Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 21 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
feel, and functionality of eLearning developed in other authoring tools. This will require that the 
information on slides be elaborated so that the slides are self-sufficient for standalone eLearning delivery 
(vs rendered in abbreviated bullet points for live presentation delivery). This approach leverages some of 
the lesser-known abilities of PowerPoint to create clickable objects, and multiplies the advantages 
mentioned above of the rapid eLearning approach (since you are eliminating the conversion and 
optimization that would be necessary using one of those tools). However, using PowerPoint as your 
delivery file format has some constraints which need to be carefully considered. 
The ADL white paper Authoring and Delivering e-Learning Using PowerPoint Files describes 
considerations and procedures for using PowerPoint files as your eLearning tool and delivery file format. 
See http://www.adlnet.gov/resources/authoring-delivering-e-learning-using-powerpoint-
files?type=research_paper  
4.6.1.
Web-based external document converter/optimizer tools 
These web-based tools offer the same advantages over desktop tools described in 4.1.3. eLearning 
development tools
collaborative authoring and centralized control/enforcement of standards. The 
collaborative authoring features are usually less important in this case, however, since these tools are 
generally simpler and easier to use, thus enabling non-technical staff to do the authoring without requiring 
teams of developers with specialized skills. Examples include: 
AuthorPoint
®
http://www.authorgen.com/ 
Brainshark Rapid Learning
®
http://www.brainshark.com 
4.6.2.
Desktop-based external document converter/optimizer tools 
Examples of these applications include: 
Articulate Presenter
®
http://www.articulate.com/products/presenter.php 
Content Point
®
http://al.assima.net/contentpoint/index.html 
CourseAvenue Accessibility Player
®
[builds Section 508/ADA compliance into content]
http://www.courseavenue.com 
Elicitus Suite
®
http://www.elicitus.com/ 
Presenter
®
http://training.hughes.com/products/presenter/ 
iSpring Suite
®
http://www.ispringsolutions.com/ispring-suite 
Learning Essentials for Microsoft Office
®
http://www.microsoft.com/learningessentials/default.mspx 
Metamorphosis
®
http://www.easyauthoring.com/metamorphosis.php?static_id=15 
PowerPoint Integrator
®
http://www.solics.de/uploads/media/Lectora_2008_Lectora_Integrator_EN.pdf 
Bookmarks pdf documents - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
export pdf bookmarks; export pdf bookmarks to text
Bookmarks pdf documents - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
how to create bookmarks in pdf file; how to add bookmarks on pdf
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 22 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
PPT2Flash Professional
®
http://www.wondershare.com/pro/ppt2flash-pro.html 
Studio 09
®
http://www.articulate.com 
SmartBuilder
® 
http://www.suddenlysmart.com 
Trivantis Snap!
®
http://lectora.com/rapid-e-learning-snap-by-lectora 
Wimba Create
®
http://www.wimba.com/products/wimbacreate/ 
Zenler Studio
®
http://www.zenler.com/ 
4.7.
Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) tools 
ITSs are a new and rapidly emerging technology that, in their most robust implementations, use artificial 
intelligence to mimic the behavior of an expert human tutor, including holding a naturalistic (often 
inductive, Socratic question-based) dialogue with the student via a 3D avatar. Other ITSs provide step-
based assistance when solving problems, some using a text-based model. For more information, see the 
Wikipedia article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intelligent_tutoring_system . 
A key difference between ITSs and other forms of technology-based learning is that true ITSs 
dynamically generate instruction through artificial intelligence-driven algorithms. They do this in the 
form of dynamically crafted conversation (usually based on rule sets that adapt to the student
s ongoing 
correct and incorrect expression of concepts) containing discussion, hints, feedback, questions, etc. This is 
fundamentally different from other technology-based learning, where the instruction is 100% 
predesigned, pre-developed, and pre-packaged, thus inherently limiting the interaction, response choices, 
and paths the student can take to learn the content. 
ITSs are not completely devoid of this 
prearranged instruction
” 
approach, however, since: 1) some level 
of anticipation of student responses to questions (and consequent rule sets for dealing with them) 
currently is required to be programmed into ITSs; 2) the AI 
understanding
” 
module of the ITS needs to 
be 
trained
” 
in the content; and 3) ITS courses usually contain one or more pre-developed content 
modules, which could be standalone, separate eLearning courses, tutorials, or media objects such as text, 
graphics, animations, simulations, videos, etc. These content modules are adaptively delivered by the ITS 
to convey initial information or concepts to the student, or reinforce or remediate understanding later in 
the instruction. 
Each of the three items described above represent separate authoring dimensions; #1 and #2 are usually an 
integral part of the ITS and are completely dependent on the capabilities and engineered design of the 
system. This authoring is done mostly as custom programming by system engineers. 
In the case of dimension #3, the course author must design and develop these content modules in advance 
separately from the ITS (using any of the authoring tools described elsewhere in this document), and link 
them to instructional nodes programmed into the ITS (described in dimension #1). 
There are currently no universal standards that would allow interoperating between an authoring tool and 
an ITS. However, there is conceptual movement towards this interoperable separation of authoring 
function from the ITS. Examples include the following: 
ASPIRE 
http://aspire.cosc.canterbury.ac.nz/ASPIRE.php 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article PDF document has been widely used by and organizations to distribute and view documents.
how to create bookmark in pdf automatically; create bookmarks in pdf reader
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
PDF files or they can separate source PDF file to smaller PDF documents by every explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines
how to bookmark a pdf in reader; acrobat split pdf bookmark
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 23 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Autotutor Lite 
http://www.skoonline.org/ 
Cognitive Tutor Authoring Tools
http://ctat.pact.cs.cmu.edu/ 
The Extensible Problem-Specific Tutor (xPST) System [open source] 
http://xpst.vrac.iastate.edu/ 
http://code.google.com/p/xpst/wiki/xPST_System 
Generalized Intelligent Framework for Tutoring 
– 
GIFT [open source - under development]
https://www.gifttutoring.org/projects/gift/wiki/Overview 
Oppia [open source] 
– 
not a full blown ITS, but has some elements of one 
https://code.google.com/p/oppia/ 
Rashi 
http://althea.cs.umass.edu/ckc/40rashi.html 
http://rashi.cs.umass.edu/ 
SimCore
®
http://www.stottlerhenke.com/products/SimCore/simcore.htm 
Task Tutor Toolkit
®
http://www.stottlerhenke.com/products/ttt/task_tutor_toolkit_overview.pdf 
4.8.
Auxiliary tools 
4.8.1.
eLearning assemblers/packagers 
These tools assemble objects authored in other tools into an organization/sequence of learning objects, 
usually to create SCORM packages (see 5.10.1. SCORM for more information). For those that produce 
SCORM packages, most provide the ability to: 
Package the content 
Author the manifest 
Validate conformance 
Provide a test run-time environment 
Insert and edit SCORM data model elements 
Enter metadata 
Some allow programming of SCORM 2004 sequencing and navigation as well. 
Examples include: 
eXact Learning Packager
®
http://www.exact-learning.com/en/products/learn-exact-suite/exact-packager-scorm-compliant-
content-authoring 
Frameworker for SCORM
®
http://www.i-a-i.com/view.asp?aid=292 
RELOAD Editor [open source] 
http://edutechwiki.unige.ch/en/Reload_Editor 
XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
NET WinForms; Outstanding rendering of PowerPoint documents; zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to
pdf create bookmarks; excel hyperlink to pdf bookmark
XDoc.Excel for .NET, Comprehensive .NET Excel Imaging Features
in .NET WinForms; Outstanding rendering of Excel documents; navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail Convert Excel to PDF; Convert Excel to
add bookmarks to pdf preview; excel pdf bookmarks
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 24 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
SCORM Developer
s Toolkit
®
http://www.e-learningconsulting.com/products/SCORM-source-code.html 
SCORM Driver
®
http://scorm.com/scorm-solved/scorm-driver/ 
Trident
®
http://www.scormsoft.com/trident 
4.8.2.
Specific interaction object creation tools 
These are generally stand-alone or accessory application modules, often sold either individually or in 
application suites; vendors design each module to produce a specific interaction. You generally purchase 
modules to meet specific interaction needs that are impossible or difficult to create in your primary tool; 
you may use these tools to create the interactions, and then assemble/integrate the code objects into your 
eLearning course in the primary authoring tool. Many of the interactions in these tools are geared towards 
assessment. 
This SaaS (software as a service) model has been creeping into the authoring tool space at a slower pace 
than have LMSs, since the latter are such complex, large systems with higher potential savings from using 
the SaaS model. Examples include: 
Acuity Performance Task System
®
http://www.ctb.com/ctb.com/control/main 
eActivity
®
http://www.epathlearning.com/ 
Exam Engine
®
https://www.plattecanyon.com/ 
Hot Potatoes
[freeware] 
http://web.uvic.ca/hrd/hotpot/ 
iSpring Quizmaker
®
http://www.ispringsolutions.com/ispring-quizmaker 
Perception
® 
http://questionmark.com 
Quiz Creator
®
http://www.sameshow.com 
Quiz Maker
®
http://www.proprofs.com 
QuizMaker
® 
http://www.articulate.com 
Rapt Media
® 
[authoring tool for interactive videos]
http://www.raptmedia.com 
Studio 09
® 
http://www.articulate.com 
Raptivity
®
http://www.raptivity.com/  
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Fully featured PDF Viewer in HTML5; Outstanding rendering of PDF documents; Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display;
how to create bookmark in pdf with; creating bookmarks in pdf documents
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
in .NET WinForms; Outstanding rendering of Word documents; navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail Create Word from PDF; Create Word from
how to bookmark a pdf file in acrobat; copy pdf bookmarks to another pdf
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 25 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
ZEBRAZAPPS
®
http://www.alleninteractions.com/products/zebrazapps 
Wolfram Problem Generator
[generates math practice problems] 
http://www.wolframalpha.com/pro/problem-generator.html 
4.8.3.
Media asset production and management tools 
These tools create graphics, audio, video, and animation files. Note that there is a hybrid media category 
emerging called 
flex media
. This approach bridges the gap between a still image and a video. It can 
provide some amount of motion (limited to a certain part of an image), helping to tell a story that would 
normally require full motion video, but avoiding the file size, production complexity, and cost of full 
motion video. Flex media often take the form of 
cinemagraphs
” 
(see 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinemagraph) and 
photospheres
” 
(see 
http://www.androidcentral.com/create-your-own-street-view-photo-spheres). 
Examples of media asset production and management tools include: 
3DS Max
®
(3D graphics/models) 
http://www.autodesk.com/products/autodesk-3ds-max/overview 
Adobe Presenter
®
(video capture) 
http://www.adobe.com/products/presenter.html 
Audacity (sound production 
– 
free, open source)
http://audacity.sourceforge.net/ 
Audition
®
(sound production) 
http://www.adobe.com/products/audition 
Bryce
®
(3D landscape modeling)
http://www.daz3d.com/i.x/software/bryce/-/ 
Camtasia Studio
®
(screen recording to create system training, demos, etc.) 
http://www.techsmith.com/camtasia/ 
Edge Animate
®
(HTML 5-based web animations)
http://www.adobe.com 
Final Cut Pro
®
(video editing) 
http://www.apple.com/finalcutpro/ 
Fireworks
®
(web graphic optimization) 
http://www.adobe.com/products/fireworks.html 
Flash
®
(animations and interactive objects) 
http://www.adobe.com/products/flash/ 
Garage Band
®
(music creation) 
http://www.apple.com/ilife/garageband/ 
GoAnimate
®
(animated video creation) 
http://goanimate.com/ 
Illustrator
®
(synthetic, line art graphic editing) 
http://www.adobe.com/products/illustrator/ 
iMovie
®
(video editing) 
http://www.apple.com/ilife/imovie/ 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
document file. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview
bookmarks pdf reader; convert excel to pdf with bookmarks
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF file by top level bookmarks. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
pdf bookmark; bookmarks in pdf
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 26 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Kaltura (cloud-based video production platform 
– 
open source) 
http://corp.kaltura.com/ 
Logic Pro
®
(music production) 
http://www.apple.com/logicstudio/ 
Photoshop
®
(photographs or continuous tone graphic editing) 
http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshop/family/ 
Poser
®
(human 3D model creation)
http://poser.smithmicro.com/ 
Snag It
®
(screen capture)
http://www.techsmith.com/snagit-gslp.html?gclid=CNK6gceWyLcCFQyk4AodAV8AFw 
SWiSH Max
®
(animation 
– 
outputs to Flash format)
http://www.swishzone.com/index.php?area=products&product=max 
4.8.4.
Word processors, page layout, and document format tools 
These tools create eLearning reference and planning documents and store them in a convenient format 
(for example, PDF) that preserves their appearance. Examples include: 
Acrobat
®
http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/ 
Google Docs
®
http://docs.google.com 
iBooks Author
®
http://www.apple.com/ibooks-author/ 
Mindjet Maps
®
[visual mapping tool for organizing content 
– 
for iPad]
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/mindjet-maps-for-ipad/id440272860?mt=8 
Mindmeister
®
[visual mapping tool for organizing ideas 
– 
for authoring, or direct use by students]
http://www.mindmeister.com 
Mockflow
®
[user interface concept/wireframe design tool] 
http://www.mockflow.com 
Office
®
http://www.microsoft.com/ 
OpenOffice [open source] 
http://www.openoffice.org/ 
QuarkXPress
®
http://www.quark.com/ 
Viewportsizes.com
®
[ guide to screen sizes of mobile devices]
http://viewportsizes.com 
4.8.5.
Database applications 
These applications create and configure databases that may be accessed by an eLearning application. 
Examples include: 
Access
®
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/access/FX100487571033.aspx 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 27 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Oracle
®
http://www.oracle.com/  
4.8.6.
Web-based collaboration tools 
These applications create collaboration mechanisms and peer-to-peer communication functions, normally 
for meetings. Use of these features in eLearning is increasing rapidly; some vendors now specifically 
tailor these tools to support eLearning and their authoring and delivery systems. There is considerable 
overlap between these tools and the virtual classroom authoring tools category described in 4.3. Virtual 
classroom systems. Examples include: 
Adobe Connect
®
http://www.adobe.com/products/adobeconnect.html?promoid=DINSD 
ELGG [open source] 
http://elgg.org/ 
GoToMeeting
®
http://www.gotomeeting.com/fec/online_meeting 
WebEx
®
http://www.webex.com 
4.8.7.
Web page editors 
These applications create web pages that may be references or are otherwise ancillary to the main 
eLearning course screens. The tools listed in 4.1.1. Website development tools are also used to create web 
pages; the tools listed here differ in that they do not include extensive site management features, hence 
they are simpler to use and less expensive. 
CoffeeCup
®
http://www.coffeecup.com/html-editor/ 
Easy WebContent
®
http://easywebcontent.com 
Editor
®
http://www.mozilla.org/editor/ 
4.9.
Comparison of categories 
Although eLearning projects can vary widely in their level of effort and complexity, thus putting varying 
burdens on the capabilities of authoring tools, the following chart illustrates one way in which some of 
the categories of tools presented in this section can be compared. Much of the variation between 
categories is simply due to the inherent complexity of the product that the category is designed to author. 
Note that in general, as power and flexibility increases, so does the development time and cost (both of 
the tool and the products it creates). 
According to a recent survey of authoring tools (Shank & Ganci, 2013), users generally prefer power 
(58.8%) over ease of use (36.6%). 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 28 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
A 2014 survey by DiDonato (2014) compared new eLearning tools being acquired. Note that some of 
these are not authoring tools per se (although there is an authoring component involved). 
Mobile learning ......................................33% 
e-Learning development tools ...............30% 
Video solutions ......................................25% 
Virtual events/classroom .......................22% 
Assessment and testing ..........................21% 
Gamification and reward solutions ........18% 
Presenter tools ........................................17% 
Content development tools ....................17% 
Wikis, blogs, or forums .........................16% 
Collaborative work spaces .....................15% 
Social networks ......................................15% 
Web conferencing ..................................13% 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 29 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
5.
Special features and issues to consider 
5.1.
Rapid eLearning authoring tools 
Rapid e-learning authoring tools are simpler to use than the standalone tools described in 4.1.3. eLearning 
development tools, since they enable developers to use a familiar program like PowerPoint
®
or Word
®
for 
authoring the raw content. Developers then convert these documents to eLearning screens using the rapid 
eLearning authoring tool, adding interactive features. These tools enable the rank and file user (this means 
subject matter experts with no page design, authoring, or programming experience
not instructional 
designers or course developers) to create training modules.  
The general advantages often cited for these tools are: 
Shortened development times 
Reduced cost, due not only to the reduced overall level of effort (LOE) in producing the course, 
but because the authoring tools are generally cheaper 
Ability to quickly and easily make changes and redeploy content (especially critical where 
content is volatile) 
Critics of these tools note that they often produce courses with a cookie-cutter look and feel (due to the 
template-driven architecture and technical inexperience of course developers) and that there is usually a 
substantial tradeoff in the ability to produce complex eLearning products, as shown in 4.9. Comparison of 
categories. The fact that developers must use Word
®
or PowerPoint
®
as a starting point can be a 
limitation for producing interactive, media-rich eLearning, unless the tool provides a substantial ability to 
add interactions after conversion. In these cases, the fact that the output format is a robust interactive file 
type like Flash, can be helpful in enabling greater interactivity in the final product. 
These tools generally make the most sense where content already exists in a usable form (for example, as 
PowerPoint
®
slides used in an instructor-led course) and where only lower-level learning objectives need 
to be met. Note that most PowerPoint
®
slides contain highly abridged information that is not designed to 
stand alone as learning, so there will need to be some effort to modify the slides or augment them before 
or after conversion. 
A lively debate on the pros and cons of use of these tools is presented in the first three chapters of Allen 
(2012). 
Use of these tools has become quite widespread; the eLearning Guild reported in their 2013 survey of 
authoring tools (Shank & Ganci), 2013) that 64% of respondents create 
PowerPoint-to-eLearning
” 
with 
their authoring tool. 
5.2.
mLearning authoring tools 
Authoring learning for mobile devices is different in a number of significant ways, involving the 
following issues: 
Operating systems and hardware specs (especially screen size and resolution) for mobile devices 
are very different from one device to the next. 
Connection speed to data networks is highly variable, depending on time of day, user location, 
etc. 
Performance is generally considerably less powerful than desktop computers. This is dependent 
on such things as memory, disk space, chip design, etc.  
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 30 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Mobile phones are highly personalized (as opposed to desktop computers), which makes it hard 
to baseline a design. 
There are different paradigms for interaction with mobile device (e.g., using fingers, especially 
thumbs, rather than a mouse). This presents problems for rollover interactions and large text entry 
windows.  
Many phones can dynamically shift portrait vs landscape orientation. Content may need to adjust 
accordingly, or be viewed only in a locked mode (which users need to be warned about). 
There is a need to test developed content on many different platforms
small businesses do not 
normally have the resources to acquire all of these. A way to avoid this problem is to use 
http://www.deviceanywhere.com for testing (a cloud-based mobile phone emulator that shows 
you what your learning looks like and how well it works on any platform). Note that emulators 
are not always 100% consistent with the actual device. 
Not all eLearning content is appropriate for mobile delivery. Appropriate mobile learning content 
can be thought of as falling in three basic categories (Quinn, 2011): 
 Learning augmentation 
Motivational examples 
Extending learning processes with new concept representations, new contexts for 
examples, extended practice. 
 Performance augmentation (aka performance support) 
Decision support tools 
Job aids 
Help applications 
 Learnlet/Microcourses 
Output files can be standalone apps or browser-delivered. In the case of standalone apps, Flash
®
is currently not compatible with some devices. 
Authoring tools currently do not usually have the ability to build content to take advantage of 
built-in functions like cameras, compasses, GPS, accelerometers, gyroscope, and other sensors, 
although this is changing quickly. Certain mobile device functions will always be hard to access 
unless you build your content within a native app environment (using a low level programming 
language like Objective C, however). 
Standard interactive controls on the mobile platform work differently than on the desktop. This 
has resulted in the following best practices: 
Don’t
use radio buttons, use regular buttons 
Don’t
use rollovers 
 Use built-in cell phone themes, functions, and navigation when possible 
An important decision in authoring mLearning is whether to author the application as a standalone app or 
a web-based application that displays with the mobile device
s browser. Here are some of the 
considerations (Haag, 2011): 
Develop mLearning as a web application when: 
 You seek cross-platform compatibility. 
 You 
can’t
support the development of native apps using proprietary Software 
Development Kits (SDKs). 
 Accessibility is a requirement. 
 Using more advanced capabilities of the device 
isn’t
required (e.g., offline, camera, 
accelerometer, gyroscope, etc.). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested