rural areas, will require better training and
equipment of these entities.
Internet infrastructure.
Internet growth has been phenomenal in Africa,
with the number of countries with access jumping from 4 in 1995 to 50
in 1999 (including North Africa). Similarly, Internet hosts grew from 316
in 1995 to 10,703 in January 1999. Although these numbers are impres-
sive, access is unequal both between and within countries. Access is largely
confined to capital cities, though a growing number of countries have
providers in some secondary towns. 
There is also a rapidly growing interest in kiosks, cybercafes, and other
sites for public Internet access (schools, police stations, clinics) that can
share the cost of equipment and access among many users. Many phone
shops are adding Internet access to their services—even in remote towns
where reaching the nearest dialup access point requires a long-distance
Improving information
and communications
infrastructure will require
better training and
equipment
156
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
call. In addition, a growing number of hotels and business centers are
providing Internet access.
The cost of Internet access is a substantial barrier to its growth in the
region. Charges vary between $10 and $100 a month. The average
monthly cost of using a local dialup account for five hours is $60
(including  usage  fees  and  telephone  time,  but  not  telephone  line
rental). Twenty hours of Internet access costs $29 a month or less in the
United States. Although European costs are higher than U.S. levels,
most are far lower than African charges for comparable use. Moreover,
industrial countries  have  per  capita  incomes at  least  20 times  the
African average.
Competition could cut Africa’s costs dramatically. Most African cap-
itals now have more than one Internet service provider, and there are
more than 400 public providers across the region. Yet 20 countries have
just one provider, most of which are run by public telephone operators.
Other challenges include low-bandwidth access to international gate-
ways, inadequate cooperation among local providers, poor strategies for
managing domain names and Internet protocol (IP) addresses, insuffi-
cient regional cooperation, and the lack of a regional Internet back-
bone.
Still, the greatest challenge for Africa’s Internet connectivity is not
access but content. A recent survey found that Africa generates just 0.4
percent of global content. And when South Africa is excluded, Africa gen-
erates a paltry 0.02 percent. It is difficult to categorize content on Africa
into meaningful subject areas. But a large portion can be broadly classi-
fied as business information—about institutional activities, products and
services, and news. There is a dearth of scientific and technological infor-
mation on Africa, from Africa.
Applications for Social and Economic Development
Despite the limitations, many Africans have embraced information
and communications technology. Electronic mail, for example, has been
adopted  by  almost  every  agency  with  international  communication
needs. Similarly, the Internet has become a cheap and effective means of
exchanging information on and marketing African businesses, including
for selling distinctive products abroad. 
More than 6,000 correspondence course students all over Africa can
now use email and the World Wide Web to obtain advice and reading
The greatest challenge
for Africa’s Internet
connectivity is not
access but content
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested