pdf sdk c# : Bookmarks pdf file SDK control project wpf azure windows UWP Choosing-Authoring-Tools6-part985

Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 61 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
contribution). More and more, tools allow modeling of organization structures and processes, and 
assignment of specific roles in the production process. These roles allow the tool to encompass a greater 
scope of production and maintenance activities within the ADDIE model, such as analysis and evaluation. 
8.2.
Use of XML or JSON 
Like the software arena in general, tools are moving towards use of XML (Extensible Markup Language) 
or JSON (Javascript Object Notation) as an output format and/or as the internal authoring source code. 
XML is a universal, durable markup language that is relatively easy to learn and use, and is a robust 
means for storing structured data. Because of these characteristics, some training organizations are 
requiring that their learning content be stored in its raw form in this format. Using a transformation 
application, XML stored in this format can then be output into many different formats, including all kinds 
of documentation that is not related to eLearning.  
JSON is not a markup language, but functions similar to XML in that it is a universal data interchange file 
format. It has advantages over XML in that: 
It can be directly read in and 
understood
” 
by browsers, since it is part of the Javascript 
specification. XML requires some sort of transformation code or middleware in order to be 
understood by browsers. 
Its syntax is significantly simpler than XML. 
It is more compact than XML. 
Similarly, tools are starting to appear that use XML or JSON as the means of storing the authored content 
internally. This XML or JSON content can then be compiled into an eLearning runtime file or set of files 
using, again, a transformation application. This 
open architecture
” 
approach achieves three goals: 
It separates content from appearance (see 8.3. Separation of content and appearance), which 
promotes greater flexibility in content maintenance, and more delivery options. 
In line with the term 
open architecture,
using an open, universal format (XML or JSON) for 
storing content allows the possibility of using that content in different output formats, 
applications, and contexts, depending on the transformation engine used, which could be a COTS 
(commercial off-the-shelf) application or custom one. In other words, use of XML or JSON takes 
the content data out of proprietary code objects and puts it into a universal file format, increasing 
the interoperability of this data with other (proprietary) applications and systems. For instance, 
some authoring tools (such as Flash) have the ability to read in data from external XML or JSON 
files, either at runtime or during the authoring process. 
In addition to allowing a variety of output formats as described above, it can free the authoring 
capabilities (which determine the complexity of learning interactions) from the typical constraints 
of feature sets presented by authoring tools with 
canned
” 
(i.e., non-scripted) feature sets. Custom 
scripts and code can be written to manipulate the stored content in various creative and complex 
ways, without interfering with the content itself. 
One technically difficult feat for an authoring tool is to import courses created in other authoring tools 
such that they are fully editable. Unless the course is 100% free of proprietary code, it may be difficult or 
impossible for the tool that is importing these externally-created courses to understand and interpret this 
code. One solution is to use XML or JSON, which avoids using proprietary code for storing the content 
(the modules that transforms the content may however be proprietary), thus making importing and editing 
content between tools more interoperable. This relies on tools being able to import XML or JSON files. It 
would then be up to the authoring tool to apply the correct transform to the XML or JSON data to output 
into screens. 
Bookmarks pdf file - add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your C# Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
bookmarks pdf; creating bookmarks in pdf from word
Bookmarks pdf file - VB.NET PDF bookmark library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Your VB.NET Project with Rapid PDF Internal Navigation Via Bookmark and Outline
create bookmarks pdf files; auto bookmark pdf
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 62 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Though the content data may not be imported into the tool in the form of XML or JSON files, and XML 
or JSON may not be used internally as the means for storing content, the tool may still have an option of 
compiling the content portion of it into XML or JSON output. This XML or JSON output can be used as 
part of the runtime file set (i.e., data is read in from it by the runtime engine to assemble screens), or it can 
be imported into other tools or used to create other formats, as described above. 
A further advantage of using XML or JSON is that it enables direct editing of content in a text editor or
through using an XML or JSON interface application
a web form in order to update content, making the 
content updating process simpler. In this case, the content updaters (who may be SMEs or instructors) can 
make changes to text, change URLs, etc., without needing access to or experience with the primary 
authoring tool. 
8.3.
Separation of content and appearance 
For quite a while now, there has been a trend towards separation of content and appearance. Examples of 
this are tools that use technologies like Cold Fusion and server technologies like ASP. This trend has 
permeated deeper and deeper into application architecture. Separation of content and appearance 
facilitates flexible updating of text, media files, etc. without recoding the screens they appear on. Some 
tools that use this principle rely on dynamic assembly of eLearning at runtime (which requires server 
software); others assemble and solidify the final product at the time files are published (handled within 
the authoring tool). XML or JSON are common means for storing the 
content
” 
portion of the equation 
(see 8.2. Use of XML or JSON). 
Another way that separation of content and appearance manifests is the separation of the course interface 
from the content. Most often this involves use of skins, which are interface designs (possibly including 
functionality as well as visual design) that can be swapped out easily. 
8.4.
Support for ISD Process 
Some tools are adding support for the ISD process
in other words, the activities that led up to (and 
possibly come after) the design of the course that is rendered in the authoring tool. This usually includes 
wizards, coaches, and templates, as well as checklists for doing training needs analysis, writing design 
documents, determining instructional strategies, writing learning objectives, etc. This ISD support is often 
targeted at non-instructional designers, i.e., SMEs who know little or nothing about instructional design. 
8.5.
Integration and complexity of templates and skins 
Templates and skins were discussed in 5.5. Templates, themes, and skins. Templates and skins have 
always been a part of authoring tools, but they are becoming much more integral to the tools, and are 
becoming more complex. The tools to build and manage templates are also becoming more complex to 
keep pace with the templates themselves. This trend has the overall effect of simplifying the authoring 
process, so that the author only needs to focus on the information to be presented and instructional 
strategy, rather than format and function (which are automatically taken care of by the template). 
8.6.
Learning object-centric architecture 
Authoring systems that are integrated with LCMSs or content repositories best exemplify this principle. 
They give developers the flexibility to develop all kinds of content objects (not just explicitly designed for 
learning purposes) and assemble and reassemble them in different combinations (often relying on 
SCORM to do this) for learning modules either at runtime or when courses are published. This trend 
reflects the growing popularity and movement towards knowledge management practices. 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Compress & decompress PDF document file while maintaining original content of target PDF document file. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels
create bookmarks in pdf reader; export pdf bookmarks
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Split PDF file by top level bookmarks. The following C# codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by PDF bookmarks or outlines.
add bookmarks to pdf file; excel print to pdf with bookmarks
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 63 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
8.7.
Embedded best practice design principles 
Tools are integrating visual and instructional design principles more and more, as these principles are 
more accepted and standardized, and become the default working principles for eLearning. 
8.8.
Automated metadata generation/extraction 
Tools are making the onerous task of determining and entering metadata (particularly for SCORM 
courses) easier by extracting directly or intelligently inferring (using latent semantic analysis [LSA] 
technologies) data for certain metadata fields such as keywords, learning time, reading level, etc. 
8.9.
Open architectures 
Open architecture
” 
infers that the tool has APIs that allow integration of external applications and 
systems into the tool, including, in some cases, swapping a tool vendor-provided function with an 
externally produced one. Open architectures imply a relaxation of proprietary control and constraints on 
the part of the tool vendor, allowing potential users to 
look under the hood
” 
at their implementation.  
To enable open architecture, the vendor usually must share all or parts of its architecture with add-
on/system integration developers. This may require some license agreements between entities sharing the 
architecture information. 
In spite of the potential for competitive disadvantages resulting from publicly exposing the inner 
workings of their system, some vendors favor them because their customers want to be able to easily 
customize the system by purchasing additions that the tool vendor may not feel are important enough to 
develop themselves. 
Open architectures have driven the creation of a marketplace for third-party applications that can be 
integrated into the core tool as modules. These modules can provide all sorts of functions, mostly 
revolving around advanced types of interactions and assessments. 
8.10.
Support for team-based learning 
True team-based learning implies more than a group of learners in a meeting room taking a course 
together under one login, presenting themselves to the LMS as if they are one learner and making group 
decisions about how to complete course activities, or synchronously progressing through a course from 
different locations and being scored by the average of their individual scores. Team-based learning 
revolves around the idea of learning activities that both affect other team members
’ 
activities and are 
affected in turn by the actions of others in their team, who may be using a different version or part of the 
course based on their individual role in the team. 
Thus, authoring tool support for team-based learning involves more than just providing communication 
functions in the content in order to provide collaboration and peer review by multiple learners. 
Complicated assessment and sequencing paradigms must be possible, with intelligent agents or 
middleware automatically tracking and mediating the activities and performance of each team member, 
and reporting rollup progress as well as an audit trail for how these scores were generated (based on 
individuals
’ 
performance) to the LMS.  
The technological challenges in this type of learning are now being worked out, but there is no universally 
accepted solution, so no prominent authoring solutions to support it have appeared yet. But as soon as the 
team-based learning paradigm becomes an established part of the training and education space, authoring 
tool and LMSs will surely move to support it. 
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF File by Top Level Bookmarks Demo Code in VB.NET. The following VB.NET codes explain how to split a PDF file into multiple
how to bookmark a pdf file; how to add bookmarks on pdf
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Easy to compress & decompress PDF document file in .NET framework. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while
creating bookmarks pdf files; how to add bookmarks to pdf files
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 64 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
8.11.
“Gadget”-based interface 
Gadgets (aka 
widgets
” 
or 
applets
) are functionalities that are presented as separate items on a page. 
They are used in many commercial e-mail 
My Page
” 
interfaces, and in many enterprise portal interfaces. 
They make it possible to completely customize the user interface; gadgets can be turned off so they do not 
appear on the interface, and can be moved to any location on the page. They can be associated with a 
specific role so that users only see the ones that are relevant or permitted for their role. 
This type of portal-like interface has gained traction with some vendors, simply because users are more 
comfortable with this type of modern interface, and it allows a high degree of interface tailoring to suit 
their needs. 
8.12.
Support for social media 
Learning experiences are now being designed to include elements outside of the traditional didactic 
eLearning model. They often involve user-generated, and decentralized sources. These elements are 
generally termed 
social media.
” 
The list of types includes: 
Wikis (for example, Wikipedia) 
Social networking (for example, Facebook
®
Blogs (for example, Blogger
®
Micro-blogs (for example, Twitter
®
Social bookmarking (for example, Delicious
®
Social news (for example, Digg
®
Picture sharing (for example, Flickr
®
Video sharing (for example, YouTube
®
Communities of practice (CoPs) 
Courses can be authored to include these elements, as APIs; a learner could, for example, be given an 
assignment to research a topic in some of these tools. The API would embed the functionality into the 
content as a 
widget
” 
on a course screen. However, access to these social media elements is usually not 
provided within the content, but rather, the course author configures the LMS to provide the access to the 
social media site or function through the LMS interface. 
A recent emerging trend in social media-based courses are 
massive open online courses
” 
(MOOCs). 
These are courses where both participants and course materials are distributed across the Internet. They 
are usually based on informal learning principles, relying heavily on social media. Learners participate at 
their own level of time and interest, and there is no cost. Universities are usually the sponsors of MOOCs. 
Rather than author and deliver original content, you may be able to leverage content or curriculum 
components that are already offered in an MOOC. For more information on MOOCs, see 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mooc.  
8.13.
Support for immersive learning technologies 
There is growing interest in developing learning for serious games and virtual worlds. Tools are now 
appearing to support developing learning experiences for these, although the authoring paradigms are 
very different in the sense that you are not authoring screens as in an eLearning course; you are creating 
3D environments that have particular interaction nodes, and, in the case of games, a narrative that drives 
the sequence of activities, as well as competitive and incentivizing elements such as rewards, points, and 
leaderboards.  
With these technologies, authors do not create course packages and learning objects that can be uploaded 
to and delivered from an LMS. They require special players and extensive server software to enable them. 
Most virtual worlds require development to take place inside the environment itself. Assets (3D objects) 
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Convert PDF to Jpeg images; More about PDF Conversion Page File & Page Process
split pdf by bookmark; how to bookmark a pdf file in acrobat
XDoc.Word for .NET, Advanced .NET Word Processing Features
Full page navigation, zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Convert Word to PDF; Convert Word to HTML5; Convert Word to File & Page Process
how to add bookmark in pdf; convert word pdf bookmarks
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 65 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
can usually be created inside or outside of the virtual world, but assembling the assets into a learning 
scenario requires tools and techniques within the platform. 
Most virtual world learning implementations involve synchronous learning exercises using live avatars. 
Asynchronous implementations are currently mostly just rendering of traditional 2D eLearning through a 
web browser either inside of the virtual world or in a daughter window of the virtual world application. 
This type of implementation can be created using traditional eLearning authoring tools. Asynchronous 
multiplayer implementations involve 
bots
” 
(scripted avatars that operate autonomously). These are 
slowly appearing in learning implementations, but are technically advanced to develop and implement. 
For synchronous learning experiences in virtual worlds and games, the authored 
course
” 
consists of three 
parts:  
1.  Building out the environment in which participants are to learn in. 
2.  Scripts for the avatars who take part in the learning exercise. 
3.  Assignments or challenges for the learner avatars. 
A combination of authoring tools is needed to create all three parts. These tools are usually platform-
specific, and offered only by the platform vendor. 
8.14.
Support for online assessment of performance tasks 
With the growth and acceptance of informal learning approaches, there has been a growing consensus 
among educators and trainers that assessment needs to focus more on observation of student target 
performance and products thereof. The trend is away from relying on traditional multiple choice tests, 
whose relationship to the target performance may be tenuous at best.  
Until recently, there was not much attention paid to designing special authoring software to create these 
types of assessments, since all this type of assessment really required was thoughtfully-prepared 
product/project assignments and evaluation rubrics. However, this area is starting to become 
systematized, formalized, and standardized via specialized authoring software, particularly in the K-12 
education arena. An example of this is the Acuity Performance Task System
®
(see 
http://thejournal.com/articles/2012/11/14/new-acuity-tool-tackles-online-assessment-of-performance-
tasks.aspx?m=1). 
These systems allow users to create and assign performance tasks that mimic the complexity of real-world 
situations and draw upon interdisciplinary knowledge. The tasks are instructional tools as well as 
assessment vehicles. Scoring can focus on overall product/project performance as well as individual tasks 
involved within a performance product/project. In K-12 education, these authoring tools include a library 
of common performance task scenarios in English, math, science, etc.  
8.15.
Support for semantic web/Web 3.0 technologies 
Tozman (2012) argues that both online and offline learning presented as a formal event that requires some 
form of attendance (i.e., away from one
s current tasks) is a dying breed. It is being replaced (rightly so, 
he says) by the just-in-time, just-in-place performance support paradigm. 
Tozman says that the advent of semantic web/Web 3.0 technology (as exemplified in web sites such as 
Wolfram/Alpha and Open Cyc) will revolutionize learning such that appropriate content and curricula 
will be generated on-the spot, in accordance with the performance needs of the user at the moment of 
need. Semantic web technologies will apply human-like reasoning and ontologies of meaning to directly 
answer factual questions and recommend the correct action or decision. Event-driven learning may not 
entirely disappear; it could remain as one of many performance support options.  
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc.
export bookmarks from pdf to excel; pdf bookmark editor
XDoc.PowerPoint for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
zooming & rotation; Outlines, bookmarks, & thumbnail Convert PowerPoint to PDF; Convert PowerPoint to HTML5; PowerPoint from existing PowerPoint file or stream
adding bookmarks to a pdf; copy pdf bookmarks
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 66 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
To sync up with this trend, he says, authoring tools will need to produce content in a form that is 
consistent with the evolution of web technologies like semantic web/Web 3.0. The content must be 
transparent and structured (for example, with XML) to allow semantic processing engines to understand 
its meaning and utility to learners. The authoring tool would not be designed to assign any specifics to the 
packaging and formatting of content at the outset; it would be designed to set up the rules for semantic 
web applications to package and format content. 
The authoring process will, he says, need to include creating taxonomies to help a computer understand 
the content, its context, and appropriate formats for display of it, and store this in a schema. It then needs 
to have the ability to create processing rules that dictate how to process content of a specific type into a 
defined format. 
8.16.
Authoring performance support applications 
Performance support application development is surging, especially for the mobile platform, due the 
“always
on, always with 
you”
nature. Although the instructional design process and end-use is different 
for performance support vs eLearning, there are no reasons why standard eLearning tools and techniques 
cannot be used to develop performance support. However, some of the differences between performance 
support tools and eLearning can drive emphasis of the following features when choosing an authoring 
tool: 
Robust search capability. This can include content stored locally in the application as well as 
repositories of web-based content. 
Lack of need for assessments, with the possible exception of self-assessments. 
Workflow, checklist, and timeline-based screen templates may be needed. Decision support trees 
may also be helpful. 
The ability to use the tool in either standalone disconnected or connected mode, if users will be in 
field environments where connectivity is absent. 
The ability to send usage data to a web service to enable stakeholders to easily evaluate tool 
effectiveness and diagnose performance gaps (where performance support tool emphasis may be 
needed). 
If your organization is involved in building performance support applications, you may want to limit your 
choice of authoring tools to those that robustly support these features. 
Currently, there are no authoring tools advertised or designed specifically for authoring performance 
support, although this may change due to the popularity of performance support in the workplace. 
8.17.
HTML5 format 
The Adobe Flash
®
format has dominated the interactive multimedia and eLearning landscape since 1996. 
It has been used to create countless media-rich, interactive Level 3 and Level 4 eLearning courses, as well 
as animations and videos appearing as media assets within a variety of learning objects. Many authoring 
tools output to Flash format simply because of its near unlimited ability, via its ActionScript scripting 
language, to handle extensive interactivity in Rich Internet Applications (RIAs). It has also been the 
format of choice for Internet videos (via .flv format). 
Flash has recently experienced a downturn in popularity and support, however, in favor of what is known 
as HTML5 (the combination of CSS3, HTML v.5, and JavaScript) for a variety of reasons: 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 67 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Apple has never supported Flash on its iOS mobile devices, and these devices (especially iPads, 
where rich media content is less constrained by a smaller screen) have become vastly more 
popular (including for mLearning). 
Performance and instability issues with Flash. 
Security issues with Flash that inherently limit the ability of a plug-in application-based web 
object (like Flash) to control and communicate with web pages and the browser (especially its 
parent web page). 
Usability issues with Flash in a browser context that, for instance, renders use of the Back and 
Forward buttons confusing. 
The steep learning curve to learn Adobe Flash authoring. Many programs simpler than Flash are 
available to create Flash objects, but to fully take advantage of its features, it is necessary to learn 
the Flash program. 
Adobe started going down a path of deprecating Flash in 2011, culminating with their withdrawal of 
support for Flash Mobile (for Android devices) in June 2012. 
HTML5 is now widely touted (and seemingly accepted by Adobe) as the replacement for Flash due to the 
fact that it is designed as the new native web authoring language. It is not a fully completed 
specification
it will probably remain in progress for a number of years
but browsers have nevertheless 
adopted many parts of the draft spec already. 
There are fundamental advantages to using a native web language (HTML) vs a plug-in application 
language, as follows: 
HTML content can more easily be made accessible to screen readers. 
There is no plug-in application that needs to be continuously updated. This can be a problem in 
managed IT environments where new versions must go through lengthy approval processes and 
users must rely on IT staff to upgrade their system. 
HTML content is far easier to edit. HTML only requires a text editor. In Flash, editing requires 
making changes to the source files in the source application. The output files (.swf) and the 
editing files (.fla) are different formats, and you cannot edit the output files in the Flash software. 
In HTML, there does not necessarily need to be a different source file format from the output file 
format; if you use a 
round trip
” 
WYSIWYG web page editor such as Dreamweaver
®
, you can 
reimport outputted files into the web page editor and edit them at any time. 
HTML is generally easier to hand code than a plug-in language like ActionScript (though this 
depends on how much JavaScript is used), reducing development costs. 
Security issues are lessened because the browser does not see HTML code as coming from a 
foreign
” 
application. 
It is difficult to configure plug-in content to be searchable by external search engines, whereas 
HTML code is always searchable by default. 
It is easier to translate native HTML code, or at least expose the contents of the web page to 
translation engines. 
In general, it is harder to create a seamless user experience when users navigate from the browser 
environment to the plug-in environment; the plug-in environment tends to be more functionally 
self-contained (it needs to be since the code base is different). 
Furthermore, there are particular advantages offered by HTML5 (vs earlier versions of HTML): 
Audio and video can be streamed natively in HTML5. 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 68 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Programmers have new structural elements in HTML5 that allow code to be more efficiently 
organized, as well as features that improve interoperability. 
Validation of user input in forms is a built-in feature. 
Bandwidth-efficient vector graphics (via SVG format) are natively supported. 
HTML5 allows local data storage, which can be accessed to support the web application. 
Drag and drop interactions are natively supported. 
Geolocation features of a mobile device can be leveraged. 
Perhaps the biggest advantage of HTML5 to eLearning is that it allows 
responsive design
” 
for mobile 
devices, meaning that the content is dynamically resized based on the size of the browser window. Add to 
this the fact that it is supported by iOS, and it is clearly the best strategy for delivering eLearning to many 
mobile audiences. 
Should you look for an authoring tool that outputs HTML5? It depends on your audience. If you are 
delivering eLearning to users outside of your organization (i.e., you cannot easily baseline the browsers 
that will be used), you may want to err on the conservative side and skip it for now, since users may not 
have a browser that can handle it (or certain parts of the spec at least). But the day is fast approaching 
when browsers will support it fully in its current draft state. 
For further information on the impact of HTML5 on eLearning and how to make the decision as to 
whether to adopt it as your eLearning format (and consequently choose an authoring tool to support it), 
see the Elearning Guild report on HTML5 at 
http://www.elearningguild.com/content.cfm?selection=doc.2574
As of this writing there are very few authoring tools that support output to HTML5. The ones that do may 
not offer all of the features and advantages of HTML5 that are implemented by browsers. Check with a 
vendor to specifically identify which features of HTML5 are supported and which are not before you 
purchase a tool that advertises the ability to output in HTML5 format. The following is a preliminary list 
of authoring tools that support HTML5 from Ganci (2013): 
Adobe Captivate 7 
Articulate Storyline 1, Update 3 
Composica Enterprise 6 
Claro 
iSpring Suite 
Landmark Liquid 
Lectora Inspire 11.1 
ReadyGo 
SmartBuilder 
8.18.
Interactive video 
Interactive video is quickly becoming a mainstream type of content object for learning applications. It 
leverages the popularity of video as an effective medium for learning by adding interactivity to the video. 
The idea of associating menus, links, and (semitransparent or opaque) buttons/hotspots with a video has 
always been possible within web pages that launch videos. However, in interactive video, the navigation 
controls are superimposed over areas of the video itself while it is running, appearing at strategic points, 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 69 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
rather than placed around the video on the web page. The navigation controls can navigate to other related 
video clips (including other interactive videos), other types of content (such as PDFs), or web sites. 
Forms, text entry fields, and assessments can also be overlaid on the video.  
Interactive video provides a seamless, immersive experience for the user and makes 
choose your own 
adventure
” 
adaptive learning scenarios, as well as 
drill down
” 
options for more detailed or relevant 
information, more user friendly. It also makes tracking the user
s interactions with the video easier. 
Interactive video usually connotes use on mobile devices, since that is the main platform for videos for 
learning currently. One especially compelling implementation for mobile is to superimpose semi-
transparent hot spots that allow such things as scrubbing quickly forwards or backwards through the 
video, as a convenience for 
fat finger
” 
mobile phone navigation (via thumbs, etc.), rather than traditional 
small buttons in the interface. 
8.19.
Crowd sourced authoring systems 
Crowd-sourced authoring systems are emerging (for example, Oppia
®
) that gather and compile data on 
how learners interact with it, making it easy for authors to spot and fix shortcomings in a lesson. These 
systems identify responses that learners are giving to questions that the system is not responding to 
adequately, allowing authors to create a new learning path for it based on what they would actually say if 
they were interacting in-person with the learner. This allows the system to accumulate the collective 
wisdom of course authors and incrementally improve the learning.  
Systems have been available for some time now in which interaction widgets can be uploaded and made 
available to the community of authors using that tool (for example, ZebraZapps
®
). The crowd sourcing 
referred to here is different in that it deals with the pedagogical aspect of the content, rather than the 
technical mechanics of rendering it.
9.
For more information about authoring tools 
Bersin & Associates 
www.bersin.com 
This company offers a variety of reports on aspects of eLearning, including authoring tools. 
Brandon Hall Group 
http://www.brandon-hall.com 
This company sells research reports containing trends and profiles of authoring tool products, a 
selection utility, and a comparison utility. 
Centre for Learning and Performance Technologies. Directory of Learning Tools. 
http://c4lpt.co.uk/directory-of-learning-performance-tools/instructional-tools/ 
This web site contains a detailed list of available authoring tools, with abstracts describing each. 
ELearning Centre (UK).  
http://www.e-learningcentre.co.uk/eclipse/vendors/authoring.htm. 
Web site that contains a detailed list of available authoring tools with abstracts describing each. 
ELearning Guild 
http://www.elearningguild.com 
This trade association offers buyer
s guides and trend reports on authoring tools and other aspects 
of eLearning. 
Choosing Authoring Tools 
ADL Instructional Design Team
Choosing Authoring Tools.docx 
page 70 of 74 
© 2009 CC: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0
Fenrich, P. (2005). Creating Instructional Multimedia Solutions: Practical Guidelines for the Real 
World. Santa Rosa, CA:  Informing Science Institute.  
This book contains a chapter about comparing, contrasting, and evaluating authoring tools. 
TRADOC Capability Manager for the Army Distributed Learning Program (TCM-TADLP) 
http://www.atsc.army.mil/tadlp/index.asp.  
This web site contains comprehensive information for anyone involved in designing and 
developing technology-based training for the U.S. Army. 
Training & Education Developer Toolbox (TED-T) 
https://atn.army.mil/TreeViewCStab.aspx?loadTierID=2904&docID=35.  
This site is not an authoring tool itself, but has helpful technical information for U.S. DoD 
developers. It is available to U.S. DoD users only. It requires a Common Access Card (CAC) to 
log in since it is on the Army Training Network (ATN). 
Trainer
s Guide to Authoring Tools (Training Media Review) 
http://www.tmreview.com/ResearchReports/ .  
Contains ratings of tools. 
10.
References cited in this paper 
Allen, M. (2012). Michael Allen
s ELearning Annual 2012. San Francisco: Pfeiffer Publishing. 
Haag, J. (2011). ADL Mobile Learning Workshop 29 Aug 2011. (presentation slides) 
Lee, C.S. (2014). Why Responsive Design? Elearning Magazine  July/August 2014. 6(2), 40. 
Retrieved 12/17/14 from http://gelmezine.epubxp.com/i/350882/40
Quinn (2011). Designing mLearning. San Francisco: Pfeiffer Publishing. 
Shank, P., & Ganci, J. (2013). eLearning Authoring Tools 2013: What We
re Using, What We 
Want (eLearning Guild Survey Report 2013). Available at 
http://www.elearningguild.com/research/archives/index.cfm?id=170&action=viewonly&from=ho
me 
Tozman, R. (2012). Why ELearning Must Change: A Call to End Rapid Development
In M. 
Allen (Ed.) Michael  Allen
s ELearning Annual 2012. San Francisco: Pfeiffer Publishing. 
Udell (2012). Learning Everywhere.  Nashville: Rockbench Publishing. 
Weigers (2000). Karl Wiegers Describes 10 Requirements Traps to Avoid. Web article retrieved 
12/16/14 from http://processimpact.com/articles/reqtraps.html 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested