pdf sdk c# : Create pdf bookmarks online application control cloud windows web page asp.net class Choosing-Authoring-Tools1-part980

Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 11 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
allowing you to align your eLearning product requirements to tool types and characteristics. It is 
important to note that these categories are not mutually exclusive. Many tools have elements that qualify 
them for two or more categories. However, most tools can be assigned to one category as its primary 
intended use or design architecture.  
The following is an outline and description of the types of authoring tools, with examples. The websites 
listed for each provide feature sets and further details on each tool. Note that some tools appear in more 
than one category, as they fulfill multiple purposes. 
Tools that are open source, GOTS (government off-the-shelf), or freeware are indicated. All other 
examples are COTS (commercial off-the-shelf) products. For more information on open source, freeware, 
or GOTS, see 5.3. Open source, freeware, and GOTS solutions. 
Note: the lists of examples are not comprehensive, nor do they represent an endorsement of particular 
products. They are based on ADL
s knowledge and ongoing research as of the date of this document. 
³
Section 9: For further reference
´
lists web sites that may provide more comprehensive and updated 
information about specific tools. 
4.1.
Self-contained authoring environments 
These applications enable building entire eLearning courses using capabilities within the authoring tool; 
they do not rely on externally created documents (except for media assets and possibly databases). These 
generally incorporate WYSIWYG features for screen layout and design, and use an object-oriented 
approach for structuring course elements and activities.
4.1.1.
Website development tools 
These are open-ended tools for website design; they can be used for any type of website or web pages, 
including eLearning. Once your organization has developed templates and established workflows, these 
open-ended tools can work well for authoring eLearning. All create output in standard eLearning web 
formats using HTML, CSS, and Javascript. Examples are: 
Dreamweaver
®
http://www.adobe.com/products/dreamweaver/ 
Visual Studio 2012
®
http://www.microsoft.com/visualstudio/eng/team-foundation-service 
4.1.2.
Rapid Application Development (RAD) tools  
These are open-ended tools for designing robust interactive applications (usually for web delivery). They 
produce binary runtime files that are executed by a player or plug-in. Examples include: 
Flash
®
http://www.adobe.com/products/flash/ 
Flex
®
http://www.adobe.com/products/flex/ 
Flypaper
®
http://www.flypaper.com/ 
4.1.3.
eLearning development tools 
These tools are specifically designed to produce eLearning, generally in one or two output file format 
options. These systems are what training professionals are most commonly referring to when using the 
Create pdf bookmarks online - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
add bookmarks to pdf reader; convert word to pdf with bookmarks
Create pdf bookmarks online - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
how to add bookmarks to a pdf; create bookmark pdf file
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 12 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
term 
authoring tools.
” 
The system architecture often relies heavily on templates and 
skins
” 
to maximize 
production efficiencies. In some cases, the developer cannot create templates; the vendors must create 
them. In addition to template-based tools, there are two other types: timeline-based tools and object-based 
tools. 
Timeline-based tools allow authors to create a sequence of actions on a timeline. These tools tend to be 
more powerful in that they can natively support authoring animations and object state dependencies. 
These two features in combination can be used to create simulations.  
Object-based tools allow authors to build content using predefined objects with highly configurable 
properties. Objects can include a wide variety of screen elements, such as search capability, wikis, etc.. 
Object-based tools can be thought of as a variation on the theme of template-based tools in the sense that 
the individual objects are essentially the templates. They are less constrained because these objects can be 
mixed and matched at a much finer-grained level than screen templates. Object-based tools are usually 
more technical and complex than template-based tools; however, they require more development time and 
training. 
The simpler, easier-to-use tools in this category are sometimes loosely referred to as 
rapid eLearning 
development tools
” 
due to both the speed with which authors (especially those that are not technically 
inclined) can learn to use the tool and the speed of production. However, the term is generally better 
suited for the tools described in 4.6. External document converter/optimizer tools. 
4.1.3.1.
Web-based eLearning development tools 
These tools are web-based in terms of the authoring tool itself, not just the output files (i.e., the tool uses 
the web browser as the application interface). These server-based applications have the advantage of 
enabling collaborative authoring and permission/role-based production workflows. Some web-based 
applications require installation of a thin desktop client or a browser plug-in. The web-based aspect of 
these tools also enables centralized control and enforcement of standards. Examples include: 
Brainshark Learning Cloud
®
http://www.brainshark.com/solutions/learning-cloud.aspx 
CHOOSE-IT [under development by Army Research Institute for use in DoD only] 
[contact Dr. Cheryl Johnson: cheryl.i.johnson@us.army.mil] 
Claro
®
http://www.dominknow.com 
Course Avenue Studio
®
http://www.courseavenue.com 
D2 Interactive Multimedia Instruction Framework
®
http://www.d2teamsim.com/d2-products/DIF.html 
Easygenerator
®
http://wwww.easygenerator.com 
Ilias SCORM Editor [open source] 
http://www.ilias.de 
Lectora Online
®
http://lectora.com/online-e-learning-lectora-online 
Luminosity Studio
®
http://www.cm-luminosity.co.uk/ 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Bookmarks. inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing options
convert word pdf bookmarks; how to bookmark a pdf page
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines Valid value for each index: 1 to (Page Count - 1). ' Create output PDF file path
adding bookmarks to pdf; create bookmarks pdf file
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 13 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Mohive
®
http://www.crossknowledge.com/en_GB/elearning/technologies/mohive.html 
Oppia [open source] 
https://www.oppia.org/ 
Podium
®
http://www.authoronpodium.com/podium/ 
RapideL
®
http://www.rapidel.com/rapideli.html 
Rapid Intake
®
http://rapidintake.com/overview 
ROCCE
®
[GOTS] 
http://www.ntis.gov/pdf/08.133.08B%20Rapid%20Online%20Content%20Creation%20Environ
ment.pdf 
Skilitix Interact
®
http://www.skilitix.com/ 
SmartBuilder
®
http://www.suddenlysmart.com/smartbuilder.htm 
Udutu
®
http://www.udutu.com/ 
ZEBRAZAPPS
®
https://zebrazapps.com/#/list?visitor&zapp 
4.1.3.2.
Desktop-based eLearning development tools 
Many vendors are moving away from desktop-based authoring applications since they cannot be used 
collaboratively; some are retaining desktop-based versions as an option. Desktop-based applications 
generally perform better than their web-based cousins, and have more features. Some desktop tools (for 
example, those with video editing tools) do not have web counterparts due to high minimum performance 
requirements. Examples include: 
Captivate
®
http://www.adobe.com/products/captivate/ 
Content Publisher
®
http://www.elicitus.com 
Course Builder [open source] 
https://code.google.com/p/course-builder/ 
CourseLab
®
[available as a commercial product (latest version) and as freeware (earlier version)]
http://www.courselab.com/view_doc.html?mode=home 
e-Learning Suite
®
http://www.adobe.com/products/elearningsuite/ 
eXe [open source] 
http://exelearning.org/ 
EXPERT Platform [open source 
– 
limited to government and non-profit organizations] 
for information contact Bill Bandrowski 
– 
band@ctc.com 
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Free download library and use online C# class source codes in .NET framework 2.0 explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines
pdf reader with bookmarks; bookmark page in pdf
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing options
creating bookmarks in pdf files; delete bookmarks pdf
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 14 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Expert Author
®
http://www.knowledgequest.com 
GLO Maker [open source] 
http://learning.londonmet.ac.uk/RLO-CETL/glomaker/index.html 
Impression Learning Content Framework
®
http://impressionlcf.com/ 
iSpring Suite
® 
http://www.ispringsolutions.com 
Learn
®
http://www.sumtotalsystems.com/enterprise/learn/ 
Learning Content Development System (LCDS)
®
[free] 
http://www.microsoft.com/learning/tools/lcds/default.mspx 
Learning Suite
® 
http://www.kenexa.com 
Lectora Inspire
®
http://lectora.com 
MOS Solo
®
[free] 
http://www.moschorus.com/centre/MosPub/solo_en/index.html 
Multimedia Learning Object Authoring Tool
®
[free] 
http://www.learningtools.arts.ubc.ca/mloat.htm 
SmartBuilder
®
http://www.smartbuilder.com/product/smartbuilder 
Storyline
®
http://www.articulate.com 
Xerte [open source] 
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/xerte/xerte.htm 
4.1.4.
Simulation development tools 
These tools are specifically designed for developing simulations and their component animations. Some 
incorporate scientific data sets that allow modeling of physical phenomena to simulate the real world as 
closely as possible (for example, weather conditions in a flight simulator). Many Rapid Application 
Development (RAD) tools can create simulations as well. 
4.1.4.1.
System simulation development tools 
These tools are optimized for systems training, producing essentially a recording of what is happening in 
a computer screen (often called 
screencasts
). They allow easy capture and captioning of interface 
features with voiceover narration, additional graphics, and interaction. Examples include: 
Assima Training Suite
®
http://www.assima.net/training-suite.html 
Captivate
®
http://www.adobe.com/products/captivate/ 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures Create fillable PDF document with fields. Preview PDF documents without other plug-ins.
creating bookmarks pdf; export bookmarks from pdf to excel
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Download Free Trial View Online Demo Purchase Now. Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Conversion. PDF Create.
bookmarks pdf files; bookmark a pdf file
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 15 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Camtasia Studio
® 
http://www.techsmith.com 
Firefly Simulation Developer
®
http://www.mzinga.com/products/omnisocial-content/firefly-simulation-developer/ 
4.1.4.2.
3D simulation development tools 
These tools are used to create 3D simulations, usually that look and act like the physical world. The tools 
can either model the physical world using geotypical or geospatial data. Geotypical modeling renders 
artifacts and environments using databases of scientific data sets that predict, for example, the state of 
cloud cover over a location at a certain time of the year and day (not limited to the clouds
’ 
appearance, 
but also including physical properties such as altitude, moisture content, etc.). The clouds are then 
generated synthetically (as vector-based 3D models) using a library of textures and skins, and can interact 
with other items in the environment based on their assigned physical properties. 
Geospatial modeling renders artifacts and environments using satellite imagery, archived photographs, 
GPS surveys, and live data feeds from sensors. This type of modeling would render the state of cloud 
cover over a location for a particular date and time, as it truly exists or existed. It may include their 
physical properties as they actually exist/existed as well. 
Geotypical modeling is more flexible and better suited for most simulations, since it allows on-the-fly, 
dynamic changes to the physical appearance and attributes controlled by either the user or simulation 
itself. This permits a wide variety of 
what if
” 
scenarios. Examples of 3D simulation development tools 
include: 
CodeBaby Studio
®
http://codebaby.com/elearning-solutions/get-free-trial-now/?cpid=ELGad100112 
ESP
®
[this tool is still available, but Microsoft no longer supports it] 
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff798293.aspx 
Flex Builder
®
http://www.adobe.com/products/flex/ 
Kuda
®
[open source] 
http://code.google.com/p/kuda/ 
SimWriter
®
http://www.simwriter.com 
Thinking Worlds
®
http://www.thinkingworlds.com/ 
4.1.5.
Game development environments 
Although you can use many RAD and simulation tools to create game-based learning applications, tools 
in this category are specific to a particular game engine or game standard. Examples include: 
GameSalad
®
[optimized for producing mobile games] 
http://gamesalad.com 
GameStudio
®
http://www.3dgamestudio.com/ 
Torque Game Engine
®
http://www.garagegames.com/ 
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Load PDF from stream programmatically in VB.NET.
adding bookmarks to pdf reader; creating bookmarks in pdf from word
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
& rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated annotation; More about Web Viewer ▶. Conversion. Word Create. Create Word from PDF; Create Word
display bookmarks in pdf; create bookmarks pdf files
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 16 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Truevision 3D
®
http://www.truevision3d.com/page-14-create-3d-game-development 
Unity Pro
®
http://unity3d.com 
VBS Worlds
®
http://www.vbsworlds.com/ 
Visual3D
®
http://www.visual3d.net/ 
4.1.6.
Virtual world development environments 
Although you can use many RAD, simulation, and game development tools to create virtual world 
learning applications, these refer to those that are specific to a particular virtual world or virtual world 
type. Examples include: 
3Dxplorer
®
http://www.3dxplorer.com/ 
OpenQwaq [open source] 
http://code.google.com/p/openqwaq/ 
OpenSim [open source] 
http://opensimulator.org/wiki/Main_Page 
Open Wonderland [open source] 
http://openwonderland.org/ 
Protosphere
®
http://www.protonmedia.com/ 
Second Life
®
http://www.secondlife.com 
Vastpark Creator
®
[freeware for up to 5 users] 
http://www.vastpark.com/ 
Vizard Virtual Reality Toolkit
®
http://www.worldviz.com/products/vizard 
World Visions
®
http://www.aesthetic.com/home_frame/home_frame.htm 
4.1.7.
Database-delivered web application systems 
These tools represent the ultimate leveraging of the concept of separation of content and appearance; 
developers store the content (text and media assets) in a database, and apply formats to them on a 
presentation layer at runtime. This can be a great advantage if learning content information is volatile; 
you can update content simply and cleanly by replacing objects in a database through a web form. This 
approach can minimize course maintenance costs for clients by allowing them to make minor updates 
themselves rather than paying the content developer for every change. 
The authoring tools rely on manipulating screen placeholders (that call objects in from the database), and 
provide form-based methods for configuring and populating the database. These tools require server 
software to deliver the eLearning. Examples include: 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 17 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
ColdFusion
®
http://www.adobe.com/products/coldfusion/ 
ASP.Net
®
[programming language built in to all Microsoft servers]
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/centrum-asp-net.aspx 
4.2.
Learning content management systems (LCMSs) 
These applications integrate the authoring functions with content management, storage, and delivery, 
leveraging the advantages of integrating these functions. They also generally assemble and deliver the 
eLearning dynamically at runtime from a central content repository. This provides great flexibility for 
reuse of content and media. Users do not develop actual files during the authoring process; they assemble 
virtual learning objects from database and file elements, similar to the database-delivered web application 
systems described in section 4.1.7. Database-delivered web application systems. See the ADL paper 
Choosing an LMS at http://www.adlnet.gov/resources/choosing-an-lms-white-paper?type=research_paper 
for more details on LCMSs. Examples include: 
ATutor
®
http://www.atutor.ca/atutor/index.php 
SilkRoad Greenlight
®
http://www.silkroad.com 
Impression Learning Content Framework
®
http://impressionlcf.com/ 
LCMS by KeneXa
®
http://www.outstart.com/outstart_lcms.htm 
Learn eXact
®
http://www.exact-learning.com/en/products/learn-exact-suite 
Mindflash
®
http://www.mindflash.com 
MOS Chorus
®
http://www.moschorus.com/centre/MosPub/chorus_en/index.html 
SAP Enterprise Learning
®
http://www.sap.com
Sumtotal Learn
®
http://www.sumtotalsystems.com 
Xyleme LCMS
®
http://www.xyleme.com/ 
4.3.
Virtual classroom systems 
Vendors design these applications specifically to create eLearning that is delivered via an online 
collaboration tool (usually one that is optimized for eLearning, with familiar classroom metaphors). The 
collaboration functionality is usually combined with the authoring functionality in one system. LMS 
functions are often included as well. 
Developers use these systems to author synchronous or asynchronous virtual classroom training; most are 
capable of creating asynchronous eLearning only by virtue of the fact that the synchronous session can be 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 18 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
recorded and played back for self-paced learning. These are not standalone systems, because they require 
files to be generated externally and imported (for example, PowerPoint
®
slides). Examples include: 
Adobe Presenter
®
http://www.adobe.com/products/presenter.html 
Blackboard Collaborate
®
http://www.blackboard.com 
Classroom
®
https://cloud.saba.com/classroom/ 
Connect
®
http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobatconnectpro/ 
GoToTraining
®
http://www.gotomeeting.com/fec/training/online_training 
OmniSocial HR and Learning Suite
®
http://www.mzinga.com/a/pdf/MzingaDS-HRSolutions.pdf 
4.4.
Mobile learning development tools 
Many authoring tools can deliver content to mobile devices. The tools provide this capability by using a 
mobile device screen template and output files that work with the mobile device operating system. 
However, tools are emerging that are specifically designed for mobile learning (mLearning), for instance, 
providing authoring capability for audio learning content (e.g., spoken word, podcasts) along with 
associated interactive assessments and surveys. Other tools are optimized to provide eLearning content 
through the phone
s web browsing capability. 
Note that some of the mLearning authoring tools are designed to run only within their own LMS 
platform; stand-alone portability isn't always possible. Also, some target only one screen size (for 
example, the Apple iPad
®
). Some of them support SCORM output (for details on SCORM 
implementation strategies, see 
https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=YWRsbmV0Lmdvdnxtb2JpbGUtbGVhcm5pbmct
Z3VpZGV8Z3g6MzM2ZDcyMDQ0ZjkwOTZmYw).  
See 5.2. mLearning authoring tools for more information on these tools. 
Examples of mLearning development tools include:  
AppCooker
® 
[creates prototype mockups]
http://www.appcooker.com 
LearnCast
®
http://www.learncast.com/ 
Claro
®
http://www.dominknow.com/ 
CourseAvenue Enterprise Mobile Solution
®
http://www.courseavenue.com/mlearning 
eLearning Objects Navigator (eLON
TM
) [U.S. Coast Guard system for creating, classifying, and 
retrieving reusable mobile learning objects] 
http://uwf.edu/atc/projects/eLON.html 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 19 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Evernote
® 
http://www.evernote.com 
eXact Mobile
®
http://www.exact-learning.com/en/products/learn-exact-suite/exact-mobile-solution-for-mobile-
learning 
EXPERT Platform [open source 
– 
limited to government and non-profit organizations] 
for information contact Bill Bandrowski 
– 
band@ctc.com 
Hot Lava Mobile
®
http://www.outstart.com/about-hot-lava-mobile.htm 
iSpring Pro
® 
http://www.ispringsolutions.com 
StoryWorks OnDemand
®
http://www.storyworksondemand.com/ 
MASLO [open source 
– 
under development]
http://www.adlnet.gov/capabilities/mobile-learning/maslo#tab-main 
mLearning Studio
®
http://www.rapidintake.com/products/mobile/mobile-learning-studio/ 
Mobile Study
®
http://www.mobilestudy.org/ 
Mobl 21
®
http://www.emantras.com 
On Point Learning and Performance System
® 
http://www.onpointdigital.com/new_site/products_content13.htm 
Pastiche
®
http://www.xyleme.com/product/pastiche 
QStream
® 
http://qstream.com 
Raptivity
®
http://www.raptivity.com/ 
ReadyGo Mobile
®
http://readygo.com/ 
Sencha Complete
®
http://www.sencha.com/ 
SumTotal Mobile e-Learning Solution
®
http://www.sumtotalsystems.com/products/learning-mobile.html 
For a matrix of tool vendors and their capabilities in relation to mLearning (published July 2011), see 
https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=YWRsbmV0Lmdvdnxtb2JpbGUtbGVhcm5pbmct
Z3VpZGV8Z3g6MzM2ZDcyMDQ0ZjkwOTZmYw 
See 5.2. mLearning authoring tools for more details on issues and opportunities involved in authoring for 
the mobile platform. 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 20 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
4.5.
Social learning development tools 
Some authoring tools are designed to create learning that is based on learner-generated content, peer-to-
peer communication, and collaboration provided by social media tools. Use of these features in eLearning 
is increasing rapidly; some vendors now specifically tailor collaboration tools to support eLearning and 
their authoring and delivery systems. These authoring tools support publishing learning modules that 
include such formats as: 
Wikis (for example, Wikipedia
®
Social networking (for example, Facebook
®
Blogs (for example, Blogger
®
Micro-blogs (for example, Twitter
®
Social bookmarking (for example, Delicious
®
Social news (for example, Digg
®
Picture sharing (for example, Flickr
®
Video sharing (for example, YouTube
®
Communities of practice (CoPs) 
Expert exchanges (for example, Experts-Exchange.com
®
Examples of tools include: 
Bizlibrary Community
® 
http://www.bizlibrary.com 
Bloomfire
® 
http://www.bloomfire.com 
Scate Ignite
®
https://www.scateignite.com/s2.php?action=info.products 
Composica
®
http://www.composica.com 
Engage
®
http://www.blackboard.com/Platforms/Engage/Overview.aspx 
Social LMS
®
http://www.outstart.com/trainingedge-lms.htm 
4.6.
External document converter/optimizer tools 
These applications usually offer limited ability to develop eLearning from scratch; they are primarily 
designed to import and convert external documents (usually PowerPoint
®
and Word
®
documents) to web-
based eLearning (in DHTML or Flash
®
format usually). Often these external documents are legacy ILT 
(instructor-led training) files (student guides and presentation slides, for example) that need to be 
converted to eLearning. 
This category of tools includes what is known as 
rapid eLearning development tools.
See 5.1. Rapid 
eLearning authoring tools for more information. 
If you are using PowerPoint as the starting point for your content, you may not need to convert using one 
of these tools. PowerPoint alone can be used to produce traditional asynchronous eLearning with the look, 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested