save pdf in folder c# : How to create bookmark in pdf automatically control software system azure html winforms console canafricaclaim20-part925

187
SPURRIN G AGRIC ULTURAL AN D RURAL D EVE LOPM ENT
cial agriculture in South Africa and Zimbabwe) applying fertilizer at the
same rate as other developing or even developed regions.
In the late 1970s and early 1980s almost all countries in the region
adopted fertilizer subsidies, distorting prices and leading to an unreliable,
high-cost marketing and distribution system with a limited choice of
basic fertilizers (Lele, Chistiansen, and Kadiresan 1989).
9
Most of the
gains from these subsidies went to better-off farmers and intermediaries.
Fertilizer reforms began in the 1980s with the removal of these subsidies
in nearly all African countries. This, together with currency devaluations
and world price increases, caused fertilizer prices to rise, sometimes by
200–300 percent. These high costs have led several countries to backslide
on previous reforms, reintroducing fertilizer subsidies.
A key issue in the reform process, one that is not always considered, is
the sequencing of subsidy removal. Eliminating subsidies at the same time
as major macroeconomic reforms (such as currency devaluation) will
exacerbate fertilizer price increases and inhibit the entry of the private sec-
tor to fulfill the role of parastatals. Alternatively, removing subsidies at
the same time as a reduction in fertilizer import duties would mitigate
some of the price increases from subsidy removals.
The private sector has responded weakly to fertilizer market liberal-
ization. A few large private firms dominate the market. Trade restrictions
are still widespread, with tariff and nontariff barriers. Some countries
impose restrictions on the types of fertilizer that can be imported, along
with stringent clearance requirements for imports and specifications for
who can import (Gisselquist 1994). Many countries also rely almost
exclusively on fertilizer aid to meet their domestic requirements, causing
uncertainties in supply, limiting product choice, and disrupting domes-
tic fertilizer markets. In addition, the mechanisms used to deliver fertil-
izer aid inhibit the development of sustainable private supply systems for
agricultural inputs (box 6.4).
Exploiting the Synergy between Price and
Nonprice Factors
R
ECENTREFORMSHAVEIMPROVEDAGRICULTURALPRICEINCENTIVES
.
But they have not done as well at addressing other structural and
institutional constraints, including rural infrastructure (irrigation,
The mechanisms used to
deliver fertilizer aid inhibit
the development of
sustainable private
supply systems for
agricultural inputs
How to create bookmark in pdf automatically - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
add bookmarks to pdf preview; create bookmarks in pdf reader
How to create bookmark in pdf automatically - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
create pdf bookmarks; excel hyperlink to pdf bookmark
188
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
roads, power, telecommunications), agricultural research and extension,
and farmer education and health—factors that impede agricultural pro-
ductivity and output (Binswanger 1989). Removing these impediments
would require substantial increases in both public and private investments
in rural areas. Not only is there a direct effect of public investments, there
is also complementarity between public and private investments.
Public Investments in Agriculture: Too Few and Too Inefficient
Data on public spending and investment in African agriculture are
hard to come by, but the available evidence suggests that since the 1960s
the level of public resources allocated to agriculture has been consistently
J
APANESE
G
RANT
A
ID FOR THE
I
NCREASE OF
F
OOD
Production, also known as the 2KR aid program, pro-
vides  grant  aid  tied  to  the  purchase  of  fertilizer,
machinery, and chemicals. In 1996 the 2KR program
provided 58 countries with these inputs. Twenty-six
African  countries  received  this aid,  accounting for
about 40 percent of the annual 2KR budget of $260
million. The process of supplying inputs under the
program  is  similar  to  programs  of  other  donors.
Formal requests are made to the government of the
donor country, discussions are held to assess the mer-
its of the request and the ability of the donor country
to supply the goods, the donor opens a restricted ten-
der for the requested goods, an award is made to the
lowest bidder, and counterpart funds are deposited by
the  recipient  country  into  a  designated  domestic
account upon sale of the goods. The 2KR program has
been a significant source of agricultural inputs for the
poorest African countries, but several concerns have
been raised. 
The procurement process has often resulted in a
disconnect between the inputs acquired under the pro-
gram (for example, the types of fertilizer, machinery,
and chemicals) and the inputs needed by recipient
countries. Inputs acquired through the program typi-
cally arrive too late for effective use. Recipient country
governments usually distort the domestic markets for
inputs received under the program, inhibiting private
sector involvement  in  input (particularly  fertilizer)
importation, distribution, and storage. In particular,
2KR fertilizers have not been well integrated with the
domestic market, being distributed through govern-
ment channels with the exclusion of the private sector.
Competition in 2KR tendering and procurement is
limited. Restrictions on who can participate in the pro-
gram were most prevalent in the 1980s, when aid was
tied exclusively to Japanese products procured through
Japanese trading companies. Even today the tendering
process  appears  to be insufficiently competitive, as
indicated by the high price of 2KR inputs relative to
the cost in competitive markets. Some countries even
have difficulties setting up counterpart funds, which
vary between one-half and two-thirds of the value of
the aid (depending on recipient country conditions).
Where these funds have been set up, they have often
been used counterproductively. 
Changes to the program must ensure the emer-
gence of strong private networks for input delivery and
should offer greater transparency and consistency as
well as faster delivery.
Source:Tobin 1996; Adachi and Townsend 1998.
Box 6.4 The 2KR Aid Program
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
project. On this C# tutorial, you will learn how to fill-in field data to PDF automatically in your C#.NET application. Following
add bookmarks to pdf file; create bookmarks in pdf from excel
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data
NET Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET how to fill-in field data to PDF automatically in your
creating bookmarks in pdf documents; bookmarks pdf documents
189
SPURRIN G AGRIC ULTURAL AN D RURAL D EVE LOPM ENT
low relative to the sector’s size and contribution to the economy. In most
African countries the sector receives less than 10 percent of public (recur-
rent and investment) spending but accounts for 30–80 percent of gross
domestic output.
Moreover, the direct and indirect transfers of income from agriculture
to government and the rest of the economy have been larger than the pub-
lic resources allocated to the sector. Inadequate public resources have con-
strained the development of rural public goods (infrastructure, institutions,
human capital, support services) and the ability of the private sector to
develop. In turn, these policies have stifled economic development by for-
feiting the strong linkage effects of high agricultural growth on the rest of
the economy.
Moreover, where public investments in African agriculture have been
high, as in a number of countries in the postcolonial period, they have
often been misallocated. Or the recurrent budgets to maintain these
investments have been low (box 6.5)
African countries that have maintained strong price incentives and
developed rural public capital goods and services have enjoyed faster
growth—price and nonprice incentives are complementary (see box 6.3).
That makes it imperative for policymakers to enhance the price incen-
tives facing farmers and other economic agents in agricultural activities.
Policymakers also have to promote rural public goods and services and
stimulate private agricultural investments.
Despite High Returns, Research and Extension Remain a Low Priority
We know a little more about public spending on agricultural research,
for which donors have typically contributed about 40 percent of the funds
(Pardey,  Roseboom, and Beintema  1997). These investments have a
potentially high payoff in Africa: a recent study finds a median internal
rate of return on research spending of 37 percent (table 6.2). But after
increasing from $256 million in 1961 to $701 million in 1981, agricul-
tural research spending in Africa dropped to $684 million in 1991.
The  consistently  high  returns  achieved  in  research  stations  and
demonstration plots suggest that such research could contribute greatly
to agricultural growth and development. Research continues by interna-
tional and national agricultural research stations, though with shrinking
budgets. But many constraints, including those discussed above, prevent
farmers from adopting and internalizing these technologies. 
Spending on agricultural
research has a potentially
high payoff in Africa
C# PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in C#.net, ASP.NET
Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET library control SDK for automatically printing PDF document online
bookmark pdf in preview; add bookmark to pdf reader
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on Visual Studio .NET
C#.NET Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer Demo or XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Editor
excel pdf bookmarks; bookmarks pdf
190
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Better Policies Have Stimulated Agricultural Growth
Agriculture has become  more  competitive as  better  policies have
improved incentives. But it remains undercapitalized. In 1990–97, 25
countries had real agricultural GDP growth rates over 2 percent, with
12 over 4 percent (Benin, Cameroon, Chad, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau,
Equatorial  Guinea,  Lesotho,  Malawi,  Mauritania,  Mozambique,
Namibia, Togo).
10
In 1993–97 five more countries joined this group
(Côte d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Mali, South Africa, Zimbabwe). This is a big
Low  public investment in Nigeria. The  size and
structure of public spending on agriculture have been
grossly inadequate in Nigeria, with weak government
commitment to agricultural funding worsening after
structural adjustment. The share of agriculture in gov-
ernment spending was 1.9 percent during the boom
period (1972–80), 3.0 percent during the crisis period
(1981–87), and 1.1 percent after structural adjustment
(1988–92) (Olomola 1998). Agriculture accounts for
about 30 percent of GDP.
Misallocation of public investment in Senegal. An
analysis  of  79  agricultural  projects  and  programs
implemented in Senegal in 1990–95, costing about 3
percent of GDP, provides a good illustration. About
75 percent of the resources were allocated to crops, 15
percent to forests and other natural resources, 6 per-
cent to fisheries, and 3 percent to livestock. For crops
the overwhelming share went to irrigated rice. Factors
such as agroecological potential, natural constraints,
infrastructure development, human resources, institu-
tions, demographics, and an area’s contribution to
GDP do not seem to have been considered in the
regional allocation of public resources—the case in
most of Africa.
Maintenance failures in Chad, Ghana, and Senegal.
Africa’s capital investments are often not matched by
adequate recurrent budgets, limiting the maintenance
and  management  of  these  public  goods.  Examples
abound for roads, irrigation infrastructure, and other
public structures. Even where significant investments
developed public agricultural capital goods, governments
have often not provided resources to maintain them and
achieve high standards of management and use.
Irrigation infrastructure suffering from poor man-
agement and use is so widespread that it deserves men-
tion. In Ghana, of 18,000 hectares developed, only 33
percent is cultivated; the rest requires rehabilitation to
be effectively cropped. In Chad, of 12,000 hectares
developed,  only  25  percent  is  used  effectively.  In
Senegal, where large investments were made to develop
irrigation infrastructure in the north, the experience is
the same.
Why do most African governments put such a low pri-
ority on investments in such a key sector?Simple benefit-
cost analyses often grossly underestimate the benefits
of rural investments, particularly in rural infrastructure
(Lipton 1987). For example, rate of return calculations
for building new roads usually ignore both the multi-
pliers and upsurge of economic activity that come from
resource movement following new road development.
But even when there is ample evidence of high returns,
as in agricultural research, government commitment is
hard to obtain. Political economy issues are a major
determinant of government  spending—widely dis-
persed smallholders have a hard time organizing them-
selves for economic, social, and  political purposes.
Given the tight budget constraints facing most African
governments, expenditures that are not defended by a
well-organized constituency  will likely be squeezed
out, no matter what is known about high returns.
Box 6.5 Problems with Public Investment in African Agriculture
VB.NET PDF - Deploy VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer on Visual Studio.NET
C#.NET Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET to How to Build Online VB.NET PDF Viewer in
export pdf bookmarks to text; export bookmarks from pdf to excel
VB.NET PDF - Acquire or Save PDF Image to File
NET Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET NET TWAIN Scanning DLLs: Scan Many Pages into One PDF.
bookmarks in pdf files; export pdf bookmarks to text file
191
SPURRIN G AGRIC ULTURAL AN D RURAL D EVE LOPM ENT
improvement  over  the  1980s,  when  only  three  countries  (Benin,
Guinea-Bissau, Togo) had annual agricultural growth rates exceeding 4
percent.
Though Still Low, Land Productivity Is Rising 
Between 1980 and 1995 cereal production increased by 3.4 percent a
year, mostly from area expansion. Cereal yields improved in 24 countries,
and 9 countries had growth of more than 2 percent a year (Benin, Burkina
Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-
Bissau, Mauritania, Mauritius). But there is still much to be gained from
yield  improvements  in  every  African  country.  Continuing  growth
through area expansion is possible in only a few countries, because insti-
tutional and economic constraints generally limit access to land.
Labor Productivity Has Increased, Particularly in West Africa
In 19 of 31 African countries agricultural value added per worker
increased  between  1979–81  and  1995–97  (World  Bank  1999c).
Agricultural labor productivity in West Africa showed a particularly strong
improvement after 1983 (UNCTAD 1998). The use of bovine animal
traction has spread in the cotton-maize zones of West Africa, in northern
Benin (Brü ü ntrup 1997) and Mali in particular. This was in response to the
need for a power source for the profitable cotton-maize technologies being
extended. For Africa as a whole there was a dramatic decline in agricul-
tural labor productivity in 1975–84, then a temporary improvement in
the  mid-1980s  followed  by  fluctuating  but  generally  stagnant  levels
(UNCTAD 1998).
Table 6.2 Internal Rates of Return on Agricultural Research and Extension
Spending by Region
Applied research
Extension
Number of
Median return
Number of Median return
Region
studies reviewed
(percent) studies reviewed
(percent)
Africa
44
37
10
27
Asia
120
67
21
47
Latin America
80
47
23
46
OECD
146
40
19
50
Source:Evenson forthcoming.
There is still much to be
gained from yield
improvements in every
African country
C# PDF - Acquire or Save PDF Image to File
scanners and digital cameras) automatically and saving the images to file in C#.NET application. C#.NET TWAIN Scanning DLLs: Scan Many Pages into One PDF.
how to bookmark a page in pdf document; export excel to pdf with bookmarks
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
this file Default.aspx and Visual Studio will automatically create a code take RE default var _userCmdDemoPdf = new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.addCSS
bookmarks pdf file; create bookmark in pdf automatically
192
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Export Shares of Several Crops Have Grown, and Diversification Is
Starting 
Since 1970 Africa has suffered losses in its world market share for
agricultural exports—55 percentage points for groundnuts, 27 points
for cocoa, and 14 points for coffee (see figure 6.1). But recent trends
have been more favorable (table 6.3). The export shares for five of the
region’s nine main crops (bananas, cotton, sugar, tea, tobacco) rose
between 1980–89 and 1990–97, though some increases were small. In
addition,  many  countries  in  East  and  Southern  Africa  (Kenya,
Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe) as well as in West Africa (Burkina Faso)
have expanded into nontraditional export crops such as horticulture
and floriculture.
A Business Plan for Agriculture in the 21
st
Century
P
OLICIES CLEARLY MATTER
EVEN WHERE THERE ARESERIOUS PHYS
-
ical constraints. That policies in Africa were poor for several cen-
turies suggests huge unrealized opportunities for further growth
in agriculture. Even limited and incomplete improvements have had sig-
nificant effects. Yet many countries have not completed policy and insti-
tutional  reforms  or  are  experiencing  second-generation  problems
Table 6.3 Africa’s Share of and Change in World Trade for Its Main Export
Crops, 1970–97 (percent)
Share
Crop
1970–79
1980–89
1990–97
Bananas
6
3
4
–3.3
Cocoa
59
45
40
–2.0
Coffee
28
22
14
–3.1
Cotton
13
11
12
–0.2
Groundnuts
40
8
5
–10.2
Rubber
6
6
5
–0.5
Sugar
6
6
8
–0.2
Tea
15
15
19
1.3
Tobacco
8
9
12
1.7
Source:FAOSTAT 2000.
Policies clearly matter,
even where there are
serious physical
constraints
Annual change,
1970–97
VB Imaging - VB ISBN Barcode Tutorial
use .NET solution that is designed to create ISBN barcode Automatically compute and add check digit for ISBN barcode document files in VB.NET like PDF & Word.
creating bookmarks in pdf from word; bookmarks in pdf
C# Imaging - Scan Linear ISSN in C#.NET
Detect orientation of scanned ISSN barcode automatically from image files using C#. Integrated with PDF controlling library to scan ISSN barcode from PDF
auto bookmark pdf; bookmark a pdf file
193
SPURRIN G AGRIC ULTURAL AN D RURAL D EVE LOPM ENT
associated with the implementation of policy reforms. Private agents
have not sufficiently entered input, output, and rural financial markets,
and market development and competition remain low. Tariff and non-
tariff barriers to agricultural and agroindustrial trade continue to be
high, and access to OECD markets is still limited. Public spending in
rural areas remains inadequate. The privatization of agricultural paras-
tatals is well advanced, but the decentralization of public agricultural and
rural development services is proceeding slowly in most countries, with
fiscal decentralization still lagging badly.
This section elaborates on key elements of the proposed agenda to
capitalize African agriculture, increase its competitiveness, and harness
the potential of agricultural growth and rural development. The agenda
and business plan must address three key questions: What are the best
ways to capitalize agriculture and the rural sector? Where can resources
be found to do this? And how can the use of these resources be made
more efficient?
Some of the proposed measures consolidate and expand the traditional
domestic reform agenda. Others deal with emerging national, regional,
and global developments. Many can be undertaken by African countries
on their own. Others will have to be taken by their development part-
ners, or in association with them. 
All stakeholders need to take part in developing the vision for rural
development and agricultural transformation and the broad outlines of
the business plan. Roles for the public and private sectors and priorities
for public action need to be further clarified through a consultative
process. The need for consultation and for dealing with development
constraints outside agriculture that could have profound impacts on the
sector has been vividly emphasized by the Organization of African Unity
in a recent position paper on food security and agricultural development
(OAU 1996). The OAU states that the actions to be taken for imple-
mentation of this position must “ensure the participation of all segments
of society in civil life through participatory and stable political institu-
tions” and “mobilize national, regional and international initiatives to
prevent conflicts and to resolve emergency crises” (p. 5). The OAU also
suggests that to accelerate agricultural and rural development, the objec-
tives must be “(a) to expand the effective participation of farmers and
producers in  the agricultural  and rural development process; (b) to
improve  self-reliant  food  security  throughout  rural  areas  through
increasing rural incomes; and (c) to promote and facilitate broad-based
All stakeholders need to
take part in developing
the vision for rural
development and
agricultural
transformation
194
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
and more self-reliant rural development, including improvements in
infrastructure, better marketing arrangements, access to improved tech-
nologies  and  supporting  services  and inputs,  and  more secure land
tenure arrangements” (p. 14).
Any business plan for agricultural and rural development must address
complex issues. How to strike the appropriate balance between a central
vision and detailed, decentralized implementation? How to strengthen
capacity and institutions? How to ensure that macroeconomic and agri-
cultural policies do not work at cross-purposes and to devise the appro-
priate sequencing of reforms? How to implement and finance the plan,
dividing responsibilities among development partners (public sector, pri-
vate sector, producers, and donors)? How to allocate resources within and
among sectors and regions, between production types (upstream and
downstream), and between economic agents?
Moreover, implementation of a business plan should be continu-
ously monitored and evaluated, and adjusted based on the findings.
The assessment  should  analyze  the plan’s  impact on three sets of
impact indicators: agricultural performance (production, productiv-
ity, costs, competitiveness, diversification, vertical integration), wel-
fare  (food  security,  nutritional  status,  poverty  reduction,  food
consumption, consumption of nonfood products, education, health),
and sustainability  of  natural  resources  (preservation  of  farmlands,
forests, and water). For a recent example of a comprehensive national
strategy,  consider  the  development  of  a  framework  to  modernize 
agriculture in Uganda (box 6.6).
Huge Investments Are Needed to Capitalize Agriculture
Huge investments will be required to accelerate agricultural growth
and rural development. Both the private and public sectors will have to
make on-farm, agroindustrial, and infrastructure investments as well as
investments in agricultural research, extension, and education (Thirtle,
Hadley, and Townsend 1995; Vyas and Casley 1988).
11
Women must be
assured access to productive assets and services if the growth potential of
these  investments  is  to  be  realized  (box  6.7).  On-farm  investments
include agricultural inputs, livestock, tree capital, soil improvements, irri-
gation, farm  machinery, housing,  and human capital.  Agroindustrial
investments are required for plants, equipment, skills, operating systems,
and market development. 
Huge investments will be
required to accelerate
agricultural growth and
rural development
196
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
tally friendly technologies and farming practices. The resulting degrada-
tion of soils constrains agricultural growth. Lagging agricultural growth
perpetuates rural poverty and food insecurity, impeding the onset of the
demographic transition to lower fertility rates (Cleaver and Schreiber
1994, p. 198).
Why aren’t farmers adopting new technologies and investing in their
soils? Why are the normal intensification processes described by Boserup
(1965)  and  Ruthenberg (1980)  not occurring,  or  not occurring fast
enough? Farmers will only make these investments and adopt more pro-
ductive and environmentally benign farming technologies and practices
if it is profitable to do so. The central thesis of this chapter is that poor
policies and institutional failures have undermined this required prof-
itability. Under favorable policies and institutions, farmers protect nat-
ural resources—Kenya’s Machakos district is a well-documented example
(Monitimore and Tiffen 1994).
In addition to removing poor agricultural and macroeconomic poli-
cies, higher profitability will require increasing investments in notori-
ously weak transportation and communications infrastructure, as well as
in food storage and processing facilities. Farmers will have more incen-
tives to invest if input markets are made more efficient, property rights
are strengthened (including formal and informal land tenure arrange-
W
OMEN PLAY ABIG ROLE IN
A
FRICA
SAGRICULTURAL
production, performing 90 percent of the work of
processing food crops and providing household water
and fuelwood, 80 percent of the work of food storage
and transport from farm to village, 90 percent of the
work of hoeing and weeding, and 60 percent of the
work of harvesting and marketing (Quisumbing and
others 1995). Despite their importance in agricultural
production, women face disadvantages in accessing
land and financial, research, extension, education, and
health  services.  This  lack  of  access  has  inhibited
opportunities  for  agricultural  investment,  growth,
and income (chapter 1).
For example, giving women farmers the same agri-
cultural inputs and education as men could increase
women’s yields by more than 20 percent in Kenya
(Saito,  Mekonnen,  and  Spurling  1994).  And  if
Zambian women enjoyed the same level of capital
investment in agricultural inputs, including land, as
their male counterparts, output could increase by 15
percent (Saito 1992). 
Thus more must be done to ensure gender equality
in access to productive assets and services. Efforts could
include providing clean, accessible water to reduce the
time burden of domestic work, investing in girls’ edu-
cation, ensuring gender-neutral land policy and legis-
lation, and building women’s skills and capabilities to
reduce their “political deficit.”
Source:Blackden and Bhanu 1999.
Box 6.7 Ensuring Gender Equality in Access to Productive Assets and Services
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested