save pdf to database c# : Bookmark pdf reader Library software component asp.net winforms web page mvc canafricaclaim5-part936

37
CAN AFRIC A C LAIM TH E 2 1
ST
CEN TURY?
Other legacies of the crisis decades.
Thus reforms have been instrumental
in Africa’s recovery and have laid the basis for deeper changes. But the
focus on macroeconomic management over an extended period has also
left deeper and difficult legacies for African countries: “hysteresis effects,”
which are not quickly reversed. 
Perhaps unavoidably, economic management focused on short-term
concerns. Thus reforms—for example, of the civil service—have restored
macroeconomic balance rather than increased effectiveness. Many coun-
tries have seen improvements in capacity within central banks and min-
istries of finance. But with weaknesses in governance and severe erosion
of pay, especially at higher levels, the adjustment decades also saw a sub-
stantial deterioration in the quality of public institutions, a demoraliza-
tion of public  servants,  and a  decline  in the effectiveness of service
delivery in many countries. Together with falling incomes, these effects—
which cannot be speedily reversed—translated into falling social indica-
tors and capabilities in many countries, and to losses of human capital,
especially (though not exclusively) in the public service. 
Cash management limits to control aggregate spending and contin-
ued macroeconomic instability increase the difficulty of assuring a pre-
dictable flow of resources to agreed programs. The divergence between
budgeted and actual spending is often gaping, with at least a 30 percent
deviation in one of every five African countries for national budgets, and
in half of African countries for sector and program budgets (Kostopoulos
1999). This discrepancy has undermined the accountability of sector
ministries for agreed outcomes—and left programs poorly performing
and subject to the diversion of funds. 
As  external  funding became more critical, African governments
increasingly turned to external advisers, often those connected with
the provision of funding. Conditionality became ever more intrusive,
and the shaping of reforms was seen to lie mainly outside the region.
This further weakened internal capacity for economic management
and reduced African governments’ sense of ownership and account-
ability  for  economic  outcomes.  Reforms  were  not  “marketed”  or
explained to the population. Arrangements between governments and
donors often weakened the role of representative institutions, partic-
ularly parliaments, with essential legislative and budgetary functions.
The effect was lower credibility for both the reforms and the programs
that tried to enforce them. Foreign assistance, largely shaped by the
strategic considerations of the Cold War, was not allocated in a par-
The long period of
macroeconomic
adjustment also left
some difficult legacies
Bookmark pdf reader - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
creating bookmarks pdf; how to create bookmark in pdf automatically
Bookmark pdf reader - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
bookmarks in pdf; creating bookmarks in pdf documents
38
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
ticularly discriminating way between better-managed and worse-man-
aged countries. This too did little to encourage credible reforms. 
The long crisis also lowered expectations of Africa and within Africa.
In the 1960s governments actively strove for accelerated development. By
the mid-1990s simply restoring growth to allow rising per capita income
was seen as an achievement for many countries. 
The end of the 20
th
century, however, marked the emergence of a
fragile consensus between Africa and its donors, at least on broad prin-
ciples. There was far greater understanding within Africa of the need
for a stable macroeconomy, for working markets, for private initiative,
and  for  the  need  to  increase  global  competitiveness.  Donors  had
accepted the limits of narrow approaches. Market-driven development
could not succeed without strong social and institutional infrastruc-
ture—including a strong and capable state—and without active mea-
sures  to  alleviate  severe  poverty  and  raise  the  capacity  of  the
population. Africans and their development partners had also begun
to ask how to deliver assistance in ways that strengthen the account-
ability of governments to their people in Africa’s emerging but aid-
dependent democracies. 
Toward An Agenda for the Future
It is not sufficient for African governments merely to consolidate the
progress made in their adjustment programs. They need to go beyond
the issues of public finance, monetary policy, prices, and markets to
address fundamental questions relating to human capacities, institu-
tions, governance, the environment, population growth and distribu-
tion, and technology.
——World Bank 1989
W
HAT
THEN
IS NEEDED FOR ACCELERATED PROGRESS
? W
ITH
so many  challenges—and  so  many  interactions  among
them—it is hard for governments and donors to set priori-
ties. How can African countries develop comprehensive development
plans or “business plans” that will help guide them through the increas-
ingly competitive and fast-moving 21
st
century, but that are sufficiently
prioritized to guide implementation? 
The end of the 20
th
century marked the
emergence of a fragile
consensus between
Africa and its donors
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET
bookmark a pdf file; how to bookmark a pdf page
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
bookmark template pdf; add bookmark pdf file
39
CAN AFRIC A C LAIM TH E 2 1
ST
CEN TURY?
Circles of Causation
One approach is to focus on blocks of issues with strong cumulative
interactions—circles of cumulative causation, which can be virtuous or
vicious (figure 1.8). Success in one element of a circle will ease improve-
ment in others, but it is difficult to envision Africa claiming the 21
st
cen-
tury unless there is progress in all the circles. The unfinished agenda can
be framed in four such circles: improving governance and preventing con-
flict,  investing  in  people,  increasing  competitiveness  and  diversifying
economies, and reducing aid dependence and strengthening partnerships. 
Circle 1: Improving governance and resolving conflict.
Governance, conflict,
and poverty intertwine on several levels in Africa. At one end of the spec-
trum, the countries that made the greatest gains in political rights and
1.
Improving governance
and resolving conflict
Figure 1.8  Africa's Circles of Cumulative Causation
4. 
Reducing 
aid dependence and debt 
and strengthening 
partnerships
3.
Increasing 
competitiveness 
and diversifying
economies
2.
Investing 
in people
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF document by PDF bookmark and outlines in VB.NET. Independent component for splitting PDF document in preview without using external PDF control.
delete bookmarks pdf; add bookmarks to pdf file
C# PDF - Read Barcode on PDF in C#.NET
pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET C#.NET PDF Barcode Reader & Scanner
create bookmark in pdf automatically; excel hyperlink to pdf bookmark
40
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
civil liberties in the 1990s are also those with better economic manage-
ment and performance (figure 1.9). This does not prove that political lib-
eralization caused better economic management. But the relationship
suggests that stronger and more accountable economic management has
been associated with more participatory political systems and govern-
ments  less  accountable  solely to narrow interest  groups.  Conversely,
increased accountability and decentralized service delivery that comes
closer to the people can strengthen political participation, contribute to
a stronger state, and raise efficiency. 
At the other end of the spectrum, about one African in five lives in a
country formally at war or severely disrupted by conflict that, on average,
lowers growth by at least 2 percentage points for every year that it per-
sists. The direct annual costs of conflict in Central Africa and West Africa
have been estimated at $1 billion and $800 million, and this does not
include  the  costs  associated  with  refugees  and  displaced  persons—
another $500 million in Central Africa alone. Indirect costs, including
for neighbors not involved directly, are incalculable. Economic manage-
ment has been far less effective in conflict-ridden countries, which make
With highly diverse,
multiethnic states,
African countries will
need to search for
inclusive constitutional
models and institutions
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Good
Average
Unsatisfactory
Poor
Figure 1.9  Political Rights, Civil Liberties, and 
Economic Management in Africa by Country Group, 1990–99
Average score for political rights and civil liberties (scale of 1 to 7)
Economic policy performance
1990–91
1998–99
Source: Freedom House 1991, 1999.
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Support to take notes on adobe PDF file without adobe reader installed. Support to add text, text box, text field and crop marks to PDF document.
add bookmarks to pdf reader; copy pdf bookmarks to another pdf
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
add bookmarks pdf; create pdf bookmark
41
CAN AFRIC A C LAIM TH E 2 1
ST
CEN TURY?
up most of the lower third in the CPIA ratings. A growing body of evi-
dence shows that poverty, lack of employment, and low education levels
are important determinants of conflict—more so, perhaps, than ethnic
diversity. 
Economic development is vital for political stability. But with highly
diverse, multiethnic states, African countries will need to search for inclu-
sive constitutional models and institutions that build consensus, facili-
tate the participation of diverse groups, entrench good governance, and
lay a stable basis for development. These are themes taken up again in
chapter 2.
Circle 2: Investing in people. 
Even with hidden growth reserves such as
reversing capital flight (Collier and Gunning 1998) and reallocating aid
flows to better-managed countries (Collier and Dollar 1999), Africa’s sav-
ings are too low to sustain growth in income and consumption at rates
needed to rapidly reduce poverty. In addition, Africa’s productive base is
rapidly shifting from natural resources toward people. The second circle
of  causation  facing  African  countries  is  the  strong  interrelationship
between investing in people, accelerating the demographic transition,
and promoting savings and growth.
Savings respond to higher and growing incomes, as well as to falling
dependency ratios. Elbadawi and Mwega (forthcoming) suggest that a
drop in Africa’s dependency ratio to levels prevailing in East Asia could
increase private savings by 9 percent of GDP. Demographic trends, in
turn, respond to higher incomes and to better health and social services—
including female education and contraceptives, demand for which is sub-
stantial in many African countries. Kenya shows that the demographic
transition can be speeded by effective public policy even without rapid
economic growth. Raising the efficiency of delivery mechanisms to invest
in people—especially women and poor rural residents—is thus a key
entry point into any poverty-reducing growth strategy, from a demo-
graphic perspective as well as for savings and productivity. 
All this is threatened by a new factor, however. Although the full
impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic is not yet apparent, it promises to
impart a massive shock to this interrelated system. Countries will expe-
rience a reverse demographic transition as life expectancy falls by up to
20 years. Population growth will be lower, but the number of children
orphaned by AIDS will explode. Age-based dependency ratios will rise
despite a decline in fertility, because AIDS mainly affects young adults
in their productive years. With 2–4 percent of the potential workforce
Confronting AIDS is
essential if African
countries are to prevent
a long-term downward
spiral
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
A powerful PDF reader allows C# users to view PDF, annotate PDF file, create PDF from other file formats, convert PDF document in .NET framework class.
bookmark pdf documents; export excel to pdf with bookmarks
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
bookmarks pdf; add bookmark to pdf reader
42
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
incapacitated at any point in time, actual dependency rates will increase
even further.
AIDS depletes scarce human capital. Firms, farms, and households are
already  seeing the impact in  lower  output,  much higher health and
funeral costs, increased family insecurity with the loss of breadwinners,
and increased training needs to replace lost skills across a wide range of
professions. AIDS will also further reduce the incentive to save, given the
increased  risk  of  mortality.  And  it  will  deplete  public  and  private
resources: caring for one AIDS patient costs as much as educating 10 pri-
mary school children (World Bank 1997). Confronting AIDS and revers-
ing rising  transmission  rates  are essential  if African  countries  are to
prevent this second development circle from turning into a long-term
downward  spiral.  Political  commitment  to  address  this  problem  is
urgently needed. These themes are taken up in chapters 3 and 4.
Circle 3: Increasing competitiveness and diversifying economies.
With their
close links to other sectors and importance for employment and exports,
raising the productivity of agriculture and protecting the natural resource
base are essential for Africa’s structural transformation (chapter 6). Eighty
percent of Africa’s poor live in rural areas, but forested area per capita will
halve in less than 20 years. And productivity in agriculture is rising only
slowly. 
Africa is also urbanizing rapidly. At 4.9 percent, urban population
growth is the highest in the world. Rural-urban migration reflects many
factors, including the lack of access to essential services in rural areas, low
productivity and incomes in agriculture, and, in some countries, conflict
and insecurity. On current trends, Africa’s urban population will exceed
the rural in the first quarter of the 21
st
century. By 2025 the urban pop-
ulation will be three times larger than today. But Africa’s urbanization is
unique—accelerating  without  rising  incomes  and without the  usual
structural transformation that accompanies development, including in
agriculture.
Urban agglomeration can have advantages. It is easier to deliver ser-
vices to denser populations, and urban concentrations offer possibilities
for building new industrial and service sectors that are impossible for
sparsely populated rural economies. But Africa’s urban economies have
not been sufficiently dynamic to diversify and create rapid employment
growth. Real wages are down in most countries, and formal employment
has been falling or stagnant, with informal activities taking up the slack.
Open unemployment, which averages about 20 percent in a sample of
Africa’s economies have
not been sufficiently
dynamic to diversify and
create rapid employment
growth
43
CAN AFRIC A C LAIM TH E 2 1
ST
CEN TURY?
African countries, is becoming an urgent economic and political prob-
lem. Unemployment rates are higher among the young and the better
educated. And recent studies suggest that spells of unemployment are get-
ting longer (Agenor 1998; Dabalen 1999). Cuts in public employment
contribute to this dismal picture in a few cases, but the real culprit is the
wider failure of private employment to expand.
Why have Africa’s economies failed to diversify and create jobs in
response to macroeconomic reforms? Labor costs and flexibility are a key
issue in South Africa. But business surveys and comparisons with other
regions suggest that the problem lies elsewhere in most other countries—
in poor infrastructure services, including for the information economy
(chapter 5), and in other factors and policies that cause high costs and
risks for investors (chapter 7). 
The third development circle therefore involves the interaction of pop-
ulation growth, urbanization, and economic diversification. The politi-
cal  economy  of  this  circle  is  important.  Without  productive  urban
centers, tensions will rise as cities fail to generate resources for their infra-
structure needs and employment for growing populations. These trends
will further undermine political and economic stability and degrade the
business environment.
Export diversification is essential to avoid these outcomes (chapter 7).
Without exports, including of agroindustrial products, producers will be
confined to tiny home markets and have fewer avenues to import global
knowledge. No strong exporter lobby will arise to press for competitive
service standards, including those needed to facilitate trade, whether in
agroindustrial products, tourism, or manufacturing. Some African gov-
ernments still need to forge a trusting and supportive relationship with
their business communities, stressing entry and competition while phas-
ing out informal, personalized links between government and business.
Understanding why Africa’s economies have been slow to diversify and to
grow strong  productive  sectors  (including agriculture) is  essential to
understanding the challenge of the 21
st
century. 
Circle 4: Reducing aid dependence and strengthening partnerships.
Africa is in
the midst of an intense debate on aid dependence—on the size and allo-
cation of assistance, on delivery mechanisms (including debt relief), and
on the relationship between donors and recipients. There is wide agree-
ment that past aid programs have been disappointing, but also recogni-
tion that the objective of much of the Cold War aid flow was strategic
and political rather than developmental. 
The sharp decline in aid
since the mid-1990s is
cause for concern
44
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
Aid is a two-edged sword for Africa. On the one hand, foreign savings
are essential to permit both higher investment for growth and higher con-
sumption to reduce poverty. Even under favorable conditions for private
inflows and Asian levels of investment efficiency, the typical African
country faces a resource gap of more than 12 percent of GDP relative to
the investment needs of a growth rate likely to achieve the poverty reduc-
tion goal for 2015. Continued assistance is therefore essential, and the
sharp decline in aid since the mid-1990s is cause for concern. 
On the other hand, while high aid dependence and debt service are
not the direct cause of weak capacity and accountability, they can make
these problems worse and prolong them, especially when the institutional
and capacity base is already weakened. With few exceptions, African
countries face severe constraints on capacity and skills. Although weak
education systems are a serious concern, capacity constraints are not sim-
ply a matter of low supply. The region has been losing more than 23,000
professionals a year, partly replaced by some 100,000 foreign advisers
funded by technical assistance at an annual cost of $4 billion. The fac-
tors underlying Africa’s massive brain drain are not just economic. They
also reflect security concerns and, in some countries, violent political
upheavals. But economic factors have been important too. Since the mid-
1970s capacity has been weakened in many countries by the politiciza-
tion of service under autocratic governments, severe wage compression,
and inadequate working conditions. Only in the 1990s have reforms
begun to redress pay and working conditions in the public sector, and
only in a few countries. 
Political participation has increased, but Africa’s civil society and repre-
sentative institutions are far from economically empowered A survey of
government audit institutions in 22 countries showed that few satisfied cri-
teria for professionalism, standards, staffing, independence, timely report-
ing, and quality of follow-up. Only five produced timely reports, and in
only two cases were these publicized to encourage scrutiny of public spend-
ing by civil society. Few African parliaments have access to the information
and technical support they need to monitor the use of public funds.
Limited resources and ineffective delivery—and in some cases, admin-
istrative  barriers to cost-effective procurement—create massive ineffi-
ciencies in translating inputs into outcomes. It has been estimated that
Africa receives benefits worth only $12 for every $100 spent on medi-
cines (chapter 4) and that, in parts of West Africa, achieving one 6-year
primary school graduate can require the equivalent of 21 student-years,
Limited resources and
ineffective delivery
create massive
inefficiencies in
translating inputs into
outcomes
45
CAN AFRIC A C LAIM TH E 2 1
ST
CEN TURY?
given high  dropout  and repetition  rates.  Cross-country relationships
between inputs and outcomes are therefore weak.
How does this relate to aid? Net transfers (which take into account
debt service paid on public and publicly guaranteed debt) may have com-
pensated for terms of trade losses (see table 1.4), but most of this assis-
tance has not supplemented normal flows of private income and public
revenue. Commitments under SPA programs, which are largely untied
and represent the closest equivalent to budget support, represent about
one-quarter of net disbursements and in total are less than the debt ser-
vice payments made by recipient countries.
The rest of the aid flow sustains a parallel, multidonor, multiproject
economy, obscure to host governments and where donors are some-
times reluctant to share information. This parallel economy fragments
public programs in key sectors—for example, donors are estimated to
fund 40 percent of health spending in a typical African country (World
Bank 1999b)—and makes integrated budget management impossible.
Because donors prefer to fund capital spending on physical projects, aid
also  distorts  recurrent  and  capital  spending  in  favor  of  the  latter.
Recipient governments become cash poor and project rich, a trend
exacerbated in the phase of fiscal stabilization with the tightness of cur-
rent spending limits.
Recipient governments also cannot compete with better-paying pro-
ject implementation units that draw the best-trained staff out of public
service. Moreover, negotiating aid programs and debt relief with multi-
ple donors absorbs valuable time of key officials in aid-dependent coun-
tries. Informal surveys suggest that these officials may spend half their
time on donor-related activities rather than on internal administration.
Particularly in countries that have only recently moved toward partic-
ipatory political systems, aid dependence can make governments less
accountable to their civil societies. Donor flows are equivalent to half or
more of fiscal revenues in many countries—and finance a major part of
social and  infrastructure  spending.  Donors  are  concerned  about the
financial integrity of their projects, so governments have to account for
aid resources using a variety of donor-specific procedures. But at the same
time, governments face less pressure to be accountable to their societies.
Institutions, accountability, capacity, and aid dependence thus consti-
tute a fourth development circle. The weaker are the institutional capac-
ity and accountability at the core of government, the stronger is the
incentive for donors to rely on their own institutional controls, further
There is still a long way
to go in improving aid
effectiveness
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested