167
LOWE RING INFRASTRUC TURE, INFORM ATION, AN D FINANCE  BARRIERS
To share risk, informal and semiformal financial agents must be cred-
ible. Because it is difficult to regulate and supervise such agents, they
should be given incentives for increasing formalization through stronger
links with the formal sector. A possible approach is to develop rural bank-
ing based on cooperative arrangements that allow banks to regulate infor-
mal and semiformal lenders (Aryeetey 1997).
Strengthen financial sector governance.
In many countries improving con-
tract enforcement, transparency, payments systems, and other micro and
institutional aspects of the financial system is a higher priority than fur-
ther liberalization. While regulation and supervision have improved in
some countries, further improvements will require, among other things,
paying competitive salaries for skills that are in high demand in the pri-
vate sector and outside Africa.
There is also a long way to go in ensuring that regulators are truly inde-
pendent. External links may enhance independence and offer economies
of scale. For example, regional supervisory agencies might be more cred-
ible than national ones. But accounting standards, disclosure require-
ments, and contract law will all require sustained attention to ensure the
integrity and credibility of financial institutions. The issues involved in
creating proper incentives for financial sector development go beyond
financial institutions to much broader issues of governance, such as judi-
cial independence. Without a political commitment to good governance,
financial sector development will be difficult whatever the level of tech-
nical expertise in the sector.
Develop nonbank financial institutions.
As noted, Africa’s financial sectors are
dominated by commercial banks. More emphasis needs to be placed on
developing nonbank financial institutions, including those offering con-
tractual savings and leasing services, as well as equity and debt markets.
These can promote competition in different segments of the market. Africa’s
young and growing population suggests potential for contractual savings
institutions such as pension funds and insurance companies, but in many
countries this area of finance is underdeveloped and provides few attractive
options to potential clients. Capital markets improve risk management,
offer opportunities for price discovery, bolster corporate governance, and
create possibilities for privatization and can be stimulated by it (Aryeetey
and Senbet 1999; box 5.4). While a portfolio in any one African country
might be risky, rates of return for groups of countries are far less volatile. 
Pursue a regional approach to financial sector development.
As noted, most
African financial sectors are small, and most economies depend on a
Accounting standards,
disclosure requirements,
and contract law will
require sustained
attention to ensure the
integrity and credibility of
financial institutions
Pdf export bookmarks - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
add bookmarks to pdf online; add bookmarks to pdf
Pdf export bookmarks - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
creating bookmarks pdf; convert word pdf bookmarks
168
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
few primary products. A few large firms may represent a dispropor-
tionate share of the bankable demand for credit, and a few major banks
may saturate the market, reducing the potential for competition and
lowering incentives to develop new clients. In many countries, even
well-intentioned efforts to strengthen national institutions will have a
hard time overcoming these obstacles.
A regional approach offers many advantages. It enables institutions to
operate over a wider area and diversify risk, and it offers potential for
greater competition and economies of scale—especially important for
spreading the high fixed costs of institutions such as stock markets and
bank supervision agencies. But in the presence of capital controls and
without a common currency, there are limits to what can be done region-
ally. And even with free movement of capital and a common currency,
financial development will not occur unless other policies are in place. In
the CFA zone during the 1980s, for example, banking systems were used
to avoid the fiscal rigor required by the monetary union, leading to the
buildup of arrears by public enterprises and subsequent financial distress.
But a number of cross-border activities can be developed on a regional
basis, including banking, bank supervision, and stock markets.
The basic building blocks for cross-border banking are improving and
harmonizing  commercial  and  financial  law,  contract  enforcement,
accounting standards, and prudential supervision. A number of regional
organizations—the  Southern  Africa  Development  Community,  the
Central Bank of West African States, the Macroeconomic and Financial
Management Institute of Eastern and Southern Africa—are working at
the political and technical levels to improve and harmonize regional stan-
C
APITALMARKETS HAVE BEENAN IMPORTANTVEHICLE
for privatization in countries such as Chile and have,
in turn, been stimulated by new issues stemming from
divestiture. In Africa transactions such as the privati-
zation of Kenya Airways and of major utilities also have
potential for stimulating capital market development,
deepening markets by increasing the supply of major
listed companies. This is particularly welcome given
the thinness of Africa’s stock markets.
Capital market–based privatization also offers less
obvious benefits. These markets can provide a moni-
toring mechanism  to  curtail inefficiencies resulting
from mismanagement. They increase the likelihood
that enterprises will be fairly priced and so can help
depoliticize privatization. And privatization through
local capital markets allows for local investor participa-
tion, diversifying ownership of the economy’s resources
and contributing to the credibility of privatization.
Box 5.4 Privatization Based on Capital Markets
Africa’s young and
growing population
suggests potential for
contractual savings
institutions such as
pension funds and
insurance companies
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
document file. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview
how to create bookmark in pdf automatically; create bookmark pdf
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF file by top level bookmarks. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
how to bookmark a pdf file; bookmark pdf acrobat
169
LOWE RING INFRASTRUC TURE, INFORM ATION, AN D FINANCE  BARRIERS
dards. Well-capitalized regional and international financial institutions
are increasingly recognized as a means of providing a base of institutions
with the ability to diversify risks within their aggregate balance sheet, and
it is notable that Africa already has the highest penetration by foreign
banks of any region.
Foreign banks have provided stability, know-how, and a range of ser-
vices to African financial systems. But the marginal returns to further for-
eign entry may be lower than elsewhere. And if finance is confined to small
countries, foreign entry will not solve the problem of banking concentra-
tion. In the next phase of financial sector development, greater gains may
come from improving incentives and transparency in local markets and
aligning policies and regulation to facilitate regional banking. 
More broadly, pooling resources for regional capital market develop-
ment would enhance the potential for mobilizing local and international
finance for regional companies, while injecting more liquidity into the
markets (Senbet 1998). Among the potential vehicles for financial inte-
gration are regional securities and exchange commissions, regional self-
regulating organizations, regional committees to harmonize legal and
regulatory systems, and coordinated monetary arrangements. Tax treat-
ment of investments must be reviewed with a view to harmonization,
because tax policy is an important incentive or disincentive for both
issuers and  investors.  Clearance,  settlement,  and  depository systems,
along with regulation and accounting standards, should conform to inter-
national standards.
This discussion of regionalization is not taking place in a vacuum.
Initiatives have already developed mechanisms for regional capital mar-
kets,  anchored around the  Abidjan  (Côte d’Ivoire)  Stock  Exchange.
There are also proposals in Southern Africa for developing stronger links
between  the Johannesburg  (South  Africa) exchange  and  the  smaller
exchanges of Botswana, Namibia, Swaziland, and Zimbabwe (Aryeetey
and Senbet 1999). These efforts at regional capital market integration are
positive examples for the rest of the region.
Pooling resources for
regional capital market
development would
enhance the potential for
mobilizing local and
international finance
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Demo Code in VB.NET. The following VB.NET codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
bookmarks in pdf from word; pdf bookmark
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
NET framework. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. C# class demo
how to add bookmarks on pdf; create pdf bookmarks from word
170
Spurring Agricultural and
Rural Development
C
ENTURIES OF POOR POLICIES AND INSTITUTIONAL FAIL
-
ures are the primary cause of Africa’s undercapitalized
and  uncompetitive  agriculture.  Adverse  resource
endowments have also had some direct effects, as well
as indirect effects through their influence on policy.
The lack of a prolonged period of favorable incentives,
rural  public  investments,  and  institutional  supports  has  limited  the
opportunities for African farmers and agroindustrialists.
As a result the potential of African agriculture remains latent—good
reason for optimism. Indeed, modest policy improvements in the 1980s
and 1990s triggered a significant response. Thus persistent and compre-
hensive improvements in policies, institutions, and public and private
investment could accelerate agricultural and rural growth to levels that
would help reduce rural poverty.
Indeed, the undercapitalization of agriculture will have to be addressed
if Africa is to feed itself, compete in world markets, and reduce rural
poverty. As the main source of rural livelihoods, agriculture dominates
many African economies, accounting for about 35 percent of the region’s
GDP, 70 percent of employment, and 40 percent of exports (World Bank
1997a). 
One often overlooked contribution of agriculture is the strength of
backward and forward linkages within agriculture and with other sectors
of the economy. Recent evidence from Africa suggests that the added
growth and rural income from such linkages, especially from increases in
farm incomes, has been underestimated (Delgado, Hopkins, and Kelly
1998).
1
Moreover, these linkages generally become stronger with devel-
opment  (Vogel  1994)  and  drive  agriculture-led  industrialization
(Adelman 1984). 
C
HA P T E R
6
Comprehensive
improvements in policies,
institutions, and
investment could
accelerate agricultural
and rural growth to levels
that would help reduce
rural poverty
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Export PDF images to HTML images. The HTML document file, converted by C#.NET PDF to HTML SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and font
delete bookmarks pdf; how to add bookmarks to pdf document
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
document. OutLines. This class describes bookmarks in a PDF document. Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>. All Rights Reserved.
how to bookmark a pdf document; create pdf bookmarks online
172
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
labor is much greater than the marginal product (Delgado and Ranade
1987). Africa’s agricultural capital stock per hectare of agricultural land
in 1988–92 was about one-sixth of that in Asia and less than one-quar-
ter of that in Latin America (UNCTAD 1998).
Undercapitalization is associated with the lack of competitiveness of
African products in world markets. And this position is made worse by
high transactions costs (Ahmed and Rustagi 1987; Jaffee and Morton
1995), inadequate market infrastructure (Hayami and Platteau 1997),
weak institutions and support services (Eicher 1999), inadequate diver-
sification, and limited vertical integration (Delgado 1998b). As a result
Table 6.1 Agricultural Indicators for Africa, Asia, and Latin America
Indicator
Africa
Asia
Latin America
Agricultural GDP (millions of dollars), 1997
62,367
400,105
143,186
Agriculture/GDP (percent), 1995
30
25
10
Labor force/agriculture (percent), 1995
70
72
29
Agriculture/exports (percent), 1995
40
18
30
Agricultural production index (1961–64 = 100)
1965–69
113
115
115
1975–79
135
154
153
1985–89
166
230
200
1995–98
221
338
253
Agricultural production per capita index (1961–64 = 100)
1965–69
100
103
102
1975–79
92
110
106
1985–89
84
135
112
1995–98
87
169
120
Cereal yields (kilograms per hectare), 1994 
1,230
2,943
2,477
Cereal output per capita (kilograms), 1993–96
133
285
256
Agricultural land/labor (hectares per worker), 1994
5.9
1.3
24.8
Fertilizer/arable land (kilograms per hectares of arable land), 1993–96 
15
180
75
Irrigated area/arable land (percent), 1994
6.6
33.3
9.2
Tractors/arable land (number per 1,000 hectares), 1994
290
804
1,165
Road density (kilometers of road per square kilometer), 1995
0.06
0.37
0.16
Paved roads (percentage of total roads), 1995
15
29
25
Population density (people per square kilometer), 1995
25
146
24
Rural nonfarm income/total rural income (percent)
42
32
40
Nonagricultural/agricultural value added per worker, 1980–90
7.8
3.6
2.5
Source:World Bank 1997a, 1999a, 1999c; FAOSTAT 2000; UNCTAD 1998; Hayami and Platteau 1997; Reardon and others 1998; Larson
and Mundlak 1997.
SPURRIN G AGRIC ULTURAL AN D RURAL D EVE LOPM ENT
African agriculture has been steadily marginalized in world trade (Ng and
Yeats 1996). What caused these factors to occur?
History and Policy
African agriculture has been plagued by centuries of poor policies and
institutional failures—and a record of heavy extraction and heavy taxation
of rural areas (box 6.1). Although there were policy improvements between
the mid-1950s and the late 1960s, these were temporary. Subsequent pol-
icy distortions—in the form of overvalued exchange rates and inward-look-
ing  industrialization  policies—reversed  the  gains,  particularly  in  crop
exports.
Over the past few centuries private individuals and groups have had
few opportunities to engage in free, competitive trade and investment
in agriculture and agroindustry. Farmers have had little incentive to
invest in cash or in kind in their farms and natural resources. There has
been no extended period of active public investment for agricultural and
rural development—and the  programs that  were implemented have 
suffered from severe public sector bias and excessive centralization. In
most countries local populations have not been able to use local tax bases
for their development—because tax bases were assigned, by design or
default, to colonial or central governments or to monopolistic private or
Figure 6.1  Africa's Share of World Trade for Its Main Export Crops, 1970 and 1997
Percent
Source: FAOSTAT 2000.
Cocoa
Groundnuts
Coffee
Cotton
Tea
Rubber
Bananas
Sugar
Tobacco
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
1970
1997
173
174
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
state structures. Despite high taxes, public investment in rural services
and infrastructure has been poor.
4
Indeed, if high taxes had been com-
plemented with significant public investment in agriculture (as in Asia),
the sector would not have fared so poorly.
Precolonial era. Extraction from rural Africa during the
precolonial  era  occurred  through  the  slave  trade.
Especially between 1650 and 1850, the slave trade dis-
rupted Africa’s demographic, social, institutional, and
moral development (Fage 1977, Aplers 1977, Curto
1992). The political entities that conducted the slave
raids  were  never  able  to  reproduce  themselves
(Meillassoux 1981). They even failed to reproduce the
population of  captured  slaves, depending on ever-
widening geographic areas to capture new slaves from
subsistence agricultural systems.
Colonial era.With the onset of colonialism, policies
for extraction from rural areas changed. Several mech-
anisms were developed to ensure labor supplies for
mines,  plantations,  settler farms,  and public works
(Binswanger, Deininger, and Feder 1993). Access to
markets was restricted through cooperatives or monop-
oly marketing schemes that excluded peasant farmers or
forced them to sell their crops at depressed and uncom-
petitive prices. In East and Southern Africa land for
peasant agriculture was systematically reduced, confin-
ing these farmers to less fertile lands. In addition, access
to agricultural public goods and services (roads, exten-
sion, credit) was limited to plantations or settlers. Such
distortions were also used on other continents, but in
Africa they persisted much longer and left policy and
institutional remnants still visible today.
Between the mid-1950s and late 1960s, however,
policy improvements, together with favorable world
prices, bolstered the performance of African agricul-
ture, and export cropping spread rapidly (Anthony and
others 1979; Kamarck 1967; De Wilde 1967). Export
crops induced technological change because they had
different seasonal labor profiles from traditional crops,
allowing farms constrained by seasonal labor bottle-
necks to significantly expand cultivated land (Delgado
and Ranade 1987). Market-oriented agriculture grew
rapidly in many countries (Delgado 1998b). But this
improved performance was halted by policy changes
that shifted from export crop growth strategies toward
import-substituting industrialization, partly induced
by the 1973 oil shock. Real exchange rates became
overvalued, and incentives shifted from agriculture to
manufacturing.
Postcolonial era.The chance was missed to create a
better policy environment for agriculture at the start of
the postcolonial period. Policies continued to impose
high explicit and implicit taxes on agriculture: pricing
policies taxed agriculture about as much as the indirect
tax resulting from industrial protection and macro-
economic policies (Schiff and Valdés 1992; Herrmann
1997). With help from donors, postcolonial regimes
built on the institutional residues of colonial powers
and increased public sector dominance over agricul-
tural marketing and input supply systems, inhibiting
the development of individual traders, private compa-
nies, and farmer cooperatives. In most countries out-
put  markets were dominated by marketing boards
(World Bank 1994).  In more than  60  percent  of
African countries, governments completely controlled
the  procurement  and  distribution  of fertilizer  and
seeds (World Bank 1981), yet these systems were unre-
liable. Parallel  trading or processing was inhibited.
Controls on crop movements, particularly for grains
(Jayne and Jones 1997), were common. And such mar-
keting systems imposed huge fiscal costs.
Box 6.1 Centuries of Extraction from African Agriculture
175
SPURRIN G AGRIC ULTURAL AN D RURAL D EVE LOPM ENT
More recently, particularly in the 1970s and 1980s, heavy taxes and
constraints on private and collective initiatives continued to retard agri-
cultural growth and rural development. Consider the limited opportu-
nities  of a  dynamic  rural entrepreneur  in  a typical  African  country
around 1980. Private investment in agriculture and agroindustry was
undermined by heavy taxation, and the space for private sector activity
was severely limited by the dominant public sector. There was little
potential for producer organizations and nongovernmental organiza-
tions to be involved in the development process. Local governments
could not provide public services (roads, schools, health, agricultural ser-
vices) because the authority and financing needed to do so were with
centralized government agencies. Even if they wanted to raise revenues
for  local  development,  local  governments  did  not  have  access  to 
significant tax bases.
Economic policies and institutions in Africa have been characterized
by urban bias and by centralized political, fiscal, and institutional systems
(chapter 2). Both features have inhibited agricultural and rural develop-
ment. And both have received increased attention in the literature.
The urban bias in services and prices persistently favored urban peo-
ple over rural, harming efficiency and income distribution (Lipton 1977).
By  organizing,  centralizing,  and  controlling  political  and  economic
power, elites have controlled policy and the distribution of resources. In
many other countries pernicious political, administrative, and fiscal con-
sequences have made urban bias unsustainable. But these pressures do not
seem to have been strong enough in most of Africa, despite the conti-
nent’s exceptionally high urban bias. Why? Because of the lack of open
political systems and of well-articulated, competitive institutions in civil
society (Lipton 1993).
Africa’s postcolonial regimes had many reasons for establishing highly
centralized political, fiscal, and institutional systems for rural develop-
ment. These reasons included a desire for political integration of fragile
nations and the dominance of state-led development and planning ide-
ologies in the Western and Marxist development economics of the time
(Manor 1999).
Recent World Bank research on decentralization and rural develop-
ment developed scores for decisionmaking and resource allocation in six
important areas of rural development: rural primary education, rural 
primary health care, rural road maintenance, agricultural extension, rural
water supply, and forestry management.
5
The African countries in the
Economic policies and
institutions in Africa have
been characterized by
urban bias and by
centralized political,
fiscal, and institutional
systems 
176
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
sample had the most centralized institutions for rural development in the
first half of the 1990s (figure 6.2). High centralization inhibited the devel-
opment of local institutional capacity, limited local resource mobilization,
undermined the accountability of development programs to local popu-
lations,  and  discouraged  popular  participation  (McLean,  Kerr,  and
Williams 1998; Parker 1995). Further inhibiting local initiatives was the
lack of democracy in most countries—and the discouragement or even
suppression of voluntary private associations.
In addition to Africa’s poor policies and institutions, developed coun-
try policies and market access restrictions—prominent in the postcolonial
period—have limited Africa’s agricultural export growth (box 6.2). Several
developing countries (Brazil, Thailand) have managed to penetrate devel-
oped country markets for some products despite such restrictions. But
Africa, for the most part, has not. Indeed, poor domestic policies and insti-
tutional failures, as well as developed country policies limiting market
access, have reduced incentives to invest in African agriculture. 
Agricultural subsidies and
market access
restrictions in developed
countries have limited
Africa’s agricultural
export growth
Figure 6.2  Levels of Decentralized Rural Service Delivery in Various Parts of the Developing World, 1990s
Decentralization score (scale of 1 to 10)
Source: McLean, Kerr, and Williams 1998.
Jiangxi (China)
Imo (Nigeria)
Colombia
Côte d’Ivoire
Philippines
Burkina Faso
Poland
Senegal
NTT (Indonesia)
Bangladesh
Bahia (Brazil)
Egypt
Chile
Tanzania
Zambia
Punjab (Pakistan)
Kamataka (India)
Hidalgo (Mexico)
Tunisia
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested