save pdf in folder c# : Convert excel to pdf with bookmarks software application cloud windows html asp.net class canafricaclaim27-part932

257
REDUC ING AID DE PEND ENC E AND S TRENGT HEN ING PARTNERS HIPS
modities, including agricultural products. To help shift African countries
away from aid dependence, development partners must do all they can
to accelerate these developments.
Protectionist policies in industrial countries have not been the main
cause of Africa’s declining trade share. But many impediments to open
market access affect sectors where Africa can probably realize compar-
ative advantage (chapters 6, 7). These include barriers to processed and
temperate agricultural products and textiles and clothing, as well as
large subsidies for agricultural products that compete with exports from
Africa. Even moderately higher tariffs for, say, wood and leather prod-
ucts or textiles and clothing confer high protection on processing indus-
tries in industrial countries. And the threat of antidumping restrictions
and other measures imposed to slow “disruptive” import growth—such
as the restraint on clothing exports from Kenya to the United States—
increases risk to potential investors. Africa must also cope with new
requirements,  including  sanitary  and  phytosanitary  standards,  that
were  less  restrictive  when  other  exporters  were  establishing  their
footholds.
Thus there are many areas outside aid for forging a development pact
with Africa. Emerging exporters should be granted full, tariff-free access
to OECD markets for a wide range of exports, with exemptions from
antidumping measures, countervailing duties, and other safeguards that
create uncertainty about access. Such arrangements can be made com-
patible  with World  Trade  Organization requirements  by embedding
them in a framework of reciprocity, where African countries and their
industrial trading partners gradually move toward free trade arrange-
ments, with a longer transition in Africa. This principle is included in the
successor to the Lomé Convention negotiated in Fiji in January 2000 and
underlies the Africa Trade and Opportunity Act being discussed in the
United States (chapter 7).
Implementation of such proposals should not be piecemeal. Special
efforts should be made to eliminate tariff peaks and high effective pro-
tection to processing industries, extending tariff cuts to all stages of pro-
duction. Rules of origin will need to be generous so that they do not
impede  economic  integration  in  Africa.  Industrial  countries  should
ensure that information is easily available on technical regulations, prod-
uct standards, and sanitary and phytosanitary standards. A fund could be
created to help new exporters test products and meet standards, includ-
ing through changes in processing and marketing. And standards should
There are many areas
outside aid for forging a
development pact with
Africa
Convert excel to pdf with bookmarks - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
how to bookmark a pdf file in acrobat; bookmark pdf in preview
Convert excel to pdf with bookmarks - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
add bookmarks pdf; create bookmark pdf
258
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
be implemented in a way that minimizes costs, avoiding duplicative test-
ing and excessive charges. 
Because Africa’s exports are so small, such measures would have minor
costs for industrial countries. To be fully effective, they need to be imple-
mented  with  other  measures  to  sustain  aid  levels  and  improve  aid
processes—including to make better use of technical assistance to sup-
port capacity building in recipient countries. For the moment the goal
must be “trade with aid” rather than “trade not aid.” But fully opening
markets to Africa sends an important signal that donors are genuinely
committed to Africa’s long-term development.
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Bookmarks. Comments, forms and multimedia. Convert smooth lines to curves. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
bookmarks pdf file; export pdf bookmarks to excel
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF file by top level bookmarks. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
how to add bookmarks to a pdf; how to add bookmarks to pdf files
259
References
Chapter 1
Ablo, Emmanuel, and Ritva Reinikka. 1998. “Do Budgets
Really Matter?  Evidence from  Public  Spending  on
Education and Health in Uganda.” Policy Research
Working Paper 1926. World Bank, Washington, D.C. 
Agenor,  Pierre-Richard.  1998.  “Stabilization  Policies,
Poverty  and  the  Labor  Market.”  International
Monetary  Fund, Research  Department, and World
Bank, Economic Development Institute. Washington,
D.C.
Auty,  Richard  M.  1998.  “Resource  Abundance  and
Economic  Development.”  Research  for  Action 44.
United  Nations  University,  World  Institute  for
Development Economics Research, Helsinki.
Azam, Jean Paul, Augustin Fosu, and Njuguna Ndung’u.
1999:  “Explaining  Slow  Growth  in  Africa.”
Background  paper  prepared  for  Africa  in  the  21
st
Century Project. World Bank, Washington, D.C.
Blackden,  Mark,  and  Chitra  Bhanu.  1999.  Gender,
Growth,  and  Poverty  Reduction:  Special Program of
Assistance for Africa, 1998 Status Report on Poverty in
Sub-Saharan Africa. World Bank Technical Paper 428.
Washington, D.C.
Bloom,  David  E.,  and  Jeffrey  D.  Sachs.  1998.
“Geography, Demography and Economic Growth in
Africa.”  Brookings  Papers  on  Economic  Activity 2.
Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution.
CBI  (Cross-Border  Initiative).  1999.  “Cross-Border
Initiative:  Road  Map  for  Investment  Facilitation.”
Paper prepared for the Fourth Ministerial Conference,
25 March. 
Collier, Paul. 1999. “On the Economic Consequences of
Civil War.” Oxford Economic Papers51: 168–83.
Collier, Paul, and David Dollar. 1999. “Aid Allocation
and Poverty Reduction.” World Bank, Washington,
D.C.
Collier, Paul, and Jan W. Gunning. 1998. “Explaining
African Economic Performance.” Journal of Economic
Literature 37 (March): 64–111.
———. 1999. “Why Has Africa Grown Slowly?” Journal
of Economic Perspectives 13 (3): 3–22.
Dabalen, Andrew. 1999. “Labor Markets in Sub-Saharan
Africa:  A  Review.”  World  Bank,  Africa  Region,
Washington, D.C.
Demery, Lionel, and Micheal Walton. 1998. “Are Poverty
Reduction  and  Other  Twenty-first  Century  Social
Goals Attainable?” World Bank, Washington, D.C. 
Devarajan, Shanta, William Easterly, and Howard Pack.
1999. “Is Investment in Africa Too Low or Too High?”
World Bank, Washington, D.C.
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Demo Code in VB.NET. The following VB.NET codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
adding bookmarks to pdf document; bookmarks pdf files
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. Comments, forms and multimedia. Hidden layer content. Convert smooth lines to curves. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document.
creating bookmarks pdf files; creating bookmarks pdf files
260
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Dollar, David, and Craig Burnside. 1997. “Aid, Policies,
and Growth.” Policy Research Working Paper 1777.
World Bank, Washington, D.C.
Easterly,  William,  and  Ross  Levine.  1997.  “Africa’s
Growth  Tragedy:  Policies  and  Ethnic  Divisions.”
Quarterly Journal of Economics112: 1203–50.
Elbadawi, Ibrahim, and Francis Mwega. Forthcoming.
“Can  Africa’s  Saving  Collapse  Be  Reverted?”  The
World Bank Economic Review.
Freedom House. Various years. Freedom in the World: The
Annual Survey of Political Rights & Civil Liberties. New
York. 
Gelb, Alan H. 1988. Oil Windfalls: Blessing or Curse? New
York: Oxford University Press. 
Gelb, Alan H., and Robert Floyd. 1998. “The Challenge
of  Globalization  for  Africa.”  World  Bank,  Africa
Region, Washington, D.C. 
Guillamont, Patrick, Sylvaine Guillamont-Jeanneney, and
Aristeme Varoudakis. 1999. “Economic Policy Reform
and  Growth  Prospects  in  Emerging  African
Economies.”  Development  Centre Technical  Paper
145.  Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development, Paris. 
Hamilton, Kirk, and Michael Clemens. 1999. “Genuine
Savings Rates in Developing Countries.” The World
Bank Economic Review 13 (May): 333–56.
Hoeffler, Anke. 1999. “Augmented Solow Model and the
African  Growth  Debate.”  Paper  presented  at  the
African Economic Research Consortium Workshop,
Harvard University, 26–27 March, Cambridge, Mass.
IDA  (International  Development  Association).  1998.
IDA Portfolio Review. Washington, D.C.
IMF (International Monetary Fund). 1997. “The ESAF at
Ten Years: Economic Adjustment and Reform in Low-
Income  Countries.”  Occasional  Paper  156.
Washington, D.C.
———. 1998. “External  Evaluation  of the  Enhanced
Structural Adjustment Facility: Report by a Group of
Independent Experts.” Washington, D.C. 
Kostopoulos,  Christos.  1999.  “Progress  in  Public
Expenditure Management in Africa: Evidence from
World Bank Surveys.” Africa Region Working Paper 1.
World Bank, Washington, D.C.
Mkandawire, Thandika, and Charles Soludo. 1999. Our
Continent, Our Future. Trenton, N.J.: Africa World
Press. 
Myrdal, Gunnar. 1968. Asian Drama: An Inquiry into the
Poverty of Nations. New York: Twentieth Fund.
Ndulu,  Benno  J.  1986.  “Governance  and  Economic
Management.” In Robert J. Berg and Jennifer Seymour
Whitaker,  eds.,  Strategies  for  African  Development.
Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press. 
OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development). 1996. Shaping the 21
st
Century: The
Contribution of Development Co-operation. Paris.
OED  (Operations  Evaluation  Department).  1998a.
Annual  Review  of  Development  Effectiveness.
Washington, D.C.: World Bank.
———.  1998b. The Special Program of Assistance  for
Africa (SPA): An Independent Evaluation. Washington,
D.C.: World Bank.
Ottaway, Marina. 1999. “Africa.” Foreign Policy (spring):
13–24.
Reinikka, Ritva, and Jakob Svensson. 1998. “Investment
Response  to  Structural  Reforms  and  Remaining
Constraints: Firm Survey Evidence From Uganda.”
World Bank, Africa Region, Washington, D.C.
Rodrik,  Dani.  1998a.  “Trade  Policy  and  Economic
Performance in Sub-Saharan Africa.” NBER Working
Paper 6562. National Bureau of Economic Research,
Cambridge, Mass.
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
it extremely easy for C# developers to convert and transform document file, converted by C#.NET PDF to HTML all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and font
create pdf with bookmarks from word; how to add bookmark in pdf
XDoc.Excel for .NET, Comprehensive .NET Excel Imaging Features
zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Excel Convert. Convert Excel to PDF; Convert Excel
copy pdf bookmarks; excel pdf bookmarks
261
REFE RENC ES
———. 1998b. “Where Did All the Growth Go? External
Shocks,  Social  Conflict  and  Growth  Collapses.”
Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.
———.  1999.  “Making  Openness  Work:  The  New
Global  Economy  and  the  Developing  Countries.”
Overseas Development Council, Washington, D.C. 
Transparency  International.  1998.  “1998  Corruption
Perceptions  Index.”  Press  release.  Gottingen
University, Germany. 
UNCTAD (United Nations Conference on Trade and
Development). 1998. Trade and Development Report.
Geneva.
———.  1999.  Foreign  Direct  Investment  in  Africa:
Performance and Potential. Geneva.
UNDP  (United  Nations  Development  Programme).
1998. Human Development Report 1998. New York:
Oxford University Press.
UNECA (United Nations Economic  Commission for
Africa).  1999.  Annual  Report  1999.  Addis  Ababa,
Ethiopia.
Weder, Beatrice, Aymo Brunetti, and Gregory Kisunko.
1998. “Credibility of Rules and Economic Growth:
Evidence  from a Worldwide Survey  of the  Private
Sector.” The  World Bank  Economic Review 12  (3):
353–84. 
Wood, Adrian, and Jorg Mayer. 1998. “Africa’s Export
Structure  in  a  Comparative  Perspective.”  United
Nations  Conference  on  Trade  and  Development,
Geneva.
World Bank. 1989. Africa’s Adjustment and Growth in the
1980s. Washington, D.C.
———. 1994. Adjustment in Africa: Reforms, Results, and
the Road Ahead. A Policy Research Report. New York:
Oxford University Press.
———. 1996. A Continent in Transition: Sub-Saharan
Africa in the Mid-1990s. Washington, D.C.
———. 1997. Confronting AIDS: Public Priorities in a
Global Epidemic. A Policy Research Report. New York:
Oxford University Press.
———. 1998a. Africa Can Compete! A Framework for
World  Bank  Group  Support  for  Private  Sector
Development  in  Sub-Saharan  Africa.  Africa  Region,
Washington, D.C.
———.  1998b.  Global  Economic  Prospects  and  the
Developing Countries. Washington, D.C.
———. 1998c. “Higher Impact Adjustment Lending in
Sub-Saharan Africa: An Update.” Africa Region, Chief
Economist’s Office, Washington, D.C.
———. 1999a. Intensifying Action Against HIV/AIDS in
Africa:  Responding  to  a  Development  Crisis.  Africa
Region, Washington, D.C.
———.  1999b.  World  Development  Report  1998/99:
Knowledge  for  Development.  New  York:  Oxford
University Press.
Yeats,  Alexander  J.  1999.  “Have  Policy  Reforms
Influenced  the  Trade  Performance  of  Sub-Saharan
African Countries?” World Bank, Washington, D.C.
Chapter 2
Biggs, Tyler, Mayank  Raturi,  and Pradeep  Srivastava.
1996. “Enforcement of Contracts in an African Credit
Market:  Working  Capital  and  Finance  in  Kenyan
Manufacturing.” RPED Discussion Paper 71. World
Bank, Washington, D.C.
Bratton,  Michael, and  Nicholas  van  de  Walle.  1997.
Democratic  Experiments  in  Africa.  New  York:
Cambridge University Press.
Chege,  Michael.  1999.  “Politics  of  Development:
Institutions and Governance.” Global Coalition for
Africa, Washington, D.C.
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Create PDF from Word (docx, doc); Create PDF from Excel (xlsx, xls); Create PDF PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx); Convert PDF to HTML; Convert PDF to Tiff
export pdf bookmarks to excel; add bookmarks to pdf online
XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
& rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. PowerPoint Convert. Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert
bookmark pdf in preview; convert word to pdf with bookmarks
262
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Collier, Paul. 1994. “Demobilization and Insecurity: A
Study in the Economics of the Transition from War to
Peace.” Journal of International Development.
———.  1998.  “The  Role  of  the  State  in  Economic
Development: Cross-regional Experiences.” Journal of
African Economies 7 (2): 38–76.
———.  1999.  “The  Challenge  of  Uganda  Recon-
struction,  1986–98.”  World  Bank,  Development
Research Group, Washington, D.C.
Collier,  Paul,  and  Hans  Binswanger.  1999.  “Ethnic
Loyalties, State Formation and Conflict.” Background
paper prepared for Africa in the 21st Century Project.
World Bank, Washington, D.C.
Collier, Paul, and Anke Hoeffler. 1998. “On Economic
Causes  of Civil War.” Oxford Economic  Papers 50:
563–73.
———. 1999. “Loot-Seeking and Justice-Seeking in Civil
War.” World Bank, Development Research Group,
Washington, D.C.
Collier,  Paul,  and  Sanjay  Pradhan.  1998.  “Economic
Aspects of the Ugandan Transition to Peace.” In H. B.
Hansen and M. Twaddle, eds., Developing Uganda.
London: James Curry.
Collier,  Paul,  Ibrahim  Elbadawi,  and  Nicholas
Sambanis. 2000a. “How Much War Will We See?
Estimating the Likelihood and Amount of War in 161
Countries, 1960–1998.” World Bank, Washington,
D.C.
———. 2000b. “Why Are There So Many Civil Wars in
Africa?” World Bank, Development Research Group,
Washington, D.C.
Collier,  Paul,  Anke  Hoeffler,  and  Catherine  Pattillo.
1999. “Flight Capital As a Portfolio Choice.” Policy
Research  Working  Paper  2066.  World  Bank,
Washington, D.C.
Collier, Paul, Anke Hoeffler, and Mans Soderbom. 1999.
“ On the Duration of Civil War and Post-War Peace.”
University of Oxford, Centre for the Study of African
Economies, Oxford.
Doyle,  Michael  W.,  and  Nicholas  Sambanis.  1999.
“Peacebuilding:  A  Theoretical  and  Quantitative
Analysis.”  Working  paper.  Princeton  University,
Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International
Affairs,  Center  of  International  Studies,  Princeton,
N.J.
Elbadawi, Ibrahim. 1999. “The Tragedy of the Civil War
in the Sudan and Its Economic Consequences.” In Karl
Wohlmuth,  ed.,  Empowerment  and  Economic
Development in Africa: African Development Perspectives
Yearbook.  New  Brunswick,  N.J.  and  London:
Transactions Publishers. 
Gurr, Ted R., and Keith Jaggers. 1999. Polity 98 Project.
http://www.bsos.umd.edu/cidcm/polity/
Johnson, R.W., and Lawrence  Schlemmer, eds. 1996.
Launching Democracy in South Africa. New Haven,
Conn.:Yale University Press.
Lancaster,  Carol.  1999.  Aid  to  Africa.  Chicago,  Ill.:
University of Chicago Press.
Legum,  Colin.  1999.  Africa  since  Independence.
Bloomington: University of Indiana Press.
Lewis, W. Arthur. 1965. Politics in West Africa. Toronto:
Oxford University Press.
Lijphart, Arend. 1977. Democracy in Plural Societies: A
Comparative  Exploration. New Haven,  Conn.: Yale
University Press.
Mamdani,  Mahmood.  1996.  Citizen  and  Subject.
Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.
Mkandawire, Thandika, and Charles Soludo. 1999. Our
Continent, Our Future. Trenton, N.J.: Africa World
Press.
263
REFE RENC ES
Nohlen,  Dieter,  Michael  Krennerich,  and  Bernard
Thibaut. 1999. Elections in Africa: A Data Handbook.
New York: Oxford University Press.
Rodrik, Dani. 1998. “Globalisation, Social Conflict and
Economic Growth.” World Economy 21: 143–58.
Sen, Amartya. 1994. “Economic Regress: Concepts and
Features.” In Michael Bruno and Boris Pleskovic, eds.,
Proceedings of the World Bank Annual Conference on
Development  Economics  1993.  Washington,  D.C.:
World Bank.
Soyinka, Wole. 1999. The Burden of Memory and the Muse
of Forgiveness. New York: Oxford University Press.
Tilly, Charles. 1993. European Revolutions, 1492–1992.
Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell.
Young, Crawford. 1994. The African Colonial State in
Comparative  Perspective. New  Haven,  Conn.:  Yale
University Press.
Zartman,  I.  William,  ed.  1995.  Collapsed  States:  The
Disintegration and Restoration of Legitimate Authority.
Boulder, Colo.: Lynne Reinner Publishers.
Chapter 3
Alesina, Alberto, and Dani Rodrik. 1994. “Distributive
Politics and Economic Growth.” Quarterly Journal of
Economics 109 (2): 465–90.
Ali,  A.G.  Ali. 1999. “Inequality  and Development  in
Africa: Issues for the 21
st
Century.” Background paper
prepared for Africa in the 21
st
Century Project. World
Bank, Washington, D.C.
Ali, A.G. Ali, and Ibrahim Elbadawi. 1999. “Inequality
and  the  Dynamics  of  Poverty  and Growth.”  CID
Working Paper 32. Harvard University, Center for
International Development, Cambridge, Mass.
Appleton, Simon. 1999. “Education and Health at the
Household  Level  in  Sub-Saharan  Africa.”  CID
Working Paper 33. Harvard University, Center for
International Development, Cambridge, Mass.
Castro-Leal, Florencia, Julia Dayton, Lionel Demery, and
Kalpana Mehra.  1999. “Public  Social Spending in
Africa: Do the Poor Benefit?” The World Bank Research
Observer 14 (February): 49–72. 
Deininger, Klaus, and Lyn Squire. 1996. “A New Data Set
Measuring  Income  Inequality.”  The  World  Bank
Economic Review 10 (September): 565–91.
———. 1998. “New Ways of Looking at Old Issues:
Inequality  and  Growth.”  Journal  of  Development
Economics 57: 259–87.
Demery, Lionel. 1999. “Poverty in Africa: Capability,
Opportunity and Security.” Background paper pre-
pared for Africa in the 21
st
Century Project. World
Bank, Washington, D.C. 
Demery,  Lionel,  and  Micheael  Walton.  1998.  “Are
Poverty Reduction and Other Twenty-first Century
Social Goals Attainable?” World Bank, Washington,
D.C.
Dercon, Stefan. 1998. “The Urban Labour Market during
Structural  Adjustment:  Ethiopia  1990–1997.”
Working  Paper  WPS/98-9.  University  of  Oxford,
Centre for the Study of African Economies, Oxford.
Ghana Statistical Service. 1999. “Ghana Living Standards
Survey.” Accra.
Grootaert, Christiaan, Ravi Kanbur, and Gi-Taik Oh.
1997. “The Dynamics ofWelfare Gains and Losses: An
African Case Study.” Journal of Development Studies33
(5): 635–57. 
Sahn, David E., Paul A. Dorosh, and Stephen D. Younger.
1999. “A Reply to De Maio, Stewart, and van der
Hoeven.” World Development 27 (3): 471–75. 
World  Bank.  1999a.  African  Development  Indicators
1998–99. Washington, D.C.
264
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
———. 1999b. “Poverty Trends and Voices of the Poor.”
Poverty  Reduction  and  Economic  Management
Network, Washington, D.C.
Chapter 4
Ainsworth,  Martha.  1996.  “The  Impact  of  Women’s
Schooling on Fertility and Contraceptive Use: A Study
of Fourteen Sub-Saharan Countries.” The World Bank
Economic Review 10 (January): 85–122.
Feachem, Richard, and Dean Jamison, eds. 1991. Disease
and  Mortality  in  Sub-Saharan  Africa.  Washington,
D.C.: World Bank.
Fine, Jeffrey, Samuel Wangwe, Marcelina Chijoriga, Mick
Foster, Richard Hooper, and Ibrahim Kaduma. 1999.
“The  Tanzania  Education  Sector  Development
Programme:  Appraisal  of  Financial  Planning  and
Management Review  Team Final  Report.”  African
Economic Research Consortium, Nairobi, Kenya.
Frigenti,  Laura,  Alberto  Hasth,  and  Rumana  Haque.
1998.  Local  Solutions  to  Regional  Problems.
Washington, D.C.: World Bank. 
Gallup,  John  L.,  and  Jeffrey  D.  Sachs.  1998.  “The
Economic Burden of Malaria.” Harvard University,
Center  for  International  Development,  Cambridge,
Mass.
Knight,  John  B.,  and  R.H.  Sabot.  1990.  Education,
Productivity and Inequality: The East African Natural
Experiment. New York: Oxford University Press.
Leighton, C., and R. Foster. 1993. Economic Impacts of
Malaria  in  Kenya  and  Niger. Bethesda,  Md.:  Abt
Associates.
Mingat, Alain, and Bruno Suchaut. Forthcoming. “Une
analyse economique comparative des systemes educat-
ifs Africains.” Universite de Bourgogne, Institut de
Recherche  sur  l’Economie  de  l’Education,  Dijon
Cedex, France.
NRC  (National  Research  Council).  1993.  Population
Dynamics of Sub-Saharan Africa. Washington, D.C.
OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development). 1996. Shaping the 21st Century: The
Contribution of Development Co-operation. Paris.
Peters, David H. 1999. Health Expenditures, Services, and
Outcomes in Africa. Washington, D.C.: World Bank.
Psacharopoulos, George. 1994. “Returns to Investment in
Education: A Global Update.” World Development 22
(9): 1325–43.
SACMEQ (Southern Africa Consortium for Monitoring
Educational  Quality).  1998.  “The  Quality  of
Education: Some Policy Questions Based on a Survey.”
International Institute of Education Planning, Paris.
Shepard,  D.S.,  M.B.  Ettling,  U.  Brinkmann,  and  R.
Sauerborn. 1991. “The Economic Cost of Malaria in
Africa.”  Tropical  Medicine  and Parasitology  42 (3):
199–203.
Strauss, John. 2000. Personal communication. Michigan
State  University,  Department  of  Economics,  East
Lansing, Mich.
Strauss, John,  and Duncan Thomas. 1988. In Hollis
Chenery  and  T.N.  Srinivasan,  eds.,  Handbook  of
Development Economics. vol. 3b. Amsterdam: North-
Holland.
UN (United Nations). 1987. “Education and Fertility.” In
Fertility  Behaviour  in  the  Context  of  Development:
Evidence from the World Fertility Survey. New York.
———. 1999. World Population Prospects 1999. New
York.
UN  ACC/SCN  (United  Nations  Administrative
Committee  on  Coordination/Sub-Committee  on
Nutrition). 1997. Third Report on the World Nutrition
Situation. Geneva.
265
REFE RENC ES
UNAIDS  (Joint  United  Nations  Programme  on
HIV/AIDS). 1998. AIDS Epidemic Update: December
1998. Geneva.
UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific, and
Cultural Organization). 1998. World Education Report
1998. Paris.
———. Various years. StatisticalYearbook. Paris.
UNHCR  (United  Nations  High  Commissioner  on
Refugees).  1998.  “UNHCR  by  Numbers.”
http://www.unhcr.ch/un&ref/numbers/table1.htm
UNICEF (United Nations Children’s Fund). 1996. The
Progress of Nations. New York. 
van der Gaag, Jacques, and Wim Vijverberg. 1987. “Wage
Determinants  in  Côte  d’Ivoire.”  Living  Standards
Measurement Study Working Paper 33. World Bank,
Washington, D.C.
WHO (World Health Organization). 1999. World Health
Report 1999. Geneva.
World Bank. 1994. Better Health in Africa. Washington,
D.C.
———.  1995.  Priorities  and  Strategies  for  Education.
Washington, D.C.
———. 1997. Health, Nutrition, and Population Sector
Strategy. Human Development Network. Washington,
D.C.
———. 1999a. “Dynamic Risk Management and the
Poor:  Developing  a  Social  Protection  Strategy  for
Africa.” Washington, D.C.
———. 1999b. Intensifying Action Against HIV/AIDS in
Africa:  Responding  to  a  Development  Crisis.  Africa
Region, Washington, D.C.
———. 1999c. “Knowledge and Finance for Education:
Sector  Assistance  Strategy.”  Africa  Region,
Washington, D.C.
———.  1999d.  “Population  and  the  World  Bank:
Adapting  to  Change.”  Health,  Nutrition,  and
Population  Series.  Human  Development  Network,
Washington, D.C.
Chapter 5
Adam, Lishan. 1998. “The Dynamics of African Policy
and  Regulatory  Environment  in  Information  and
Communications  Sector.”  Paper  presented  at
Commsphere Africa 1998, July.
Adam, Lishan, and Karima Bounemra Ben Soltane. 1999.
“Information and Communication Technologies: A
Boom or Hurdle to Africa?” Background paper pre-
pared for Africa in the 21
st
Century Project. World
Bank, Washington, D.C.
ADB  (African  Development  Bank).  1999.  African
Development Report 1999: Infrastructure Development
in Africa. New York: Oxford University Press.
Amjadi,  Azita,  and  Alexander  J.  Yeats.  1995.  “Have
Transport Costs Contributed to the Relative Decline
of African Exports?” Policy Research Working Paper
1559. World Bank, Washington, D.C.
Aryeetey,  Ernest.  1997.  “Rural  Finance  in  Africa:
Institutional Developments and Access for the Poor.”
In Michael Bruno and Boris Pleskovic, eds., Annual
World  Bank  Conference  on  Development  Economics
1996. Washington D.C.: World Bank.
Aryeetey, Ernest, and Lemma Senbet. 1999. “Essential
Financial  Market  Reforms  in  Africa.”  Background
paper prepared for Africa in the 21
st
Century Project.
World Bank, Washington, D.C.
Aryeetey,  Ernest,  and  W.F.  Steel.  1992.  “Incomplete
Linkage  between  Formal  and  Informal  Finance  in
Ghana.” In W.F. Steel, ed., Financial Deepening in
Sub-Saharan Africa: Theory and Innovations. Industry
and  Energy  Department  Working  Paper,  Industry
Series Paper 62. Washington, D.C.: World Bank. 
266
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Ayogu,  Melvin.  1999.  “Addressing  Infrastructure
Constraints.” Background paper prepared for Africa in
the 21st Century Project. World Bank, Washington,
D.C.
Barwell, Ian. 1996. Transport and the Village: Findings
from African Village-level Travel and Transport Surveys
and Related Studies. World Bank Discussion Paper 344.
Washington, D.C. 
Besley, Timothy. 1994. “Savings, Credit and Insurance.”
In  Hollis  Chenery  and  T.N.  Srinivasan,  eds.,
Handbook  of  Development  Economics.  Amsterdam:
North-Holland.
Bloom,  David  E.,  and  Jeffrey  D.  Sachs.  1998.
“Geography, Demography and Economic Growth in
Africa.”  Brookings  Papers  on  Economic  Activity 2.
Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution.
DBSA (Development Bank of Southern Africa). 1998.
Infrastructure:  A  Foundation  for  Development—
Development Report 1998. Midrand, South Africa.
Easterly,  William,  and  Ross  Levine.  1997.  “Africa’s
Growth  Tragedy:  Policies  and  Ethnic  Divisions.”
Quarterly Journal of Economics112: 1203–50.
Gwilliam, Ken, and Zmarak Shalizi. 1999. “Road Funds,
User Charges, and Taxes.” The World Bank Research
Observer14 (2): 159–85.
Hanmer,  Lucia,  Graham  Pyatt,  Howard  White,  and
Nicky Pouw. 1997. “Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa:
What Can We Learn from the World Bank’s Poverty
Assessments?” Institute of Social Studies, The Hague.
Jensen,  Michael.  1999.  “Policy  Strategies  for  African
Information  and  Communications  Infrastructure.”
Paper presented at African Development Forum 1999.
http://www.un.org/depts/eca/adf
Lee,  K.S.,  and  A.  Anas.  1992.  “Costs  of  Deficient
Infrastructure: The Case of Nigerian Manufacturing.”
Urban Studies 29 (7): 1071–92.
Limão,  Nuno,  and  Anthony  Venables.  1999.
“Infrastructure,  Geographical  Disadvantage  and
Transport  Costs.”  Policy  Research  Working  Paper
2257. World Bank, Washington, D.C.
Mariki, Wilberforce A. 1999. “African Competitiveness:
Comparative  Analysis  of  African  Infrastructure.”
World Bank, Washington, D.C.
Mody,  Ashoka,  and  Kamil  Yilmaz.  1994.  “Is  There
Persistence in the Growth of Manufactured Exports?
Evidence  from  Newly  Industrializing  Countries.”
Policy  Research  Paper  1276.  World  Bank,
Washington, D.C.
Nissanke, Machiko, and Ernest Aryeetey 1998. Financial
Integration and Development: Liberalization and Reform
in  Sub-Saharan  Africa.  London  and  New  York:
Routledge.
Okigbo, Charles. 1999. Communication and Poverty: The
Challenge of Social Change in Africa. Proceedings of the
international conference on Connecting Knowledge in
Communications, 14–17 April, Montreal, Canada. 
Oshikoya,  T.W.,  A.  Jerome,  M.N.  Hussain,  and  K.
Mlambo. 1999. “Closing the Infrastructure Deficit.”
Background  paper  prepared  for  Africa  in  the  21st
Century Project. World Bank, Washington, D.C.
Popiel,  P.A.  1994. Financial  Systems  in  Sub-Saharan
Africa: A Comparative Study. World Bank Discussion
Paper 260. Washington, D.C.
Robinson, Marguerite S. Forthcoming. The Microfinance
Revolution:  Sustainable  Finance for the Poor. World
Bank.
Senbet,  L.W.  1997.  “The  Development  of  Capital
Markets in Africa: Challenges and Prospects.” Paper
presented at the sixth session of the Conference of
African  Ministers  of  Finance  and  the  Meeting  of
Intergovernmental Group of Experts,  31  March–2
April, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested