Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 51 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Includes pre-built modules/scripts that can easily be inserted to check learner systems for 
necessary plug-ins, etc. 
Allows insertion of web pages and other web content into containers (such as Webobjects) that 
can be displayed within authored content. 
Imports native HTML5 animations without requiring any plug-ins. 
Supports output to mobile devices (see 5.2. mLearning authoring tools). Some tools offer this as 
an output option, though they may not be designed specifically for this type of learning. 
Requires a minimum of players and plug-ins, especially proprietary ones that are not 
automatically installed with the browser. 
Supports foreign character sets (Unicode or other multi-byte fonts), especially Asian characters. 
Supports creation of a desktop executable file that can run on CDs or DVDs or run on the desktop 
after being downloaded from the intranet when there is limited bandwidth. 
Ideally, has an output file format that is identical to the internal source file format, and that this 
format is clean, universal code like DHTML or XML; none or a minimal amount of proprietary 
code is involved. This allows courses to be imported and edited in other authoring tools, and 
greatly enhances the durability of the output. Some authoring tools rely on special code inserted 
into HTML comments fields, or Java applets, for instance, to implement certain functionalities. If 
the authoring tool is no longer available, it may be difficult to interpret and edit this code. 
Has options for enabling and configuring printing of the course screens. This enables authors to 
view the course in a storyboard type of format (ideally, in an editable word processing document) 
and enables students to print sets of course screens (ideally in non-editable PDF format), rather 
than limiting both groups to using the browser Print function (which will only print the current 
screen). 
Has options for export as a screencam movie file for offline and mobile device viewing. Of 
course, this will strip out any interactivity. If important content is hidden behind popups, etc., you 
would not want to use this feature. 
Output works well with Section 508 accessibility technologies like screen readers. 
6.2.
Authoring of documents related to course 
Includes templates for authoring of Glossaries whose contents can be automatically linked to 
hotwords
in the course. 
Allows templates for authoring of course FAQs. 
Includes templates for authoring of course tutorial and Help pages. 
Includes templates for reference and resource pages (possibly in Word, for conversion to PDF). 
Provides support for creating student surveys, certificates, and course evaluations. Many LMSs 
do this, but you may want this feature in your authoring tool so that these items are portable to 
other LMSs. 
Pdf bookmark - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
excel hyperlink to pdf bookmark; bookmarks pdf file
Pdf bookmark - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
adding bookmarks to pdf document; add bookmark pdf
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 52 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
6.3.
Ease of learning and use 
Is easy to learn and use, ideally with the ability for users to choose from tiers of features 
according to the knowledge and expertise of the user. This allows users to start using the program 
quickly and gradually progress to more complex authoring tiers/feature sets as their skills mature. 
In other words, users only see features that are relevant to their level of skill and the kind of 
operations they are capable of performing. 
Displays interfaces that are consistent and standardized throughout all screens. 
Allows customizing of workspaces and saving them 
Includes grids that allow convenient layout out of objects, and snapping to the grid and other 
objects 
Has robust panel management features (docking, stacking, etc.) 
Uses straightforward, simple, and intuitive paths for performing authoring functions. You should 
test your most common and important use cases on the system to verify this. 
Provides user interface customization (not on the level of tiers of features, as above, but on an 
individual feature basis), so that users can optimize for their particular needs. 
Is easy to install and configure, ideally not requiring a system administrator (possibly using 
wizards). 
Includes spell check and grammar check features 
Provides clear, specific error messages and diagnostics that aid in troubleshooting. A generic 
message that is the same for all errors is not acceptable. You also want to avoid cryptic, technical 
messages that can only be interpreted by the tool
s software developers. Messages should be 
understandable not just be technically-inclined tool administrators, but also content developers.  
6.4.
User training, support, and documentation 
Has robust support documentation in a wide variety of forms including tutorials, help, examples, 
references, and user manuals. 
Has a variety of Help Desk support options for administrators and learners (telephone, chat, 
email, etc.). 
Has a Help Desk system that is structured and process-driven via trouble call tracking and 
reporting. 
Has Help Desk support that coordinates problem resolution with the appropriate parties: vendors, 
SME
s, etc. for problem resolution. 
Has knowledgeable, experienced support personnel. 
Is available as close to 24/7 and world-wide as possible. 
Offers extensive training options: eLearning, video tutorials, ILT sessions, webinars, etc.. 
Has onsite training options. If training is at vendor site, the location(s) are a reasonable distance. 
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit
add bookmarks pdf; create bookmark pdf
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
convert excel to pdf with bookmarks; how to create bookmarks in pdf file
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 53 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Includes an orientation tutorial for new users. 
Has free online forums for support. 
Has an established user community to turn to for help (this is generally true only of the tools that 
are in the most widespread use) 
Has a low average turn-around time for help-desk support. 
Has a feedback function for suggestions on improving the product. 
Provides technical consulting services options for customizations, implementation, configuration,  
architecture design, needs analysis, change management services, etc. 
6.5.
Technical architecture 
Does not arbitrarily limit the number of levels, objects, or sizes of items included in the course. 
Supports a wide variety of delivery architectures. For instance, if you have an eLearning 
architecture involving a dedicated content repository (that may be on a different server than the 
course delivery system), the tool supports configuring the eLearning for this. 
Has reasonable system requirements that are attainable within your organization (both for authors 
and learners). 
Has the ability to call external applications and code objects (such as calculators and random 
number generators), and set up interfaces to read and write from databases. 
Uses an open architecture that allows additional functionality to be added from external sources. 
Is interoperable with other authoring tools, based on input and output file formats, etc. 
6.6.
Acquisition and maintenance 
Has a licensing agreement that is flexible and easily scalable to reflect changing number of users. 
Costs less than competing authoring systems with the same or similar feature set. This includes 
all TCO (total cost of ownership) costs. 
Costs less for recurring and ongoing support compared to the cost of other similar systems. 
Is projected to cost less for required customizations compared to the cost of customizations for 
other similar systems. 
Costs less for add-ons such as APIs to external applications compared to the cost of other similar 
systems. 
6.7.
Automation and process optimization 
Includes a convenient mechanism for adding metadata or descriptive labeling to course 
components (for SCORM courses, this should include the ability to attach metadata at the course, 
aggregation, SCO, and asset levels). Ensure that the metadata format is the one that your 
organization uses. 
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF document by PDF bookmark and outlines in VB.NET. Independent component for splitting PDF document in preview without using external PDF control.
creating bookmarks in pdf documents; add bookmark pdf file
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
bookmarks pdf documents; bookmark pdf acrobat
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 54 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Integrates the storyboarding process into the tool. Some tools integrate storyboarding with the 
authoring process, so that most files can be output when the storyboard is complete, without any 
need for further production. Some tools support using PowerPoint to create storyboards, which 
can be imported, edited, and turned into eLearning. 
Allows searching within individual courses, and across course libraries, both while authoring and 
after it is published on the LMS (the latter may only be available as an LMS feature, depending 
on your implementation). 
Includes options for automating the creation of course navigation functions from the content. For 
example, creating course maps, menus, and table of contents from screen titles, or keyword 
glossaries from identified hotwords. 
Stores links in an externalized database file so they can be updated from a master instance. 
Allows importing content in other file formats (especially Microsoft Office
®
).  
Has mapping feature that allows you to indicate how the styles and items in Microsoft Office 
documents to be imported relate to how it will be inserted into the course. For example, an 
H1
heading in a Microsoft Word document becomes a screen title in the LCMS content object. 
Allows importing of content packages such that they are fully editable (for SCORM content). 
Provides features that allow authors to view the course structure in a graphical representation 
(diagrams, outlines, etc.) using a variety of metaphors, for example, object trees and flowcharts. It 
should allow not only viewing but creating and editing course structures with navigation links to 
nonexistent or placeholder screens before these screens are populated with content. Reorganizing 
and reordering lessons and screens should be as easy as dragging and dropping structural 
elements. 
Includes a spelling and grammar checker. 
Has robust support for building tables and diagrams. 
Has global find and replace function. 
Is optimized for reusability in general (not just measured by SCORM support). Some tools have 
their own internal content repository that allows mixing and matching objects, allowing you to 
pool assets in a media library so they are reusable across courses authored with the tool. This 
feature is common for LCMSs, but not for other types of authoring tools. 
Includes a wide variety and numbers of templates or skins that you can use out of the box with 
little or no modification, and supports easy creation and application of new templates and skins. It 
should allow templates and skins to be applied to any level of course structure (a screen, lesson, 
module, or the entire course).  
Allows authors to easily override elements (for individual screens) of the course-wide or screen 
templates and skins, to allow flexibility and creativity. 
Apart from templates, incorporates a library of reusable components (scripts, images, text pieces, 
etc.). If the elements in this library are updated or changed, these changes should propagate 
throughout the course. And they should be sharable across courses, not just within the same 
course. 
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
bookmarks pdf files; delete bookmarks pdf
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
creating bookmarks in a pdf document; create bookmark pdf file
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 55 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Incorporates some degree of ability to edit raw material assets at a low application level; for 
example, support for editing of images to the degree that use of image editing software like 
Photoshop
®
might not even be necessary. 
Has a high degree of traceability for the impact of all changes across all courses and objects (this 
applies mostly to LCMSs). For example, properties and attendant warnings that object x is used 
in courses y and z; changes to that object will affect those courses, and vice versa. 
6.8.
Media handling 
Audio 
 Allows embedding or linking to audio files. 
 Allows native editing of audio files 
in place,
including setting compression type and 
amount, and audio quality. 
 Allows author to record narration audio that is synched automatically to screens and 
screen sequences as recording progresses. 
 Enables set audio clips to launch based on user actions. 
 Allows providing closed captioning. 
Graphics 
 Allows native editing of images 
in place,
including applying special effects like 
transitions. 
 Allows setting graphics to be interactive elements that the user can drag and drop, link 
from, etc. 
 Internally and automatically converts imported graphics to standard file types used by the 
authoring tool (PNG or JPG). 
 Supports a wide variety of media (see below) and media file formats. Examples include: 
Audio 
MP3 
RealAudio 
WAV 
Video 
MPEG-4 
RealVideo 
Quicktime 
AVI 
H.264 
Documents 
Microsoft Office 
Adobe PDF 
HTML5 
Graphics 
JPEG 
PNG 
GIF 
SVG 
2D animation 
SWF 
HLA Simulations 
HTML5 
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET edit PDF bookmark, C#.NET edit
create pdf bookmarks online; bookmark template pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Ability to get word count of PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
adding bookmarks to pdf reader; acrobat split pdf bookmark
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 56 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
3D animation 
SWF 
WebGL 
Animation 
 Includes a library of animation objects, including characters/avatars. 
 Has the ability to build and/or incorporate HTML 5 animations. 
Video 
 Allows embedding or linking to video files. 
 Allows native setting parameters of video files 
in place,
including setting compression 
type and amount, and video quality. 
 Allows author to record screen video (i.e., for system simulations). 
 Enables set audio clips to launch based on user actions. 
 Enables annotating videos with timed overlays. 
 Allows providing closed captioning. 
6.9.
Programming features 
Provides browser emulation (or previewing in a separate browser window) that allows quick 
previewing of screens and objects exactly as they appear and function in the target browser. 
Includes revision tracking to audit changes and roll back to earlier versions. 
Runs validation checks of HTML code. 
Incorporates 
round-trip
editing of code, meaning that changes made while in code editing mode 
(for example, directly making changes to the HTML code) are immediately reflected in 
WYSIWYG editing mode, and vice versa. This also means that WYSIWYG authoring functions 
do not overwrite or are not incompatible with HTML code entered manually. 
If the tool incorporates use of XML as the core internal format or as ancillary data storage (see 
Error! Hyperlink reference not valid. Error! Hyperlink reference not valid.), it has an XML 
editor that allows programmers to edit the XML directly. 
Provides the ability to launch source object editing applications from within the tool. For 
example, the ability to launch and edit graphic objects in Photoshop from within the tool; saving 
changes automatically updates the file in the target format (like JPEG). 
Allows authors to establish and control course file directory structures without rigid constraints. 
For example, it should allow authors to specify which assets are stored in which directory, and 
they should be able to easily rename and reorganize this directory later, updating links to 
associated files. 
Offers a scripting language (such as Adobe Flash
®
, ActionScript
®
, or Javascript) to extend the 
tool
s functionality, with the ability to create and manipulate variables that control a wide variety 
of functions and behavior. 
Offers convenient features related to media handling, including: 
 Cropping of graphics, not just resizing 
 Adding alt-tag data for Section 508 compliance 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 57 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
 Vector graphic creation tools (ability to create lines and simple shapes to aid in layouts) 
Ability to set control parameters for media objects (for example, Flash
®
animations) within the 
tool rather than requiring them to be set within the media object authoring tool. This includes 
looping behavior, streaming parameters, etc. 
6.10.
Criteria specific only to web-based tools 
The following criteria apply only to web-based tools, and not desktop tools. These criteria are added to 
the list above. 
6.10.1.
Collaborative authoring and process management 
Offers 
organization aware
features that allow collaborative server-based authoring based on 
organization roles and permissions. Permissions should be able to be assigned not just by 
organization or role, but course or project as well. 
Includes project management features, to help project managers plan and track progress on 
individual screens and other components. 
Manages the production process efficiently. This may include built-in workflows (for approvals, 
for instance) and production, QA, and review pipelines. It is ideal for notifications (for example, 
telling the next person in the next role in the pipeline that the course is ready for them to work on) 
to be handled through email, not just an internal authoring tool notification mechanism (since you 
may not be able to depend on people logging in to the tool regularly to check their notifications). 
Includes configuration management and version control features such as checking files in and out 
to prevent accidental overwriting. 
Allows adding of media-empty placeholders with properties and tasks associated with them (i.e., 
requests for further action by other developers). 
Provides the ability to annotate and communicate actions taken, approvals, errors, etc. in regards 
to screens and content objects, for future reference or for other authors, using built in fields as 
well as email. 
Provides a means to assign tasks that are tracked and managed in the system, at the level of 
particular content objects (provides a means for scheduling content maintenance and 
management) 
When reviewers make comments they can make edits directly in the content (similar to Revision 
Tracking in Microsoft Word
®
). 
6.10.2.
System access 
Uses robust security architecture to maintain system access. 
Allows users to self-register or create a request for an account. 
Provides a single sign-on, so that users who have logged in to the enterprise intranet (through a 
portal, etc.) can get into the tool without additional login. 
Requires user logon only once per tool session. 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 58 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Uses Common Access Card (CAC) access (for high-security government installations). 
Incorporates appropriate security certifications and standards, and features (see 5.6. Security 
considerations). Other security standards you may need include SSL, PKI, and FIPS 
140-1. 
6.10.3.
System performance 
Performs with minimal latency under a variety of use case scenarios and load conditions. 
Handles reasonably large numbers of concurrent users. 
Handles user load efficiently, provisioning and scaling resources to smoothly accommodate 
fluctuations (especially spikes) in numbers of concurrent users. 
Works equally well (all functions, including especially course previews) on all standard Internet 
browsers. 
6.10.4.
Permissions and roles 
Defines a wide variety of permission and role levels that are applicable to a range of 
organizational structures and use case scenarios for the tool. 
Uses administration templates to easily set group permissions. 
Restricts access to authoring functions for individual or groups of courses based on membership 
on teams associated with those course(s). 
Allows delegating permissions for users at a lower level of permission than what one is logged in 
as. 
Allows creation of subgroups that inherit permissions of parent groups. 
Allows administration based on external data feeds concerning organization roles and 
permissions. 
Supports mirroring an organization
s structure in the database to manage authors, content 
administrators/owners, programmers, and approvers based on where they exist within the 
organizational structure. 
Manages the administration process efficiently with built-in workflows (for approvals, for 
instance). 
Provides features that allow administrators to view role structures in a graphical representation 
(diagrams, outlines, etc.). 
Has administrative interfaces are clear, simple, and optimized for usability. Administrator 
interfaces are no less important than author interfaces. Just because author interfaces are well-
designed does not mean the administrative interfaces will be also. This is particularly important 
where there is a need for non-technical staff to perform administrative functions. 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 59 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
7.
General recommandations 
Some authoring tools (especially RAD tools) are relatively agnostic of learning theories and 
approaches. They are open-ended and flexible, and can be used to support many different types of 
learning (for example, scenario-based learning). However, many tools (especially ones that rely 
on use of templates) have an explicit or implicit assumption of the type of learning that will be 
produced using the tool, and are optimized to build that particular type of learning. Be sure to 
determine what these assumptions are, and either look for a tool that supports it, or at least avoid 
tools that are optimized for a different, incompatible, learning type.  
Do not underestimate the degree to which a tool assumes a certain type of learning. Most tools 
implicitly assume traditional declarative, cognitivist learning, especially in terms of the 
assessments they produce (standard multiple choice tests). Tools that are optimized for alternative 
learning types, such as constructivist learning environments, are not common. It is generally the 
case currently that you would need to use an open-ended tool to create for these learning types. 
Keep in mind that most software tools that are easier to learn and use have fewer capabilities, and 
vice versa. Sophisticated media and/or learning strategies will inherently require a tool that is 
harder to learn and/or require specialized professional expertise. 
If you do not have a designated, experienced programmer with a training background who 
develops your eLearning, it is generally better to predicate your choice of authoring tool on 
having an instructional designer learn to use it, rather than an IT person. In this case, a non-
technical tool is better. All other things being equal, production will be faster, easier, and you will 
get a better quality product if instructional designers are doing the authoring. 
Avoid the first release of a new authoring tool. 
Ask the vendor who their other clients are, what they use the tool for, and see if you can talk to 
these clients about their experience using the tool. 
Ask the vendor for a demonstration in your facility, running your content on your enterprise 
system(s). The vendor may present a canned demo of the product on their system, and that is fine 
as a general overview of the tool
s capabilities, but you should see how well the tool expresses 
these capabilities within your IT environment. 
Avoid authoring tools created by companies that have a short history in the market (less than 5 
years), or have been operating for a short time, or have a small organization. You also want to 
watch out for companies that are about to be acquired or merged with another vendor. 
You might want to check to see if the company is International Standards Organization (ISO) 
and/or Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) certified to ensure the quality of their 
software. 
Determine exactly what capabilities you really need. If you already have a course delivery 
system, for instance, you may not need that capability that is included in an LCMS. Many LCMS 
vendors sell the authoring module as a separate application for a lower price. 
For a web-based tool, determine whether a hosted solution may be right for you (see 5.4. Hosted 
solutions for more information). In most cases, outright ownership is the best route. However, a 
hosted solution may be cheaper in the long run, in terms of server usage and saving the hassle of 
performing your own admin and maintenance functions. 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 60 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Do not overlook open source, freeware, or GOTS solutions; solutions may be available at very 
low overall cost that adequately meet your needs (see 5.3. Open source, freeware, and GOTS 
solutions for more information). 
As described in 1. Purpose and scope of this paper, assume that you will need several authoring 
tools in combination; a primary one for authoring the 
shell
, and secondary/auxiliary authoring 
tools that are optimized for particular capabilities or assets. This is very commonly done in the 
case of courses that are authored in DHTML (for instance, using Adobe Dreamweaver
®
, with 
Adobe Flash
®
objects inserted for animations). 
Consider the current roles, responsibilities, and skill levels of the people who will do authoring, 
and how much you are willing to ask them to learn new skills and change the parameters of their 
job to become tool experts and take on the role of authoring, if they are not doing authoring now. 
A simpler, less powerful tool may be the best option in order to avoid having to make significant 
changes in your personnel landscape. 
This also relates to the question of whether your authors or authors-to-be are generalists or 
specialists, and whether it is realistic or desirable to force them to become more of one or the 
other. Tools that are simpler and less powerful will be better suited to those who want to remain 
generalists. Those who are currently generalists will be resistant to the technical nature and steep 
learning curve of a complex tool. For instance, an instructional designer who is also a course 
developer (i.e., generalist) may use a simple tool for development that allows him or her to spend 
most of their time on instructional design, rather than wrestle with the technical nuances of a 
complex and powerful tool as a specialist developer). 
It is generally better to make a more powerful and flexible program work for you via carefully 
designed, robust templates than to use a less powerful tool that owes its ease of use to limiting 
what you can do. If you set up your templates and workflows for using them correctly, the 
learning curve and level of effort of the more powerful tool will eventually be on a par with the 
less powerful, easier to use tool
but you will always be able to call on the added power and 
flexibility of the more powerful tool if you need it. 
Try the tool out on the system configuration your authors would typically use in your training 
organization. You may discover some surprises in performance and features that you would not 
otherwise have found. For instance, the authoring tool
s preview function may actually preview 
screens quite differently than what they look like in the actual end-user browser. 
Determine the skill sets within your pool of course authoring staff, so that you know what you are 
prepared for and/or what you might have to acquire in terms of staffing or training. 
8.
Current trends in authoring tools 
8.1.
Team-based life cycle production and maintenance 
Life cycle production and maintenance of courseware includes all of the phases of an eLearning project in 
a single tool
s capabilities: analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation (ADDIE). In 
order for an authoring tool to support this, it must allow collaborative authoring and permission-driven 
production pipelines. This trend is driving many desktop tools to move permanently to web-based 
architecture, or at least to have a web-based option, since this enables all kinds of "organization aware" 
workflows (enforcing who does what when during production
centralized control with distributed 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested