save pdf in folder c# : Create pdf bookmarks online control software system azure html winforms console canafricaclaim22-part927

207
SPURRIN G AGRIC ULTURAL AN D RURAL D EVE LOPM ENT
marketing structures appropriate to the development of intensive agricultural
production systems.
12. First, in a risky sector such as agriculture, debt-equity ratios have to be
quite low, implying substantial investment out of savings. Second, credit has to
be repaid, making a strategy based on credit, rather than savings, unattractive
given the high real interest rates likely to prevail in most African countries for
the foreseeable future.
13. Noxious cereal export bans—slapped on at will by local authorities—are
an example of these trade barriers. Such bans are retarding growth in many high-
potential but remote areas that have a natural market in another country (Mali,
Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia).
Create pdf bookmarks online - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
bookmarks in pdf reader; create bookmarks pdf file
Create pdf bookmarks online - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
add bookmark pdf file; adding bookmarks in pdf
208
Diversifying Exports,
Reorienting Trade Policy, and
Pursuing Regional Integration
T
O SUCCEED IN THE
21
ST
CENTURY
, A
FRICA HAS TO
become a full partner in the global economy. The
region accounts for barely 1 percent of global GDP
and about 2 percent of world trade. Its share of global
manufactured exports is almost zero. Over the past 30
years it has lost market shares in global trade—even in
traditional primary goods—and failed to diversify on any scale. Africa
thus remains almost totally dependent on its traditional export com-
modities—despite their low income elasticity and declining and volatile
terms of trade. Continuing concentration on these traditional exports
would have adverse consequences for income and employment, even
more so given the speed of rural-urban migration (chapter 1). Had Africa
maintained the share of world trade it had in the late 1960s, its exports
and income would be some $70 billion higher today.
But Africa has huge potential for more diversified production and
exports, including in agroprocessing, manufacturing, and services. The
more successful African economies have already begun to diversify and
make themselves more attractive business addresses. For some, nontradi-
tional exports—including floriculture, other nontraditional agricultural
goods, and nontraditional industrial products—have been growing by 30
percent a year since the mid-1990s, albeit from a low base. Tourism has
also grown rapidly. And better-managed economies have been attracting
higher foreign direct investment.
The challenge: to sustain the momentum of diversification in some
cases and to initiate it in others. Given the region’s tiny and fragmented
C
HA P T E R
7
Africa has huge potential
for more diversified
production and exports,
including in
agroprocessing,
manufacturing, and
services
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Bookmarks. inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing options
how to add a bookmark in pdf; add bookmarks to pdf reader
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines Valid value for each index: 1 to (Page Count - 1). ' Create output PDF file path
how to bookmark a pdf file in acrobat; pdf bookmark editor
210
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
formance. In the same vein, the cooperation and support of the labor
movement  have  always been critical to successful  and sustainable
development policy. In many countries closer consultation with labor
will be needed in the new era of globalization, democracy, and partic-
ipatory politics. 
Why Should Africa Diversify?
T
HE NEED TO DIVERSIFY
A
FRICA
SECONOMIES
PARTICULARLY TO
increase the weight of industry, has preoccupied the region’s gov-
ernments for many years. Diversification is indeed a valid con-
cern. Africa’s urban population will triple by 2025. Urban growth and
agglomeration create opportunities for new types of economic activity by
lowering transactions costs, concentrating consumer power and skilled
labor, and facilitating dense producer networks. But providing employ-
ment for rapidly growing urban population will be an enormous chal-
lenge—as will creating a productive urban economic base to support the
infrastructure investment needed to make cities attractive places to live
and invest.
Export diversification has received less attention but is equally vital
for two reasons. First, export receipts are needed to finance imports of
consumer, intermediate, and capital goods. But receipts have been lim-
ited by lost trade shares for traditional products and by concentration
on a few primary commodities with low demand elasticity. The prices
of these staples, though volatile, are expected to continue their long-run
decline. Second, given Africa’s small economies, it is hard to imagine a
successful diversification drive based solely on domestic markets. For the
same reason, exports—especially of industrial and nontraditional prod-
ucts—provide the best avenue for attracting high and productive invest-
ment.  As  the  experiences  of  other  developing  regions  suggest,  the
virtuous circle begins with investment, which triggers higher and sus-
tained  growth,  increased  voluntary  savings,  and  further  investment
(UNCTAD 1998; Helleiner forthcoming; Rodrik 1996; Agosin 1997).
But  without  broad  and  growing  markets,  investment  will  not  be
attracted to Africa. 
African countries are not just small—they also have a history of high
trade restrictions and low domestic competition, and are far behind on
Without broad and
growing markets,
investment will not be
attracted to Africa
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures Create fillable PDF document with fields. Preview PDF documents without other plug-ins.
export excel to pdf with bookmarks; export bookmarks from pdf to excel
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Download Free Trial View Online Demo Purchase Now. Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Conversion. PDF Create.
pdf bookmark; create pdf bookmarks online
Recent Evidence
These conclusions are buttressed by recent trends in export diversifica-
tion. The performance of nontraditional exports in eight African countries
in 1994–98 suggests three encouraging patterns (table 7.1). First, in most
cases the range of the new exports is quite wide. It includes diverse processed
primary products, a few new agricultural exports, manufactures, and, in
Uganda, gold.
Second, though starting from small bases, growth of nontraditional
exports has been quite rapid in most of the eight countries. Even with gold
exports excluded, nontraditional exports from Uganda grew by more than
70  percent  a  year,  accounting  for  22  percent  of  exports  by  1998.
Nontraditional exports from Ghana, Madagascar, and Mozambique have
also shown impressive growth. In Ghana and Mozambique nontraditional
exports now account for nearly one-fifth of exports. Most important, the
growth in Ghana was mainly accounted for by exports of processed and
semiprocessed products. In Madagascar the share of nontraditional exports
soared to 86 percent. Côte d’Ivoire, Zambia, and to a lesser extent Senegal
have also seen considerable export diversification, notably in product lines
related to their natural resource bases. 
Table 7.1 Nontraditional Exports from Selected African Countries, 
1994–98 (percent)
Share of
total exports
Country
1994
1998
Côte d’ Ivoire
13.5
17.4
16.4
Excluding processed cocoa, coffee
6.9
8.8
16.2
Ghana
9.7
19.2
35.5
Processed and semiprocessed
6.3
15.2
42.1
Madagascar
64.1
86.1
11.9
Export processing zone
14.3
37.4
32.2
Mauritius
a
Export processing zone
67.2
68.9
2.9
Mozambique
5.6
17.8
50.3
Excluding processed cashews
3.5
10.1
47.1
Senegal
11.5
13.3
9.3
Uganda
a
5.6
34.9
101.5
Excluding gold
5.6
21.6
72.2
Zambia
b
14.7
33.0
16.5
a. Data are for 1994–97.
b. Nonmetal exports.
Source:World Bank data.
215
REO RIENTIN G TRAD E AND PURS UIN G REGION AL IN TEGRATION
Many African countries
have seen rapid growth in
nontraditional exports
Average annual growth
(in current dollars)
216
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
With better policies and an improved economic environment, Africa’s
comparative advantage  in natural  resources and diverse cultures has
started  to  pay  dividends  in  terms  of  new  commodity  and  services
exports. For example, horticulture exports from several African coun-
tries have jumped to more than $2 billion a year (chapter 6), while
tourist arrivals have been increasing at rates well above world averages
(box 7.3). The potential of tourism is suggested by its 20 percent annual
growth in Tanzania.
Third, there is evidence that African countries can attract labor-inten-
sive manufactures.  With  rising  labor  costs,  Mauritius  has  probably
approached its limit in terms of textile exports (see table 7.1). But there
is good news: Mauritian firms are trying to surmount this problem by
investing in poorer African countries (box 7.4). 
This is significant for Africa because a powerful force in East Asia’s
development has been the “flying geese” phenomenon—as leading coun-
tries have advanced on the technology and wage scale, labor-intensive
activities such as garments and toys have moved to poorer countries.
Mauritius shows that the geese can fly in Africa too. Confirming business
surveys, recent international comparisons suggest that high labor costs are
W
ITH ITS WIDE SPACES
SPECTACULAR WILDLIFE AND
natural resources, and rich and varied cultures, Africa
has  tremendous  potential  for  tourism.  Moreover,
indigenous ownership of tourism facilities is quite high.
But according to the World Tourism Organization,
Africa  attracted  less  than 4  percent of the  world’s
tourists and accounted for just 2 percent of interna-
tional tourism receipts in 1997. Only South Africa was
among the 40 top tourism destinations in 1998.
The region is gaining momentum, however.  In
1988–97 world tourism grew 5 percent a year—but
Africa’s growth was 7.2 percent, second only to East
Asia and the Pacific. And in 1997 Africa had the fastest
growth in tourist arrivals (8.1 percent). The World
Travel and Tourism Council estimates that travel and
tourism accounted for more than 11 percent of Africa’s
GDP in 1999 and projects growth of more than 5 per-
cent a year (in real terms) over the next 10 years, out-
stripping global tourism growth of 3 percent. 
Africa can do even better if governments and the pri-
vate  sector  cooperate  to  eliminate  impediments  to
tourism.  Though largely  a private activity,  tourism
needs public support through security, infrastructure
development, and efficient visa and immigration pro-
cedures. For European and North American tourists,
Africa remains the most expensive place to fly, largely
because of a highly regulated and inefficient air trans-
port system. In many countries visa processing and
immigration  formalities  are  a  nightmare.  Regional
cooperation could help—at some borders, tourists and
their luggage are forced to change buses because of pro-
tection of the local travel industry. And does it make
sense for a tourist wishing to visit West Africa to secure
separate visas for each of the region’s 16 small countries? 
Box 7.3 Chances and Challenges for Tourism
African countries can
attract labor-intensive
manufactures
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested