save pdf to database c# : Export bookmarks from pdf to excel software Library dll winforms .net windows web forms chapter40-part963

Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report
85
Chap
te
r
 4
Juv
e
nil
ju
st
i
ce s
y
ste
m
st
ru
ct
ur
and
pr
ocess
The fi
r
s
t
juvenile cou
rt
in 
t
he Uni
t
ed
S
t
a
t
es was es
t
ablished in Chicago in
1899, 100 yea
r
s ago. In 
t
he long his
-
t
o
r
y of law and jus
t
ice, juvenile jus
-
t
ice is a 
r
ela
t
ively new developmen
t
.
The juvenile jus
t
ice sys
t
em has
wea
t
he
r
ed significan
t
modifica
t
ions
in 
t
he pas
t
30 yea
r
s, 
r
esul
t
ing f
r
om
Sup
r
eme Cou
rt
decisions, Fede
r
al
legisla
t
ion, and changes in S
t
a
t
e leg
-
isla
t
ion.
Pe
r
cep
t
ions of a juvenile c
r
ime epi
-
demic in 
t
he ea
r
ly 1990’s fueled pub
-
lic sc
r
u
t
iny of 
t
he sys
t
em’s abili
t
t
o
effec
t
ively con
tr
ol violen
t
juvenile
offende
r
s. As a 
r
esul
t
, S
t
a
t
es have
adop
t
ed nume
r
ous legisla
t
ive
changes in an effo
rt
t
o c
r
ack down
on juvenile c
r
ime. While some dif
-
fe
r
ences be
t
ween 
t
he c
r
iminal and
juvenile jus
t
ice sys
t
em have dimin
-
ished in 
r
ecen
t
yea
r
s, 
t
he juvenile
jus
t
ice sys
t
em 
r
emains unique,
guided by i
t
s own philosophy and
legisla
t
ion and implemen
t
ed by i
t
s
own se
t
s of agencies.
This chap
t
e
r
desc
r
ibes 
t
he juvenile
jus
t
ice sys
t
em, focusing on s
tr
uc
-
t
u
r
e and p
r
ocess fea
t
u
r
es 
t
ha
t
r
ela
t
e
t
o delinquency and s
t
a
t
us offense
ma
tt
e
r
s. (The chap
t
e
r
on vic
t
ims
discusses 
t
he handling of child mal
-
tr
ea
t
men
t
ma
tt
e
r
s.) Sec
t
ions in 
t
his
chap
t
e
r
p
r
ovide an ove
r
view of 
t
he
his
t
o
r
y of juvenile jus
t
ice in 
t
his
coun
tr
y and p
r
esen
t
t
he significan
t
Sup
r
eme Cou
rt
decisions 
t
ha
t
have
shaped 
t
he mode
r
n juvenile jus
t
ice
sys
t
em. In addi
t
ion, 
t
he chap
t
e
r
de
-
sc
r
ibes 
t
he juvenile jus
t
ice sys
t
em’s
case p
r
ocessing and compa
r
es and
con
tr
as
t
t
he juvenile and adul
t
sys
-
t
ems.  This chap
t
e
r
also sum
-
ma
r
izes changes made by S
t
a
t
es
wi
t
r
ega
r
t
t
he sys
t
em’s ju
r
isdic
-
t
ional au
t
ho
r
i
t
y, sen
t
encing, co
rr
ec
-
t
ions p
r
og
r
amming, confiden
t
iali
t
y
of 
r
eco
r
ds and cou
rt
hea
r
ings, and
vic
t
im involvemen
t
in cou
rt
hea
r-
ings. Much of 
t
he info
r
ma
t
ion was
d
r
awn f
r
om Na
t
ional Cen
t
e
r
fo
r
Ju
-
venile Jus
t
ice analyses of juvenile
codes in each S
t
a
t
e.
Export bookmarks from pdf to excel - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
edit pdf bookmarks; create bookmarks pdf files
Export bookmarks from pdf to excel - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
create bookmarks in pdf reader; create bookmark pdf
Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report
86
Chapter 4: Juvenile justice system structure and process
Th
juv
e
nil
ju
st
i
ce s
y
ste
m
wa
f
o
und
e
d
 o
n
 t
h
e
co
n
ce
p
t o
f
r
e
habili
t
a
t
i
o
n
 t
hr
o
u
g
h
individualiz
e
d
ju
st
i
ce
Early in U.S. history, children
who broke the law were treated
the same as adult criminals
Th
r
oughou
t
t
he la
t
e 18
t
h cen
t
u
r
y,
“infan
t
s” below 
t
he age of 
r
eason
(
tr
adi
t
ionally age 7) we
r
e p
r
esumed
t
o be incapable of c
r
iminal in
t
en
t
and we
r
e, 
t
he
r
efo
r
e, exemp
t
f
r
om
p
r
osecu
t
ion and punishmen
t
. Chil
-
d
r
en as young as 7, howeve
r
, could
s
t
and 
tr
ial in c
r
iminal cou
rt
fo
r
of
-
fenses commi
tt
ed and, if found
guil
t
y, could be sen
t
enced 
t
o p
r
ison
o
r
even 
t
o dea
t
h.
The 19
t
h
-
cen
t
u
r
y movemen
t
t
ha
t
led 
t
t
he es
t
ablishmen
t
of 
t
he juve
-
nile cou
rt
in 
t
he U.S. had i
t
r
oo
t
s in
16
t
h
-
cen
t
u
r
y Eu
r
opean educa
t
ional
r
efo
r
m movemen
t
s. These ea
r
lie
r
r
e
-
fo
r
m movemen
t
s changed 
t
he pe
r-
cep
t
ion of child
r
en f
r
om one of mini
-
a
t
u
r
e adul
t
t
o one of pe
r
sons wi
t
h
less 
t
han fully developed mo
r
al and
cogni
t
ive capaci
t
ies.
As ea
r
ly as 1825, 
t
he Socie
t
y fo
r
t
he
P
r
even
t
ion of Juvenile Delinquency
was advoca
t
ing 
t
he sepa
r
a
t
ion of ju
-
venile and adul
t
offende
r
s. Soon, fa
-
cili
t
ies exclusively fo
r
juveniles
we
r
e es
t
ablished in mos
t
majo
r
ci
t-
ies. By mid
-
cen
t
u
r
y, 
t
hese p
r
iva
t
ely
ope
r
a
t
ed you
t
h “p
r
isons” we
r
e un
-
de
r
c
r
i
t
icism fo
r
va
r
ious abuses.
Many S
t
a
t
es 
t
hen 
t
ook on 
t
he 
r
e
-
sponsibili
t
y of ope
r
a
t
ing juvenile fa
-
cili
t
ies.
The first juvenile court in this
country was established in Cook
County, Illinois, in 1899
Illinois passed 
t
he Juvenile Cou
rt
Ac
t
of 1899, which es
t
ablished 
t
he
Na
t
ion’s fi
r
s
t
juvenile cou
rt
. The
B
r
i
t
ish doc
tr
ine of parens patriae
(
t
he S
t
a
t
e as pa
r
en
t
) was 
t
he 
r
a
t
io
-
nale fo
r
t
he 
r
igh
t
of 
t
he S
t
a
t
t
o in
-
t
e
r
vene in 
t
he lives of child
r
en in a
manne
r
diffe
r
en
t
f
r
om 
t
he way i
t
in
-
t
e
r
venes in 
t
he lives of adul
t
s. The
doc
tr
ine was in
t
e
r
p
r
e
t
ed 
t
o mean
t
ha
t
, because child
r
en we
r
e no
t
of
full legal capaci
t
y, 
t
he S
t
a
t
e had 
t
he
inhe
r
en
t
powe
r
and 
r
esponsibili
t
y
t
o p
r
ovide p
r
o
t
ec
t
ion fo
r
child
r
en
whose na
t
u
r
al pa
r
en
t
s we
r
e no
t
p
r
o
-
viding app
r
op
r
ia
t
e ca
r
e o
r
supe
r
vi
-
sion. A key elemen
t
was 
t
he focus
on 
t
he welfa
r
e of 
t
he child. Thus,
t
he delinquen
t
child was also seen
as in need of 
t
he cou
rt
’s benevolen
t
in
t
e
r
ven
t
ion.
Juvenile courts flourished for the
first half of the 20th century
By 1910, 32 S
t
a
t
es had es
t
ablished
juvenile cou
rt
s and
/
o
r
p
r
oba
t
ion
se
r
vices. By 1925, all bu
t
t
wo S
t
a
t
es
had followed sui
t
. Ra
t
he
r
t
han
me
r
ely punishing delinquen
t
s fo
r
t
hei
r
c
r
imes, juvenile cou
rt
s sough
t
t
t
u
r
n delinquen
t
s in
t
o p
r
oduc
t
ive
ci
t
izens—
t
h
r
ough 
tr
ea
t
men
t
.
The mission 
t
o help child
r
en in
tr
ouble was s
t
a
t
ed clea
r
ly in 
t
he
laws 
t
ha
t
es
t
ablished juvenile
cou
rt
s. This benevolen
t
mission led
t
o p
r
ocedu
r
al and subs
t
an
t
ive dif
-
fe
r
ences be
t
ween 
t
he juvenile and
c
r
iminal jus
t
ice sys
t
ems.
Du
r
ing 
t
he nex
t
50 yea
r
s, mos
t
juve
-
nile cou
rt
s had exclusive o
r
iginal
ju
r
isdic
t
ion ove
r
all you
t
h unde
r
age
18 who we
r
e cha
r
ged wi
t
h viola
t
ing
c
r
iminal laws. Only if 
t
he juvenile
cou
rt
waived i
t
s ju
r
isdic
t
ion in a
case could a child be 
tr
ansfe
rr
ed 
t
o
c
r
iminal cou
rt
and 
tr
ied as an adul
t
.
T
r
ansfe
r
decisions we
r
e made on a
case
-
by
-
case basis using a “bes
t
in
t
e
r
es
t
s of 
t
he child and public”
s
t
anda
r
d, and we
r
t
hus wi
t
hin 
t
he
r
ealm of individualized jus
t
ice.
The focus on offenders and not
offenses, on rehabilitation and
not punishment, had substantial
procedural impact
Unlike 
t
he c
r
iminal jus
t
ice sys
t
em,
whe
r
e dis
tr
ic
t
a
tt
o
r
neys selec
t
cases fo
r
tr
ial, 
t
he juvenile cou
rt
con
tr
olled i
t
s own in
t
ake. And un
-
like c
r
iminal p
r
osecu
t
o
r
s, juvenile
cou
rt
in
t
ake conside
r
ed ex
tr
a
-
legal
as well as legal fac
t
o
r
s in deciding
how 
t
o handle cases. Juvenile cou
rt
in
t
ake also had disc
r
e
t
ion 
t
o handle
cases info
r
mally, bypassing judicial
ac
t
ion.
John Augustus—planting the
seeds of juvenile probation
(1847)
“I bailed nineteen boys, from 7 to 15
years of age, and in bailing them it
was understood, and agreed by the
court, that their cases should be
continued from term to term for sev-
eral months, as a season of proba-
tion; thus each month at the calling
of the docket, I would appear in
court, make my report, and thus the
cases would pass on for 5 or 6
months. At the expiration of this
term, twelve of the boys were
brought into court at one time, and
the scene formed a striking and
highly pleasing contrast with their
appearance when first arraigned.
The judge expressed much plea-
sure as well as surprise at their ap-
pearance, and remarked, that the
object of law had been accom-
plished and expressed his cordial
approval of my plan to save and re-
form.”
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
document file. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview
pdf reader with bookmarks; adding bookmarks to pdf
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Demo Code in VB.NET. The following VB.NET codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
creating bookmarks in pdf documents; how to bookmark a page in pdf document
Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report
90
Chapter 4: Juvenile justice system structure and process
U
.
S
Supr
e
m
C
o
ur
t c
a
ses 
hav
had
an
impa
ct o
n
 t
h
e
c
hara
cte
r
and
pr
oce
dur
es o
f
 t
h
juv
e
nil
ju
st
i
ce s
y
ste
m
The Supreme Court has made its
mark on juvenile justice
Issues a
r
ising f
r
om juvenile delin
-
quency p
r
oceedings 
r
a
r
ely come be
-
fo
r
t
he U.S. Sup
r
eme Cou
rt
. Begin
-
ning in 
t
he la
t
e 1960’s, howeve
r
t
he
Cou
rt
decided a se
r
ies of landma
r
k
cases 
t
ha
t
d
r
ama
t
ically changed 
t
he
cha
r
ac
t
e
r
and p
r
ocedu
r
es of 
t
he
juvenile jus
t
ice sys
t
em.
Kent
v. 
United States
383 U.S. 541, 86 S.Ct. 1045 (1966)
In 1961, while on p
r
oba
t
ion f
r
om an
ea
r
lie
r
case, Mo
rr
is Ken
t
, age 16,
was cha
r
ged wi
t
r
ape and 
r
obbe
r
y.
Ken
t
confessed 
t
t
he offense as
well as 
t
o seve
r
al simila
r
inciden
t
s.
Assuming 
t
ha
t
t
he Dis
tr
ic
t
of Colum
-
bia juvenile cou
rt
would conside
r
waiving ju
r
isdic
t
ion 
t
t
he adul
t
sys
-
t
em, Ken
t
’s a
tt
o
r
ney filed a mo
t
ion
r
eques
t
ing a hea
r
ing on 
t
he issue of
ju
r
isdic
t
ion.
The juvenile cou
rt
judge did no
t
r
ule on 
t
his mo
t
ion filed by Ken
t
’s
a
tt
o
r
ney. Ins
t
ead, he en
t
e
r
ed a mo
-
t
ion s
t
a
t
ing 
t
ha
t
t
he cou
rt
was waiv
-
ing ju
r
isdic
t
ion af
t
e
r
making a “full
inves
t
iga
t
ion.” The judge did no
t
de
-
sc
r
ibe 
t
he inves
t
iga
t
ion o
r
t
he
g
r
ounds fo
r
t
he waive
r
. Ken
t
was
subsequen
t
ly found guil
t
y in c
r
imi
-
nal cou
rt
on six coun
t
s of house
-
b
r
eaking and 
r
obbe
r
y and sen
-
t
enced 
t
o 30 
t
o 90 yea
r
s in p
r
ison.
Ken
t
’s lawye
r
sough
t
t
o have 
t
he
c
r
iminal indic
t
men
t
dismissed, a
r
gu
-
ing 
t
ha
t
t
he waive
r
had been invalid.
He also appealed 
t
he waive
r
and
filed a w
r
i
t
of habeas co
r
pus asking
t
he S
t
a
t
t
o jus
t
ify Ken
t
’s de
t
en
t
ion.
Appella
t
e cou
rt
r
ejec
t
ed bo
t
t
he
appeal and 
t
he w
r
i
t
r
efused 
t
o sc
r
u
-
t
inize 
t
he judge’s “inves
t
iga
t
ion,”
and accep
t
ed 
t
he waive
r
as valid. In
appealing 
t
t
he U.S. Sup
r
eme
Cou
rt
, Ken
t
’s a
tt
o
r
ney a
r
gued 
t
ha
t
t
he judge had no
t
made a comple
t
e
inves
t
iga
t
ion and 
t
ha
t
Ken
t
was de
-
nied cons
t
i
t
u
t
ional 
r
igh
t
s simply be
-
cause he was a mino
r
.
The Cou
rt
r
uled 
t
he waive
r
invalid,
s
t
a
t
ing 
t
ha
t
Ken
t
was en
t
i
t
led 
t
o a
hea
r
ing 
t
ha
t
measu
r
ed up 
t
o “
t
he es
-
sen
t
ials of due p
r
ocess and fai
r
tr
ea
t
men
t
,” 
t
ha
t
Ken
t
’s counsel
should have had access 
t
o all
r
eco
r
ds involved in 
t
he waive
r
, and
t
ha
t
t
he judge should have p
r
ovided
written s
t
a
t
emen
t
of 
t
he 
r
easons
fo
r
waive
r
.
Technically, 
t
he Kent decision ap
-
plied only 
t
o D.C. cou
rt
s, bu
t
i
t
s im
-
pac
t
was mo
r
e widesp
r
ead. The
Cou
rt
r
aised a po
t
en
t
ial cons
t
i
t
u
-
t
ional challenge 
t
parens patriae as
t
he founda
t
ion of 
t
he juvenile cou
rt
.
In i
t
s pas
t
decisions, 
t
he Cou
rt
had
in
t
e
r
p
r
e
t
ed 
t
he equal p
r
o
t
ec
t
ion
clause of 
t
he 14
t
h amendmen
t
t
o
mean 
t
ha
t
ce
rt
ain classes of people
could 
r
eceive less due p
r
ocess if a
“compensa
t
ing benefi
t
” came wi
t
h
t
his lesse
r
p
r
o
t
ec
t
ion. In 
t
heo
r
y, 
t
he
juvenile cou
rt
p
r
ovided less due
p
r
ocess bu
t
a g
r
ea
t
e
r
conce
r
n fo
r
t
he in
t
e
r
es
t
s of 
t
he juvenile. The
Cou
rt
r
efe
rr
ed 
t
o evidence 
t
ha
t
t
his
compensa
t
ing benefi
t
may no
t
exis
t
in 
r
eali
t
y and 
t
ha
t
juveniles may 
r
e
-
ceive 
t
he “wo
r
s
t
of bo
t
h wo
r
lds”—
“nei
t
he
r
t
he p
r
o
t
ec
t
ion acco
r
ded 
t
o
adul
t
s no
r
t
he solici
t
ous ca
r
e and
r
egene
r
a
t
ive 
tr
ea
t
men
t
pos
t
ula
t
ed
fo
r
child
r
en.”
In re Gault
387 U.S. 1, 87 S.Ct. 1428 (1967)
Ge
r
ald Gaul
t
, age 15, was on p
r
oba
-
t
ion in A
r
izona fo
r
a mino
r
p
r
ope
rt
y
offense when, in 1964, he and a
f
r
iend made a c
r
ank 
t
elephone call
t
o an adul
t
neighbo
r
, asking he
r
,
“A
r
e you
r
che
rr
ies 
r
ipe 
t
oday?” and
“Do you have big bombe
r
s?” Iden
t
i
-
fied by 
t
he neighbo
r
t
he you
t
h we
r
e
a
rr
es
t
ed and de
t
ained.
The vic
t
im did no
t
appea
r
a
t
t
he
adjudica
t
ion hea
r
ing, and 
t
he cou
rt
neve
r
r
esolved 
t
he issue of whe
t
he
r
Gaul
t
made 
t
he “obscene” 
r
ema
r
ks.
Gaul
t
was commi
tt
ed 
t
o a 
tr
aining
school fo
r
t
he pe
r
iod of his mino
r-
i
t
y. The maximum sen
t
ence fo
r
an
adul
t
would have been a $50 fine o
r
2 mon
t
hs in jail.
An a
tt
o
r
ney ob
t
ained fo
r
Gaul
t
af
t
e
r
t
he 
tr
ial filed a w
r
i
t
of habeas co
r-
pus 
t
ha
t
was even
t
ually hea
r
d by
t
he U.S. Sup
r
eme Cou
rt
. The issue
p
r
esen
t
ed in 
t
he case was 
t
ha
t
Gaul
t
’s cons
t
i
t
u
t
ional 
r
igh
t
s (
t
o no
-
t
ice of cha
r
ges, counsel, ques
t
ioning
of wi
t
nesses, p
r
o
t
ec
t
ion agains
t
self
-
inc
r
imina
t
ion, a 
tr
ansc
r
ip
t
of 
t
he
p
r
oceedings, and appella
t
r
eview)
we
r
e denied.
The Cou
rt
r
uled 
t
ha
t
in hea
r
ings
t
ha
t
could 
r
esul
t
in commi
t
men
t
t
o
an ins
t
i
t
u
t
ion, juveniles have 
t
he
r
igh
t
t
o no
t
ice and counsel, 
t
o ques
-
t
ion wi
t
nesses, and 
t
o p
r
o
t
ec
t
ion
agains
t
self
-
inc
r
imina
t
ion. The Cou
rt
did no
t
r
ule on a juvenile’s 
r
igh
t
t
o
appella
t
r
eview o
r
tr
ansc
r
ip
t
s, bu
t
encou
r
aged 
t
he S
t
a
t
es 
t
o p
r
ovide
t
hose 
r
igh
t
s.
The Cou
rt
based i
t
r
uling on 
t
he
fac
t
t
ha
t
Gaul
t
was being punished
r
a
t
he
r
t
han helped by 
t
he juvenile
cou
rt
. The Cou
rt
explici
t
ly 
r
ejec
t
ed
t
he doc
tr
ine of parens patriae as 
t
he
founding p
r
inciple of juvenile jus
t
ice,
desc
r
ibing 
t
he concep
t
as mu
r
ky and
of dubious his
t
o
r
ical 
r
elevance. The
Cou
rt
concluded 
t
ha
t
t
he handling
of Gaul
t
’s case viola
t
ed 
t
he due
p
r
ocess clause of 
t
he 14
t
h amend
-
men
t
: “Juvenile cou
rt
his
t
o
r
y has
again demons
tr
a
t
ed 
t
ha
t
unb
r
idled
disc
r
e
t
ion, howeve
r
benevolen
t
ly
Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report
91
Chapter 4: Juvenile justice system structure and process
mo
t
iva
t
ed, is f
r
equen
t
ly a poo
r
sub
-
s
t
i
t
u
t
e fo
r
p
r
inciple and p
r
ocedu
r
e.”
In re Winship
397 U.S. 358, 90 S.Ct. 1068 (1970)
Samuel Winship, age 12, was
cha
r
ged wi
t
h s
t
ealing $112 f
r
om a
woman’s pu
r
se in a s
t
o
r
e. A s
t
o
r
e
employee claimed 
t
o have seen
Winship 
r
unning f
r
om 
t
he scene jus
t
befo
r
t
he woman no
t
iced 
t
he
money was missing; o
t
he
r
s in 
t
he
s
t
o
r
e s
t
a
t
ed 
t
ha
t
t
he employee was
no
t
in a posi
t
ion 
t
o see 
t
he money
being 
t
aken.
Winship was adjudica
t
ed delinquen
t
and commi
tt
ed 
t
o a 
tr
aining school.
New Yo
r
k juvenile cou
rt
s ope
r
a
t
ed
unde
r
t
he civil cou
rt
s
t
anda
r
d of a
“p
r
eponde
r
ance of evidence.” The
cou
rt
ag
r
eed wi
t
h Winship’s a
tt
o
r-
ney 
t
ha
t
t
he
r
e was “
r
easonable
doub
t
” of Winship’s guil
t
, bu
t
based
i
t
r
uling on 
t
he “p
r
eponde
r
ance” of
evidence.
Upon appeal 
t
t
he Sup
r
eme Cou
rt
,
t
he cen
tr
al issue in 
t
he case was
whe
t
he
r
“p
r
oof beyond a 
r
eason
-
able doub
t
” should be conside
r
ed
among 
t
he “essen
t
ials of due p
r
o
-
cess and fai
r
tr
ea
t
men
t
” 
r
equi
r
ed
du
r
ing 
t
he adjudica
t
o
r
y s
t
age of 
t
he
juvenile cou
rt
p
r
ocess. The Cou
rt
r
ejec
t
ed lowe
r
cou
rt
a
r
gumen
t
t
ha
t
juvenile cou
rt
s we
r
e no
t
r
equi
r
ed 
t
o
ope
r
a
t
e on 
t
he same s
t
anda
r
ds as
adul
t
cou
rt
s because juvenile cou
rt
s
we
r
e designed 
t
o “save” 
r
a
t
he
r
t
han
t
o “punish” child
r
en. The Cou
rt
r
uled 
t
ha
t
t
he “
r
easonable doub
t
s
t
anda
r
d should be 
r
equi
r
ed in all
delinquency adjudica
t
ions.
McKeiver
v. 
Pennsylvania
403 U.S. 528, 91 S.Ct. 1976 (1971)
Joseph McKeive
r
, age 16, was
cha
r
ged wi
t
r
obbe
r
y, la
r
ceny, and
r
eceiving s
t
olen goods. He and 20 
t
o
30 o
t
he
r
you
t
h allegedly chased 3
1965
1970
1975
1980
1985
1990
*Death penalty case decisions are discussed in chapter 7.
Kent 
v.
 United States
(1966)
Courts must provide the “essen-
tials of due process” in transferring
juveniles to the adult system.
Breed 
v. 
Jones
(1975)
Waiver of a juvenile to criminal court
following adjudication in juvenile court
constitutes double jeopardy.
Oklahoma Publishing Co. 
v.
 District Court
(1977)
 Smith v. Daily Mail Publishing Co.
(1979)
The press may report juvenile court
proceedings under certain circumstances.
Eddings 
v. 
Oklahoma
(1982)*
Defendant’s youthful age should be con-
sidered a mitigating factor in deciding
whether to apply the death penalty.
Schall 
v. 
Martin
(1984)
Preventive “pretrial” detention of
juveniles is allowable under certain
circumstances.
Thompson 
v. 
Oklahoma
(1988)*
 Stanford 
v. 
Kentucky
(1989)*
Minimum age for death penalty
is set at 16.
In re Gault
(1967)
In hearings that could result in commit-
ment to an institution, juveniles have
four basic constitutional rights.
In re Winship
(1970)
In delinquency matters, the State
must prove its case beyond a
reasonable doubt.
McKeiver 
v. 
Pennsylvania
(1971)
Jury trials are not constitutionally
required in juvenile court hearings.
A series of U.S. Supreme Court decisions made juvenile courts more like criminal courts but maintained
some important differences
Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report
92
Chapter 4: Juvenile justice system structure and process
you
t
h and 
t
ook 25 cen
t
s f
r
om 
t
hem.
McKeive
r
me
t
wi
t
h his a
tt
o
r
ney fo
r
only a few minu
t
es befo
r
e his adju
-
dica
t
o
r
y hea
r
ing. A
t
t
he hea
r
ing, his
a
tt
o
r
ney’s 
r
eques
t
fo
r
a ju
r
tr
ial
was denied by 
t
he cou
rt
. He was
subsequen
t
ly adjudica
t
ed and
placed on p
r
oba
t
ion.
The S
t
a
t
e sup
r
eme cou
rt
ci
t
ed 
r
e
-
cen
t
decisions of 
t
he U.S. Sup
r
eme
Cou
rt
t
ha
t
had a
tt
emp
t
ed 
t
o include
mo
r
e due p
r
ocess in juvenile cou
rt
p
r
oceedings wi
t
hou
t
e
r
oding 
t
he es
-
sen
t
ial benefi
t
s of 
t
he juvenile cou
rt
.
The S
t
a
t
e sup
r
eme cou
rt
affi
r
med
t
he lowe
r
cou
rt
, a
r
guing 
t
ha
t
of all
due p
r
ocess 
r
igh
t
s, 
tr
ial by ju
r
y is
mos
t
likely 
t
o “des
tr
oy 
t
he 
tr
adi
t
ional
cha
r
ac
t
e
r
of juvenile p
r
oceedings.”
The U.S. Sup
r
eme Cou
rt
found 
t
ha
t
t
he due p
r
ocess clause of 
t
he 14
t
h
amendmen
t
did no
t
r
equi
r
e ju
r
tr
i
-
als in juvenile cou
rt
. The impac
t
of
t
he Cou
rt
’s Gault and Winship deci
-
sions was 
t
o enhance 
t
he accu
r
acy
of 
t
he juvenile cou
rt
p
r
ocess in 
t
he
fac
t-
finding s
t
age. In McKeiver
t
he
Cou
rt
a
r
gued 
t
ha
t
ju
r
ies a
r
e no
t
known 
t
o be mo
r
e accu
r
a
t
t
han
judges in 
t
he adjudica
t
ion s
t
age and
could be dis
r
up
t
ive 
t
t
he info
r
mal
a
t
mosphe
r
e of 
t
he juvenile cou
rt
,
t
ending 
t
o make i
t
mo
r
e adve
r
sa
r
ial.
Breed
v. 
Jones
421 U.S. 519, 95 S.Ct. 1779 (1975)
In 1970, Ga
r
y Jones, age 17, was
cha
r
ged wi
t
h a
r
med 
r
obbe
r
y. Jones
appea
r
ed in Los Angeles juvenile
cou
rt
and was adjudica
t
ed delin
-
quen
t
on 
t
he o
r
iginal cha
r
ge and
t
wo o
t
he
r
r
obbe
r
ies.
A
t
t
he disposi
t
ional hea
r
ing, 
t
he
judge waived ju
r
isdic
t
ion ove
r
t
he
case 
t
o c
r
iminal cou
rt
. Counsel fo
r
Jones filed a w
r
i
t
of habeas co
r
pus,
a
r
guing 
t
ha
t
t
he waive
r
t
o c
r
iminal
cou
rt
viola
t
ed 
t
he double jeopa
r
dy
clause of 
t
he fif
t
h amendmen
t
. The
cou
rt
denied 
t
his pe
t
i
t
ion, saying
t
ha
t
Jones had no
t
been 
tr
ied 
t
wice
because juvenile adjudica
t
ion is no
t
a “
tr
ial” and does no
t
place a you
t
h
in jeopa
r
dy.
Upon appeal, 
t
he U.S. Sup
r
eme
Cou
rt
r
uled 
t
ha
t
an adjudica
t
ion in
juvenile cou
rt
, in which a juvenile is
found 
t
o have viola
t
ed a c
r
iminal
s
t
a
t
u
t
e, is equivalen
t
t
o a 
tr
ial in
c
r
iminal cou
rt
. Thus, Jones had
been placed in double jeopa
r
dy. The
Cou
rt
also specified 
t
ha
t
jeopa
r
dy
applies a
t
t
he adjudica
t
ion hea
r
ing
when evidence is fi
r
s
t
p
r
esen
t
ed.
Waive
r
canno
t
occu
r
af
t
e
r
jeopa
r
dy
a
tt
aches.
Oklahoma Publishing Company
v. 
District Court in and for
Oklahoma City
480 U.S. 308, 97 S.Ct. 1045 (1977)
The Oklahoma Publishing Company
case involved a cou
rt
o
r
de
r
p
r
ohib
-
i
t
ing 
t
he p
r
ess f
r
om 
r
epo
rt
ing 
t
he
name and pho
t
og
r
aph of a you
t
h in
-
volved in a juvenile cou
rt
p
r
oceed
-
ing. The ma
t
e
r
ial in ques
t
ion was
ob
t
ained legally f
r
om a sou
r
ce ou
t-
side 
t
he cou
rt
. The U.S. Sup
r
eme
Cou
rt
found 
t
he cou
rt
o
r
de
r
t
o be
an uncons
t
i
t
u
t
ional inf
r
ingemen
t
on
f
r
eedom of 
t
he p
r
ess.
Smith
v. 
Daily Mail Publishing
Company
443 U.S. 97, 99 S.Ct. 2667 (1979)
The Daily Mail case held 
t
ha
t
S
t
a
t
e
law canno
t
s
t
op 
t
he p
r
ess f
r
om pub
-
lishing a juvenile’s name 
t
ha
t
i
t
ob
-
t
ained independen
t
ly of 
t
he cou
rt
.
Al
t
hough 
t
he decision did no
t
hold
t
ha
t
t
he p
r
ess should have access
t
o juvenile cou
rt
files, i
t
held 
t
ha
t
if
info
r
ma
t
ion 
r
ega
r
ding a juvenile
case is lawfully ob
t
ained by 
t
he me
-
dia, 
t
he fi
r
s
t
amendmen
t
in
t
e
r
es
t
in
a f
r
ee p
r
ess 
t
akes p
r
ecedence ove
r
t
he in
t
e
r
es
t
s in p
r
ese
r
ving 
t
he ano
-
nymi
t
y of juvenile defendan
t
s.
Schall
v. 
Martin
467 U.S. 253, 104 S.Ct. 2403
(1984)
G
r
ego
r
y Ma
rt
in, age 14, was a
r-
r
es
t
ed in 1977 and cha
r
ged wi
t
r
ob
-
be
r
y, assaul
t
, and possession of a
weapon. He and 
t
wo o
t
he
r
you
t
h al
-
legedly hi
t
a boy on 
t
he head wi
t
h a
loaded gun and s
t
ole his jacke
t
and
sneake
r
s.
Ma
rt
in was held pending adjudica
-
t
ion because 
t
he cou
rt
found 
t
he
r
e
was a “se
r
ious 
r
isk” 
t
ha
t
he would
commi
t
ano
t
he
r
c
r
ime if 
r
eleased.
Ma
rt
in’s a
tt
o
r
ney filed a habeas co
r-
pus ac
t
ion challenging 
t
he funda
-
men
t
al fai
r
ness of p
r
even
t
ive de
t
en
-
t
ion. The lowe
r
appella
t
e cou
rt
s
r
eve
r
sed 
t
he juvenile cou
rt
’s de
t
en
-
t
ion o
r
de
r
, a
r
guing in pa
rt
t
ha
t
p
r
e
-
tr
ial de
t
en
t
ion is essen
t
ially punish
-
men
t
because many juveniles
de
t
ained befo
r
tr
ial a
r
r
eleased
befo
r
e, o
r
immedia
t
ely af
t
e
r
,
adjudica
t
ion.
The U.S. Sup
r
eme Cou
rt
upheld 
t
he
cons
t
i
t
u
t
ionali
t
y of 
t
he p
r
even
t
ive
de
t
en
t
ion s
t
a
t
u
t
e. The Cou
rt
s
t
a
t
ed
t
ha
t
p
r
even
t
ive de
t
en
t
ion se
r
ves a
legi
t
ima
t
e S
t
a
t
e objec
t
ive in p
r
o
t
ec
t-
ing bo
t
t
he juvenile and socie
t
y
f
r
om p
r
e
tr
ial c
r
ime and is no
t
in
-
t
ended 
t
o punish 
t
he juvenile. The
Cou
rt
found 
t
he
r
e we
r
e enough p
r
o
-
cedu
r
es in place 
t
o p
r
o
t
ec
t
juveniles
f
r
om w
r
ongful dep
r
iva
t
ion of libe
rt
y.
The p
r
o
t
ec
t
ions we
r
e p
r
ovided by
no
t
ice, a s
t
a
t
emen
t
of 
t
he fac
t
s and
r
easons fo
r
de
t
en
t
ion, and a p
r
ob
-
able cause hea
r
ing wi
t
hin a sho
rt
t
ime. The Cou
rt
also 
r
easse
rt
ed 
t
he
parens patriae in
t
e
r
es
t
s of 
t
he S
t
a
t
e
in p
r
omo
t
ing 
t
he welfa
r
e of child
r
en.
Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 1999 National Report
93
Chapter 4: Juvenile justice system structure and process
S
t
a
te st
a
t
u
tes 
d
e
fin
wh
i
und
e
r
 t
h
juri
s
di
ct
i
o
n
 o
f
juv
e
nil
e co
ur
t
State statutes define age limits
for the original jurisdiction of the
juvenile court
In mos
t
S
t
a
t
es, 
t
he juvenile cou
rt
has o
r
iginal ju
r
isdic
t
ion ove
r
all
you
t
h cha
r
ged wi
t
h a law viola
t
ion
who we
r
e below 
t
he age of 18 a
t
t
he
t
ime of 
t
he offense, a
rr
es
t
, o
r
r
efe
r-
r
al 
t
o