save pdf to database c# : Add bookmarks pdf Library software component asp.net winforms web page mvc canafricaclaim4-part935

27
CAN AFRIC A C LAIM TH E 2 1
ST
CEN TURY?
exchange rates than did other regions. These policies discouraged exports
and may have been more damaging because of the small size of Africa’s
economies. But there is some controversy over the specific impact of trade
restrictions relative to that of a policy environment that hurts efficiency,
productivity, and investment. Supporting this view—that trade restric-
tions should be seen as part of a range of broader and more comprehen-
sive policies and institutions that affect performance (Rodrik 1999)—is
the fact that Africa’s exports have changed little relative to GDP (see fig-
ure 1.2). They have moved together, influenced by common external fac-
tors and domestic policies. Trade reforms alone will not offer a simple fix,
though increasing and diversifying exports will be critical in reversing
Africa’s marginalization.
The bottom line.
Africa’s performance is influenced by its history and its
geography.  But  sound policies  and  strong  institutions  can moderate
exogenous factors, and Africa’s economies will, like others, respond to
better economic policies. Studies suggest some of the focal points for
ensuring that Africa embarks on a long-term process of rising incomes
and falling poverty.
The first area is governance and leadership. Adopting sound, growth-
oriented policies on a sustained basis will be all the more essential as fur-
ther  globalization  brings  risks  of  external  shocks  and  instability.
Successful countries must approach globalization armed with a “business
plan” that includes developing indigenous institutions for mediating con-
flict without undermining economic stability and deterring investment
and entrepreneurship, as well as improving public regulation and service
delivery. Effective policies for Africa must therefore be win-win policies:
to both strengthen the economy and to contribute to the formation of
effective states (chapter 2).
A second important area is investment in people. Some of the most
important “exogenous” variables in growth studies, including poor health
and adverse demographics, are partly the outcome of ineffective policies
and long economic decline. With its population growing rapidly relative
to natural resources, Africa must reverse the marginalization of many of
its people—notably its women—and strengthen their capabilities and
capacity. Africa loses twice as much labor through illness as any other
region. This disparity will only increase as HIV/AIDS incapacitates 2–4
percent of the active labor force and depletes skills (chapters 3 and 4). 
A third area involves the high costs and risks of the business environment,
which owe much to government policies since independence. Efficient
Sound policies and strong
institutions can moderate
exogenous factors
Add bookmarks pdf - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
export pdf bookmarks to text file; bookmarks pdf files
Add bookmarks pdf - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
creating bookmarks in pdf files; bookmarks pdf documents
28
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
investment  in  infrastructure—physical,  financial,  and  information—is
essential if Africa is to overcome geographic isolation, and this requires
the formation of public-private partnerships (chapter 5). Moreover, poli-
cies for productive sectors, particularly agriculture and industry, need to
encourage investment, employment, and export diversification (chapters
6 and 7). 
Finally, especially given Africa’s high aid dependence and the impor-
tant influence of donors, aid needs to be reassessed to ensure that it con-
tributes to these objectives (chapter 8).
Where Is Africa Now? Reforms and Their Legacy
M
OST
A
FRICAN COUNTRIES HAVE EMBARKED ON REFORM PRO
-
grams intended to regain macroeconomic balance, improve
resource allocation,  and restore  growth.  These substantial
reforms contributed to the resurgence of growth in the second half of the
1990s. Nevertheless, Africa has emerged from the reforms with a diffi-
cult legacy. And at current and projected growth rates of 4–5 percent, the
performance of Africa’s poor countries still falls short of the levels needed
to reduce poverty and offset decades of stagnation.
Progress with Reform
Reforms in  Africa have been substantial in three important areas:
macroeconomic balances, market forces, and private initiative.
Macroeconomic balances.
Many countries have made major gains in
macroeconomic stabilization, particularly since 1994. Consider the 31
poor,  aid-dependent  countries  covered  by  the  Special  Program  of
Assistance for Africa (SPA).
1
Their fiscal deficits dropped to 5.3 percent
of GDP in 1997–98 and averaged only 2.5 percent of GDP net of grant
financing (figure 1.5). And most financed part of this residual deficit
through concessional credits, making budgets more sustainable than
otherwise.
Macroeconomic balances are still fragile, however. Although infla-
tion is now less than 10 percent in most African countries, deficit esti-
mates do not fully reflect quasi-fiscal losses and contingent liabilities,
such as guarantees to state enterprises. Some governments still run sub-
Most African countries
have embarked on reform
programs intended to
regain macroeconomic
balance, improve
resource allocation, and
restore growth
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. Comments, forms and multimedia. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
how to create bookmarks in pdf file; create bookmark pdf
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
document file. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview
how to bookmark a pdf document; acrobat split pdf bookmark
29
CAN AFRIC A C LAIM TH E 2 1
ST
CEN TURY?
stantial arrears to suppliers. In addition to large external debt obliga-
tions, countries such as Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, and Zim-
babwe face high domestic debt burdens, in some cases because domestic
financial markets were liberalized before fiscal deficits were brought
under control. Nevertheless, many countries have moved toward sus-
tainable macroeconomic balances, assuming that concessional financ-
ing continues at recent levels.
Fiscal improvements have not been stress-free. Public capital spend-
ing, heavily supported by donors, has remained roughly constant as a
share of GDP. But since 1993 tax revenues have increased relative to GDP
while current spending has fallen. Many countries have taken steps to
broaden their tax bases, creating autonomous revenue authorities, curb-
ing arbitrary exemptions, and implementing value added taxes. But the
combination of weak tax administration and rising tax effort on a narrow
tax  base  has  sometimes  hit  business  profitability  and  reinvestment
(Reinikka and Svensson 1998). Relative to other regions, statutory tax
rates in Africa are quite high (table 1.5), and tax administration is some-
times seen as predatory by the small number of formal sector firms that
contribute most direct taxes. High statutory taxes encourage informal
activity and employment.
1984
Source: World Bank data.
1986
1988
1990
1992
1994
1996
1998
–12
–10
–8
–6
–4
–2
0
Percentage of GDP
Including grants
Excluding grants
Figure 1.5  Fiscal Deficits in Special Program of Assistance Countries, 
1984–98
Many countries have
moved toward
sustainable
macroeconomic
balances
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Add necessary references: The following VB.NET codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
how to bookmark a pdf file; convert excel to pdf with bookmarks
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
add bookmarks to pdf preview; pdf bookmark editor
30
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Table 1.5 Public Finance, External Support, Economic Management, Political Participation, and Risk Ranking
Indicators by Region
Africa excluding
South
East
Latin
Indicator
South Africa
Africa
Asia
Asia
America
Public finance
Government revenue/GDP, 1997
21
25
22
26
Government spending/ GDP, 1997
25
30
28
15
31
Highest marginal tax rate, 1998 (median, percent)
Individual 
35
35
35
37
30
Corporate 
35
35
38
30
30
External support 
Debt stock per capita (dollars), 1997
338
358
120
373
1,426
Foreign direct investment per capita (dollars), 1970
1.49
1.49
0.10
0.24
3.86
Foreign direct investment per capita (dollars), 1997
4.61
7.13
3.40
35.71
120.09
Aid per capita (dollars), 1997
26
3
4
13
Economic management and political participation
Country Policy and Institutional Assessment 
(CPIA) rating (scale of 1 to 6), 1998
a
3.0
3.0
3.6
3.2
3.7
Top third 
3.8
3.8
3.9
3.9
4.3
Middle third 
3.2
3.2
3.7
3.1
3.9
Bottom third 
2.2
2.2
3.1
2.8
3.1
GNP per capita (dollars, at market exchange rates), 
1997 (CPIA countries)
315
511
384
1,244
3,957
Top third 
344
866
616
1,324
5,134
Middle third 
387
387
377
884
4,024
Bottom third
249
249
435
520
1,976
PPP GNP per capita, 1997 (CPIA countries)
1,045
1,466
1,587
3,507
6,775
Top third 
1,081
2,198
3,261
3,650
8,623
Middle third 
1,245
1,245
1,611
2,871
6,546
Bottom third 
900
900
1,418
1,320
5,103
Political rights and civil liberties (scale of 1 to 7)
1990/91
2.6
2.6
3.2
4.0
6.4
1998/99
3.5
3.6
3.5
4.4
5.4
Corruption perceptions index (scale of 1 to 10)
3.6
2.8
3.3
3.4
Euromoney risk ranking 
(average rank among 116 countries)
September 1992
70
68
34
35
49
March 1999
83
81
49
40
41
Note:PPP stands for purchasing power parity.
a. The top third of countries under CPIA ratings for 1998 were Botswana, Cape Verde, Côte d’Ivoire, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Lesotho, Malawi,
Mauritania, Mauritius, Namibia, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. The middle third were Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon,
Chad, Gabon, The Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Rwanda, Swaziland, Togo, and Zimbabwe. The bottom
third were Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Comoros, Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial
Guinea, Liberia, Madagascar, Nigeria, São Tomé é  and Principe, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, and Sudan.
Source:World Bank data; Freedom House 1991, 1999; Transparency International 1998; Euromoney.
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; PDF Text Write & Extract. Insert and add text to any page of PDF document with
create bookmarks in pdf; how to add bookmarks to pdf files
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail Convert Word to PDF; Convert Word to HTML5; Convert Add and insert a blank page or multiple
excel print to pdf with bookmarks; bookmarks pdf reader
On the spending side, many countries suffer chronic shortages of cur-
rent  funding,  especially  for  operations,  maintenance,  and  nonwage
inputs.  There  are  also  large deviations  between  planned and  actual
spending, partly due to the need for cash-based expenditure manage-
ment to achieve aggregate fiscal targets. Tight fiscal restraints—includ-
ing on public sector salaries—and the proliferation of donor-driven
initiatives have created perverse financial incentives for public sector
employees. These problems have probably worsened due to the inten-
sity of aggregate fiscal pressure. And they need to be addressed in the
next stage of reform, especially in countries that have most consolidated
their macroeconomic balances.
Market forces.
A second area of reform has been the opening of Africa
to market forces. Most prices have been decontrolled and marketing
boards eliminated—except in a few countries for such key exports as cot-
ton and cocoa. Current account convertibility has been achieved and,
except in a few countries, black market premiums average only 4 percent.
Trade taxes have been rationalized from high and arbitrary levels. Average
rates of 30–40 percent of the mid-1990s have given way, in many coun-
tries (including those in the West African Economic Union), to trade-
weighted average tariffs of 15 percent or less. Trade-weighted tariffs are
now below 10 percent in more open countries such  as Uganda and
Zambia. Arbitrary exemptions, though still numerous, have also been
rationalized.
This opening to market forces continues in West Africa through the
movement to a common external tariff with a maximum rate of 20 per-
cent—and in East and Southern Africa through  country-by-country
reforms supported by several regional associations. Trade policies are still
more restrictive than in the world’s more open developing countries, and
many countries still confer substantial protection on domestic industry.
But much of the gap in the early 1990s has been closed.
Private initiative.
A third change in Africa’s economic landscape has
been wider space for private initiative. Thriving business networks
have arisen in West, East, and Southern Africa, and in politically and
economically  stable  countries  private  investment  has  increased  by
almost 3 percent of GDP in recent years. In a 1997 survey of 22
African countries, fewer businessmen saw the state as an opponent
than had in 1987 (Weder, Brunetti, and Kisunko 1998). Foreign direct
investment also rose in the second half of the 1990s—to about one-
sixth the average level per capita for all developing countries. But it
31
CAN AFRIC A C LAIM TH E 2 1
ST
CEN TURY?
Much of Africa has been
opened to market forces
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and font to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to Add necessary references
auto bookmark pdf; display bookmarks in pdf
XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to HTML5; Add a blank page or multiple pages to
pdf create bookmarks; how to create bookmark in pdf with
32
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
was still concentrated in a few countries, especially those with mineral
resources. The number  of funds seeking investments in Africa has
grown from almost none to about 30. So, Africa is becoming a viable
business address.
In many African countries privatization has accelerated and become
more widely accepted. With more than 3,000 transactions totaling $6.5
billion, privatization has entered a new phase, one marked by private par-
ticipation in providing infrastructure services (box 1.3). Private operators
have substantial involvement in telephone systems in 18 countries and in
water distribution in 23 countries. Railways and ports have been conces-
sioned to private operators. Even when the lead investor is foreign (as is
usually the case for the largest transactions), privatization is opening the
door to domestic businesses, including as suppliers and distributors, and
to better services.
Regulations have not always advanced with privatization to ensure
adequate competition, however, and most countries still need to expand
the pool of investors. In some countries case-by-case privatizations have
offered new owners exclusive rights to provide services to small national
markets, whereas a subregional approach would have enabled more com-
petitive service provision. Better regulations and more transparent priva-
tization will need to remain a focus in many countries.
O
VER THE PAST EIGHT YEARS
TE D
’I
VOIRE
SAMBI
-
tious privatization program has wholly or partly priva-
tized more than 60 firms—and yielded more than $450
million in return. The program gained momentum after
the 1994 devaluation, which restored the profitability of
a number of agribusiness companies. It has been suc-
cessful in attracting investors: in the past four years $1.4
billion were invested in agribusiness and more than $1
billion  in  infrastructure.  The  private sector  is  now
involved in almost all infrastructure sectors. A recent
study, conducted using the same methods as in other
regions, concluded that the program has been a success:
employment in privatized firms has grown by 4 percent
a year (it had been falling before), labor productivity has
risen, and so has government’s corporate tax yield.
Despite this track record, a number of questions
remain. Côte d’Ivoire has not yet succeeded in attract-
ing a diverse group of private investors. Doing so would
increase competition. The country also needs to nur-
ture a solid base of small and medium-size enterprises.
Regulations need to be rationalized to clarify the roles
of technical ministries and regulatory bodies, including
the Competition Commission. And despite the increas-
ing participation of private firms in infrastructure, the
public sector still bears a significant part of market risks.
Most contracts—power, water, railways—are of the
affermage(lease contract)type, with investment still the
responsibility of the state. Further transfers of risk to
private operators will require policies that emphasize
transparency and the building of confidence.
Box 1.3 Privatization in Côte d’Ivoire
Privatization is opening
the door to domestic
businesses and to better
services
33
CAN AFRIC A C LAIM TH E 2 1
ST
CEN TURY?
Recovery—and Other Legacies
No  single  measure  captures  the  rhythm  of  Africa’s  economies.
Aggregate output is dominated by South Africa, a country facing unique
economic and political challenges. Population-weighted growth rates or
median country performance offer broader-based measures. But all indi-
cators show that performance improved in the second half of the 1990s
(figure 1.6). In the typical country annual output growth rose to about
4.3 percent in 1994–98. Agriculture also performed well, growing 3.7
percent a year in  the median country, well above previous  levels. In
1995–97 exports also grew rapidly. While this period was one of excep-
tional growth in world trade, especially in demand for key African prod-
ucts, it also saw a reversal of falling trade shares—suggesting that African
exports were becoming more competitive (Yeats 1999). Although esti-
mates of poverty headcounts are available for only a few countries over
time, they show that rising aggregate consumption usually results in sub-
stantial declines in the percentage of the absolute poor (chapter 3).
This improving picture came under stress in 1998 in a way that under-
scores Africa’s  vulnerability to external  shocks  and  internal  conflicts.
Except for South Africa (where growth fell sharply), African countries
were less integrated with world capital markets than most other regions
and less exposed to the direct effects of the East Asian crisis. Still, many
1981–90
1991–94
1995
1996
1997
1998
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Percent
Figure 1.6  Growth in Output, Investment, and Exports in Africa, 1981–98
GDP
Investment
Population
growth
Exports
Source: World Bank data.
By all indicators, Africa’s
performance improved in
the second half of the
1990s
34
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
countries suffered sharp declines in commodity prices. Oil exporters felt
a massive terms of trade loss, but until late 1999 many oil importers were
cushioned from the immediate effects of their slumping export prices by
lower costs of oil imports (box 1.4). Even so, they faced intensified com-
petition in depressed primary export markets. Another factor was the
intensification of conflict in Central Africa, in parts of West Africa, and
in the Horn of Africa with the resumption of war between Ethiopia and
Eritrea. While many countries continued to grow strongly in 1998, the
region’s population-weighted growth slumped, leaving little growth space
to cut poverty. Growth appears to have picked up in 1999 and 2000,
though not to the peak levels of 1996, and sharp increases in fuel prices
shifted terms of trade losses back to oil-importing countries.
Reform and recovery.
Macroeconomic and structural reforms in Africa
have been highly controversial.
2
Some studies using information through
the mid-1990s failed to find a link between reform and performance.
Perhaps this is not surprising. It is not easy to disentangle the relative con-
tributions of external developments, domestic economic  policies, and
deeper institutional factors over the long run, because they work together.
Nor is evaluation easy in the medium run, because of lagged effects and
T
HESWINGINTHECURRENTACCOUNTSOF
E
AST
A
SIAN
countries in 1998 sent a massive deflationary shock
through the global economy—equal to 3 percent of
world GDP. But except for South Africa, which suf-
fered from a speculative currency attack, Africa was less
exposed to international capital movements than many
other  developing  regions.  The  main  transmission
effects from the Asian crisis were through a halving of
growth in world trade and 20–40 percent declines in
terms of trade for primary products. 
The net effects were felt sharply by African oil
exporters, which suffered a terms of trade loss of 7 per-
cent of GDP. While other countries also suffered losses
(particularly  those  exporting  metals  and  tobacco),
until late 1999 most were shielded from the immedi-
ate effects of export price declines by sharp cuts in their
oil import bills. The net effect of the crisis—coupled
with increased conflict, adverse weather in East Africa,
and political uncertainty in Nigeria—pulled growth
down in Africa, especially in larger countries.
The longer-run impact of the crisis will be felt more
widely. Second rounds of commodity price declines are
hitting some producing countries severely. Oil prices
doubled, benefiting producers but hurting importing
countries.  World  trade growth  may be  slower than
anticipated, and  competition  will come  from  other
regions where exchange rates have depreciated sharply.
For example, processed fish from Thailand has made
severe inroads on Senegal’s exports. Investors may also
show less interest in projects to extract and process raw
materials. Thus all the more pressing is the need to boost
Africa’s international competitiveness.
Source:World Bank 1998b.
Box 1.4 The East Asian Crisis and Africa
Macroeconomic and
structural reforms in
Africa have been highly
controversial
35
CAN AFRIC A C LAIM TH E 2 1
ST
CEN TURY?
because structural and institutional measures are difficult to quantify.
Many African countries have moved in and out of compliance with macro-
economic and structural reform programs, so formally being on a program
has meant little for the policies actually pursued over longer periods. And
short-term reforms have failed to address some difficult underlying insti-
tutional problems—and in some cases may have worsened them. 
Despite all this, and recognizing the difficulty of specifying a clear
counterfactual, some recent studies indicate that adherence to sound poli-
cies pays off in the medium run. But good economic management must
be sustained for some time to have a substantial effect. An independent
assessment of the Special Program of Assistance (SPA) cited eight African
countries as being generally “on track” in 1992–96.
3
This group did bet-
ter in 1992–97, both relative to its previous record and relative to a com-
parator group of SPA countries: GDP per capita grew 1.1 percent in the
on-track group but fell 0.5 percent in the others. Export growth, import
growth, investment rates, and government spending were also higher for
the on-track group. The combination of sustained reforms and financial
assistance was associated with better performance, at least at the aggre-
gate level. The on-track group also performed better on intermediate
social indicators, though it still fell well short of what was required to
achieve poverty reduction goals.
Another way to assess the impact of economic management on perfor-
mance is to group countries by broader indicators of macroeconomic,
structural, and social policies and economic institutions. One such mea-
sure is the Country Policy and Institutional Assessment (CPIA), carried
out each year by the World Bank for all borrowing countries and used—
along  with population  and  income—to  allocate  International Devel-
opment Association resources among recipient countries. Macroeconomic
sustainability has a 25 percent weight in the CPIA, and structural and
financial  sector policies  and  legal institutions about 30 percent. The
remainder is based on financial and budget management, social policies,
safety nets, and environmental policies (IDA 1998). Worldwide, few if any
countries appear able to make progress toward a middle-income level with-
out also achieving a high CPIA rating.
CPIA ratings for the late 1990s suggest that an upper tier of African
countries has a good basis for further development. But a lower tier,
including many very poor countries, is in danger of slipping ever further
behind. Africa has many well-managed economies, especially in macro-
economic terms (see table 1.5). The top third of its countries are not rated
Good economic
management must be
sustained for some time
but then has a
substantial effect
36
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
much differently from their counterparts in other regions. And while this
tier includes some of Africa’s richer countries, it also includes many poor
ones. But the lowest tier of Africa’s countries is both poorer and rated far
lower than their counterparts elsewhere. 
Countries are also distinguished by whether they have preserved a peace-
ful base for development. As discussed further below, for many countries
avoidance of conflict has been critical in the ability to sustain development.
Figure 1.7 shows how growth, investment, exports, and current account
and budget deficits have differed across countries according to whether they
have been at peace and, if so, whether their economic management has
been deemed effective. Both peace and good economic management have
been important for Africa’s recovery, with better-managed countries seeing
higher growth per capita and investment and export growth of more than
8 percent. There have also been signs of export diversification (chapter 7)
and, in some countries, such as Uganda, of a reversal in capital flight. A
number of countries  have also advanced in  international  risk  ratings,
although few (with the notable exception of South Africa) are at the level
required to attract appreciable private capital. 
Figure 1.7  Africa’s Annual Growth, Investment, Exports, and Deficits by Country Group, 1995–98
Percent
Per capita 
GDP growth
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
Investment 
growth
0
2
4
6
8
10
Export 
growth
0
2
4
6
8
10
Current account 
deficit/GDP
0
2
4
6
8
10
Budget 
deficit/GDP
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Number of 
countries
0
10
20
30
40
50
Source: World Bank data.
All countries
Countries with social stability
Countries with social and macroeconomic stability
Countries with social and macroeconomic stability and efficient resource allocation
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested