save pdf in folder c# : Excel hyperlink to pdf bookmark Library control class asp.net azure wpf ajax canafricaclaim24-part929

227
REO RIENTIN G TRAD E AND PURS UIN G REGION AL IN TEGRATION
Thus the relevant policy question for the next century should not be
whether regional integration will be on Africa’s economic and political
agenda. Rather, it should be how regionalism can help achieve Africa’s devel-
opment goals in a globalized economy. The starting point would be to iden-
tify the reasons for the region’s rather disappointing record on regionalism.
Why has regionalism failed?
Despite a multitude of subregional schemes
and the strong political rhetoric supporting them, the results of integra-
tion remain modest. Progress on the 1991 Abuja Treaty—which envi-
sions an African economic community—has been mostly subregional.
The main schemes are the Common Market for Eastern and Southern
Africa and the Southern Africa Development Community in the east and
south, the Economic Community of Central African States in the cen-
ter, and  the West  African  Economic  and  Monetary  Union  and the
Economic Community of West African States in the west. These arrange-
ments are sometimes overlapping, with countries subject to conflicting
obligations. There have also been wide variations in the nature and speed
of integration (box 7.8). 
Regional integration was conceived as an inward-looking instrument
of industrial development—a way to increase intraregional trade and
aggregate  small  national  economies  into  regional  markets.  But  this
approach was stalled by several shortcomings, including institutional and
political constraints (Oyejide, Elbadawi, and Yeo 1999; McCarthy 1999).
First, though regional economies are larger than individual economies,
the combined market was still not big enough to support industrial trans-
formation through import substitution.
Second, the inward-looking strategy of industrial substitution had two
unintended consequences that undermined regional integration. At the
macroeconomic level, policies resulted in overvalued currencies and for-
eign exchange shortages, forcing a preference for trading partners who
offered the best credit facilities. Given that most of these partners are from
industrial countries, national industrialization strategies  continued to
support the hub-and-spoke pattern of trade (Kasekende, Ng’eno, and
Lipumba  1999).  Moreover,  the  trade  protectionism  associated  with
national industrial  strategies led  to  powerful  lobbies  and  “economic
nationalism” that also undermined regional development.
Third, the design and objectives of regional integration schemes have
been driven by a preference for formal trade and factor market integration
rather than by basic policy coordination and collaboration in regional pro-
jects. This has resulted in rather ambitious models of regional integration.
Despite a strong political
impetus for integration,
integration efforts have
had modest results
Excel hyperlink to pdf bookmark - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
create bookmarks pdf; add bookmark to pdf reader
Excel hyperlink to pdf bookmark - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
excel pdf bookmarks; delete bookmarks pdf
228
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
But Africa’s unfavorable structural features—competitive primary pro-
duction, small size, low per capita income, limited manufacturing capac-
ity,  weak  financial  sectors,  poor  transportation  and  communications
infrastructure—make these ambitious models difficult to implement.
Fourth, African integration schemes have suffered from implementa-
tion lapses—including those due to weak governance. Some states could
not cope with a loss of national sovereignty. Other factors include a lack
T
HE
C
OMMON
M
ARKETFOR
E
ASTERNAND
S
OUTHERN
Africa  (COMESA)  and  the  Southern  African
Development Community (SADC) both underwent
significant  institutional  changes in  the  1990s, with
potential  positive  effects.  South  Africa  joined  the
SADC, and agreement was reached on a SADC free
trade area following ratification of the SADC Trade
Protocol in 1998. Cooperation is under way on harmo-
nizing financial infrastructure (including payments sys-
tems  and  accounting  standards),  standardizing  and
improving bank supervision, and improving manage-
ment of water resources. In addition, South Africa—
which accounts for more than 70 percent of Southern
Africa’s GDP—has signed a free trade agreement with
the European Union, with profound implications for
regional dynamics. Independent assessments indicate
that the agreement will be largely beneficial to other
SADC members.
COMESA has recently been focusing on moving
toward a free trade area and supporting regional trade
through a guarantee facility to help provide political
risk cover. The existence of overlapping and compet-
ing groups—COMESA and SADC—is a lingering
problem in East and Southern Africa, especially given
the similarity of their agendas.
In the west, the Economic Community of West
African States (ECOWAS) is the umbrella group for
16 countries. Within it are 10 francophone countries
that belong to the CFA zone and have another sub-
group—the West African Economic and Monetary
Union (UEMOA). Despite the sharp division along
linguistic lines, ECOWAS has helped keep the com-
munity together. Under its leadership, peace has been
restored to Liberia and Sierra Leone. The ECOWAS
travelers check—a step toward West African monetary
union—was launched in July 1999.
The  UEMOA  has  enjoyed  significant  achieve-
ments. Building on a convertible common currency
(the CFA franc) and the relatively free movement of
capital, a customs union—to be fully implemented in
2000—will help create a subregional economic space
to attract investment. 
The UEMOA faces challenges, however. The first
is how to cope with the pressures unleashed by har-
monized  markets,  including  increased  population
movements, and revenue losses for some members,
such as Burkina Faso. A second is not having the cen-
tral bureaucracy become bloated and ineffective—the
UEMOA includes a subregional court, subregional
parliament, and other institutions, and the import
duty to finance this is to be doubled from 0.5 to 1.0
percent. The third is to ensure sufficient flexibility to
prevent the currency from again becoming pegged at
an unsustainable level. 
The key challenge in ECOWAS is to build bridges
across the linguistic divide and fashion a viable subre-
gional group. Ghana is surrounded by the UEMOA.
Nigeria has two-thirds of the population and 55 per-
cent of the GDP of ECOWAS countries. A regional
integration arrangement in West Africa that leaves out
Nigeria would be like leaving South Africa out of the
SADC.
Box 7.8 Progress and Challenges for Africa’s Subregional Groups
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Merge all Excel sheets to one PDF file in VB.NET. Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Export PDF from Excel with cell border or no border.
creating bookmarks in pdf from word; convert excel to pdf with bookmarks
C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
Keep Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint links in PDF PDF file editing options, like options for editing PDF document hyperlink and navigation
add bookmarks to pdf file; pdf bookmark editor
229
REO RIENTIN G TRAD E AND PURS UIN G REGION AL IN TEGRATION
of adequate technical and management expertise, concerns about losing
trade tax revenues, and concerns about equitable growth and polarized
industrial transformation within the subregion. 
The way forward.
Given the political, institutional, and other problems
that have hampered African integration, especially outside the CFA franc
zone, alternative approaches are needed. One is to stress an outward ori-
entation—or “open regionalism”—and a flexible design, based on coop-
eration between countries, to jointly implement specific projects. These
can  include  transportation  and  communications  infrastructure  and
investment regulation as well as trade policies (Oyejide, Ndulu, and
Greenaway 1999; chapter 5). 
Such an approach is not necessarily incompatible with deeper inte-
gration. It can provide greater flexibility and serve as a building block for
eventual market integration once key constraints to intraregional trade,
investment,  and  labor  movements  have  been  eliminated.  McCarthy
(1999) argues that since the focus is on specific issues, these are depoliti-
cized and present less of a challenge to existing power structures. In time
a culture of regional cooperation will develop, laying the foundation for
market integration and the acceptance of the loss of sovereignty. 
Indeed, since African economies are very small, both individually and
as subgroups, the potential welfare gains from freer trade in Africa may
be limited, at least in the short to medium term. This raises the issue of
whether the principal focus of integration should be on promoting invest-
ment rather than intraregional free trade. Creating an economic space
where investors can produce for regional as well as global markets may
provide small African economies with better growth opportunities than
simply removing barriers to trade among themselves. 
The Cross-Border Initiative is an attempt to operationalize these
principle (box 7.9). As an alternative to “integration by design,” where
countries are bound by treaty obligations, the Cross-Border Initiative
is an example of “integration by emergence.” Under the initiative faster
reformers set the pace of integration within a framework of harmonized
policies that accepts the principle of variable geometry (allowing dif-
ferent groups of countries to proceed at different speeds). Within the
framework of a road map for tariff reform—a set of common targets
for  harmonizing trade policies, but without  a treaty—participating
countries have made good, if uneven, progress in removing barriers to
trade among themselves, while also lowering barriers to trade with third 
parties.
An outward-oriented
integration strategy may
be the best approach
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
C# programmers can convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint Tiff, Jpeg NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links
bookmark pdf documents; add bookmarks to pdf preview
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
how to bookmark a pdf document; create pdf with bookmarks from word
230
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Regional coordination offers African countries many benefits. It could
provide a collective agency of restraint, helping to rationalize trade and
investment policies and enhance their credibility. Beyond trade, regional
cooperation could provide a multilateral lock-in mechanism for orches-
trating convergence criteria on policies, regulations, and licensing. Recent
proposals for trade areas with the European Union and the United States
have been discussed in the context of the renegotiated Lomé Convention
4
and the Africa Growth and Opportunity Act.
5
Both arrangements call for
broader, more reciprocal and participatory economic relationships. Africa
stands to gain by developing a coordinated approach to the two initia-
tives,  especially  since  both  entail  eligibility  criteria  for  participating
African countries. There will continue to be debates on how deep and
how fast integration should proceed in Africa and in what areas. For
example, in the long run it may be desirable for African countries to adopt
a common currency or regional currency zones. But it is not clear how
quickly these measures should be or could be implemented. And given
Africa’s marginalization in world trade, there might be a payoff if coun-
tries coordinated in subregional groups in multilateral negotiations at the
World Trade Organization.
U
NDER
THE
C
ROSS
-B
ORDER
I
NITIATIVE
(CBI),
launched in 1993, 14 countries in East and Southern
Africa and the Indian Ocean have made progress on
“integration by emergence.” For example, the average
trade openness rating of CBI countries—based on an
International Monetary Fund methodology, with 0
being most open and 10 being least—improved from
8.3 in 1993–95 to 5.9 in 1998. (This compares with
an average of 6.2 for all non-CBI African countries
undergoing economic reform and 4.4 for the rest of
the world excluding Africa.) Moreover, a few coun-
tries—Uganda,  Zambia—have  made  considerable
progress toward openness levels (rating of 2) in line
with  those  of  global  good  practice  economies
(Chile, Colombia, Singapore). Nevertheless, since
this approach relies exclusively on peer pressure and
example, without any formal treaty-based enforce-
ment rules, the mechanism for locking in reforms may
not be robust. And there may be complications aris-
ing from overlapping bilateral deals and complex rules
of origin. 
CBI countries have recently moved toward a more
balanced approach, paying more attention to facilitat-
ing investment. For example, they have agreed to har-
monize tariffs, regulations, and investment promotion
policies. This approach combines tariff reform to lower
the antiexport bias of trade policies with specific mea-
sures to remove barriers to cross-border investment.
Specific actions on investment facilitation will be taken
within a flexible framework of harmonization of poli-
cies, but without formal treaty obligations. The poten-
tial  benefits  of  this  approach  would  derive  from
attracting additional  foreign  investment—currently
just 1.2 percent of GDP for participating countries—
to produce for the regional market as well as for global
markets, which offer still larger welfare gains.
Box 7.9 The Cross-Border Initiative’s “ “ Integration by Emergence”
VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
Keep Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint links in PDF document. PDF file editing options, such as editing PDF document hyperlink and navigation
create pdf bookmark; adding bookmarks to a pdf
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
create bookmark pdf file; export pdf bookmarks
231
REO RIENTIN G TRAD E AND PURS UIN G REGION AL IN TEGRATION
Africa and the world trade system
. The World Trade Organization offers a
multilateral forum for Africa to take advantage of a rules-based system for
trade and development. Most African countries have acceded to the World
Trade Organization, and the millennium round negotiations (which started
in November 1999) will offer opportunities—and enormous challenges.
New structures of global governance can increase Africa’s market access
and clarify its rights in the international trading framework. But they also
bring obligations, including giving up a degree of sovereignty over trade
and investment. As a consequence of continued global liberalization, there
will also be a continuing erosion of the preferences enjoyed by African coun-
tries. African countries will incur large financial costs as they create the insti-
tutions and implement the myriad standards demanded by the multilateral
system. For some least developed countries, implementing World Trade
Organization obligations would cost as much as an entire year’s develop-
ment budget. Finger and Schuler (1999, p. 1) note that WTO obligations
reflect little awareness of development problems and little appreciation of
the capacities of the least developed countries. In most cases standards have
been developed with little input from the least developed countries, under-
mining their sense of ownership. More fundamentally, it is not clear that
all of these standards are ideal for the least developed countries, and there
is the ever-present danger that they will be used to protect markets. 
What does this mean for Africa? African countries will need to pay
more attention to multilateral negotiations and try to influence the out-
comes. But only Nigeria and South Africa have six or more representa-
tives at the World Trade Organization in Geneva, while about 20 African
member countries have no representatives (World Bank 1999b). Multi-
lateral institutions can offer technical assistance, including through the
Integrated  Framework  for  Trade  and  Development  in  the  Least
Developed Countries.
6
But a subregional pooling of expertise is essential:
small, poor countries cannot go it alone. 
Africa can use the multilateral system to achieve clearly defined goals.
It can use the opportunity to lock in its reforms and so increase investor
confidence. At the same time, it is important that African countries par-
ticipate in setting the global agenda. They can partner with others to
negotiate for the dismantling of restrictive trade practices that inhibit
export diversification in poor countries. Three areas are important: agri-
culture (chapter 6), processed goods, and textiles and clothing. Free trade
should work for the poor—as well as for the rich. The next opportunity
must not be wasted.
World Trade Organization
rule-making should be
made compatible with
the institutional, human
capital, and
infrastructure
investments required for
poor countries to benefit
from the global trading
system
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
VB.NET programmers can convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint Tiff NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links
create pdf bookmarks; bookmark template pdf
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
conversion. Export PowerPoint hyperlink to PDF in .NET console application. Free online PowerPoint to PDF converter without email.
how to add a bookmark in pdf; bookmark pdf reader
232
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Managing the Business Plan: The Role of the State
Any serious plan for export diversification should include a strategy for
structural economic transformation. Managing this must be the responsi-
bility of the state. Still, nearly all development experiences suggest that
even if the state delivers—providing stable macroeconomic policy, strong
incentives, the rule of law, basic infrastructure, and the like—an adequate
and diversified export response may not come quickly. Why? Because of
market imperfections due to a variety of factors—such as incomplete or
absent information on consumer tastes and producer needs in overseas
markets, on the appropriate technology for producing competitive goods,
and on the requirements for penetrating these markets.
The presence of market imperfections—and they abound in Africa—
suggests an important role for the state in opening up the economy, either
by directly subsidizing activities aimed at internalizing these externalities
or by supporting creative institutional designs (such as exporter associa-
tions) to achieve the same goals. 
Most African states lack the capacity to address these complex tasks.
But such constraints will not just disappear. States have to develop the
capacity to ease them as they pursue economic diversification. For exam-
ple, a number of countries have offered matching grants to stimulate
firms to acquire new technology and overcome critical thresholds, includ-
ing information needed to comply with the standards of export markets.
African firms cannot yet benefit from large agglomerations of skilled
employees and the externalities these provide, so there is a case for subsi-
dizing training. Another possible but debated area is whether to offer tax
holidays. Many countries do so, competing with each other as well as with
countries in other regions. But statutory tax rates in Africa are often high,
and countries might benefit more from moving toward uniform and
lower tax rates as tax bases are broadened. These and other selective mea-
sures should be approached with caution and should be continuously
monitored to assess their effectiveness—in particular, that they do not
simply subsidize activities that firms would do anyway. In addition, the
experiences of other countries offer a useful guide.
Again, Chile provides a compelling case for a limited but important role
for the state in export promotion. Chile and other Latin American coun-
tries are more relevant than Asia for Africa, because their endowments also
include a rich natural resource base. As Chile makes clear, this does not nec-
essarily inhibit development. In particular, abundant natural resources did
The state should manage
structural transformation
and help overcome
market imperfections
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB.NET Export PowerPoint hyperlink to PDF.
bookmarks in pdf files; add bookmarks to pdf reader
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
create bookmarks in pdf; create bookmarks in pdf reader
233
REO RIENTIN G TRAD E AND PURS UIN G REGION AL IN TEGRATION
not prevent industrialization—but industrialization was built on different
foundations than in Asia. Chile’s export promotion polices offer three use-
ful lessons for Africa. First, well-managed temporary subsidies could prime
the growth of nontraditional exports. Second, foreign direct investment is
responsive to activities that open up new export possibilities or introduce
new technologies. Finally, a growth strategy spearheaded by a few niche
exports can pay handsome dividends (Agosin 1997).
Notes
1. Not all of these global standards—most of which are set by more devel-
oped countries—are helpful for Africa. Indeed, achieving these standards can be
extremely costly for African countries (Finger and Schuler 1999). Moreover,
across-the-board implementation of these global standards could limit trade
between developing countries.
2. The Lagos Plan of Action (1980) was a declaration by African heads of
states creating four regional groups (including one for North Africa) that would
merge into an African Economic Union by 2000. 
3. The political will to unite Africa politically and economically was recently
put to the test in a September 1999 summit of the Organization of African Unity
held in Libya. Some 43 heads of state and government attended the summit to
work on a proposal for an African Union, tantamount to the United States, the
former Soviet Union, or the European Union. The African Union will have a
federal supreme court, a central bank, a monetary fund, an investment bank, and
an elected legislature. The union will protect the continent on land, sea, and air
and use the congress to help settle disputes between member states. 
4. The European Union and ministers of the 71 African, Caribbean, and
Pacific countries recently concluded negotiations on a new 20-year partnership
agreement that replaces the Lomé IV Convention (which expired on 29 February
2000). The new agreement is based on three pillars—a political dimension, a
new trade regime, and development cooperation—and will be signed in Fiji in
May 2000. The agreement signaled a radical departure in relations between the
European Union and African, Caribbean, and Pacific countries, toward broader
and more reciprocal economic relations. 
5. In 1999 the U.S. Congress approved the Africa Growth and Opportunity
Act. This initiative is aimed at encouraging U.S. trade and investment in Africa
by removing quotas and barriers for imports from African countries and estab-
lishing a U.S.-Africa free trade area. Political and economic conditions of the
arrangement, however, suggest that some African countries may not be eligible
to participate.
234
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
235
Reducing Aid Dependence and
Debt and Strengthening
Partnerships
I
N
A
FRICA MORE THAN IN ANY OTHER REGION
ENGAGEMENT
with the international community has come in the context of aid
and debt. Africa enters the 21
st
century in the midst of intense
debate on aid dependence and debt relief, two closely related
issues. Past borrowing, accumulated into a huge stock of debt, dis-
courages private investment and circumscribes the effectiveness
of current and future aid. Relief from debt service payments, by releasing
budget resources for other uses, is equivalent to an inflow of resources. It
is unlikely that aid or debt relief can be effective without the other.
While debate continues on the best ways to deliver assistance and effect
debt relief, there is little doubt that most African countries will continue
to need significant aid to achieve the International Development Goals
by 2015. As explained in chapter 1, simply preventing the number of
poor people from increasing requires annual growth of 5 percent, while
cutting the number of poor in half by 2015 will take growth of 7 percent
or more. Especially given the decapitalization of Africa’s economies, sav-
ings levels of 13 percent of GDP in the 1990s are far too low to support
such growth rates. Reversing capital flight can bring additional resources
and, especially when recovering from conflicts, some African economies
have grown rapidly without high investment rates.
But in the long run, even with East Asian efficiency levels, investment of
about 30 percent of GDP will be needed. From worldwide experience,  pri-
vate capital inflows of more than 5 percent of GDP are unlikely to be feasi-
ble or sustainable. Thus Africa faces a substantial savings gap. Aid cannot be
phased out rapidly without high costs in terms of prolonged poverty. Falling
aid, by requiring domestic savings to rise sharply, would prevent a rapid
increase in consumption and slow the reduction in poverty (chapter 3).
Africa also faces new challenges: macroeconomic and structural policies have
C
HA P T E R
8
It is unlikely that aid or
debt relief can be
effective without the
other
236
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
improved, but combating HIV/AIDS in a poor country will cost 1–2 per-
cent of GDP (chapter 4). 
Aid is no longer business as usual. Political support for aid is waning.
Since 1990 foreign assistance from the United States has fallen 20 per-
cent (in real terms) despite a $100 billion cut (in real terms) in the U.S.
defense budget (Summers 2000). Relative to donor GDP, net disburse-
ments of official development assistance have dropped almost 30 percent
in real terms (O’Connell and Soludo forthcoming). The composition of
aid flows is shifting from project assistance and structural adjustment
loans toward humanitarian assistance and peacebuilding. And competi-
tion for aid has intensified, partly because transition economies in Eastern
Europe are now also competing for aid.
Africa has been a loser in these trends. In the late 1980s it was envisaged
that aid to Africa would grow in real terms. But net transfers per capita have
fallen sharply, from $32 in 1990 to $19 in 1998 (figure 8.1). Why?
One factor may be Africa’s lower strategic importance since the end of
the Cold War—as evidenced by the very different global responses to con-
flicts  in  Kosovo and  Sierra  Leone. Another is  donor  fatigue, partly
1970
1977
1984
1991
1998
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
Figure 8.1  Per Capita Transfers of Official Development Assistance 
to Africa, 1970–98
Current dollars
Note: Excludes South Africa.
Source: World Bank data.
Aid is no longer business
as usual
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested