217
REO RIENTIN G TRAD E AND PURS UIN G REGION AL IN TEGRATION
no longer a major problem in most African countries, suggesting that
more “flying geese” may be landing in Africa in the future. In Kenya, for
example, labor productivity in multinational firms is comparable to that
in non-African countries—but nominal wages are lower (Biggs and oth-
ers 1996). Efforts to develop and upgrade skills are critical, but in many
countries labor would be relatively competitive if other obstacles to busi-
ness were reduced. And after a slow start, developments in Africa’s sub-
regions stand to intensify intraregional investment.
A Simulation Exercise
The discussion here suggests that the factors inhibiting diversification
into exports of nontraditional commodities and services are similar to
those  explaining  Africa’s low growth.  They include human resources
(including healthy and skilled workers), factors that affect transactions
costs (including governance and infrastructure services), policies that
ensure a stable and competitive macroeconomic environment, and geo-
graphic factors. Some of the geographic factors, such as being landlocked
or having a low population density, are most damaging when they inter-
T
HE
M
AURITIAN EXPORT PROCESSING ZONE EXPORTS
more than $1 billion a year in textiles and apparel. Its
firms are 75 percent owned by local capital. Floreal, the
largest textile maker, has gone from a labor-intensive
knitting company in 1971 to an integrated spinning,
knitting, dyeing, and finishing company with show-
rooms in Paris, London, New York, and Hong Kong
(China). In 1989 Floreal started shifting labor-inten-
sive parts of its business to continental Africa, first
manufacturing knitwear in Madagascar—where the
export processing zone, dominated by textiles, has cre-
ated more than 55,000 jobs—then opening plants in
Mozambique. With 17,000 workers, Floreal is assess-
ing opportunities for expansion elsewhere in Africa. 
With pay levels three times those in poor countries,
Mauritius must position itself to become a center for
capital- and skill-intensive operations such as design,
marketing, and logistics, complementing such “soft-
ware” with the “hardware” from emerging  African
exporters. Just as Hong Kong needed China to grow,
so Mauritius needs such countries to widen its eco-
nomic space and keep its industries globally competi-
tive.  East  Asia’s  development  was  spread  and
accelerated by the “flying geese” pattern, involving
similar transfers of labor-intensive stages of production
from richer to poorer neighbors. Africa can attract
labor-intensive activities and make the geese fly.
But  investors  still  see  the  usual  obstacles.
Heightening  the  urgency  of  strengthening  African
competitiveness in textiles is the abolition of the Multi-
Fiber Arrangement on 1 January 2005. Guaranteed
access to major markets, including through a renewed
Lomé Convention and a liberal U.S. Africa Growth
and Opportunity Bill, would help Africa compete. 
Box 7.4 Are the Geese Flying in Africa?
After a slow start,
developments in Africa’s
subregions stand to
intensify intraregional
investment
Pdf create bookmarks - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
bookmarks pdf documents; adding bookmarks to pdf
Pdf create bookmarks - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
convert word pdf bookmarks; bookmarks pdf
219
REO RIENTIN G TRAD E AND PURS UIN G REGION AL IN TEGRATION
in a relatively short period given that a better macroeconomic environment
and lower transactions costs could be achieved fairly quickly.
Second, should the median African country also attain East Asian invest-
ment and education levels, its industrial and processed exports would reach
$20 billion a year in the medium to long run. Geography does not seem to
be an insurmountable obstacle  to diversification—the catch-up effects
unleashed by sound policies, especially when augmented by strategies to
retain and attract investment and invest in people, seem very strong.
Third, the simulations suggest that coastal countries have more options
because of their more favorable location. Were it to benchmark policies and
development variables on East Asian levels and achieve East Asian coastal
densities (an unlikely outcome), the median African country would achieve
industrial exports of $52 billion (figure 7.2). 
True, any such estimates can only be taken as illustrative. But the cen-
tral point of the simulations is that despite the constraints of geography, a
lot can be done. And with appropriate integration, the dynamic spillover
effects from big coastal countries could shorten the catch-up time for the
median African country. The results also define the challenges facing poli-
cymakers in Africa. With knowledge of what is possible, countries need to
design and implement national policies and regional cooperative arrange-
ments to achieve their goals. 
A Business Plan for Export Diversification
H
AVING POTENTIAL IS ONE THING
. R
EALIZING IT IS ANOTHER
.
Realizing Africa’s  export  potential requires actions  on several
fronts—appropriate and stable real exchange rates and other poli-
cies to foster openness and economywide competitiveness, complementary
measures to strengthen the supply response and raise international com-
petitiveness, and measures to widen economic space through open region-
alism and multilateralism. These measures go well beyond trade, but trade
policy is the focus here. 
Sustaining Competitive and Stable Real Exchange Rates
Real exchange rates are central to the business plan for diversifying
exports. International evidence suggests that the real exchange rate is even
Geography variables
21
94
84
71
Percent
Figure 7.2  Aspects of
Africa’s Geography
Source: Elbadawi and Soludo 1999.
Population in African countries with coastal 
land/African population
GDP of African countries with coastal land/
African GDP
Coastal population density in Africa/coastal 
population density in East Asia
Average density of population within 100 
kilometers of the sea (people per square
kilometer)
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing options
excel hyperlink to pdf bookmark; add bookmarks to pdf
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF file by top level bookmarks. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
acrobat split pdf bookmark; pdf reader with bookmarks
220
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
more powerful for export growth than trade policy (Rodrik 1997;
Helleiner  forthcoming;  Elbadawi  1998).  Successful  trade  policy
reforms  have  usually  been  accompanied  by  liberalized  foreign
exchange rates, drastically reducing real exchange rate overvaluations
or parallel market premiums. Recently, however, some countries have
seen a surge of speculative and short-term capital inflows, mainly dri-
ven by high real interest rates. The outcome has been increased real
exchangerate instability.
Africa will have to attract much higher private capital flows in the
future. Thus it cannot afford to reimpose sweeping capital account
restrictions  and  so  miss  out on  tapping global  capital  markets  to
finance future investment. Maintaining exchange rate stability and
competitiveness on the one hand, and creating a hospitable and attrac-
tive environment for foreign capital on the other, promises to be one
of the key challenges for export diversification and competitiveness. 
Malawi and Chile illustrate the challenges and options facing many
African countries. Malawi’s real exchange rate turbulence is among the
highest in Africa. Much of this instability can be attributed to fiscal
crises and to pegging the exchange rate at levels that become unsus-
tainable. Two structural elements make matters worse: the seasonality
of the country’s exports (70 percent are tobacco, mostly exported by
three companies) and the difficulty of predicting concessional donor
flows (which account for half of foreign exchange receipts). Countries
like Malawi could do several things to create more stable incentives for
trade: implement a medium-term budget framework to reduce fiscal
crises, adjust the nominal exchange rate more often to prevent massive
fluctuations, foster competition in the foreign exchange market by eas-
ing controls, and work toward diversifying exports, particularly by
encouraging manufacturing exports. (World Bank 1999a). 
Chile’s recent experience suggests that economic competitiveness
need not come at the cost of adequate integration with the global cap-
ital market. The Chilean model of real exchange rate–led export pro-
motion offers important lessons for Africa, especially for countries
with more advanced financial and capital markets. Chile has indi-
rectly influenced both the type and size of private capital inflows in
the context of an essentially open capital account. Long-term capital
was encouraged while short-term and speculative capital flows were
discouraged, holding aggregate capital inflows closer to sustainable
levels.
Chile’s model of real
exchange rate–led export
promotion offers
important lessons for
Africa
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
file. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Create fillable PDF document with fields.
copy pdf bookmarks to another pdf; bookmarks in pdf
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic .NET application.
excel print to pdf with bookmarks; creating bookmarks in pdf documents
221
REO RIENTIN G TRAD E AND PURS UIN G REGION AL IN TEGRATION
Despite high capital inflows in the 1990s, Chile did not experience
major declines in competitiveness. And unlike many emerging markets, it
managed to avoid devastating financial and currency crises. In addition to
strong macroeconomic fundamentals, genuine central bank independence
has been important for Chile’s success in managing capital flows. The
Central Bank of Chile, which is responsible for exchange rate policy, has an
explicit target for the current account: over the medium term it should be
in deficit by 3–4 percent of GDP. This approach has allowed Chile to main-
tain a competitive real exchange rate that supports rapid growth and export
diversification. It has also allowed Chile to avoid financial crisis despite the
temptation of massive capital inflows (Williamson 1997). 
Making Trade Policy Work for Diversification
There is actually a fair bit of consensus on what constitutes a reason-
able trade strategy for countries of Africa. The consensus can be crudely
expressed in terms of a number of do’s and don’ts: de-monopolize trade;
streamline the import regime, reduce red tape and implement transpar-
ent customs procedures; replace quantitative restrictions with tariffs;
avoid extreme variation in tariff rates and excessively high rates of effec-
tive protection;  allow  exporters  duty-free  access to  imported inputs;
refrain from large doses of anti-export bias; do not tax exports too highly.
—Rodrik 1997, p. 2
How far have Africa’s trade reforms come? Measured against these cri-
teria, quite a long way. Quantitative restrictions, once widespread, have
been replaced by tariffs. These tariffs have been steadily lowered in most
countries, and their dispersion reduced. By 1998 trade-weighted tariffs in
Uganda averaged 10 percent, with the countries of the West African
Economic and Monetary Union not far behind. In most countries foreign
exchange regimes have been liberalized for current transactions. And there
have been significant moves to rationalize exemptions in most countries.
What remains as the unfinished agenda? 
Policies still discourage exports.
African trade taxes and restrictions are still
higher than in other developing regions, and antiexport bias is still consid-
erable in  most countries.  Especially because  of the  small  size  of  their
economies and the importance of imported inputs, this has considerable
impact. But countries typically depend on trade taxes for about one-third of
government revenue, with half or more coming from tariffs on inter-
Africa has come a long
way on trade reform—but
more needs to be done
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. PDF Create.
how to add bookmarks to pdf document; pdf create bookmarks
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
& rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. Word Create. Create Word from PDF; Create Word
bookmarks pdf reader; creating bookmarks in a pdf document
222
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
mediate and capital goods. For countries where tariff collection approaches
the average statutory rate, reducing tariffs is likely to mean losing fiscal rev-
enue—trade liberalization is unlikely to be self-financing because exports
will not expand sufficiently in the short run to permit a large increase in
imports. Thus efforts to reduce trade taxes cannot proceed independently
of measures to strengthen other sources of fiscal revenues. 
Liberalization is not locked in.
Liberalization is not yet anchored in an ide-
ology,  such as export promotion.  This  is because  reforms have  been
spurred by adjustment programs negotiated with international financial
institutions rather than  by  voluntary  multilateral  negotiations  under-
pinned by strong national ownership. Donor-driven liberalization is sub-
ject to reversal—for example, in response to chronic fiscal and foreign
exchange shocks. In addition, African tariffs are bound at high levels under
the Uruguay Round. These features make private agents less certain of the
credibility and sustainability of reforms. An emerging policy issue is there-
fore how trade reform can be “locked in” for credibility (Gunning 1998). 
Reforms have been country-based, not regional.
Perhaps for similar reasons,
liberalization has been uneven across the region. Even within such sub-
regional groups as the Southern Africa Development Community, wide
variations in tariffs and other regulations make it hard to enlarge the eco-
nomic space for private enterprise. Country-based reforms are therefore
not always compatible with regional coordination. 
Compensatory mechanisms for exporters often do not work.
Africa is rich in export
processing zones, duty drawbacks, exemption schemes, and value added tax
rebates,  to  compensate  exporters  for  tariffs  on  inputs.  But  except  in
Mauritius, these have not worked well. In West and East Africa incentives
often leak to nonexporters, while rebates to exporters arrive late or not at all.
In addition, key services—such as customs—often operate inefficiently, tak-
ing weeks to clear consignments and imposing additional costs on business.
The global frontier is moving rapidly in such areas, with normal clear-
ance times down to as little as 15 minutes in some industrial countries.
In other regions where trade restrictions are no lower than in Africa,
export processing zones are well established and appear to operate more
effectively. One example is Central America, where customs clearance is
far faster and service standards are higher. An important reason appears
to be the strength of powerful exporters and their ability to hold govern-
ments accountable for good services. Exporters are not yet a strong pres-
sure group in most African countries. But governments will need to act
as though they were if economies are to diversify. 
Liberalization has been
uneven across the
region—country–based,
and not always
compatible with regional
coordination
224
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
caused  by  factors  similar  to  those  that  discourage  private  investment:
exchange rate overvaluation, a high-risk environment, and high external
debt (Collier, Hoeffler, and Pattillo 1999). Foreign capital follows domestic
capital. As noted, high costs for transaction-intensive activities, particularly
in manufacturing, and high perceived risks have been among the main con-
straints to investment and diversification (Collier and Gunning 1999). 
Business surveys confirm the high costs of operating in Africa. To some
extent this reflects Africa’s economic sparseness and the distance of much of
its production from the sea. But weak business services, including infra-
structure and regulation, are also major impediments to growth in countries
that have advanced on macroeconomic and structural reforms (box 7.5).
Local transport. An efficient Nacala rail line and
port could save Malawi 3 percent of GDP. A survey in
Uganda found that transport and other costs raised the
cost of capital goods by 50 percent in 1997; it required
8 or 9 days for intermediate inputs to clear customs
after a 30-day journey from Mombasa. Road transport
may be twice as costly as in Asia, in some cases reflect-
ing unofficial tolls. Delays at checkpoints in Southern
Africa often last as long as a day.
International transport. International transport and
insurance charges are higher than necessary for African
countries because of restrictive agreements. Air transport
is particularly vital given Africa’s economic sparseness,
the prevalence of landlocked countries, the high costs of
road  transport, and the promise  of new  high-value
exports such as horticulture. Yet schedules are often
inconvenient, and tariffs and handling charges can be
twice those for comparable flights in other regions.
Communications. International telephone charges
and Internet connections are among the world’s most
costly. Despite higher investment than in the past,
telecommunications reach only a tiny fraction of the
population, and waiting times for connections are the
longest of any region.
Power outages , bribes, and violence.Ugandan firms
lose an average of 91 days a year because of power out-
ages. In addition, the median firm pays bribes equiva-
lent to 3 percent of gross sales or 28 percent of invest-
ment in plants and equipment, and bears a similar cost
from theft and security charges. Crime and violence
raise costs in many countries: a study for South Africa
put the effect at 6 percent of GDP in 1996, compara-
ble  to  estimates  for  Latin  America  (Bourguignon
1999).
Trade and tax policies. Despite reforms, tariffs in
most African countries are still higher than in more
outward-oriented  developing  countries.  And  they
embody a significant antiexport bias, both for primary
products (where the sum of export taxes and import
tariffs can exceed 30 percent) and for manufactures
(due to high taxes on intermediate inputs and capital
goods). Duty drawback mechanisms have proven inef-
fective except in a few countries, and value added tax
rebates are often slow. The effect is a high tax on poten-
tial exporters requiring imported inputs.
Slow regional integration. Regional integration has
been slow to integrate markets and stimulate internal
trade.  Some  countries  belong  to  more  than  one
regional association and are torn between conflicting
obligations.
Restrictions everywhere.In many countries restrictive
regulations and practices, often aimed at generating
rents for officials and favored groups, constrain business
activity, affecting both agriculture and industry.
Box 7.5 Why the Cost of Doing Business Is High in Africa
225
REO RIENTIN G TRAD E AND PURS UIN G REGION AL IN TEGRATION
Even better-managed African countries tend to rank lower on inter-
national risk ratings than their policies would warrant. Some countries,
such as Mauritius and Uganda, have steadily improved their risk ratings.
But others, including Kenya and Zimbabwe, have seen sharp declines in
ratings, offsetting gains for the region as a whole. High perceived risks
have several causes (box 7.6).
Increasing consultations with business and labor.
Any business plan requires
developing a supportive, mutually accountable relationship among busi-
ness,  labor,  and  government.  Strong  business  associations  and labor
movements can help in this. Some dynamic relationships are starting to
evolve in Africa (box 7.7). Much of East Asia’s success has been attributed
to active interactions between the state and business. The state provided
incentives and services, while businesses delivered performance. Close
interaction ensures effective feedback and continuing pressure on both
parties.
A skilled and supportive workforce is also critical to diversification.
Labor needs to be well educated about the pains and gains of reforms,
and  special  efforts  need  to  be  made  to  carry  labor  unions  along.
Cooperation and higher productivity are more likely when a consultative
process ensures the effective participation of labor in policy formulation,
or at least its full understanding of the benefits.
P
ERCEPTIONS OF RISK IN
A
FRICA INVOLVE FACTORS
beyond political and social stability. On the macro-
economic side, many countries liberalized before con-
taining fiscal deficits, and in some cases this placed
greater stress on fiscal management. Many countries
have been prone to policy reversals—increasingly asso-
ciated with elections—and to external shocks. And real
exchange rates, real interest rates, growth rates, and fis-
cal revenues have been unstable through the period of
opening to markets (Guillamont and others 1999).
Aid  dependence  and  high  indebtedness  also
increase uncertainty. Large debt service obligations
make countries more vulnerable. This is accentuated
by “stop-go” patterns of quick-disbursing aid, where
big cuts in financing can be triggered by a failure to
meet governance standards or structural benchmarks
(such as the privatization of a given company by a cer-
tain date) rather than by a loss of macroeconomic
control.
Surveys of firms also highlight the risks of policy
reversals. In contrast to other regions, Africa’s trade
reforms have been formulated as part of structural
adjustment  programs  negotiated  with  the  World
Bank and the International Monetary Fund rather
than as part of multilateral negotiations with trading
partners. This has meant weaker commitment and
higher  perceived  risk  of  reversal  and  incomplete
reform.
Box 7.6 Why Risks Are Perceived As Being High
Any business plan
requires developing a
supportive, mutually
accountable relationship
among business, labor,
and government
226
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Widening the Economic Space: Regionalism and Multilateralism
Despite past failures and the lackluster implementation of existing
schemes, the case for Africa’s economic integration remains compelling.
There appears to be a widely held view within Africa that African unity
could help stem its political and economic marginalization, create new
structures out of its colonial heritage, and protect its interests in interna-
tional political and economic negotiations. These political motivations,
supported by the realization that integrated markets are needed for small
African economies to develop, explain the continued support for inte-
gration in Africa. The promise of pan-Africanism has kept alive the ideals
of the Lagos Plan of Action despite serious lapses in implementation.
2
More recently, continental African integration agendas have reflected the
desire for even more ambitious economic and political integration—well
beyond the Lagos Plan of Action.
3
P
OORCOMMUNICATIONSBETWEENGOVERNMENTAND
business limit growth in many African countries. Laws,
rules, and institutions are often inimical to private sec-
tor interests. Governments that lack policy credibility
have less influence on economic behavior. And a cli-
mate of uncertainty and mutual suspicion generates lit-
tle private investment. There is a bias toward short
investment horizons, and economic activity is pushed
into the informal sector. 
Enterprise networks are growing in West, East, and
Southern  Africa,  providing  a  voice  for  emerging
African businesses. Several African countries are adopt-
ing  public-private  consultative  bodies  to  facilitate
communication, some formal, some informal. These
entities enable participants to take joint responsibility
for policy choices, and the repetitive nature of the col-
laboration  constrains  self-interested  behavior.  This
also helps establish credibility—private participants
believe  that  cheating  and  reneging  are  less  likely.
Politically,  these  groups  serve  as  proto-democratic
institutions, providing direct channels to government
for business, labor, and academia. As important, the
rules established by the councils cannot be altered arbi-
trarily. As a result members can concentrate on busi-
ness and not worry about others trying to curry special
favors from the government. 
Ghana’s consultative group was among the first.
Early  initiatives led to a  private foundation  as  an
umbrella  organization  for  business  associations.
Hostility and suspicion between government and busi-
ness  have  been  reduced  and  communications
improved. Madagascar, Senegal, and Uganda have set
up similar foundations. Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, and
Senegal  have  set  up  competitiveness  commissions,
with public and private representation. 
Consultative  groups  work  best  where  there  is
urgency (a deadline) and a well-focused agenda. The
focus should first be on policies and regulations that
affect the entire private sector. The initial stages of this
type of consultation are fragile and require moral and
financial  support.  Open  and  public  consultations
increase public involvement and enhance the account-
ability of group members. These organizations can also
act as “agencies of restraint” on government behavior,
forming lobbying organizations to ensure support for
pro-export policies.
Box 7.7 Listening to Business
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested