save pdf in folder c# : Create pdf bookmarks from word control Library system web page .net windows console canafricaclaim17-part921

157
LOWE RING INFRASTRUC TURE, INFORM ATION, AN D FINANCE  BARRIERS
materials from their tutors at the University of South Africa. The uni-
versity offers its tens of thousands of students in South Africa electronic
registration, downloading  of  study  materials,  and  posting  of  exam
results. Farmers are also starting to realize the benefits of information
and communications technology. They have begun to search for the lat-
est market quotations to negotiate better local prices for their crops, and
many are exploring new avenues for international trade. A Kenyan
farming cooperative has established a relationship with the U.S.-based
Earth Marketplace to sell local produce directly to North American
consumers, bypassing distributors. Independent newspapers and mag-
azines in more than 40 African countries are now published on the Web,
allowing remote users to obtain the latest news and analysis without
waiting days or weeks for postal deliveries.
The potential of information and communications technology for social
and economic development is demonstrated by school networks in the
Eastern Cape in South Africa and by a regional network for exchanging
information on malaria outbreaks operating from South Africa’s University
of Durban. To date these initiatives have been carried out as experiments,
without sufficient human resources and tools. But access to information
could stimulate change and create learning environments more meaning-
ful and responsive to the localized and specific needs of learners. Teachers
and learners could obtain material using new technology, transforming
education and enabling people to develop new skills. The African Virtual
University now brings top-quality scientific training and online reference
materials to 13 countries in Africa. But the potential for dramatically boost-
ing Africa’s access to education and knowledge has barely been tapped.
Unlike earlier broadcast media, interactive information and com-
munications technology can empower people. Such technology could,
for example, play a decisive role in developing human capacity for food
security in Africa, by providing people with the knowledge and skills
they need to put agricultural science and production inputs to best use.
Information  and  communications  technology  could  also  improve
health care. Many of the problems in Africa’s health sector stem from a
lack of information. Information and communications technology could
provide health workers with rapid information exchange, conferencing,
and distance learning, as well as immediate access to advice and diagnos-
tic assistance (chapter 4). In Mozambique, for example, the Faculty of
Medicine in Maputo is developing a local teleconsultation service that
transfers images to doctors in other hospitals.
Though some projects
show promise, the
potential for dramatically
boosting Africa’s access
to education and
knowledge has barely
been tapped
Create pdf bookmarks from word - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
bookmarks in pdf; how to create bookmark in pdf with
Create pdf bookmarks from word - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
add bookmarks to pdf; bookmarks in pdf reader
159
LOWE RING INFRASTRUC TURE, INFORM ATION, AN D FINANCE  BARRIERS
should favor competition, not monopoly, and promote private rather
than  public  investment. In addition, policymakers should assess the
demand for new technology and set clear objectives. The need for a bet-
ter quality of life and equality of access makes universal service a manda-
tory objective.
A growing number of countries—Mauritius, South Africa, Uganda—
have created universal service funds to which telecommunications oper-
ators contribute a small percentage of their revenues (0.16 percent in
South Africa). The funds are then used to finance rural infrastructure
development. Other countries use the license fees from telecommunica-
tions  operators  to  finance  rural  telecommunications  projects.  In
Botswana  the  government  ensures  that  rural  villages  have  access  to
telecommunications services by contracting the operator to build the nec-
essary infrastructure.
Many policy issues could be tackled by developing clear and coordi-
nated policies and guidelines through broad national participation, inter-
national consultation, and within regional and subregional discussions of
national information and communications infrastructure plans. Such
plans are in place in more than half of African countries. By themselves,
however, these national strategies are no panacea. Increased government
commitment and action, improved capacity of regulators to evaluate new
technologies and projects, and innovative applications are just as essen-
tial. Policies should not only improve the governance of information and
communications technology, but also use information and communica-
tions technology to improve governance. 
Foster indigenous capacity and research.
Africa will have trouble par-
ticipating in the global information economy unless it increases the
generation and flow of knowledge. Beyond building basic skills such
as reading, writing, communications, and teamwork, Africa requires
trained people—especially young people who  can use technology,
choose technology, and develop local applications. Making the next
generation literate in information and communications technology
will require progress in education, especially in integrating technol-
ogy into primary and secondary schools through networking pro-
grams. It will require enhancing the capacity of African universities
to apply new technology for research, teaching, and learning. And it
will require creating opportunities for lifelong learning through com-
munity centers  and  school  and  university  networks  that promote
equal access for all.
Africa will have trouble
participating in the
global information
economy unless it
increases the
generation and flow of
knowledge
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines Valid value for each index: 1 to (Page Count - 1). ' Create output PDF file path
create bookmark in pdf automatically; bookmarks in pdf files
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing options
bookmark template pdf; excel print to pdf with bookmarks
160
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Enhance  national,  regional,  and  international  cooperation  and  partnerships.
Given Africa’s small markets, regional and international collaboration is
key for achieving the economies of scale needed to lower costs and attract
sufficient  private  investment. Countries  must collaborate  to  develop
strong system backbones and to share resources and knowledge on infor-
mation and communications infrastructure. Regional and national col-
laboration that leads to the bulk purchasing of capacity, capacity-building
initiatives,  and  innovative  financing  arrangements—public  offerings,
build-operate-transfer agreements, joint ventures, bond sales to users—
could also help achieve economies of scale and lower costs. 
Some efforts have already been made. The Regional African Satellite
Communications initiative, which plans to launch Africa-based satellite
systems, has provided incentives for regional cooperation. In 1998 com-
munications ministers from more than 15 African countries agreed to
support an information and communications infrastructure known as the
Africa  Connection,  and  development  efforts  are  under  way  by  the
Southern Africa Development Community, the Common Market for
Eastern and Southern Africa, and the Economic Community of West
African States. Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda (together known as the East
African Community) have launched a multimillion-dollar telecommu-
nications backbone project to improve access to advanced and reliable
communications. Regional cooperation could also help resolve common
issues such as Internet governance and encourage the creation of eco-
nomic communities. 
Developing a Robust Financial Sector
A
WELL
-
FUNCTIONINGFINANCIAL SYSTEM ISESSENTIAL FOR DEVEL
-
opment. It should be able to mobilize foreign and domestic
resources and channel them to high-return investments, inter-
mediate between savers and investors to reduce and allocate risk, and pro-
vide  broad  access  to  financial  services,  including  for  people  on  the
margins of the economy. In so doing, finance facilitates competition,
market integration, broadly based growth, and poverty reduction.
The quantity, quality, cost, and accessibility of finance are as impor-
tant to development as those of more traditional forms of infrastruc-
ture. In addition, the financial sector performs a crucial function that
Regional and
international
collaboration is key for
achieving the economies
of scale needed to lower
costs and attract private
investment in information
and communications
technology…
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc.
creating bookmarks in pdf documents; bookmark pdf documents
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
& rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. Word Create. Create Word from PDF; Create Word
adding bookmarks to a pdf; add bookmarks to pdf reader
161
LOWE RING INFRASTRUC TURE, INFORM ATION, AN D FINANCE  BARRIERS
has no direct parallel with physical infrastructure—it provides a chan-
nel for macroeconomic policy, as an instrument for stabilization and
growth. 
How effective is the financial sector in promoting African develop-
ment? Despite numerous reforms, not very. South Africa has one of the
deepest, most sophisticated financial sectors outside OECD countries,
and a few other African countries—Kenya, Mauritius, Zimbabwe—have
relatively developed systems. But most of the region’s financial systems
are weak. Limited savings are mobilized from domestic or foreign sources.
Credit to the private sector is modest and often costly. Financial sectors
are dominated by banks providing a small range of services. 
Harnessing finance for development will be a long process in Africa.
Progress will require financial  sector development as well as  financial
reform. Indeed, most African countries have introduced market-based
reforms, but post-liberalization problems need to be addressed. Increased
access to financial services is essential, and will require making borrowers
more creditworthy  (rather  than  lowering  standards  for  formal  sector
credit),  developing nonbank  financial institutions (leasing companies,
mutual funds, insurance companies), and strengthening links between for-
mal and informal financial systems. These efforts will improve quality and
access to services and increase competition. Financial sector governance—
regulation and supervision, transparency, contract enforcement—will also
require sustained attention. Given the small size and limited diversity of
many African economies, a regional approach to financial sector develop-
ment will be needed to increase competition, cut costs, and lower risks.
Financial Sector Reforms and Their Legacies 
After independence most African governments intervened heavily in
the financial sector, nationalizing private banks, creating new state banks
and nonbank financial institutions, setting interest rates for savings and
lending, restricting the allocation of credit, and limiting external capital
transactions. These policies were intended to increase savings and direct
them to areas of high economic and social priority. The methods used
were broadly in line with the development thinking of the time, and in
many cases were supported (or at least not opposed) by international
financial institutions and bilateral donors.
By  the  late  1980s,  however,  it  became  widely  apparent  that  this
approach was not working. Repressed financial systems failed to mobilize
…just as a regional
approach to financial
sector development will
be needed to increase
competition, cut costs,
and lower risks
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
& rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word (docx, doc
adding bookmarks in pdf; split pdf by bookmark
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc.
how to bookmark a page in pdf document; editing bookmarks in pdf
162
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
capital or steer investment to areas of growth, and the solvency and
capacity of financial institutions were undermined. Controls encour-
aged politically motivated loans and corruption and diverted funds from
intended purposes. Nonperforming loans increased alarmingly in many
African countries, and a lack of sound savings alternatives contributed
to capital flight. 
Financial sector reforms introduced in the 1990s tried to correct these
problems. While the scope and pace of reforms differed across countries,
they were based on two pillars: liberalization and balance sheet restruc-
turing. Most reforms liberalized interest rates and removed ceilings and
other controls on credit allocation. Though the details varied, the out-
comes were  similar (Soyibo  1997).  Thus  even  though  Ghana  lifted
restrictions on lending much faster than did Tanzania, interest rates fol-
lowed the same pattern (Nissanke and Aryeetey 1998). 
Weak standards for capital adequacy, lending, and accounting had led
to excessive concentrations of risk, unrecognized loan losses, and inflated
profit reports (Popiel 1994). Thus balance sheet restructuring and recap-
italization of state banks were often among the first steps of reform. But
as disillusionment with the results set in, efforts were directed toward
increasing private participation in banks. Privatization of financial insti-
tutions  usually  began  with  governments  seeking  strategic  buyers  to
assume majority ownership of large commercial banks. This approach
was only partly successful: some publicly owned banks were divested, but
in many cases the state remains dominant.
Other institutional reforms have been introduced in recent years.
Licenses have increasingly been granted to new private banks—includ-
ing foreign banks—and nonbank financial institutions, and efforts have
been made to improve regulation and supervision. Stock markets have
opened up in several countries. And an increasing range of nongovern-
mental organizations and other agents have entered the semiformal or
microfinance  sectors.  But while  many  countries  now  have  stronger
financial systems, reforms have often been less successful than expected. 
Costlier credit and wider spreads.
Reform programs anticipated an initial
increase in the spread between lending and deposit rates. But, more than
a decade after reforms were started, the spread continues to widen in
many countries, sometimes to high levels (table 5.4). And since liberal-
ization, many financial systems have seen high real interest rates. 
Little financial deepening.
Liberalization was expected to encourage finan-
cial deepening, with a positive effect on savings mobilization and credit
While many countries
now have stronger
financial systems,
reforms have often been
less successful than
expected
163
LOWE RING INFRASTRUC TURE, INFORM ATION, AN D FINANCE  BARRIERS
allocation. But for the most part ratios of money and credit to GDP have
not increased since reforms. On both indicators, most African countries
continue to lag behind their Asian comparators. In many countries banks
have reduced commercial lending (including in rural areas) in favor of
holding government securities. 
Continued distress and limited competition.
Governments are still reluctant
to close distressed state banks. At the same time, small, undercapitalized
institutions have mushroomed since liberalization. Many of these new
institutions are not only weak, they have also failed to trigger competi-
tion in the banking sector. As a result market segmentation has emerged
between foreign and domestic banks, solvent large private and public
banks, and small private banks. 
Limited development of money markets and capital markets.
In some cases
access to cheap credit through central bank discount facilities has made
interbank borrowing and lending less attractive. In other cases issues
of large quantities of high-yielding bills to meet fiscal requirements
Table 5.4 Inflation, Interest Rate Spreads, and Real Interest Rates in Africa and Asia, 1980–97 (percent)
Interest rate spread
Inflation
(lending rate minus deposit rate)
Country
1980
1990
1997
1980
1990
1997
Benin
3.5
8.3
9.0
Botswana
13.6
11.4
8.6
3.5
1.8
4.8
5.0
Cameroon
9.6
1.1
1.5
5.5
11.0
17.0
18.8
Côte d'Ivoire
14.7
–0.8
4.0
8.3
9.0
Ethiopia
4.5
5.2
–3.7
3.6
3.5
7.1
Ghana
50.1
37.3
27.9
7.5
Kenya
13.9
15.6
12.0
4.8
5.1
13.5
12.8
Malawi
11.8
9.1
8.8
8.9
18.0
13.0
Mozambique
47.0
5.5
Nigeria
10.0
7.4
8.2
3.2
5.5
13.1
8.9
Senegal
8.7
0.3
1.8
8.3
9.0
South Africa
13.9
14.4
8.6
4.0
2.1
4.6
11.2
Tanzania
30.2
35.8
16.1
7.5
21.4
8.3
Uganda
33.1
6.9
4.0
7.4
9.5
16.8
Zambia
107.0
24.8
2.5
9.5
12.2
16.5
Zimbabwe
5.4
17.4
18.7
14.0
2.9
13.9
14.2
Bangladesh
6.1
5.2
3.1
4.0
5.9
12.9
India
11.4
9.0
7.2
7.8
Malaysia
6.7
2.6
2.7
1.5
1.3
1.8
6.0
Philippines
18.2
13.2
5.9
1.8
4.6
6.1
9.7
Source:World Bank 1999.
Governments are still
reluctant to close
distressed state banks
Real
interest rate,
1997
164
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
have deterred other capital market issues. Though Africa has about a
dozen stock markets, several of which opened in the 1990s, their mere
existence is inconsequential for economic growth and investment if
there are few opportunities for sharing risk, trading shares, and pro-
viding liquidity. Except in South Africa, the region’s stock markets are
by far the smallest of any region, both in the number of listed compa-
nies and in market capitalization. They are also highly illiquid, which
seriously constrains their ability to contribute to economic growth
(Senbet 1997). 
Why Have Reforms Been Disappointing?
A number of explanations have been offered for the lackluster results
of financial reforms.
Incorrect sequencing.
Financial  reform  has  often  preceded macroeco-
nomic  stabilization. In  particular,  interest  rates were  often liberalized
before fiscal deficits were brought under control. When that happens,
higher interest rates can increase government debt, crowd out private
credit, and contribute to further macroeconomic imbalances—as well as
reduce incentives for banks to seek out new clients. Domestic public debt
has reached high levels in a number of countries, including Cape Verde,
Ghana, Kenya, and Zimbabwe. In Nigeria unstable political and eco-
nomic conditions led to the collapse of the financial system, necessitating
policy reversals that undermined credibility (Soyibo 1996). 
Incomplete reforms.
Continued poor financial performance has reflected
a lack of progress on some reforms (World Bank 1994a). Financial sys-
tems have still been used to finance public activities. Restructuring bal-
ance  sheets  and  recapitalizing  banks  were  not  sufficient  to  change
behavior; that would only happen if banks were no longer publicly owned
and pressured to lend to loss-making public enterprises. 
Weak institutions.
To be fully effective, financial liberalization requires a
number of prerequisites (World Bank 1994b). In addition to a stable
macroeconomy and adequate regulation and supervision, there must be
reasonably sophisticated and solvent banking institutions operating in
contestable financial markets. Few African countries satisfied these con-
ditions prior to liberalization and deregulation, limiting the possibility of
rapid gains. 
A focus on national systems.
Except in the West African monetary zones,
reforms have focused on small national systems. These offer little scope
Financial reforms have
built on weak institutions
and have often been
poorly sequenced
165
LOWE RING INFRASTRUC TURE, INFORM ATION, AN D FINANCE  BARRIERS
for competition, economies of scale, or diversification of risk, particularly
given the dependence of most African countries on a few primary prod-
ucts with variable prices.
Macroeconomic risks.
Macroeconomic risks reflect poor coordination
between fiscal and monetary policy. If tight monetary policy is main-
tained in the face of loose fiscal policy, interest rates will likely rise to
unhealthy levels, and banks will retreat from developing new business in
favor of holding public debt. Inconsistent policies (including overvalued
exchange rates) and external shocks also contribute to uncertainty, again
raising interest rates. High perceived macroeconomic risks can be inferred
from the short-term maturities at which most African governments bor-
row. In some African countries these risks have been estimated to raise
government borrowing costs by 6 percentage points.
Market risks.
Market risks arise from capital market inefficiencies such
as a lack of liquidity or severe interest rate volatility. For example, lack of
a secondary market for treasury bills restricts liquidity and raises risks and
the costs of borrowing. Poor liquidity management by governments is
estimated to have added 0.5–3.0 percentage points to short-term bor-
rowing costs in many African countries.
Microeconomic risks.
Microeconomic risks are also affected by govern-
ment policy, but tend to have a greater impact on capital costs for the pri-
vate  sector.  The  accuracy  and  reliability  of  financial  information,
including company accounts, affect the cost of capital, particularly in
equity markets. A legal system that does not enforce financial contracts
in a timely manner will reduce the supply of capital, increase its cost, and
limit access to finance. A payments system that does not permit rapid and
reliable transfer of funds for settlement of financial contracts will increase
the cost of capital. A system for title transfer that is untimely or insecure
will increase the cost of capital raised through debt securities by reducing
transactional liquidity in the secondary market or by causing a risk pre-
mium to be built into secondary market rates.
To these risks should be added the risk entailed in lack of diversifica-
tion in small markets, along with the higher costs of supervision and other
overhead that raise the cost of capital. Lowering the cost of capital is not
a simple matter of stabilization or a few macroeconomic or financial pol-
icy reforms. Rather, financial reform and development is a long process
involving the development of trust and policy credibility, complex insti-
tutions, and complicated governance procedures within a framework of
economic and financial integration (Wilton 1999).
Financial reform and
development is a long
process involving the
development of trust and
policy credibility, complex
institutions, and
complicated governance
procedures
166
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
The Way Forward
Africa’s financial systems face many challenges. The financial side of
macroeconomic policy still requires strengthening—including by setting
appropriate fiscal deficits, taking into account the arrangements for their
financing. To a large extent, well-working financial markets are the result
of sound government policy and its day to day operations. Money market
development, for example, depends on such mundane factors as whether
treasury bills are issued daily or weekly, and how these funding operations
are coordinated with the central bank. Some priorities for financial sector
development can be summarized in light of the preceding discussion.
Improve access to financial services.
Increasing access to basic financial ser-
vices—particularly savings facilities—is a major issue in Africa, where
most people do not have access to the formal financial sector. As noted,
the number of bankable clients should be increased by using innovative
approaches rather than by lowering prudential standards and so increas-
ing financial instability. One encouraging recent development has been
the expansion of commercial microfinance institutions that serve the eco-
nomically  active  poor  (Robinson  forthcoming).  Leading  examples
include Bolivia’s BancoSol and Bank Rakyat Indonesia.
The  Kenya  Rural  Enterprise  Programme,  which  is  modeled  on
BancoSol,  is Africa’s best-known  example.  Commercial  microfinance
institutions  typically offer savings  and credit services on commercial
terms to economically active households and enterprises that are too small
to be served by large commercial banks. Well-structured commercial
microfinance institutions have managed to sustain high loan recovery
rates, cover costs, and make profits. Their lending rates are higher than
those of commercial banks but lower than those of informal moneylen-
ders, who are the main alternatives for their customers. 
The growing financing needs of small borrowers can also be met by
developing closer links between the formal and informal financial sectors.
Such links can enable banks to lower the costs of information as well as
develop  innovative,  community-based  contract  enforcement  mecha-
nisms. In Ghana, for example, there is potential for linking informal sav-
ings collectors (susu) to commercial banks in a way that increases the
portion of susu savers with access to susu credit (Aryeetey and Steel 1995).
Such links, where formal institutions mobilize deposits and allocate credit
through informal and microfinance agents, could be encouraged by fis-
cal policies and regulation and supervision systems.
Commercial microfinance
institutions that serve
the economically active
poor are an encouraging
recent development
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested