save pdf to database c# : Create pdf bookmark software Library dll winforms asp.net wpf web forms canafricaclaim6-part937

47
CAN AFRIC A C LAIM TH E 2 1
ST
CEN TURY?
not take advantage of trade and investment opportunities face further
marginalization and a longer technological lag. As falling protection in
major markets reduces the value of special concessions to poor countries,
policies will need to emphasize competitiveness and productivity rather
than (or in addition to) preferential trading arrangements.
Will Africa be able to take advantage of the window? Will Africa’s devel-
opment partners be able to support the needed trends? The first set of pri-
orities  emerging  from  these  cumulative  circles—the  interaction  of
governance, conflict, and poverty—is perhaps the most difficult to address
from the perspective of economics alone, but it is also the most funda-
mental. For countries able to maintain peace and security, entry points
into the three other circles must be found. Investment in people is essen-
tial for the second circle—involving investment, growth, the demographic
transition, and HIV/AIDS. The ingredients of effective programs are
known; they can now be priced and budgeted. Addressing the structural
and institutional issues in the third and fourth circles will also be funda-
mental for sustaining the transition from adjustment to growth, social
development, and poverty alleviation. This will require more than simply
“staying the course” and deepening current reforms in macroeconomic
and structural areas, even though they are far from complete.
Notes
1. The Special Program of Assistance was created in 1987 to mobilize con-
cessional, quick-disbursing assistance for poor, debt-distressed African countries
with  adjustment  programs  led  by  the  International  Monetary  Fund  and
International Development Association. For more details, see OED (1998b).
2.  IMF  (1997)  provides  a  detailed  assessment  of  performance  under
Enhanced Structural Adjustment Facility programs; Guillamont and others
(1999) find that consistent management contributes to good performance. IMF
(1998) provides an external evaluation of the Enhanced Structural Adjustment
Facility. For a critical view of adjustment programs, see Mkandawire and Soludo
(1999). 
3. The eight countries judged to be on track were Benin, Burkina Faso,
Ghana, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Uganda, and Zambia, although Ghana and
Zambia had lapses of discipline (see OED 1998b, p. 98).
Create pdf bookmark - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
edit pdf bookmarks; create bookmarks in pdf reader
Create pdf bookmark - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
create pdf bookmarks from word; how to bookmark a pdf file in acrobat
48
Improving Governance, Managing
Conflict, and Rebuilding States
Poverty brings about instability and insecurity, which breed under-
development.  The reverse is also true. Democracy  must  deliver  on 
the bread and butter issues, otherwise the Continent could slide back
into situations where the politics of poverty gives rise to the poverty of
politics.
—Dr. Salim Ahmed Salim, Secretary-General,
Organization of African Unity, 24 October 1999
G
OVERNANCE
CONFLICT MANAGEMENT
AND STATE
reconstruction are interrelated issues. Governance is
the institutional capability of public organizations to
provide the public and other goods demanded by a
country’s citizens or their representatives in an effec-
tive, transparent, impartial, and accountable manner,
subject to resource constraints. Conflict management refers to a society’s
capacity to mediate the conflicting—though not necessarily violent—
interests  of  different  social  groups  through  political  processes.  State
reconstruction combines national and supranational competencies for
resolving violent conflicts, sustaining peace, and undertaking economic
and political postconflict reconstruction. In the past decade this nexus of
governance, conflict management, and state building has moved from rel-
ative obscurity to being a central issue on Africa’s development policy
agenda. Why? 
The first impulse has come from within Africa, where the political
landscape has been changing rapidly. After years of authoritarian regimes
and political and economic decline, there has been resurgent popular
demand for multiparty elections and accountability in public resource
management. Since the early 1990s, 42 of 48 Sub-Saharan states have
C
HA P T E R
2
Rapid changes in Africa’s
political landscape have
created opportunities for
development and growth
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work Barcode Read. Barcode Create. OCR. Twain. Create
how to add bookmarks to pdf files; create pdf bookmark
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Ability to get word count of PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
display bookmarks in pdf; bookmarks pdf files
49
IM PROVIN G GOVE RNANCE , MANAGING C ON FLIC T, AND RE BUILDING S TATES
held multiparty presidential or parliamentary elections. Though these
elections have not always been completely fair, they have often generated
high voter turnout—sometimes more than 80 percent. This trend has
been bolstered by the end of the Cold War, which has made donors less
inclined to favor trusted allies over competent development  partners
(chapter 1). New aid relations emphasize ownership, accountability to
domestic stakeholders, and good governance (chapter 8). Moreover, a
number of African countries are ready to undertake “second generation”
reforms, which require building social consensus and bargaining among
social groups. 
Globalization also explains the increased importance of these issues.
Like other countries, African states face growing pressures both to decen-
tralize and to adapt to emerging global governance structures and stan-
dards.  These  extend  beyond  trade  to  encompass  many  areas  once
considered within the purview  of national policy.  Globalization  also
brings risks of increased economic instability, which can lead to social
conflicts. All these factors have increased the importance of sound gov-
ernance and institutions for mediating conflicts and promoting social
cooperation. 
This chapter analyzes Africa’s postindependence performance in gov-
ernance  and  conflict  management  and  highlights  opportunities  for
resolving conflicts, building peace, promoting social cooperation, and
improving governance in the 21
st
century. A first theme of the chapter is
that it is wrong to think that Africa’s ethnic diversity dooms it to endemic
civil conflicts. Poverty, underdevelopment, unemployment, and political
exclusion are the root causes lurking behind social fractionalization. But
socially  fractionalized  societies—like  most  in  Africa—require  careful
management. Thus African countries need to seek inclusive, participa-
tory,  and  democratic polities compatible with  their  ethnic  diversity.
Under the right conditions diversity can promote, rather than impede,
social cooperation and stable growth. Active and collaborative involve-
ment by regional institutions and international donors is also critical for
resolving conflicts and building peace in Africa. 
 second  theme  involves  options  for  improving  institutions  for
national economic management. Africa has seen many such initiatives as
part of reform programs, but success has been limited. One reason for
past failures is that externally inspired technocratic measures to stream-
line and strengthen the bureaucracy have not been matched by comple-
mentary action by incumbent states, or by measures to generate demand
African countries need 
to seek inclusive,
participatory, and
democratic polities
compatible with their
ethnic diversity
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
adding bookmarks to pdf; export pdf bookmarks
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
Qualified Tiff files are exported with high resolution in VB.NET. Create multipage Tiff image files from PDF in VB.NET project. Support
adding bookmarks to a pdf; how to create bookmark in pdf automatically
50
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
for good governance by local constituencies. This too is changing. A new
breed of African reformers now places far more emphasis on transparency
and on measures to empower the users of public services, in part through
decentralization. Such measures have significance beyond their immedi-
ate impact, helping over time to develop the civic organizations and the
capacity needed to sustain a robust democratic system. 
Together these two themes point to the following implication: political
and economic governance are inseparable, and together they underpin sus-
tainable development. Especially with the spread of modern communica-
tions, a corrupt, ineffective state is unlikely  to meet the popular and
economic demands of the 21
st
century. As East Asia’s experience suggests,
states that successfully manage and develop their economies are likely to
strengthen their legitimacy. Indeed, African countries with well-managed
economies saw an increase in stability, political rights, and civil liberties in
the 1990s. Conversely, states in conflict perform poorly on political crite-
ria and have weaker economic policies and institutions (chapter 1).
Characteristics of a Well-Functioning State
W
ELL
-
FUNCTIONING STATES SHARE CERTAIN CHARACTERIS
-
tics. Not all of these are necessarily preconditions for devel-
opment—many countries, including many industrial ones,
fall short on a number of relevant attributes. Nor is there a single model
toward which  all  African countries  should  aspire.  Successful options
include “consensual democracy” in Japan, unitary liberal democracy in
parts of Europe, and federalist democracies and confederacies in other
regions. All of these approaches preserve political competition through
popular participation in regular elections, but they differ in many ways. 
Yet while the diversity among successful democracies suggests a vari-
ety of functional institutional arrangements, effective public institutions
generally have some common fundamental characteristics. The first is the
capacity to maintain nationwide peace, law, and order, without which
other government functions are compromised or impossible. Second,
states must secure individual liberty and equality before the law, a process
still working itself out in the West and elsewhere. This has been a major
institutional inadequacy in many African states. Secure property rights
and transparent adjudication of disputes arising thereof are critical in
Political and economic
governance are
inseparable—and
together they underpin
sustainable development
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Create PDF from Tiff. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Create PDF from Tiff. Create PDF from Tiff in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET application.
bookmark pdf in preview; bookmarks pdf
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
C#.NET PDF SDK- Create PDF from Word in Visual C#. Online C#.NET Tutorial for Create PDF from Microsoft Office Excel Spreadsheet Using .NET XDoc.PDF Library.
create bookmark pdf file; create bookmarks pdf
51
IM PROVIN G GOVE RNANCE , MANAGING C ON FLIC T, AND RE BUILDING S TATES
shaping investment decisions. Third, the state needs workable checks and
balances on the arbitrary exercise of power. Public decisionmaking must
be transparent  and predictable.  Oversight mechanisms should guard
against  arbitrariness  and  ensure  accountability  in  the  use  of  public
resources, but need not eliminate the flexibility and delegation needed to
respond quickly to changing circumstances. 
Once this institutional infrastructure is in place, the public sector has
an important role in financing and providing key social, infrastructure,
and dispute resolution services. Effective states raise revenue and supply
these services in ways that contribute to development. Where corruption
is detected, legal and administrative sanctions are implemented, regard-
less of the social and political status of perpetrators. A free press and pub-
lic watchdog organizations guard against abuse of power and reinforce
checks and balances and effective service delivery. The political process is
broadly viewed as legitimate and provides an anchor of predictability for
private investment and economic development more broadly. Besides
enhancing individual liberties, a participatory civil society, free speech,
and an independent press are indispensable for promoting productive
and healthy investment. 
It would be naïve to expect these characteristics to be adopted automat-
ically as the political platform of any country’s leadership. Governments the
world over are susceptible to factional contests for political power, moti-
vated by incentives other than those that encourage good governance. But
without political stability and checks and balances on power, public respon-
sibility for key services and social legitimacy for government are in jeopardy
and economic development may not be achieved. Without these founda-
tions of good political and economic governance, Africa’s development will
be sluggish—or stalled. 
African Governance since Independence
P
ERCEPTIONS OF
A
FRICAN GOVERNANCE HAVEBEEN BEDEVILEDBYA
tendency toward sweeping generalization—an unwillingness to
acknowledge not just failures but also mixed outcomes and some
successes. Any review of Africa’s governance track record since indepen-
dence thus confronts the challenge of both describing general patterns
and highlighting variations across countries. 
Without the foundations
of good political and
economic governance,
Africa’s development will
be sluggish—or stalled
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
C#.NET PDF SDK- Create PDF from PowerPoint in C#. How to Use C#.NET PDF Control to Create PDF from Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation in .NET Project.
export pdf bookmarks to text file; create bookmarks in pdf from excel
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Create PDF from Images. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Create PDF from Images. C#.NET PDF - Create PDF from Images in C# with XDoc.NET PDF Control.
bookmark a pdf file; create pdf bookmarks
54
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
nomic intervention. The popular processes that led to the collapse of
Benin’s military government in 1989, the fall of the Berlin Wall in late
1989, and the release of Nelson Mandela from prison in early 1990
increased demands for constitutional reform. Under popular pressure,
some  francophone  states  (Benin,  Congo-Brazzaville,  Mali)  held
national  conferences  that replaced authoritarian  constitutions  with
French-style democratic ones. Especially after 1989, popular discon-
tent with military or autocratic regimes found vent in mass demon-
strations in favor of individual freedoms and multiparty government.
Most  remaining  African  governments  conceded  the  principle  of
democracy in the first half of the 1990s. By 1999 nearly all countries
had held multiparty elections with varying degrees of credibility.
Variations across Countries
A closer look at the experiences of individual countries also points to
much greater diversity than is commonly imagined.
Capable  and  effective  governance.
 few  states,  like  Botswana  and
Mauritius, have demonstrated a capacity to build effective national gov-
ernance institutions on the foundations of genuinely competitive democ-
racy and the rule of law. Although Botswana’s dominant party (Botswana
Democratic Party) has been in office since independence in 1966, it has
provided wide freedom to opposition parties and maintained the rule of
law. Mauritius—with its medley of ethnic and religious groups, includ-
ing Hindus, Muslims, Creoles, Africans, and Europeans—has defied the
view that ethnolinguistic diversity undermines economic growth. This
has been achieved through regular multiparty elections where competi-
tion cuts across the ethnic divide and—significantly—by a delicate bal-
ance of ethnic representation at the top levels of government. South
Africa’s transition since 1994 also points in this direction. The linchpin
of the 1994 transition was an ethnically inclusive government of national
unity underpinned by the visionary leadership of Mandela. 
Violent conflict and state disintegration.
At the other end of the spectrum
are states where governance has disintegrated into protracted civil wars
and lawlessness. These states include Angola (since 1975), Burundi (since
1993),  Democratic  Republic of Congo (since 1997), Guinea-Bissau
(1997–99), Liberia (1989–97), Sierra Leone (1992–99), Somalia (since
1991), and Sudan (since 1983). In addition, large slices of states border-
ing these countries have suffered the spillover effects of conflict.
A few African states have
built effective national
governance institutions
on the foundations of
genuinely competitive
democracy and the rule
of law…
55
IM PROVIN G GOVE RNANCE , MANAGING C ON FLIC T, AND RE BUILDING S TATES
The vulnerability of these countries to conflict mirrors a global pat-
tern. Since 1980 more than half of all low-income countries have been
involved in conflict, including 15 of the world’s 20 poorest countries.
Africa is no exception. In 1999 one African in five lived in countries
severely disrupted by wars or civil conflicts, and 90 percent of the casu-
alties were civilians. There were more than 3 million refugees and 16 mil-
lion internally displaced persons. And an estimated 20 million landmines
had been laid in Africa, including 9 million in Angola alone. 
State crisis and institutional decay.
About two-thirds of African states have
neither enjoyed the opportunities created by development success nor
endured the violent risks inherent in the opposite extreme. By the 1990s
many of these countries were caught in a low-level equilibrium of poor
institutional capability and ineffective economic transformation. Some
had initially showed high promise. Kenya, for example, was an African
“miracle” in the 1960s and early 1970s, growing by 7.9 percent a year
between 1965 and 1973. Internal security, working infrastructure, and
capable public institutions staffed by competent Kenyans underpinned
that performance. But since the mid-1980s the country has been a vic-
tim of corruption and institutional decay. Since 1989 it has seen rising
internal violence, economic mismanagement, and declining external aid.
Other countries struggling to escape a low-level equilibrium trap include
some with enormous economic potential and large populations, includ-
ing Cameroon, Nigeria, and Tanzania. 
What Accounts for the Evolving Patterns of Governance? 
Broadly speaking, there are two types of explanations for Africa’s gov-
ernance patterns. The first focuses on conditions inherited at indepen-
dence—political and economic—along with structural factors that reflect
Africa’s development experience. The second focuses more on successive
generations of leaders and the political and economic policies they have
pursued. Rather than arbitrate between these competing views, the dis-
cussion here highlights the relevance and the implications of each.
The administrative heritage of colonialism
. Although colonial rule generally
provided poor preparation for African self-rule, some countries emerged
from it better prepared than others. This is evident in the cross-country dif-
ferences in investment by colonial powers in the skills needed to govern an
independent state—good leadership, administration and management of
public resources, understanding of the formulation and application of laws.
…but many have been
caught in a low-level
equilibrium of poor
institutional capability
and ineffective economic
transformation
56
CAN  AFRICA C LAIM  TH E 21
ST
CENTURY?
In  this  regard  the  British  dependencies  in  West  Africa—Ghana,
Nigeria, Sierra Leone, arguably The Gambia—had a head start. Indirect
rule and the absence of European settlers in West Africa facilitated a
greater presence of trained Africans in the governments of these states at
independence relative to British colonies in East Africa, Zambia, and
Zimbabwe. So did the output of Gordon Memorial College in Sudan. In
contrast, the first institution of higher learning in East Africa—Makerere
College in Uganda—opened its doors only in 1930. Segregated public
service systems in most of East and Southern Africa did not permit much
African participation in government—as elected representatives or civil
servants—until well into the 1950s, on the eve of independence.
French-governed territories were also not as well prepared for self-rule
as was anglophone West Africa. French colonial policy advocated assim-
ilation into an empirewide public service and recruitment into one impe-
rial French army. Only a few Africans studied at French universities and
served in the French public service, many of them in what is now Benin.
Similarly, education opportunities for Africans at top French schools—
like Ecole Normale William Ponty in Dakar, Senegal—were limited.
Only in the 1950s were university-level institutions opened in Dakar and
Tananarive (Madagascar) to serve French colonies.
Under the French Union (1946–60) a few Africans were elected to the
French legislature and served as government ministers, but the system
called for African acquiescence. Its limits are best demonstrated by the
precipitous departure of French colonial officers after the Guinean vote
for independence in 1958—leaving Guinea without effective adminis-
tration  almost  overnight.  Education  opportunities  for  Africans  in
Belgian, Portuguese, and Italian colonies were even more sparse. The
impacts of these colonial inequalities have long persisted.
Ethnic diversity.
African states are exceptionally diverse in ethnic and lin-
guistic terms. Some have argued that such diversity damages or destroys
national consensus on infrastructure, macroeconomic reform, and the
allocation of public goods. But while ethnic conflict is a major factor in
African politics, recent research suggests that its impact on economic per-
formance is mediated by a country’s institutional structure. There is no
difference in performance between multiethnic and homogeneous states
that sustain democratic institutions (Collier 1998). Without such insti-
tutions, however, multiethnic states grow far more slowly. This finding is
consonant  with  the  argument  that  faction-ridden  societies  are  best
administered by a decentralized democracy.
1
There is no difference in
performance between
multiethnic and
homogeneous states that
sustain democratic
institutions
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested