pdf sdk c# : How to add bookmarks to pdf files SDK software service wpf .net windows dnn Choosing-Authoring-Tools3-part982

Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 31 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Develop mLearning as a native app when: 
 You are charging for it (for profit). 
 You are creating a game. 
 You are using specific location information. 
 You are using cameras, accelerometers, etc.. 
 You are accessing the file systems. 
 There will be offline users. 
The following is a list of pros and cons for each: 
Native apps 
 Pros 
Best-in-class user experience, with rich design options 
Allows use of device features (GPS, compass, etc.) and offline use 
Relatively simple to develop for a single platform 
Can charge for applications 
 Cons 
Requires use of unique programming language 
Cannot be ported easily to other mobile platforms 
Developing, testing, and supporting multiple device platforms is very costly 
May require certification and distribution from a third party that you have no 
control over 
Web apps 
 Pros 
Easy to create, using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript 
Simple to deploy across multiple handsets 
Content is accessible on any mobile web browser 
Can be packaged & ported as a Native App 
Can be distributed through Native App Store/Market or Web App Store 
APIs to build most apps are already in webkit today. Missing ones can be filled 
in via web services (e.g., contacts from Google) 
 Cons 
Optimal experience might not be available on all handsets 
Can be challenging (but not impossible) to support across multiple devices 
Don
t always support native application features, like offline mode, location 
lookup, file system access, camera, etc. 
When creating native apps, if you are targeting more than one device, it is important to consider a cross-
platform development framework rather than coding separately for each device. Writing separate code for 
each device can be much more expensive, increase production time, reduce manageability of the 
codebase, and generally introduce redundancy into the development process. Cross-platform tools have 
emerged that allow some degree of cross-platform compatibility in creating native mobile apps. These 
include: 
Rhodes (http://rhomobile.com ) 
How to add bookmarks to pdf files - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
add bookmarks to pdf reader; bookmark a pdf file
How to add bookmarks to pdf files - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
create bookmarks pdf file; bookmark page in pdf
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 32 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
PhoneGap (http://phonegap.com ) 
Titanium (http://appcelerator.com ) 
Adobe AIR (http://adobe.com ) 
MoSync (http://www.mosync.com ) 
It is important to understand that these are development environments, not authoring tools; they require 
programmer talent to be used effectively. For a detailed treatment of the features and pros and cons of 
each of these, see Udell
(
2012), pp. 202 
– 
210. 
There is a growing consensus in the mLearning community that a course that is being developed for both 
mLearning and desktop delivery should be developed for the mobile platform first, then modified for the 
desktop version, since this tends to drive simplifying the content. Authoring the mLearning version first is 
called 
progressive enhancement,
as opposed to authoring the desktop version first, which is termed 
graceful degradation.
Rather than automatically including every screen in both platforms (desktop and mobile), some authoring 
tools (such as the EXPERT Platform) allow the author to designate only certain screens for mLearning 
delivery. This acknowledges the fact that mLearning tends to work better for short, concise content 
objects. These tools can also use a more performance support-oriented template for the mLearning 
version as well. 
Authoring tools are starting to appear that offer alternative formats that are dynamically determined by 
the content when it comes in contact with the mobile device. For example, Articulate Storyline
®
detects 
whether the user
s device can display Flash files, and will deliver content in that format if so. If not, it 
will deliver it in HTML 5. And if the user has an iPad
®
that has the Articulate app, it will deliver content 
through that player. 
Converters from Flash to HTML 5 are starting to appear on the market, for instance, the HTML 5 
Converter for Adobe Captivate 5.5 (see http://labs.adobe.com/technologies/captivate_html5). 
As a hybrid approach, you may want to consider placing QR codes in your eLearning or printed content 
materials, that mobile devices can read to provide a convenient entry point to a specific piece of reference 
information. QR codes are matrix barcodes that link to a web URL.  
See the following ADL documents for more information on mobile learning: 
mLearning Guide (optimized for access from a mobile phone) 
http://mlearn.adlnet.gov/ 
mLearning Handbook (for desktop computer use
contains more detailed information) 
https://sites.google.com/a/adlnet.gov/mobile-learning-guide/home/ 
5.3.
Open source, freeware, and GOTS solutions 
Open source software is defined by the fact that its source code is made available for no cost, and users 
are licensed to study, change and distribute the software to anyone and for any purpose. It is usually 
developed in a public, collaborative manner, and there is usually a community site where contributors can 
share and discuss their contributions.  
Open source options are obviously attractive to buyers because there is no licensing cost involved. You 
need to be clear on the pros and cons of purchasing an open source solution, as in the long run, the cost 
could equal or exceed a commercial solution. It
s easy to be over-enamored with the free license aspect 
and ignore other aspects of the solution that will cost money regardless. Those aspects generally include 
installation, customization, and support. 
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Add necessary references: how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines is an VB.NET example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files.
bookmark pdf in preview; how to bookmark a pdf document
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Add necessary references: how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines This is an C# example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files.
create pdf bookmarks; bookmark pdf documents
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 33 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
It is also easy to overlook the potential advantage of open source tools in that the product can be 
completely tailored to the particular requirements of the organization. If managed properly, this advantage 
can make an open source solution cheaper, not just because the license is free, but because the 
development and customization efforts can be focused solely on the needs of the organization and nothing 
more. Contrast this with a commercial product with lots of features that your organization may not need 
(but which you are essentially paying for nonetheless). The business model for a standard commercial 
system is to build to the widest set of possible requirements to attract the widest client base. Your 
organization may not need all or even most of these requirements. 
On October 16, 2009, U.S. DoD issued new guidance on open source software (see 
http://powdermonkey.blogs.com/files/2009oss.pdf). The guidance emphasizes that open source software 
should have equal weight as proprietary software during acquisition evaluations. It is a break from the 
past, when open source software was deprecated for use in DoD due to security and quality concerns. The 
benefits of open source software are described in this guidance document as follows (open source 
software is referred to as 
OSS
): 
The continuous and broad peer-review enabled by publicly available source code supports 
software reliability and security efforts through the identification and elimination of defects that 
might otherwise go unrecognized by a more limited core development team.  
The unrestricted ability to modify software source code enables the Department to respond more 
rapidly to changing situations, missions, and future threats.  
Reliance on a particular software developer or vendor due to proprietary restrictions may be 
reduced by the use of OSS, which can be operated and maintained by multiple vendors, thus 
reducing barriers to entry and exit. 
Since OSS typically does not have a per-seat licensing cost, it can provide a cost advantage in 
situations where many copies of the software may be required, and can mitigate risk of cost 
growth due to licensing in situations where the total number of users may not be known in 
advance. 
Open source licenses do not restrict who can use the software or the fields of endeavor in which 
the software can be used. Therefore, OSS provides a net-centric licensing model that enables 
rapid provisioning of both known and unanticipated users. 
Since OSS typically does not have a per-seat licensing cost, it can provide a cost advantage in 
situations where many copies of the software may be required, and can mitigate risk of cost 
growth due to licensing in situations where the total number of users may not be known in 
advance. 
By sharing the responsibility for maintenance of OSS with other users, the Department can 
benefit by reducing the total cost of ownership for software particularly compared with software 
for which the Department has sole responsibility for maintenance (e.g., GOTS). 
OSS is particularly suitable for rapid prototyping and experimentation, where the ability to "test 
drive" the software with minimal costs and administrative delays can be important. 
(Memorandum Clarifying Guidance Regarding Open Source Software (OSS), Oct. 16, 2009) 
What is important to understand about open source software is the relationship it behooves you to build 
with the community surrounding the open source product you are acquiring. Staying in touch with the 
community in order to be able to discover and use already-developed modules of functionality that you 
need (which are not part of the product baseline) can decrease your customization costs enormously. 
Open source communities often remind you that deploying open source means you are a responsible 
member of their community. There is an expectation that you must contribute to
as well as receive 
from
— 
the community code, training, and documentation. The cost of staying active in the community 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Bookmarks. Comments, forms and multimedia. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
pdf bookmarks; adding bookmarks in pdf
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and font to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to Add necessary references
create bookmarks pdf; how to add bookmarks to pdf document
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 34 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
and both researching and acquiring as well as sharing your products and solutions must be factored into 
the LOE for acquiring an open source tool. 
It is also important to evaluate the strength and size of the open source community for the open source 
product you are acquiring, as well as the longevity of the product. This can mitigate obvious concerns that 
major sponsors of open source software can stop development at any time, or that communities can 
atrophy. Another possible concern is that a tool can grow so quickly in its popularity that documentation 
takes a back seat to development and has not caught up to the current release of the software. Especially 
in the case of open source software, where you have no vendor who is obligated to support you, a lack of 
adequate documentation can make a product difficult to install, use, maintain, and troubleshoot. 
Finally, the baseline versions of some open source products are very basic; some level of customization is 
often needed to make the software not only meet your special requirements but also meet a modest level 
of universally recognized functionality for the type of product. It may be risky to assume that an open 
source product will be usable straight out of the box. If you have no development resources ready to 
augment the product
s functionality right after you acquire it, you may not be able to use it for some time. 
Freeware may or may not also be open source. Freeware may have restrictions on copying, distributing, 
and making derivative works of the software, where open source software does not. And freeware does 
not necessarily make source code available. Freeware may be restricted to personal use, non-profit use, 
non-commercial use, etc. Freeware that is not open source is a risky investment, since you cannot easily 
customize it. 
There may be special restrictions on use of freeware within your organization. For U.S. DoD, see 
http://www.acq.osd.mil/ie/bei/pm/ref-library/dodd/d85001p.pdf 
GOTS only applies to government entities. GOTS software can be created either by the technical staff of 
a government agency or by a commercial vendor (usually the latter). GOTS systems usually have the 
following characteristics: 
The government has direct control over most aspects of the product, including the source code. 
The vendor or creator has given a license to the government entity who paid for it to freely use 
and share it within the government. The license does not permit the government to give or sell it 
to outside entities. 
A popular model for GOTS installations is to have regular meetings where representatives from 
organizations that use the product throughout government discuss new requirements and possible new 
features. At these meetings, agreements are made between the representatives about sharing the cost for 
adding these features (which, after they are developed, are available to all users). 
The original vendor/developer is usually the preferred entity for doing the customizations, since their 
developers were directly involved in creating it and have the most knowledge about working with the 
code base. This pre-existing experience and expertise can substantially reduce the cost of further 
development and customization. A GOTS license does not stipulate that the original vendor has to do the 
customization, however. 
5.4.
Hosted solutions 
Some vendors of web-based authoring tools offer a hosted option. A hosted tool is installed and managed 
on the vendor
s server by their staff, rather than behind your enterprise firewall by your staff. Some of the 
advantages of a hosted platform are:
Eliminates the cost of hardware and network infrastructure needed to support a local installation 
of the system.
Lowers staff costs for administration and maintenance.
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; PDF Text Write & Extract. Insert and add text to any page of PDF document with
bookmark pdf reader; create bookmarks in pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. metadata adding control, you can add some additional Create PDF Document from Existing Files Using C#.
create bookmark in pdf automatically; bookmarks in pdf reader
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 35 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Puts less bandwidth load on the corporate network.
Content and feature updates can be accomplished without intervention by staff.
Enables faster implementation.
Requires little or no internal technical support or development.
One of the main disadvantages of a hosted solution is that it restricts opportunities and scope for local 
customization. Also, a hosted solution may not provide the level of security required by your 
organization, although hosted solutions are increasingly more secure. Finally, it may not be an option for 
government entities, since government rules tend to mandate outright ownership and control of systems, 
while a hosted solution resembles leasing. 
Vendors who offer hosted solutions commit themselves to a robust hosting and networking infrastructure 
with uninterrupted, 24/7 access from any location. The system that they host must be scalable and have 
redundant backup and security. These are items for due diligence verification during the acquisition 
process. 
Some hosted solution vendors offer access to their tools on a subscription basis. And some of these, such 
as easygenerator
®
,
offer free accounts to produce a limited number of courses, as a gradient towards fee-
based accounts.
5.5.
Templates, themes, and skins 
One of the most dramatic things you can do to streamline your workflow and reduce level of effort (LOE) 
is to use templates, themes, and skins. You may hear the terms 
skins,
” “
themes,
and 
templates
” 
used 
interchangeably, but it is useful to think of them as differing in the following ways. 
Skins usually comprise an interface wrapper or design that is applied dynamically to a basic content 
layout. The LMS usually provides the skin from a library of them and controls the skinning process. Skins 
are very common in cases where different organizations or user groups are sharing the same LMS, and 
they need to use different 
storefronts
” 
to reinforce/brand their identity, or at least in order to not confuse 
users as to the owner or source of the course. The LMS detects what organization, role, etc. the user 
belongs to, and dynamically skins the content. Skins enable local variations on parent content objects, 
providing each organization or learner community with its own visual interface or style for the same base 
content, managed on the level of a single master copy.  
Themes are generally style sheets that globally control the appearance and format of screens, but are static 
and configured in the content during the process of authoring, via the authoring tool. Unlike skins, themes 
provide formatting for items appearing within the interface (often in addition to the interface itself). They 
are not applied dynamically by the LMS. Themes generally control elements at a more fine-grained level, 
controlling color themes, look and feel of interactive widgets, etc.  
Templates are of two types. One supplies a convenient starting point for developing a screen (often 
including the interface); you simply replace placeholder text, graphics, etc. Templates can include not just 
visual elements but a large proportion of the functionality of the screen, often based on instructional 
activities or kinds of interactions. Some authoring tools force you to use templates as starting points for 
building screens; you cannot design an individual page without specifying a template first. 
Templates can also be a whole structure for a course. For example, you may have a pre-test with a certain 
number of questions, followed by instruction, followed by a post test. In this kind of template, the  
standardized sequence of activities of the course rather than the appearance is controlled. This kind of 
template can also be provided by the LMS, though in this case, the elements have to be created in the 
authoring tool as separate learning objects. 
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail Convert Word to PDF; Convert Word to HTML5; Convert Add and insert a blank page or multiple
excel pdf bookmarks; convert word to pdf with bookmarks
XDoc.Excel for .NET, Comprehensive .NET Excel Imaging Features
page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail Convert Excel to PDF; Convert Excel to HTML5; Convert Add a blank page or multiple pages to
create pdf with bookmarks from word; create pdf bookmarks from word
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 36 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
An authoring paradigm that relies heavily on templates, sometimes termed 
form-based authoring,
is 
popular for rapid eLearning development (see 5.1. Rapid eLearning authoring tools). Under this 
paradigm, the course author populates forms with content data and objects. There is a form (i.e., template) 
for each type of screen, built to accomplish a specific design, function, and/or interaction. The form is 
limited to the functions and designs included in that template. This is contrasted with 
freeform 
authoring,
” 
where authors start with a blank screen, and have unlimited access to all of the functionality 
provided by the tool itself. Form-based authoring takes little or no programming skill and enables 
authoring by non-technical SMEs, while freeform authoring takes some programming skills. In form-
based authoring, instructional designers or SMEs simply choose the template or theme that applies to a 
screen they wish to build and populate the content. This saves huge amounts of time, reduces the 
requirement for technical expertise, and simplifies the authoring process, since authors are just populating 
a template rather than engineering the whole screen. 
During the design phase of a project, authors may either develop their own themes and templates or 
choose them from a library (usually packaged with the authoring tool). Skins are usually controlled and 
customized via a function within the LMS. Managers can mandate the use of templates and themes to 
enforce uniform standards for eLearning across an organization. 
Tools vary in the features they provide for building your own templates. In general, the process is: 
1.  Create a skeleton for the template that specifies the types of media objects that will be included 
on the page. 
2.  Create or specify the user interface within which the content will appear (often in terms of a pre-
built skin). 
3.  Create the layout for the template that includes sizes and positions of media objects. 
Of course, use of templates can restrict creativity and create eLearning that is 
cookie cutter
” 
in look and 
feel; developers can mitigate this by simply populating a template/skins library with a wide selection of 
appropriate designs and screen types. 
Screen templates are critical for authoring mobile learning, since screen real estate is so restricted and 
particular to each platform. Some authoring and graphic design tools include a catalog of templates for 
particular devices. 
5.6.
Security considerations 
This section only applies to web-based tools. Like any other enterprise system, authoring tools must meet 
the security needs of the organization. For commercial installations, authoring tool security amounts to: 
Protecting against unauthorized login. This is not primarily a function of the tool, whose login 
functionality relies on universal web standards, but rather the placement of the system within the 
corporate intranet environment and the inherent security features of that placement. Commercial 
entities are of course concerned about other organizations gaining competitive advantage by 
seeing the training of competing companies, and government entities have obvious security 
concerns, so access to the tool is a primary concern. 
Locking users out of capabilities that are not included in their user profile, in other words, 
keeping users from doing particular things once in the system that they are not authorized to do. 
All web-based authoring tools include levels of permission based on roles, but beyond this, they 
vary widely in terms of the types and number of roles and permissions that can be assigned. 
Segmenting system permissions so that they map to the levels and specific kinds of permission 
that your organization requires. The question here is, if the system forces you to use a 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 37 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
permission/roles assignment template, how applicable is it to your environment, and can 
templates be tailored to meet your needs? Is there an override that permits assignment of 
individual permissions on a function-by-function basis?
For DoD organizations, there are specific considerations relating to the possible harmful effects to 
national security and individuals
’ 
life and limb due to unauthorized access to the system and particular 
courses that may be classified, etc.. There are a number of issues that need to be considered in this regard.  
5.7.
File formats 
5.7.1.
Input 
Sometimes there is a need to convert materials from ILT to eLearning. The input format in this case is 
often Word
®
and PowerPoint
®
files. Rather than starting from scratch to recreate these in the output 
medium, you can use an external document converter/optimizer tool (described in 4.6. External document 
converter/optimizer tools) to automate the conversion into eLearning. The first step is to convert the 
PowerPoint
®
and Word
®
documents to web pages residing within an eLearning interface; developers can 
then build eLearning interactivity into these pages (some interactive features may be automatically 
converted from PowerPoint®
as well). 
If you are in this situation, you need to: 1) limit your tool selection to this specific kind of tool; and 2) 
carefully assess your input formats to confirm that they match the tool
s support input formats. Do not 
assume that your legacy ILT documents are in Word
®
and PowerPoint
®
; some may be in desktop 
publishing applications like Quark
®
, or may only be available in PDF format (and the original source files 
may be lost). 
5.7.2.
Output 
Probably the single most important question to ask when choosing an authoring tool is: 
What output file 
format(s) does it produce
? It is important that you determine your output format before beginning to 
choose authoring tools. This serves to filter and focus your search considerably, and ensures that: 1) the 
files will work within your IT and training delivery infrastructure, including the end-user platforms (for 
example, PC and Mac), operating systems, and browsers; and 2) you are not stuck with a proprietary 
format that may disappear from the marketplace and eventually leave you with no ability to open and edit 
the files, nor with the ability to run them in a browser. Countless organizations that used Authorware
®
as 
their authoring tool now find themselves in this situation. 
Many LCMSs and some web-based authoring tools are designed to assemble and deliver eLearning 
dynamically, at runtime. They can output complete eLearning files for use on another platform as a 
convenience, but are generally not intended to be used this way. However, one major LCMS vendor has 
reported to the authors that most of their clients prefer to generate files in advance and use them on a 
another platform (often, the same vendor
s separate LMS product) rather than take advantage of the 
internal ability of an LCMS to dynamically assemble and deliver files at runtime. Even though runtime 
output files may not be stored on the server, it is important to consider the file format of the files that are 
delivered to users at runtime relative to factors such as browser compatibility. 
Frequently, the type of training you are creating drives the output format. The most important division is 
between synchronous vs asynchronous learning. Authoring systems differ markedly in their optimization 
for these types of learning. For instance, for synchronous eLearning, an external document 
converter/optimizer tool is probably your best choice. Most of these tools offer outputs for synchronous 
learning such as speaker notes, handouts, or student guides, in Word
®
or PowerPoint
®
format. 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 38 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
The choice of an output format depends primarily on the requirements of your delivery system, as well as 
on the type of learning that the file format supports. For instance, the Flash
®
.swf format robustly supports 
high levels of interactivity and is supported by most delivery systems when embedded in web pages. 
However, the range of tools that can natively edit .fla source Flash
®
files is much narrower than DHTML. 
You will need to check with your IT department to verify the compatibility of desired output formats with 
the network and firewalls. For instance, some firewalls block Java applets due to potential security risks. 
Output formats that require browser plug-ins other than ones that are provided as a default with the 
browser installation (such as Flash
®
with Internet Explorer
®
) can be a serious liability. This can put an 
administrative burden on users and/or IT personnel to install and maintain these plug-ins. They may be 
prohibited in a user environment for this or security reasons. 
Some output formats (such as Flash
®
and HTML5) have the advantage of built-in compression and 
streaming of files at run time. This can be a significant advantage in cases where bandwidth is limited. 
Output file format can greatly affect the editability of your developed course within other authoring tools. 
This can become an issue when a tool disappears from the marketplace or if a new author comes on board 
who prefers working in a different tool; if the course can be imported into another tool and manipulated as  
source files in that tool, these problems can be alleviated. 
It is important to understand that authoring tools often use proprietary code objects (for instance, 
references to internal Java applets, or code inserted into HTML comment fields) to facilitate authoring 
functions and course features. There may be no problem running these courses in LMSs, and they may 
work in any browser, but these code objects may be difficult to understand, troubleshoot, and edit in 
another authoring tool or DHTML editor. The ideal for an authoring tool is that the output format is 
identical to the internal source file format, and that this format is a clean, universal code like DHTML or 
XML; no proprietary code should be involved. 
It is important that you determine whether the files that an authoring tool produces (in a standard non-
proprietary format) are 100% editable in other tools that say that they can handle that format, especially 
those that generate that format natively. For example, some authoring tools that allow output as source 
.fla Flash
®
files are not as fully editable as native Flash
®
files, although they could be opened in Flash
®
You may need to take a detailed look at a product
s support of an output format. The term 
supports
” 
may 
not have the same connotations as the term 
is optimized for
” 
or 
is built for
Output formats are becoming even more important as we enter the mobile learning era. Authoring tools 
have features that support producing files that can play on mobile devices. In the past, developers had to 
completely customize eLearning architecture and format for mobile devices, but that is less often the case 
with devices like the Apple iPhone
®
that have robust browser capabilities (that match desktop browsers) 
and larger screens. 
Note:
at the time of this writing, the Flash format is not accepted on iPhones. Any authoring for the 
iPhone platform must take this into account. If you are developing courses for the desktop platform that 
you intend to repurpose for the mobile platform, you will have to re-output or rebuild any Flash pieces in 
your content in some other format (such as HTML5 or Adobe AIR
®
) for iPhone delivery. 
As of this writing, HTML 5 is being implemented in the major browsers. This output format is likely to 
become a universal format for eLearning. See 8.17. HTML5 format for important considerations regarding 
this format. 
5.8.
Reuse of learning objects 
Courses and the learning objects of which they are comprised are usually expensive to produce, no matter 
what authoring tool is used. This is especially true of media-rich learning objects. Of course, there is a 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 39 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
natural incentive to reuse learning objects and media assets where it is instructionally appropriate, to save 
development time and money. Most authoring tools (especially web-based tools and LCMSs) 
acknowledge this fact by offering robust content object library functions that facilitate reuse within and 
between courses. Reuse scenarios can range all the way from a single author with an authoring tool that 
offers a self-contained library of objects used (or on deck to use) in a course to a web-based tool that 
allows storage, search, and retrieval of objects across an entire enterprise of authors and courses. Reuse 
can even take place between organizations, enabled by registry efforts such as the Learning Registry 
(http://learningregistry.org/) and repositories such as the RUSSEL system 
(http://www.adlnet.gov/tla/russel). 
Be aware that having an authoring tool that is optimized for reuse is only the first step towards realizing 
reuse as an authoring paradigm; institutional and logistical barriers may deter full implementation of 
reuse. Some examples of these barriers listed on the ADL RUSSEL site at 
http://www.adlnet.gov/tla/russel are as follows:
Developed content is not stored in approved, accessible content repositories 
Creating, uploading, and maintaining metadata associated with learning assets, Shareable 
Content Objects (SCOs), or SCORM content packages is a time-consuming process 
Creating and registering content in approved content repositories (if available) is time-
consuming 
How to optimize the design and development of eLearning content for reuse is not 
understood 
Policy enforcing reuse is either non-existent or ambiguous 
Intellectual property rights concerns 
5.9.
Commercially available courses 
One option that may be less expensive than developing custom courseware from scratch is to 
purchase commercially available courses. Models for delivery vary; in some cases, they reside 
on the vendor
s server only and require login to a separate LMS. A review of commercial 
courseware vendors can be found at http://mason.gmu.edu/~ndabbagh/wblg/Forbes-Review-
Dabbagh.htm
5.10.
Standards support 
5.10.1.
SCORM 
5.10.1.1.
Overview 
ADL has identified the following high-level attributes for all distributed learning environments.   
Interoperability
: the ability to take instructional components developed in one system and use 
them in another system.   
Accessibility
: the ability to locate and access instructional components from multiple locations 
and deliver them to other locations. 
Reusability
: the ability to use instructional components in multiple applications, courses and 
contexts. 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 40 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Durability
: the ability to withstand technology changes over time without costly redesign, 
reconfiguration, or recoding. 
To achieve these attributes in distributed learning environments, ADL promotes the use of the Sharable 
Content Object Reference Model (SCORM). SCORM defines the interrelationship of course components, 
data models, and protocols so that learning content 
objects
” 
are sharable across systems that conform 
with the same model. To support interoperability, SCORM standardizes the means of communication 
from the sharable content objects (SCOs) to the learning management system (LMS), through an 
Application Programming Interface (API) and prescribed data model elements. 
For more information on SCORM, see www.ADLNet.gov. 
It is important to understand that SCORM neither dictates nor precludes any instructional, performance 
support, or evaluation strategy. SCORM does enable object-based approaches to the development and 
presentation of eLearning. This is enabled by aggregating learning content composed from relatively 
small, reusable content objects to form meaningful units of instruction. Individual content objects can 
thus be designed for reuse in multiple contexts, and aggregated variously to assemble new components 
and programs of instruction.  
This object-based approach, intended to support reuse, means that content objects must not determine by 
themselves how to sequence/navigate aggregations that represent parcels of instruction. Doing so would 
require content objects to contain information about other content objects, which would inhibit their 
reusability. ADL addressed this requirement by standardizing a set of behaviors that that all SCORM 
2004-conformant LMSs must support. Thus, the LMS, rather than the content, controls the movement of 
learners from SCO to SCO. 
To support reuse, SCORM uses metadata to enable content objects to be discoverable through and across 
enterprises, within distributed content repositories.  
NOTE: Content acquired by U.S. DoD must be SCORM-conformant (
current version
) according to 
DoD Instruction 1322.26 (June 16, 2006). See http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/132226p.pdf 
for more details. 
5.10.1.2.
Requirements for SCORM support 
For an authoring tool to robustly support SCORM, the authoring tool must: 
Support object-based learning design 
Allow defining of SCOs at any level of organization 
Support incorporation of all SCORM data model elements into SCOs, including: 
 Mandatory calls inserted without consulting the developer 
 Optional calls inserted as drag and drop elements, such as a 
Finish and Exit
button that 
triggers an api.setValue(cmi.exit.normal); Terminate() call. 
Create SCORM course packages that include all necessary files and information for the LMS to 
properly deliver the course at runtime. Either drop down menus or wizards should be available to 
assist the author in the process of creating the course package. 
Allow direct viewing and editing of manifest files 
Provide tools enabling reuse of course packages and manifests in creating new course packages 
and manifests 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested