save pdf in folder c# : Export pdf bookmarks to excel application software cloud windows html web page class canafricaclaim2-part924

7
Can Africa Claim the 
21
st
Century?
S
UB
-S
AHARAN
A
FRICA
(A
FRICA
ENTERED THE
20
TH
CENTURY
a poor, mostly colonialized region. As it enters the 21
st
, a lot
has changed. Education has spread, and life expectancy has
increased. Many countries have seen gains in civil liberties and
political participation. Since the mid-1990s there have been
signs that better economic management has started to pay off
in many countries, with rising incomes and exports and, in some cases,
decreases in severe poverty. Even as part of the region is making headlines
with crises and conflicts, other countries are making headway with steady
growth, rising investment, increasing exports, and growing private activity.
Africa’s countries are diverse in many ways, including history and culture,
incomes, natural endowments, and human resources. And in considering
Africa’s  potential,  it  is  worth  remembering  that  the  region  contains
Botswana, one of the world’s fastest-growing economies in recent decades. 
The Challenge of African Development
S
TILL
 A
FRICA FACES ENORMOUS DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES
 E
X
-
cluding South Africa, the region’s average income per capita averaged
just $315 in 1997 when converted at market exchange rates (table
1.1). When expressed in terms of purchasing power parity (PPP)—which
takes into account the higher costs and prices in Africa—real income aver-
aged one-third less than in South Asia, making Africa the poorest region in
the world. The region’s total income is not much more than Belgium’s, and
is divided among 48 countries with median GDP of just over $2 billion—
about the output of a town of 60,000 in a rich country. 
C
HA P T E R
1
Africa’s diverse
economies reveal
opportunities—and
challenges
Export pdf bookmarks to excel - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
create bookmarks in pdf; create pdf bookmark
Export pdf bookmarks to excel - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
bookmark pdf documents; bookmark template pdf
8
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Unlike other developing regions, Africa’s average output per capita in
constant prices was lower at the end of the 1990s than 30 years before—
and in some countries had fallen by more than 50 percent (figure 1.1). In
real terms fiscal resources per capita were smaller for many countries than
in the late 1960s. Africa’s share of world trade has plummeted since the
1960s: it now accounts for less than 2 percent of world trade. Three
decades ago, African countries were specialized in primary products and
highly trade dependent. But Africa missed out on industrial expansion and
now risks being excluded from the global information revolution. In con-
trast to other regions that have diversified, most countries in Africa are still
Table 1.1 Population, Income, and Economic Indicators by Region
Africa excluding
South
East
Latin
Indicator
South Africa
Africa
Asia
Asia
America
Population
Population (millions), 1997
575
612
1,281
1,751
494
Population growth (percent), 1997
2.9
2.9
1.8
1.2
1.6
Dependency ratio (workers age 15–64 per 
dependent)
1.1
1.1
1.4
2.0
1.7
Urban population share (percent), 1997
31.1
31.7
26.6
32.2
73.7
Urban population growth (percent), 1997
5.2
4.9
3.3
3.7
2.2
Income
GNP per capita (dollars, at market exchange
rates), 1997
315
510
380
970
3,940
PPP GNP per capita, 1997
1,045
1,460
1,590
3,170
6,730
Gini index, latest year available
45.9
46.5
31.2
40.6
51.0
Economy
GDP per capita, 1970
a
525
546
239
157
1,216
GDP per capita, 1997
a
336
525
449
715
1,890
Investment per capita, 1970a
80
130
48
37
367
Investment per capita, 1997
a
73
92
105
252
504
Exports per capita, 1970
a
105
175
14
23
209
Exports per capita, 1997a
105
163
51
199
601
Savings/GDP (percent), 1970
18.1
20.7
17.2
22.3
27.1
Savings/GDP (percent), 1997
16.3
16.6
20.0
37.5
24.0
Exports/GDP (percent), 1970
36.4
32.1
5.9
14.6
17.2
Exports/GDP (percent), 1997
33.0
31.0
11.4
27.8
31.8
Genuine domestic savings/GDP (percent), 1997
2.8
3.4
7.1
29.7
12.1
Incremental output-capital ratio (percent), 1970–97
12
10
23
23
14
Note:PPP stands for purchasing power parity.
a. 1987 dollars. 
Source:World Bank data.
Africa’s share of world
trade has plummeted
since the 1960s
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
document file. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview
convert word to pdf with bookmarks; how to bookmark a pdf in reader
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Demo Code in VB.NET. The following VB.NET codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
bookmark pdf reader; bookmarks pdf reader
9
CAN AFRIC A C LAIM TH E 2 1
ST
CEN TURY?
largely  primary  exporters.  They  are  also  aid  dependent  and  deeply
indebted. Net transfers from foreign assistance average 9 percent of GDP
for a typical poor country—equivalent to almost half of public spending
and far higher than for typical countries in other regions. By the end of
1997 foreign debt represented a burden of more than 80 percent of GDP
in net present value terms.
Africa is the only major region to see investment and savings per capita
decline after 1970. Averaging about 13 percent of GDP in the 1990s, the
savings rate of the typical African country has been the lowest in the
world. Rapid population growth and environmental degradation com-
pound the low savings. Estimates of genuine domestic savings (Hamilton
and Clemens 1999), which capture the effects of resource depletion, are
just 3 percent for Africa (see table 1.1). This is far below the genuine sav-
ings rates for other regions, though they too suffer from severe environ-
Figure 1.1  Change in GDP Per Capita, 1970–97
Note: Measured in constant local currency. Regional estimates are weighted by population.
Source: World Bank data.
–100
Congo, Dem. Rep.
Niger
Sierra Leone
Madagascar
Zambia
Central African Republic
Mauritania
Chad
Ghana
Rwanda
Côte d'Ivoire
Togo
Burundi
Senegal
South Africa
Africa
Nigeria
Mali
Benin
Gambia, The
Zimbabwe
Cameroon
Malawi
Sudan
Burkina Faso
Gabon
Kenya
Congo, Rep.
Latin America
Swaziland
South Asia
Lesotho
Mauritius
East Asia
Botswana
0
100
200
300
400
500
Percent
A few countries have
gained, but many have
lost
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF file by top level bookmarks. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
bookmarks pdf files; export pdf bookmarks to excel
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
NET framework. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. C# class demo
adding bookmarks to a pdf; copy pdf bookmarks
10
mental degradation and resource overuse. And it is far below what is
needed to sustain a major long-term boost in economic performance.
Africa’s development challenges go deeper than low income, falling
trade shares, low savings,  and slow growth. They also  include  high
inequality, uneven access to resources, social exclusion, and insecurity.
Income inequality is as high as in Latin America, making Africa’s poor
the poorest of the poor. More than 40 percent of its 600 million people
live below the internationally recognized poverty line of $1 a day, with
incomes averaging just $0.65 a day in purchasing power parity terms.
The number of poor people has grown relentlessly, causing Africa’s share
of the world’s absolute poor to increase from 25 to 30 percent in the
1990s. 
Many people lack the capabilities—including health status, education,
and access to basic infrastructure—needed to benefit from and contribute
to economic growth. Health and life expectancy indicators are adverse, even
taking into account low incomes: in many countries 200 of every 1,000
children die before the age of 5. Large parts of the population are locked in
a dynastic form of poverty, progressively less able to escape because children
lack the basic capabilities to participate in a productive economy—and so
to contribute to growth. Despite recent gains, more than 250 million of
Africa’s people lack access to safe water. More than 200 million have no
access to health services. In the only region where nutrition has not been
improving, more than 2 million children a year die before their first birth-
day. More than 140 million youth are illiterate, and less than one-quarter
of poor, rural females attend primary school. Disparities in social spending
between poor African countries and rich industrial countries are massive.
Education spending in poor African countries averages less than $50 a
year—compared with more than $11,000 in France and the United States.
Many Africans are excluded from basic services—and from the power to
influence the allocation of resources. 
Malaria typifies the tendency of many formerly global problems of
basic development to have become mainly African. At the turn of the 20
th
century, Africa saw 223 deaths a year from malaria per 100,000 people,
only slightly more than other developing regions. By 1970 the rate had
fallen to 107 in Africa, compared with only 7 in other regions. But while
the decline has continued elsewhere, the death rate has soared again in
Africa to 165 per 100,000. Social upheaval and civil wars, a breakdown
of health services in many countries, and growing resistance to anti-
malarial drugs are to blame (The Washington Post, 20 October 1999).
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Because of high income
inequality, Africa’s poor
are the poorest of the
world’s poor
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Export PDF images to HTML images. The HTML document file, converted by C#.NET PDF to HTML SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and font
edit pdf bookmarks; how to bookmark a pdf page
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
C# programmers can convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint Tiff, Jpeg, Bmp, Png, and Gif to PDF document. This class describes bookmarks in a PDF document.
creating bookmarks in pdf files; bookmark page in pdf
11
Then  there is  the  HIV/AIDS  pandemic. With 70 percent  of the
world’s cases in Africa, AIDS has already had an enormous impact on life
expectancy in the countries most affected. It is projected to reduce life
expectancy by up to 20 years from today’s modest levels—more than eras-
ing the gains since the 1950s. AIDS orphans already make up 11 percent
of the population in the most afflicted countries. This could rise to more
than 16 percent in the next 25 years, with disastrous implications for tra-
ditional social structures. The ultimate economic impact of AIDS, not
yet fully known, promises to be devastating.
Unless action is taken, the scale of these problems will only increase.
Population growth continues to be faster than in other regions, so pri-
mary school cohorts will continue to grow rather than shrink as in most
parts of the world. For every potential worker between 15 and 64, Africa
now has almost one dependent, almost all of them young (see table 1.1).
Even with a progressive  demographic transition,  Africa’s dependency
rates will fall only gradually through the next century.
These aren’t the only hurdles. The spread of conflict threatens economic
and social progress. At least one African in five lives in a country severely dis-
rupted by an ongoing war. Governance issues loom large in explaining the eco-
nomic record of African countries. If present trends continue, few countries
are likely to achieve the International Development Goals for 2015 endorsed
by the international development community—goals covering poverty reduc-
tion, health, education,  gender  equality,  and  environmental  preservation
(OECD 1996). Indeed, economic performance will have to improve just to
keep the number of absolute poor from increasing.
Africa Can Claim the Century—with Determined Leadership
In view of all this, what does “claiming the century” actually mean? Is
it a credible objective for Africans—and for their children? Economists
(and social scientists more broadly) are not known for their ability to pre-
dict short-term developments, let alone provide a vision of societies one
hundred years into the future. A more modest approach would be to ask
how, over the next few decades, Africa can reverse years of social and eco-
nomic  marginalization  in  an  increasingly  dynamic  and  competitive
world, and so be well placed, after the early decades of the century, to take
advantage of the rest.
As described below, simply preventing an increase in the number of
absolute poor over the next 15 years will require annual growth rates in
CAN AFRIC A C LAIM TH E 2 1
ST
CEN TURY?
Without action, Africa’s
problems will only worsen
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
create searchable PDF document from Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures
adding bookmarks to pdf; copy bookmarks from one pdf to another
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
VB.NET programmers can convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint Tiff, Jpeg, Bmp, Png, and Gif to PDF document. This class describes bookmarks in a PDF document.
pdf bookmarks; creating bookmarks pdf files
12
excess of 5 percent, almost twice those of the dismal decades after 1973.
And reaching the International Development Goal of halving the inci-
dence of severe poverty by 2015 will require annual growth of 7 percent
or more—and a better distribution of income. If Africa’s terms of trade
continue to deteriorate as they have for many countries since the late
1960s, the growth requirement for reducing poverty will be even higher.
Is the goal of reducing poverty impossible? Not at all. Africa is not
doomed by its poverty or its poor development record. In the 1960s and
early 1970s many prominent economists considered Asian countries,
with their vast, poverty-stricken populations and limited resources, to be
caught in a low-level development trap. It was inconceivable in the early
1960s that the Republic of Korea would emerge as an industrial power.
The passing of time has shown how wrong such views were. The perfor-
mance of other regions, the findings of cross-country studies, and the
achievements of a number of African countries suggest that reversing the
increase in poverty is possible. 
Trends in Africa will need to change radically for a catchup process to
materialize. This will require determined leadership within Africa. It will
require better governance—developing stable and representative consti-
tutional arrangements, implementing the rule of law, managing resources
transparently,  and delivering  services  effectively to communities  and
firms. It will require greater investment in Africa’s people, as well as mea-
sures that encourage private investment in infrastructure and production.
It will not happen without an increase in investment and efficiency. And
it will require better support—and perhaps more support—from the
international development community. 
In facing these challenges, Africa has enormous unexploited poten-
tial—in resource-based sectors and in processing and manufacturing. It
also has hidden growth reserves in its people—including the potential
of its women, who now provide more than half of the region’s labor but
lack  equal  access  to  education  and  factors  of  production.  African
economies can perform far better. The region has great scope for more
effective use of its resources—public and private, financial and human—
and much scope for improving the delivery of the essential services
needed to upgrade the capabilities and health of its people and increase
their opportunities. 
Even with better prioritization, the range of urgent challenges will strain
Africa’s limited capacity to make and implement policies and to nurture
strong institutions. But the sheer number of challenges is not insurmount-
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Africa has enormous
unexploited potential and
hidden growth reserves
14
require a fundamental change from Africa’s donors because Africa’s
governments are one of the excluded groups: with high aid depen-
dence, in many countries development policy is seen as being the pre-
rogative of donors rather than governments. Africa’s interests also need
to be articulated more effectively in global forums, especially those
dealing with trade and investment. 
Within Africa there has been increasing research, analysis, and rethink-
ing on these issues. Consensus has emerged on the failures of past poli-
cies, though there is still debate on how best to move forward and a sense
that the region still needs to find its place in the world economy. Africa
has been experiencing its own Renaissance, in the true sense of a rebirth
of thought on governance and development policies, particularly in the
context of an increasingly globalized and competitive world. This is not
surprising: some 70 percent of today’s Africans were born after the end
of colonialism, and that proportion is rising rapidly.
Donors have also been reevaluating their role, especially since the end
of the Cold War reduced the imperative to fund loyal allies rather than
support effective development states. Donors have entered the new cen-
tury in the midst of a feverish debate on how to make aid more effective,
including a watershed change in the Bretton Woods institutions—the
World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, widely seen as the
main external architects of Africa’s economic policies. 
This report selects a number of areas that seem important in answer-
ing the question of whether Africa can claim the 21
st
century. It brings
together the implications of this recent body of work—particularly that
emanating from Africa. It does not claim to be exhaustive. Nor does it
attempt to lay out a blueprint for individual countries. But it draws on
the many positive examples of African development to show how some
countries are approaching common issues. African economies and sub-
regions are diverse, and each will have to find its way to address the chal-
lenges of the 21
st
century. 
How Fast Must Africa Grow to Reduce Poverty?
The International Development Goals for the 21
st
century—adopted
by the global development community and endorsed by many develop-
ing country governments—set targets for poverty reduction, education,
health,  gender  equality,  and  environmental  sustainability  for  2015
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
The many positive
examples of African
development show how
some countries are
approaching common
issues
15
(OECD 1996). Here we concentrate on one goal: halving the incidence
of absolute poverty, defined by the international poverty line of $1 a per-
son per day, from current levels.
Growth is not sufficient for poverty reduction, but it is essential—no
country has achieved a sustained improvement in the economic fortunes
of its citizens without substantial, as well as broadly based, increases in
income. Indeed, where growth has been sustained and has increased con-
sumption, poverty in African countries has been reduced (chapter 3).
How  growth  affects  poverty  also  depends  on  how  it  is distributed.
Especially with Africa’s high income inequality, it is essential that growth
be broadly based rather than narrow. But while cross-country evidence
shows a wide range of variation between changes in income levels and
distribution, it finds a neutral overall relationship between growth rates
and inequality. So, income distribution is assumed here to be constant.
The performance needed to halve the incidence of absolute poverty
depends on the period in which it is to be achieved. Demery and Walton
(1998) consider a period of 25 years, corresponding to the interval between
the latest data available (for 1990) when the goals were formulated and 2015.
This also produces a useful minimal criterion for Africa. The region’s pop-
ulation is doubling every 25 years at current growth rates, so achieving this
target would mean that the absolute number of absolute poor is neither
increasing nor falling. To achieve this minimum goal, consumption per
capita would need to rise by almost 2 percent a year. With a constant sav-
ings rate, GDP would need to grow by 4.7 percent a year. But savings rates
are too low to sustain the investment needed for rapid growth. Adding in an
increase in the savings rate of 10 percentage points spread over 25 years sug-
gests a target GDP growth rate of 5 percent a year just to prevent an increase
in  the  number  of  the  poor.  Only  a  few  African  countries,  including
Botswana,  Mauritius,  and Uganda, sustained such growth  rates in  the
1990s—and a recent evaluation suggests that few countries have the condi-
tions and resources to sustain such growth in the long run (UNECA 1999). 
But the growth hurdle to halving poverty by 2015 is now far higher
because, on average, income and consumption levels did not rise in the
1990s. Including the projected increase in savings, the average GDP
growth needed would be more than 7 percent a year. And if Africa’s terms
of trade continue to deteriorate, or if the savings provided by foreign assis-
tance continue to fall, the growth requirement will be even greater.
Africa’s growth goal is higher than those for other regions for several
reasons. First, consumption per capita needs to rise rapidly because of low
CAN AFRIC A C LAIM TH E 2 1
ST
CEN TURY?
Growth is not sufficient
for poverty reduction, but
it is essential
16
incomes, large numbers of poor people, and a very high poverty gap.
Second, Africa’s population growth rate is the highest in the world. Unlike
other regions—particularly East Asia, where the ratio of working-age
population to dependents has risen sharply to around two to one—
Africa’s dependency ratio has remained close to one (see table 1.1). There
are signs that Africa is embarking on a demographic transition, and some
projections foresee a considerable decline in the dependency ratio in the
middle of the 21
st
century. But today sharply lower fertility rates are lim-
ited to a small group of middle-income countries with far better repro-
ductive health care, far higher contraceptive prevalence, and far higher
health spending than the rest of the region (table 1.2).
A third factor raising the growth hurdle for Africa is the need to
increase savings while also allowing consumption to rise fast enough to
reduce poverty. Higher savings and investment are not sufficient for
growth—the productivity of investment, as captured by the long-run
incremental output-capital ratio, needs to double to place Africa on the
same trajectory as fast-growing regions (see table 1.1). Africa can call on
some hidden reserves. Countries can grow for a period with moderate
investment rates when recovering from extremely depressed conditions,
such as those caused by extended conflict. And reversing Africa’s massive
capital flight—estimated at almost 40 percent of private savings in the
early 1990s (table 1.3)—could boost domestic savings. 
Even so, in the long run investment rates would need to be sustained
at around 30 percent for an extended period if growth is to make a
major dent in poverty. Both agriculture and industry are severely decap-
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Table 1.2 Indicators of a Demographic Transition in Africa by Income Group
Indicator
Lowest
Low
Middle
All
Fertility (percent), 1990
6.5
6.1
4.4
6.1
Fertility (percent), 1995
6.2
5.3
3.3
5.7
Infant mortality (per 1,000 live births), 1990
108
87
59
97
Infant mortality (per 1,000 live births), 1995
101
80
55
90
Maternal mortality (per 100,000)
1,015
606
277
822
Contraceptive prevalence (percent)
8
20
62
17
Health spending per capita (dollars), 1990–96
7.25
22.73
162.59
30.80
Public
3.19
9.58
71.99
11.22
Private
4.06
13.15
90.60
19.58
Note:Lowest-income countries are less than $300 per capita. Low-income countries are $300–765 per capita. Middle-income countries are more
than $765 per capita.
Source:World Bank data.
Savings must increase
while also allowing
consumption to rise fast
enough to reduce poverty
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested