save pdf in folder c# : How to add bookmarks to a pdf SDK application project wpf windows winforms UWP canafricaclaim25-part930

237
REDUC ING AID DE PEND ENC E AND S TRENGT HEN ING PARTNERS HIPS
explained by the belief that aid to Africa has done little to raise growth or
reduce poverty. Indeed, despite large aid inflows (largely offset, however,
by  terms  of  trade  losses;  see  chapter  1),  Africa  has  grown  slowly.
Furthermore, aid—and the programs supported by aid—has not focused
on the poor. A typical poor country receives net transfers of 9 percent of
GDP through aid, but the poorest quintile of the population consumes
only about 4 percent of GDP (chapter 2). 
Many of the factors undermining aid effectiveness are amenable to
reform. They include the support provided for “trusted allies” even
when they pursue poor development policies, donor preferences on aid
objectives and delivery mechanisms, and the effects of the debt over-
hang. And donors and Africans alike are well aware of how a multi-
plicity of aid processes and instruments have weakened accountability
and ownership of development processes in Africa. The aid system is
changing  to  address  these problems. Paradoxically,  however, aid to
Africa is shrinking just as the features that have reduced its effectiveness
are beginning to change. 
Africa and its development partners need to work together for a more
effective developmental aid regime—one that deconcentrates delivery
systems, empowers local communities, and puts Africans in charge of
their development programming, with development partners recogniz-
ing  and  supporting  Africa’s  leadership  and  responsibility.  Intrusive
micromanagement by a host of uncoordinated donors serves no one’s
interests. Rather, it weakens African bureaucratic capacity and account-
ability and undermines aid effectiveness. Aid must not be seen as a sub-
stitute for the productive energies of Africans.
While aid is moving in a new direction, its underlying principles—a
comprehensive  approach,  strong ownership,  selectivity,  participation,
partnership, decentralization—need further refinement. They need to
become integrated with the sociopolitical processes of recipient countries.
Work is needed to include aid flows in recipients’ national budgets and
financial management processes, to coordinate donor and country pro-
cedures, to support decentralization, and to enhance debt relief. In some
cases donors will have to adjust their procedures. 
Aid also needs to support Africa’s changing needs. Mechanisms need
to be developed for regional aid delivery. Programs should not be con-
fined to national borders—they should support economic integration,
encouraging policy coordination and funding public goods such as vac-
cines,  regional  transportation  and  communications  infrastructure,
Aid to Africa is shrinking
just as the features that
have reduced its
effectiveness are
beginning to change
How to add bookmarks to a pdf - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
pdf export bookmarks; creating bookmarks pdf
How to add bookmarks to a pdf - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
bookmarks in pdf reader; adding bookmarks to pdf reader
238
financial infrastructure  for trade,  and centers  for developing critical
skills, including in agricultural research (chapter 6). Aid should also
focus on combating public bads such as multicountry conflict, infec-
tious disease transmission, and drug trafficking. 
Finally, even though aid cannot be phased out rapidly, an exit strategy
is needed. This is not a matter of simply setting a timetable for phasing
out aid. Rather, it requires a serious strategic partnership that enables
Africa to outgrow aid dependence. Africans need to implement a “busi-
ness plan” to reshape domestic regulations and institutions that deter
domestic and foreign investment. For its part, the international commu-
nity should open markets unconditionally to African exports, including
those based on agriculture and processed primary products. This would
be the clearest demonstration of a genuine commitment to Africa’s long-
term development—not dependency.
The Context and Profile of Aid 
A
ID HAS GONE TO
A
FRICA FOR MANY PURPOSES
ONLY ONE OF
which is development. Donors use aid to advance their values,
their commercial interests, their cultural aspirations, and their
diplomatic and political objectives. Aid flows reflect political pressures
from groups in donor countries and bureaucratic imperatives from within
their aid agencies, including pressures to spend all available aid funds
within set budget cycles. The end of the Cold War diminished but did
not eliminate the importance of diplomatic objectives for some govern-
ments. But the Cold War also left a legacy of ineffective aid, partly in the
form of loans that have accumulated into large debt stocks. 
Aid has also served development goals. Development aid has always
sought to raise living standards and reduce poverty in poor countries. But
concepts of how aid can help achieve those goals have shifted almost
decade by decade (box 8.1).
African countries have been among the world’s largest recipients of aid.
Many receive net official development assistance equal to 10 percent of
their GNP (at market exchange rates). In the early 1980s the top five
African aid recipients were Sudan, Tanzania, Kenya, Somalia, and Zaire
(now the Democratic Republic of Congo). All but one of these countries
(Tanzania) played key roles in the Cold War politics of the United States
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
The Cold War left a
legacy of ineffective aid,
partly in the form of loans
that have accumulated
into large debt stocks
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
Document Protect. You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. OutLines. This class describes bookmarks in a PDF document.
how to bookmark a pdf file; adding bookmarks in pdf
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
Document Protect. You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. OutLines. This class describes bookmarks in a PDF document.
create bookmarks pdf file; how to bookmark a pdf page
239
REDUC ING AID DE PEND ENC E AND S TRENGT HEN ING PARTNERS HIPS
S
INCE THE END OF
W
ORLD
W
AR
II 
AID HAS SOUGHT
to raise living standards and reduce poverty in poor
countries. But concepts of how aid can achieve those
goals have shifted considerably. During the 1950s and
1960s access to capital was considered crucial for invest-
ment and growth in poor countries. But private inter-
national capital was limited and disinclined to locate in
poor countries. Thus public international capital was
needed, preferably on highly concessional terms—that
is, foreign aid. Aid needs were estimated on the basis of
a target growth rate, the incremental capital-output
ratio, and the funds available from domestic savings and
international investment. Foreign exchange was seen as
another constraint, so aid needs were also calculated
using balance of payments gaps.
Ideas about aid shifted markedly in the 1970s. It
came to be thought that growth did little to improve the
lot of the poor—and may even worsen relative and
absolute poverty. Thus aid was used more directly to
help meet the basic needs of the poor, usually defined as
basic health and education, rural roads, water, shelter,
sanitation, and tools for increasing employment and
income. Much of this aid was provided through com-
plex development projects and focused on rural areas,
on the assumption that most of the poor lived there.
In the 1970s surging oil prices and the rise and
subsequent collapse of prices for other primary prod-
ucts—combined  with  extensive  commercial  bor-
rowing—produced  a  severe  debt  and  balance  of
payments crisis in many African countries. As gov-
ernments sought debt relief and additional assistance
to  supplement  their  dwindling  foreign  exchange
earnings, donor governments and international insti-
tutions began to condition their aid and debt relief
on stabilization and economic adjustment programs.
So, in the 1980s the focus of aid began to shift back
to policies perceived to enhance growth—but unlike
in the 1960s, the state was often seen as an obstacle
to growth. In Africa aid became an incentive and
source of finance for adjusting exchange rates, reduc-
ing fiscal deficits, reforming monetary policy, liberal-
izing trade, reducing price controls and subsidies, and
shrinking the state’s role in the economy.
In the 1990s development thinking shifted yet again.
Development specialists began asking why investment
and growth remained low even after economic reforms.
The answer they came up with was the quality of gover-
nance. Where public institutions are weak, incompetent,
or corrupt and where governments lack transparency or
predictability, even the best reforms will not produce
growth. A number of developed country governments
came to identify democracy with good governance—and
so pushed for political reforms as part of development.
This phase coincided with the collapse of the socialist
bloc and the spread of democracy through much of the
developing world. In the mid-1990s some development
experts and aid officials also began to argue that aid to
civil society organizations—especially nongovernmental
organizations working on human and civil rights—was
important for development.
Several other shifts in development thinking occurred
in the 1990s. There was a renewed emphasis on poverty
reduction as a key purpose of aid. And there was increas-
ing emphasis on addressing transnational problems. The
discourse on aid and development has begun to incor-
porate these concerns by emphasizing environmental
issues (such as global warming) and the spread of infec-
tious disease. What is often not recognized is that a con-
cern with global problems implies a shift from promoting
growth and poverty reduction in the world’s poor coun-
tries toward addressing problems wherever they occur. 
A final shift evident at the end of the 1990s involved
a growing emphasis on social justice and humanitarian
assistance. The emphasis on gender equality, the im-
portance of integrating ethnic minorities into society,
and efforts to help the disabled and street children and
to empower local communities arise as much from the
strongly held values of groups supporting these pro-
grams as from the contribution such  activities can
make to development.
Source:Lancaster 1999.
Box 8.1 Changing Thinking on Aid
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. Comments, forms and multimedia. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
add bookmark pdf file; how to add bookmark in pdf
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
document file. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview
bookmark pdf acrobat; auto bookmark pdf
240
and other major Western powers. By 1997 only one of these countries
(Tanzania again) remained among the top five aid recipients; the others
were Mozambique,  Uganda,  Madagascar,  and Ethiopia. These  latter
countries had undertaken extensive political and economic reforms, and
Ethiopia, Mozambique, and Uganda were recovering from long civil
wars. Changes in the composition of the top recipients reflect the shift-
ing considerations of donors—geopolitical strategic alliance is no longer
the dominant factor.
Since independence France has been the largest source of aid to Africa,
primarily for its former colonies in West and Central Africa. Two multi-
lateral institutions, the World Bank (through its soft loan window, the
International Development Association) and the European Union, have
periodically traded places as the second and third largest donors to Africa.
Aid flows to Africa have become less concentrated. In 1981–82 the
five largest bilateral and multilateral aid sources (France, the World Bank,
the European Union, Germany, the United States) provided three-quar-
ters of net aid flows. By 1997 the five largest sources (the World Bank,
France, the European Union, Germany, Japan) provided just over half of
net aid flows. Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) headquartered in
developed countries have become increasing sources of aid to Africa,
using resources from the citizens of their countries as well as their official
aid agencies.
The purposes of aid are not broken down by region, but data pub-
lished by the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee show the
worldwide breakdown. In 1997 technical assistance accounted for one-
quarter of bilateral assistance, and the amount from multilateral sources
is believed to be substantial. At some $4 billion a year, technical assis-
tance has been one of the largest components of official development
assistance  to  Africa.  Quick-disbursing  aid  in  support  of  economic
reforms has averaged $3.1 billion a year excluding debt relief (World
Bank 1998). The remaining aid has funded investment projects and
other activities.
Aid to Africa is not only to governments. NGOs (indigenous and for-
eign) have proliferated in number and activities, and many donors chan-
nel their aid through them. In 1997 donors channeled 2 percent of their
worldwide aid—nearly $1 billion—through NGOs. (These data do not
include private funds raised and spent by NGOs). It would be surprising
if this percentage were not higher in Africa given the growing reliance by
the United States and other major aid donors on NGOs to implement
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Nongovernmental
organizations have
become increasing
sources of aid to Africa
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Add necessary references: The following VB.NET codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
how to bookmark a pdf in reader; how to create bookmark in pdf with
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
how to create bookmark in pdf automatically; export pdf bookmarks to text file
241
their programs, especially for relief and reconstruction. The United States
estimates that more than one-third of its development assistance world-
wide is channeled through NGOs.
Influences on and Outcomes of Aid
D
ESPITE CRITICISMS
AID HAS HAD MANY SUCCESSES IN
A
FRICA
controlling river blindness in West Africa, expanding family
planning in Kenya and elsewhere, developing and disseminat-
ing better varieties of maize in Kenya and Zimbabwe and of rice in West
Africa, developing and spreading oral rehydration treatment. These and
other achievements have improved the lives of many Africans. Even in
difficult environments, aid has funded many productive investment pro-
jects—roads, ports, public utilities and communication facilities, vacci-
nation programs, the expansion of schools and health clinics.
Without increased balance of payments support in the 1980s, it is hard
to imagine how Africa would have coped with huge terms of trade losses.
In postwar countries such as Mozambique, generous aid has underpinned
political reconciliation (chapter 2). Aid has also helped sustain essential
reforms, including trade liberalization, that have adverse short-run effects
on fiscal revenues. And donors, including international financial institu-
tions, have  been crucial for  building capacity in certain institutions,
notably central banks and ministries of finance. 
Yet the perception of a disappointing record on growth and poverty
reduction has prompted questions. Where did all the aid money go, and
what has it bought? Why, despite high aid flows, was the income of the
average African lower in 1997 than in 1970? Was this due only to exoge-
nous factors, such as civil wars or terms of trade losses? A number of
donors—the World Bank, U.S. Agency for International Development,
U.K. Department  for  International  Development,  France,  Sweden—
assess the effectiveness of their aid by sector and region. These assessments
often show less success in Africa in areas such as agricultural and rural
development, development finance organizations, industrial projects, and
especially projects (such as civil service reform) intended to strengthen
African institutions. If aid had fully augmented national savings and high
productivity was maintained, it would have raised per capita income in
Zambia to levels comparable to those in OECD countries (Easterly 1997).
REDUC ING AID DE PEND ENC E AND S TRENGT HEN ING PARTNERS HIPS
Despite criticisms, aid
has had many successes
in Africa
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; PDF Text Write & Extract. Insert and add text to any page of PDF document with
create pdf bookmarks from word; export pdf bookmarks to text
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail Convert Word to PDF; Convert Word to HTML5; Convert Add and insert a blank page or multiple
bookmarks in pdf from word; copy bookmarks from one pdf to another
242
Aid has clearly not been the only factor at work. But why are outcomes so
far from the possibilities?
Poor Selectivity
The domestic environment is a critical determinant of aid effectiveness.
Some aspects of Africa’s geography that have been held to impede devel-
opment—its tropical location, variable (and in some cases low) rainfall,
small share of population near the coast (Bloom and Sachs 1998)—also
reduce the returns to aid. Poorly managed, extensive natural resources can
also inhibit development, making governments less accountable to their
people and spurring civil conflicts as groups vie to control resources (chap-
ter 2). But geography and resources are not destiny. The remarkable eco-
nomic progress made by Botswana—located in the tropics, landlocked
with a small population, and endowed with abundant mineral resources,
but with a demonstrated record of using aid well—shows that these fac-
tors are not insurmountable obstacles to development or to effective aid.
Policies can be even more important than physical factors. Collier and
Dollar (1999) show that aid is more effective when it goes to countries
with  sound economic  management—yet this criterion has had  little
influence on allocations. To be most efficient in reducing poverty, aid
should be higher for countries with better policies and lower incomes.
Instead, aid flows surge to countries with poor policies (figure 8.2), then
are phased out prematurely as policies improve, even in poor countries.
This approach greatly lowers the efficiency of assistance and its potential
for increasing growth and reducing poverty.
Can aid encourage good policies? Much of the recent debate on aid
effectiveness has been couched in polar terms: whether aid should be
given before or after proven reforms. One World Bank study argues that
there is little relationship between aid and policy reform (Burnside and
Dollar 1997). Where there is a significant domestic constituency for eco-
nomic reform or where donors can anticipate turning points in govern-
ment policies, aid can encourage reform. But turning points are not
always easy to recognize.
Further, donors have undermined potential incentives by providing
aid even where conditions for its effectiveness are unfavorable. When aid
is given to serve the political, military, and commercial interests of donors
(or for humanitarian purposes), there is less chance that it will spur sound
development policies. 
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
To be most efficient in
reducing poverty, aid
should be higher for
countries with better
policies and lower
incomes
243
Aid Delivery Mechanisms and Their Institutional Impacts
Donors loom large in Africa’s small, aid-dependent countries, shaping
development  policies and  identifying,  designing,  implementing,  and
evaluating projects. Donor dominance has several implications for the
environment in which aid is implemented.
Weakened ownership of development policies and programs.
A lot of aid comes
with a lot of conditions attached. Even if donors’ desired policies are
appropriate—and the record confirms that good policies are needed for
growth and poverty reduction—they are rarely negotiated with broad
local consultation and so are widely seen by Africans as imposed. This
creates what has been dubbed “choiceless democracy.”
Compounding the problem, aid programs are highly fragmented. In the
health sector alone the typical aid-receiving African country might have
30–40 donor and NGO initiatives, all with different priorities and proce-
dures. To circumvent the weaknesses of African governments, donors often
create project implementation units to ensure adequate accountability and
rapid implementation. But in many cases these arrangements make mat-
REDUC ING AID DE PEND ENC E AND S TRENGT HEN ING PARTNERS HIPS
0
1.0
5.0
4.5
4.0
3.5
3.0
2.5
2.0
1.5
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Figure 8.2  Actual Aid, Poverty-Reducing Aid, and Policy Ratings
Percentage of GDP
Actual aid
Poverty-reducing aid
Policy rating
Note: Policy ratings are based on the World Bank's Country Policy and Institutional Assessments, 
which rank country policies from 1 (bad) to 6 (good).
Source: Collier and Dollar 1999.
Donor programs are
fragmented and rarely
negotiated with broad
constituencies
244
ters worse, preventing integrated management of public spending and
siphoning off talented civil servants (through high salaries) to work as pro-
ject managers or consultants for donors. 
The accounting standards and salary scales of the aid “economy” frag-
ment budgets and programs and divert senior government officials from
development challenges. Senior officials often spend more than half their
time dealing with donors: seeking funds, negotiating, writing multiple
reports, and managing successive rounds of debt relief. 
Less accountability to Africans.
Since at least the early 1990s, bilateral
donors have offered support for democracy in Africa, while multilateral
organizations  have  stressed  broad  participation  in  development  pro-
grams. Aid is not the cause of weak institutions in Africa; institutions are
no stronger in countries, such as Nigeria, where aid flows have been
smaller. But when institutions are already weak, aid can make recipient
governments less accountable to their people. With donors providing
much development funding, there is less incentive to strengthen domes-
tic accountability and economic governance  for the use of resources
(chapters 1 and 2). And with donors micromanaging aid, in many coun-
tries development activities are reduced to satisfying their demands. 
Capacity building—and destruction.
Despite massive technical assistance,
aid programs have probably weakened capacity in Africa. Technical assis-
tance has displaced local expertise and drawn away civil servants to
administer aid-funded programs—precisely the opposite of the capac-
ity-building intentions of donors and recipients. In some countries tech-
nical  assistance  accounts  for  40  percent  of  aid,  and  much  of  the
remaining aid is tied. But with large numbers of technical experts from
donor countries in Africa—estimated by some at 100,000—a lot of
technical assistance is also effectively tied, flowing back to donor coun-
tries  with  less  long-run  impact  on  the  development  of  recipients’
economies.
Reduced sustainability and transparency.
Aid and its accompanying reforms
have not been well marketed. As a result recipient countries have a lim-
ited understanding of what aid and its reforms intend to achieve and how
they intend to achieve it. Aid agencies used to seek allies within African
governments who were supportive of reforms (often ministers of finance
and governors of central banks). But these allies were often limited in
number and not always in office for the time needed to implement and
consolidate reforms. Understanding the ends and means of aid-funded
programs has therefore been a problem in Africa, especially where com-
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Senior officials often
spend more than half
their time dealing with
donors
245
plicated reforms or technical assistance programs have been urged on gov-
ernments by bilateral and multilateral aid agencies.
Stories of African officials not even having access to studies and data
developed by multilateral institutions are common, so it is hardly sur-
prising that such officials have invested little in the success of such pro-
grams. Neither have parliaments been adequately involved in discussions
on aid and its applications—even though these usually have sizable bud-
get impacts. But over the past 10 years considerable efforts have been
made to strengthen consultative processes and to share data. (For exam-
ple, the World Bank is making its databases available in electronic form.)
And there appears to be better understanding and support for reforms
than 10 or 20 years ago. 
Funding difficulties and complexities have also weakened sustainabil-
ity. Rather than fund balanced programs fully integrated with national
budgets, donors have supported capital investments without adequate
attention to the need for both counterpart funding and additional domes-
tic resources to operate and maintain facilities. Without sufficient bud-
get  support,  investments  are  likely  to  be  ineffectively  used  and
maintained—especially  with  debt  service  draining  public  budgets.
Finally, the number and complexity of aid projects have sometimes over-
whelmed African government agencies, leading to their collapse once aid
ends. The integrated rural development projects of the 1970s and early
1980s required that multiple activities be managed and coordinated by a
variety of government ministries—a challenge that would have taxed even
the most efficient governments in developed countries.
Excessive country focus.
Africa is the world’s most fragmented region. It
is demarcated by 165 borders into 48 countries—22 with less than 5 mil-
lion people, 11 with less than 1 million. Small size imposes real con-
straints  on  development,  and  without  economic  cooperation  and
integration  Africa will  fall further behind the global frontier (Jaycox
1992, p. 66). 
Yet with few exceptions, aid programs are confined to national eco-
nomic spaces. African countries confront similar economic problems—
and so need to support regional and international public goods (box 8.2).
Regional public goods include regional infrastructure (roads, railways,
ports, electric distribution and power-pooling systems), infectious disease
control, centers of excellence for training, the underpinnings of regional
markets and trade, and agricultural research and early warning systems
for drought. A regional approach could lead to lower costs and faster
REDUC ING AID DE PEND ENC E AND S TRENGT HEN ING PARTNERS HIPS
Recipient countries have
a limited understanding
of what aid and its
reforms intend to achieve
and how they intend to
achieve it
246
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
growth than individual country efforts, while also encouraging policy
coordination.
Excessive debt.
High debt crowds out the effects of new aid in two ways
(Elbadawi, Ndulu, and Ngung’u 1996). First, in stagnant economies rising
debt service drains the fiscal resources needed for development. Even if total
aid inflows exceed debt service outflows, most aid goes to projects: quick-
disbursing nonproject assistance is less than debt service payments. As a
result funds for recurrent spending shrink even as programs proliferate.
Second, a large stock of debt may signal taxes on future success and raises
questions about the credibility and sustainability of announced reforms.
High and fixed debt service obligations increase countries’ leverage and raise
uncertainty, especially if donor funding is decided on a short-term basis. In
such circumstances investors wait until returns are high enough to cover
their risk. Some have argued that debt relief encourages moral hazard. But
sustaining large volumes of unserviceable debt does the same thing. It can
pressure donors to continue funding countries despite weak development
T
WO PROPERTIES DISTINGUISH PUBLIC GOODS FROM
other goods. There is no easy way to extract payment
from those who use them—so they are nonexcludable.
And one user’s consumption does not diminish the
benefits available to others—so their benefits are non-
rivalrous. International public goods (or bads) gener-
ate benefits (or harms) that spill over national borders,
either within a region or globally. “Public” does not
necessarily imply that government must supply the
good. Some (such as national defense) are indeed pro-
vided by the government. But others may be offered
by the private sector or by both the private and public
sectors.
International public goods differ from one another
along at least three dimensions—the geographic range
of benefit spillovers, the individual actions needed to
supply the good, and the extent to which potential
beneficiaries can be excluded. Each of these features
has implications for schemes to address undersupply—
and hence, for development assistance. In particular,
the different geographic extent of spillovers gives rise
to the principle of subsidiarity, in which cross-border
issues are dealt with at the relevant level of decentral-
ization through available institutions.
Some global public goods—limiting global warm-
ing, curbing organized crime—are not especially rele-
vant to Africa. But others—such as finding an effective
vaccine against HIV/AIDS—are of special importance.
The low income of many of those affected (or poten-
tially infected) by HIV/AIDS has led to calls for donors
to support private research by committing to purchase
an effective vaccine, once developed, for distribution in
Africa. Eliminating malaria is an example of a regional
good, as are transit corridors, immunization programs,
and  peacekeeping  forces.  Policy  coordination  that
widens  the  scope of  markets and  investments  and
increases efficiency can also be considered a regional
public good.
Source:Kanbur, Sandler, and Morrisson 1999.
Box 8.2 Public Goods and Development Assistance
High debt crowds out
new aid
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested