Choosing Authoring Tools 
Advanced Distributed Learning (ADL) Co-Laboratories 
17 December 2014 
Version 8.0 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ 
Export bookmarks from pdf to excel - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
create bookmark in pdf automatically; export pdf bookmarks to excel
Export bookmarks from pdf to excel - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
create pdf with bookmarks from word; add bookmark to pdf reader
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 2 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
This document was produced by Serco Services, Inc. under OPM Contract OPM0207008 Project Code: 
02 EA3TTAN MP Vol. 3. Author is Peter Berking. Address comments to peter.berking.ctr@adlnet.gov 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
document file. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview
create pdf bookmarks online; create bookmarks in pdf from excel
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Demo Code in VB.NET. The following VB.NET codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
add bookmarks to pdf; pdf export bookmarks
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 3 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Table of Contents 
1.
Purpose and scope of this paper ........................................................................... 6
2.
Overview ................................................................................................................... 6
2.1. What is an authoring tool? .............................................................................................. 6 
2.2. Why use authoring tools? ............................................................................................... 7 
2.3. Why is the choice of tools so important? ......................................................................... 7 
2.4. Should my organization mandate use of standard tools? ................................................ 8 
3.
Process for choosing tools ..................................................................................... 8
4.
Categories and examples of authoring tools ...................................................... 10
4.1. Self-contained authoring environments ......................................................................... 11 
4.1.1.
Website development tools .................................................................................................... 11
4.1.2.
Rapid Application Development (RAD) tools ......................................................................... 11
4.1.3.
eLearning development tools ................................................................................................. 11
4.1.4.
Simulation development tools ................................................................................................ 14
4.1.5.
Game development environments ......................................................................................... 15
4.1.6.
Virtual world development environments ............................................................................... 16
4.1.7.
Database-delivered web application systems ....................................................................... 16
4.2. Learning content management systems (LCMSs) ........................................................ 17 
4.3. Virtual classroom systems ............................................................................................ 17 
4.4. Mobile learning development tools ............................................................................... 18 
4.5. Social learning development tools ................................................................................ 20 
4.6. External document converter/optimizer tools ................................................................ 20 
4.6.1.
Web-based external document converter/optimizer tools ..................................................... 21
4.6.2.
Desktop-based external document converter/optimizer tools ................................................ 21
4.7. Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) tools .......................................................................... 22 
4.8. Auxiliary tools ............................................................................................................... 23 
4.8.1.
eLearning assemblers/packagers .......................................................................................... 23
4.8.2.
Specific interaction object creation tools ................................................................................ 24
4.8.3.
Media asset production and management tools .................................................................... 25
4.8.4.
Word processors, page layout, and document format tools .................................................. 26
4.8.5.
Database applications ............................................................................................................ 26
4.8.6.
Web-based collaboration tools .............................................................................................. 27
4.8.7.
Web page editors ................................................................................................................... 27
4.9. Comparison of categories ............................................................................................. 27 
5.
Special features and issues to consider .............................................................. 29
5.1. Rapid eLearning authoring tools ................................................................................... 29 
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF file by top level bookmarks. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
export pdf bookmarks to text file; pdf bookmarks
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
NET framework. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. C# class demo
adding bookmarks in pdf; bookmarks in pdf reader
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 4 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
5.2. mLearning authoring tools ............................................................................................ 29 
5.3. Open source, freeware, and GOTS solutions ............................................................... 32 
5.4. Hosted solutions ........................................................................................................... 34 
5.5. Templates, themes, and skins ...................................................................................... 35 
5.6. Security considerations ................................................................................................ 36 
5.7. File formats .................................................................................................................. 37 
5.7.1.
Input ....................................................................................................................................... 37
5.7.2.
Output .................................................................................................................................... 37
5.8. Reuse of learning objects ............................................................................................. 38 
5.9. Commercially available courses ................................................................................... 39 
5.10.  Standards support ..................................................................................................... 39 
5.10.1.
SCORM .................................................................................................................................. 39
5.10.2.
Section 508 ............................................................................................................................ 42
5.10.3.
Aviation Industry CBT Consortium (AICC) ............................................................................. 43
5.10.4.
Standards for metadata ......................................................................................................... 43
5.10.5.
Common Cartridge ................................................................................................................. 44
5.10.6.
Training and Learning Architecture (TLA) .............................................................................. 44
5.11.  Assessments ............................................................................................................. 46 
5.12.  Responsive design .................................................................................................... 46 
6.
Criteria for assessing quality and suitability of tools ......................................... 47
6.1. Criteria applicable to desktop and web-based tools ...................................................... 47 
6.1.1.
Support for instructional strategies and learning technologies .............................................. 47
6.1.2.
Sequencing and navigation ................................................................................................... 48
6.1.3.
Assessment features ............................................................................................................. 49
6.1.4.
Technical characteristics of output ........................................................................................ 50
6.2. Authoring of documents related to course .................................................................... 51 
6.3. Ease of learning and use .............................................................................................. 52 
6.4. User training, support, and documentation ................................................................... 52 
6.5. Technical architecture .................................................................................................. 53 
6.6. Acquisition and maintenance ........................................................................................ 53 
6.7. Automation and process optimization ........................................................................... 53 
6.8. Media handling ............................................................................................................. 55 
6.9. Programming features .................................................................................................. 56 
6.10.  Criteria specific only to web-based tools .................................................................... 57 
6.10.1.
Collaborative authoring and process management ............................................................... 57
6.10.2.
System access ....................................................................................................................... 57
6.10.3.
System performance .............................................................................................................. 58
6.10.4.
Permissions and roles ............................................................................................................ 58
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Export PDF images to HTML images. SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and font style that are included in target PDF document file.
bookmark pdf documents; create pdf bookmark
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
C# programmers can convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint Tiff, Jpeg, Bmp, Png, and Gif to PDF document. This class describes bookmarks in a PDF document.
editing bookmarks in pdf; bookmarks pdf
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 5 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
7.
General recommandations .................................................................................... 59
8.
Current trends in authoring tools ......................................................................... 60
8.1. Team-based life cycle production and maintenance ..................................................... 60 
8.2. Use of XML or JSON .................................................................................................... 61 
8.3. Separation of content and appearance ......................................................................... 62 
8.4. Support for ISD Process ............................................................................................... 62 
8.5. Integration and complexity of templates and skins ........................................................ 62 
8.6. Learning object-centric architecture .............................................................................. 62 
8.7. Embedded best practice design principles .................................................................... 63 
8.8. Automated metadata generation/extraction .................................................................. 63 
8.9. Open architectures ....................................................................................................... 63 
8.10.  Support for team-based learning ............................................................................... 63 
8.11. 
Gadget
-based interface .......................................................................................... 64 
8.12.  Support for social media ............................................................................................ 64 
8.13.  Support for immersive learning technologies ............................................................. 64 
8.14.  Support for online assessment of performance tasks ................................................ 65 
8.15.  Support for semantic web/Web 3.0 technologies ....................................................... 65 
8.16.  Authoring performance support applications .............................................................. 66 
8.17.  HTML5 format ........................................................................................................... 66 
8.18.  Interactive video ........................................................................................................ 68 
8.19.  Crowd sourced authoring systems ............................................................................. 69 
9.
For more information about authoring tools ....................................................... 69
10.
References cited in this paper .............................................................................. 70
Appendix ...................................................................................................................... 71
A. Sample Tool Requirements Matrix ................................................................................... 71 
B. Sample Tool Features Rating Matrix ................................................................................ 73 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
create searchable PDF document from Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures
bookmarks in pdf from word; bookmarks pdf file
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
VB.NET programmers can convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint Tiff, Jpeg, Bmp, Png, and Gif to PDF document. This class describes bookmarks in a PDF document.
add bookmark pdf; how to bookmark a page in pdf document
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 6 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
NOTE: Vendor citations or descriptions in this paper are for illustrative purposes and do not 
constitute an endorsement by ADL. All listings of vendors and products are in alphabetical order 
unless otherwise noted. 
1.
Purpose and scope of this paper 
The purpose of this paper is to help those involved in the process of choosing authoring tools to make an 
informed decision. The paper presents a range of considerations for choosing tools, whether as an 
enterprise-wide acquisition or a single user purchase, and includes a sampling of current tools categorized 
according to the kind of product they are intended to produce.  
This paper does not contain a comprehensive survey of available tools on the market, nor does it contain a 
comparative rating or evaluation of products, and should not be construed as having such. For more in-
depth information about tools and their features, see the references in 9. For more information about 
authoring tools, or consult the vendors. ADL presents this paper merely as a guide to the issues, 
opportunities, and processes that are typically considered in choosing authoring tools. 
ADL has titled this paper 
Choosing Authoring Tools
” 
rather than 
Choosing an Authoring Tool,
” 
since 
there is usually a need to select more than one product. Rarely will one tool meet all the production needs 
of an organization or developer. Most developers use a combination of tools, even to produce a single 
eLearning product; using a combination of tools that are each optimized to produce particular components 
of the product can increase production efficiencies dramatically. Additionally, you may find it impossible 
to create the variety of eLearning product types your organization requires with a single tool. An 
eLearning Guild survey of authoring tools in 2013 reported that respondents use an average of 3.35 tools 
(Shank & Ganci, 2013). 
In line with our mission to promote reusability and interoperability in eLearning, ADL recommends 
authoring tools with built-in features that allow creating SCORM
®
-conformant eLearning. Creating 
eLearning that is not reusable or interoperable can be a significant business risk, since you may not be 
able to run your content in more than one LMS, and you may needlessly develop already-existing content. 
You can find SCORM considerations for authoring tools in 5.10.1. SCORM . 
2.
Overview 
2.1.
What is an authoring tool? 
Authoring tools are software applications used to develop eLearning products. They generally include the 
capabilities to create, edit, review, test, and configure eLearning. These tools support learning, education, 
and training by enabling using distributed eLearning that is cost-efficient to produce, and that facilitates 
incorporating effective learning strategies and delivery technologies into the eLearning. 
Authoring tools range from advanced software to create a wide array of sophisticated applications (not 
limited to eLearning) to simple tools that convert instructional PowerPoint
®
slides to web pages. In this 
regard, it is important to understand that some software tools used as authoring tools are not necessarily 
designed for the creation of eLearning specifically; they can be open-ended, multi-purpose tools designed 
to create, for instance, any kind of web page/site. But when developers use them to create eLearning, they 
are referred to as authoring tools. 
Vendors build some authoring tools into systems that perform broader functions; this is the case with 
learning content management systems (LCMSs). See 4.2. Learning content management systems 
(LCMSs) for more details. In many LCMSs, you can decouple the authoring tool component and use it as 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 7 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
a separate application to develop and output eLearning without relying on the other components of the 
system.   
As described in 1. Purpose and scope of this paper, developers rarely use authoring tools in isolation; in 
fact, most developers use more than one software tool during the production process, and a substantial 
number use four or more. Even when using a combination of tools, however, a developer generally uses 
one primary tool to create the base screens and assemble them into an eLearning product. These tools are 
distinguished from auxiliary software tools (for instance, Adobe Photoshop
®
) that are not authoring tools 
but may be used in support of or in conjunction with those tools. This paper includes a discussion of 
auxiliary tools.   
Authoring tools discussed in this paper refer to web-based eLearning (or web-based training, WBT); CD-
ROM or DVD-based eLearning has largely disappeared due to the establishment of enterprise intranets 
and extranets, and the distributing efficiencies of using web-based delivery. However, many authoring 
tools offer disc-based delivery as an output option in order to support environments where bandwidth is 
limited or non-existent.   
2.2.
Why use authoring tools? 
Authoring tools (as opposed to writing code or script directly in a programming editor) reduce technical 
overhead; they generally use WYSIWYG (
what you see is what you get
) interfaces allowing users to 
easily manipulate and configure eLearning assets, using familiar visual metaphors. Thus, programming 
editors that facilitate writing application code like C++ or script languages like JavaScript are not truly 
authoring tools. Developers can indeed use them to author eLearning content, but they are not designed to 
reduce the technical overhead of knowing the programming or scripting language. Furthermore, most 
training organizations do not have the advanced (and expensive) programming skill sets in their 
development staff to program eLearning applications using only programming languages or scripts, and 
they do not have the infrastructure to support code-based traditional software application development.   
Primarily, authoring tools serve to reduce the skill set requirements for the authoring process, in some 
cases to a level where an untrained user can start using a tool and producing screens within minutes.   
Secondarily, most authoring tools base a major part of their value-add proposition on automating time-
consuming tasks, optimizing workflows, and generally offering a more streamlined and efficient approach 
to the authoring process, which can be very time consuming.   
2.3.
Why is the choice of tools so important? 
Choosing eLearning authoring tools is one of the most crucial decisions any training organization, project, 
or developer can make. Authoring tools are designed for particular styles of learning, delivery platforms, 
file formats, eLearning standards, and production workflows. If your organization chooses a tool or set of 
tools that is not optimized for your needs, you could waste a lot of time and money creating eLearning 
that does not function correctly within your training infrastructure or that is instructionally ineffective.    
Another critical factor in choosing tools
one that can make or break an organization
s training budget 
with costly conversions
is durability. This relates to whether the tools will have longevity in the 
marketplace such that they continue to be available and supported, allowing source files to be opened and 
edited in future versions of the application. It also relates to whether the tools will, in the future, produce 
output formats supported by browser versions and browser plug-in updates.   
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 8 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
2.4.
Should my organization mandate use of standard tools? 
Many organizations wonder whether they should mandate adopting a particular set of tools as a required 
standard across their organization. This has many advantages, among them:   
Reducing costs through purchase of group or enterprise licenses that lower the per end-user cost  
Providing for economies of scale in training to use the tools, help desk support, configuration 
management, etc.   
Making enforcing uniform standards easier through dissemination of application source file 
templates   
The most important consideration in whether to standardize on tools, however, is the variability in types 
of training your organization produces. As stated above, authoring tools are optimized for particular types 
of training or IT environments. Mandating use of a single tool set as the organizational standard can 
effectively amount to enforcing one style or type of training across the organization, which may be 
counter to the organization
s (or even single project
s) needs. More and more nowadays, training 
programs incorporate disparate elements in a blended or hybrid solution.  
For instance, you may decide that the best way to teach some skills in a course is through asynchronous 
eLearning, while you may decide to teach other skills in the same training course through a synchronous 
virtual classroom environment. The choice of authoring tools probably will not be the same for both. You 
must take this into account in developing the tool standard specifications, when tools are standardized 
throughout the organization. The standard must address each type of learning, file output type, etc., with a 
standard tool set specification for each type. Seldom will one tool set suffice to cover all aspects of the 
authoring process or meet all needs for the various types of training produced by the organization.   
Before specifying tool standards, ADL recommends that you standardize the requirements for the 
eLearning products themselves, using style guides and other policy documents. This includes such things 
as look and feel, interface functionality, file formats, course elements, and assessment design. This will 
drive and clarify the choice of tools.   
In the Department of Defense (DoD), the MIL HDBK 29612 provides guidelines that may be useful in 
developing standards. Part 2 deals with training design and development, and Part 5 deals specifically 
with eLearning. Note that these are not mandates; they are guidelines only, and they may be out of date. 
3.
Process for choosing tools 
ADL recommends the following high-level process for choosing authoring tools. This process should be 
first applied to the primary tool you will use for authoring, then separately for each secondary or auxiliary 
tool. Once you have gone through the requirements definition exercise in the process below and selected a 
primary tool, you should then know what gaps you need to fill by acquiring secondary tools (for example, 
for asset production):   
1.  Determine your high-level requirements. It is important to stick to only the critical, high-level, 
and highly differentiating requirements at this point. That will serve to quickly filter many 
unsuitable candidates when you get to Step 4 below. This may require a formal requirements 
definition effort, especially if you are a large enterprise with many different organizations who 
may have different (and hard to predict) needs from your organization. 
Be aware that there are many types of requirements (functional, usability, etc.), representing 
different points of view (users, administrators, stakeholders, etc.). See 
Wiegers’s
(2000) article 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 9 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
(available at http://processimpact.com/articles/reqtraps.html) for information on how to avoid 
“requirements
traps”
such as ambiguous or vague definitions. 
2.  Your high-level requirements should focus on the following areas: 
Type(s) of training (sometimes multiple types are required in your organization) 
Asynchronous eLearning 
Synchronous virtual classroom or virtual world 
Asynchronous virtual classroom (for example, recorded synchronous classroom 
sessions) 
Instructor-led training (ILT) with certain aspects delivered electronically (for 
example, assessments) 
Particular learning functions needed, especially social learning functions such as wikis, blogs, 
forums, and chat. 
Media 
Audio 
Video 
Graphics 
2D animation 
3D animation 
Level of interactivity  
1.  Passive
no interactivity except to navigate to next screen 
2.  Simple interactions limited to elaboration of information or getting feedback 
3.  Adaptive navigation and branching 
4.  Highly interactive simulation with granular assessment and adaptive learning paths 
Skill sets of authors. Generally, your authors will fall into these groups: 
Instructional designers 
SMEs 
Junior developers 
Senior developers 
Skill sets should be matched to the power and complexity of the tool you choose. For 
instance, you would not want to give an easy-to-learn but simplistic, limited-functionality 
tool to senior developers, since they would be hamstrung and frustrated using the tool. 
Need for non-technical staff to edit content (this is especially important where content 
changes frequently or client wants to take over content maintenance responsibilities) 
Output file format (see 5.7. File formats
Standards compliance for output files (see 5.10. Standards support) 
Kinds and levels of support and training required by the tool 
Interworking and/or compatibility with other tools or software you will be using 
Collaborative authoring (vs standalone authoring) 
Number, roles, and distribution of potential tool users 
Bandwidth and other IT constraints and opportunities 
3.  Determine your budget for purchasing the tool and associated support/training contracts. This 
includes any customization, special features, or adjustments to your IT environment that you 
predict you will need. 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 10 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
4.  Determine categories of tools you will need (see 4. Categories and examples of authoring tools). 
Because these categories overlap, you may identify more than one category for consideration.  
5.  Identify specific tools for the key categories identified in the previous step (see 4. Categories and 
examples of authoring tools  for example tools in each category). You may decide at this point to 
develop your own product rather than purchase a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) product or 
acquire an open source product. Note that if you are a U.S. government entity, the government 
acquisition process requires justifications for acquisition choices. You will need to validate or 
justify your decision to develop your own tool. 
6.  Develop and complete a matrix that allows assessing the tools identified in Step 5 against your 
requirements developed in Step 1. See Appendix A: Sample Tool Requirements Matrix for a 
sample. You may want to complete a separate matrix for each different category of tools you 
have identified as a requirement for your organization, since each category of tools has its own 
distinct parameters and typical feature sets. You may need to acquire different toolsets for 
different types of projects in your organization. 
7.  Filter the list of potential candidates, eliminating those that do not meet your minimum 
requirements and/or are over your budget. Create and send Requests for Proposals (RFPs) to the 
final candidates at this point, if that is required by your acquisition process. 
8.  Compile a detailed and complete features list for all of the remaining candidate tools. You may 
want to develop this list from sampling one tool that seems to be the most feature-rich, and add 
any features uncovered by your analysis of other systems as you complete the comparison 
process. Or, you can use part or all of the criteria mentioned in 6. Criteria for assessing quality 
and suitability of tools as your features list. You may want to edit this list of features to only those 
that you care about now; however, this may be limiting since you may be unfamiliar with the 
usefulness of some features, or they may become useful in the future. 
9.  Develop a matrix (see the Appendix B: Sample Tool Features Rating Matrix for a sample) that 
compares the systems identified in Step 7 using the features list developed in Step 8. Complete as 
much of this matrix as possible from the tools
’ 
documentation; if you need more information, ask 
their sales representatives for it. Assign a numerical rating for each cell in the matrix, indicating 
the degree of implementation of that feature (which could be 0 if it does not have that feature). 
The matrix should weigh each feature according to its importance to you, enabling a rollup score 
for each tool. 
10. Contact the top scoring vendors (three to five is a reasonable number) from the previous step and 
ask for a live presentation/demo. Ask the vendor for a demonstration in your facility, running 
their system in your IT environment. The vendor may want to present a canned demo of their 
product using a presentation format like PowerPoint
®
or Flash
®
, and that is fine as a general 
overview of the tool
s capabilities, but you should see how well the system expresses these 
capabilities within your IT environment and with your content (if you need to be able to edit 
legacy content in the tool). 
11. Make your decision based on the results of the previous step, taking into account the total cost of 
ownership (TCO), including the application, training, upgrades, maintenance, and any intangible 
items. Consider whether a hosted (see 5.4. Hosted solutions) solution is right for you, if you are 
considering web-based tools and if a hosted solution is available from the vendor. 
4.
Categories and examples of authoring tools  
Authoring tools run a wide gamut. This section outlines the major categories and subcategories of 
available tools. These categories are key to choosing an authoring tool, since they set the stage for 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested