c# parse pdf content : Google search pdf metadata software Library cloud windows asp.net web page class SpatialEcologyGME7-part102

There is an option to only keep the vector cells that overlap with the features in another
layer. This can be particularly useful for generating sampling grids where sample plots are
only needed/allowed in places wherethere is something tosample. Notethat using this option
can result in considerably longer processing times, especially if there are large numbers of
features in the layer you specify for the overlap test.
The snap option forces the spatial position of the grid to be aligned with the underlying
coordinate system. For instance, specifying snap=1000 would force the vector grid lines to
be aligned with the exact 1km positions in a UTM grid.
The line geometry option results in what are eectively graticule lines. The point geom-
etry option generates a grid of points, with the additional option that alternate rows can be
oset (resulting in a honeycomb pattern rather than a chessboard pattern).
Syntax
genvecgrid(extent, dim, out, [geometry], [snap], [testoverlap], [oset]);
extent
the reference layer that denes the extent of the vector grid, or a set of
four values that dene the extent (min x, max x, min y, max y)
dim
the dimensions of each vector grid cell (either a single value representing
thecell width and height, or two values representing the width and height
respectively if they are not the same dimension)
out
the output feature data source
[geometry]
the type of output geometry (default=POLYGON, options: POINT,
LINE, POLYGON)
[snap]
avalue > 0; controls whether the vector grid is aligned with a major
coordinate system interval (supplying a value of 1000 will result in the
grid being aligned to the 1000-mark intervals of the coordinate system);
default=0 (no snap)
[testoverlap] only vector grid cells that overlap features in this feature data source will
be retained
[oset]
(TRUE/FALSE; only applies to the geometry="POINT" option) osets
alternate rows of points by half of the x spacing (default=FALSE)"
Example
genvecgrid(extent=c(100000, 220000, 2000000, 2300000), dim=c(1000, 2000),
out="myoutput.shp");
genvecgrid(extent="C:ndatanreferencelayer.shp", dim=1000, out="myoutput.shp",
geometry="LINE", snap=100, testoverlap="C:ndatanroads.shp");
genvecgrid(extent="C:ndatanlocs.shp", dim=c(0.05,0.1), out="myoutput.shp", snap=0.1,
usesel=TRUE, testoverlap="C:ndatanrivers.shp");
genvecgrid(extent="C:ndatancounty.shp", dim=1000, out="pntgrid.shp",
geometry="POINT", oset=TRUE);
71
Google search pdf metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
remove metadata from pdf online; extract pdf metadata
Google search pdf metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
pdf remove metadata; edit pdf metadata
3.50 geom.clip
Clip Geometries: Clips the geometry of the input feature data source to polygons in the
clip feature data source.
Description
This tool clips the features in the input feature data source to the polygons in the clip feature
data source. All attribute data in the input table is copied to the output table.
The ’where’ clause can be used to dene a subset of polygon clip features to use. See the
’where’ section for further details on how to formulate a where clause.
Syntax
geom.clip(in, clip, out, [where]);
in
the input feature data source
clip
the input polygon data source that is used to clip the input feature data
source
out
the output feature data source
[where] the selection statement that will be applied to the clip polygon feature
data source to identify a subset of polygons to process (see full Help
documentation for further details)
Example
geom.clip(in="C:ndatanstands.shp", clip="C:ndatanplots.shp",
out="C:ndatanstandsclipped.shp");
geom.clip(in="C:ndatanstands.shp", clip="C:ndatanplots.shp",
out="C:ndatanstandsclipped.shp", where="YEAR=2010");
3.51 geom.dierence
Dierence Between Geometries: Calculates the geometric dierence between the input
features and the polygons in a clip feature data source.
Description
This tool calculates the geometric dierence of the features in the input feature data source
to the polygons in the clip feature data source. All attribute data in the input table is copied
to the output table. The geometric dierence retains the feature data that is outside of the
clip polygon boundaries, and is thus the opposite of the clip command.
This tool modies the source data, and is therefore dangerous if not applied with caution.
It is advised that you use the copyfeaturedataset command to make a backup of your input
feature data source before using this command. As a safety precaution, you must set the
72
C# PDF url edit Library: insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.
Help to extract and search url in PDF file. Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; // Open a PDF file. String uri = @"http://www.google.com"; // Create the
read pdf metadata; edit multiple pdf metadata
VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
Extract and search url in existing PDF file in VB Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" ' Open a PDF file. Dim uri As String = "http://www.google.com" ' Create
clean pdf metadata; acrobat pdf additional metadata
modifysource command option to TRUE to run this command. If you do not explicitly set
this option then the command will not run.
By default the tool will write multipart geometries as output. However, if you specify
the singlepart=TRUE option then any multipart geometries will be split into singlepart
geometries and written back to the input data source as separate records.
The ’where’ clause can be used to dene a subset of polygon clip features to use. See the
’where’ section for further details on how to formulate a where clause.
Syntax
geom.dierence(in, clip, modifysource, [singlepart], [where]);
in
the input feature data source (WARNING: the input data source is mod-
ied; use copyfeaturedatasource rst if you need to preserve the original)
clip
the input polygon data source that is used to clip the input feature data
source
modifysource (TRUE/FALSE; default=FALSE) a safety measure that forces you to
explicitly authorize the source input data to be modied (the command
does not run if set to false)
[singlepart]
(TRUE/FALSE; default=FALSE) if TRUE, forces the output geometries
to be singlepart geometries
[where]
the selection statement that will be applied to the clip polygon feature
data source to identify a subset of polygons to process (see full Help
documentation for further details)
Example
geom.dierence(in="C:ndatanelds.shp", clip="C:ndatanplots.shp", modifysource=TRUE);
geom.dierence(in="C:ndatanelds.shp", clip="C:ndatanplots.shp", modifysource=TRUE,
singlepart=TRUE, where="YEAR=2010");
3.52 geom.extractpolygoncomponents
Extract Polygon Components: Extracts the exterior or interior components of polygons
containing holes.
Description
This tool allows you to create a new polygon layer consisting of only the exterior or interior
components of the input polygons. Thus, it is only usefully applied to polygons containing
’holes’ when you either want the outer edges of the polygon without preserving the holes, or
you want to convert the holes to new polygons.
The ’where’ clause can be used to dene a subset of polygons to process. See the ’where’
section for further details on how to formulate a where clause.
73
DocImage SDK for .NET: Document Imaging Features
of case-sensitive and whole-word-only search options. 6 (OJPEG) encoding Image only PDF encoding support. devices OCR Add-on: Support Google baseed Tesseract OCR
adding metadata to pdf; remove metadata from pdf acrobat
Syntax
geom.extractpolygoncomponents(in, out, extract, [copyelds], [where]);
in
the input polygon data source
out
the output polygon feature data source
extract
the keyword dening what components toextract (options: EXTERIOR,
INTERIOR)
[copyelds] (TRUE/FALSE): if TRUE the elds in the input attribute table are
copied to the output attribute table (default=FALSE)
[where]
the selection statement that will be applied tothe line feature datasource
to identify a subset of lines to process (see full Help documentation for
further details)
Example
geom.extractpolygoncomponents(in="C:ndatanlakes.shp", out="C:ndatanshore.shp",
extract="EXTERIOR");
geom.extractpolygoncomponents(in="C:ndatanlakes.shp", out="C:ndatanislands.shp",
extract="INTERIOR", copyelds=TRUE, where="AREA > 10000");
3.53 geom.polygonfetch
Calculate Fetch In Polygons: Determines the longest line that can be position within the
bounds of a polygon, crossing no edges.
Description
This tool estimates the longest straight line that can be positioned within a polygon, without
crossing any edges. It corresponds to the ’fetch’ of a lake: the longest stretch of water over
which waves can build up as a function of wind action. The calculation is based on evaluating
the lines created by connecting all pairs ofnon-neighbouring vertices and retaining thelongest
line that does not cross any interior or exterior boundaries of the polygons. This is a brute
force algorithm that can take a long time for very complex polygons (e.g. polygons with
more than 1000 vertices).
The ’where’ clause can be used to dene a subset of polygons to process. See the ’where’
section for further details on how to formulate a where clause.
Syntax
geom.polygonfetch(in, uideld, out, [where]);
in
the input polygon data source
uideld the unique ID eld of the input feature data source
out
the output line data source
[where] the selection statement that will be applied to the line feature data source
to identify a subset of lines to process (see full Help documentation for
further details)
74
Example
geom.polygonfetch(in="C:ndatanlakes.shp", out="C:ndatanfetch.shp",
uideld="LAKEID");
geom.polygonfetch(in="C:ndatanlakes.shp", out="C:ndatanfetch.shp",
uideld="LAKEID", where="AREA > 10000");
3.54 geom.splitpolysbylines
Split Polygons By Lines: Splits input polygons using lines.
Description
This tool splits the polygon features in the input data source based on the lines in another
feature data source. All attribute data in the input table is copied to the output table. If an
input polygon is not intersected by any lines, it is written to the output data source without
modication. If a split results in multiple polygon fragments, each fragment is written as a
new records in the output data source.
The ’where’ clause can be used to dene a subset of line features to use to split polygons.
See the ’where’ section for further details on how to formulate a where clause.
Syntax
geom.splitpolysbylines(in, line, out, [singlepart], [where]);
in
the input polygon data source
line
the input line data source that is used to split the input polygons
out
the output polygon feature data source
[singlepart] (TRUE/FALSE; default=FALSE) ifTRUE, forces the output geometries
to be singlepart geometries
[where]
the selection statement thatwill beapplied tothe line feature data source
to identify a subset of lines to process (see full Help documentation for
further details)
Example
geom.splitpolysbylines(in="C:ndatanplots.shp", line="C:ndatanroads.shp",
out="C:ndatansplitplots.shp");
geom.splitpolysbylines(in="C:ndatanplots.shp", line="C:ndatanroads.shp",
out="C:ndatansplitplots.shp", where="TYPE=’HWY’");
3.55 graph.createfrompoints
Generate Spatial Graph From Points: Creates a spatial graph by connecting points
based on a distance threshold, and exports node and edge data that can be imported into R.
75
Description
This tool converts a point dataset representing graph nodes to a spatial graph by connecting
nodes automatically using a distance threshold. The edges are output as a line feature
dataset, and the nodes and edges are export as two delimited text les that can be easily
read into R. The unique point ID eld is preserved in the exported node data so that the
connection with the original point data can be preserved. An optional node wieght eld can
also be specied, which results in an extra column of data being written to the export le.
The graph can be created in R using the igraph library as follows.
setwd(”C:nngmennmygraphdata”)
require(igraph)
edata <- read.csv(”exportedges.csv”)
ndata <- read.csv(”exportnodes.csv”)
graph1 <- graph.data.frame(edata[,-1], directed=FALSE, vertices=NULL)
Syntax
graph.createfrompoints(in, uideld, distance, outline, exportnode, exportedge, [nodeweight-
eld], [where]);
in
the input point data source that represents graph nodes
uideld
the unique feature ID eld for the input data source
distance
the threshold distance for connecting nodes
outline
the output line feature data source
exportnode
the graph node export csv le
exportedge
the graph edge export csv le
[nodeweighteld] a eld name containing node weights to be included in the export le)
[where]
the selection statement that will be applied to the input feature data
source to identify a subset of features to process (see full Help documen-
tation for further details)
Example
graph.createfrompoints(in="C:ndatanpoints.shp", uideld="PNTID",
outline="C:ndatangraphedges.shp", exportnode="C:ndatanexportnodes.csv",
exportedge="C:ndatanexportedges.shp");
graph.createfrompoints(in="C:ndatanpatchpolygons.shp", uideld="PATCHID",
outline="C:ndatangraphedges.shp", exportnode="C:ndatanexportnodes.csv",
exportedge="C:ndatanexportedges.shp", nodeweighteld="POPULATION",
where="POPULATION > 0");
3.56 graph.createfrompolygons
Generate Spatial Graph From Polygons: Creates a spatial graph by connecting poly-
gons based on a distance threshold, and exports node and edge data that can be imported
76
into R.
Description
This tool creates a spatial graph based on discontinuous (non-touching) polygons. (To create
agraph based on polygon adjacency see the calc.sharedborders command.) To create the
nodes a single point is generated to represent each polygon using either the centroid or label
point methods (see the genpointinpoly command for a description of these terms). Nodes
are connected if the shortest distance between the polygons they represent is no larger than
the distance threshold specied. The command generates two types of edge outputs: the
straight lines connecting the node points, and the lines (links) representing the shortest
distance between polygons. The length of both edges and links is written to both attribute
tables, and the edge export le.
Nodes and edges are export as two delimited text les that can be easily read into R. The
unique point ID eld is preserved in the exported node data so that the connection with the
original point data can be preserved. An optional node wieght eld can also be specied,
which results in an extra column of data being written to the export le.
The graph can be created in R using the igraph library as follows.
setwd(”C:nngmennmygraphdata”)
require(igraph)
edata <- read.csv(”exportedges.csv”)
ndata <- read.csv(”exportnodes.csv”)
graph1 <- graph.data.frame(edata[,-1], directed=FALSE, vertices=NULL)
Syntax
graph.createfrompolygons(in, uideld, distance, outline, outpoint, outlink, exportnode, ex-
portedge, [nodeweighteld], [centroid], [where]);
in
the input polygon data source that represents graph nodes
uideld
the unique feature ID eld for the input data source
distance
the threshold distance for connecting nodes
outline
the output line feature data source
outpoint
the output point (node) feature data source
outlink
the output link (line) feature data source
exportnode
the graph node export csv le
exportedge
the graph edge export csv le
[nodeweighteld] a eld name containing node weights to be included in the export le)
[centroid]
(TRUE/FALSE) if TRUE uses the centroid point of the polygon for the
node, if FALSE uses the label point)
[where]
the selection statement that will be applied to the input feature data
source to identify a subset of features to process (see full Help documen-
tation for further details)
77
Example
graph.createfrompolygons(in="C:ndatanpoints.shp", uideld="PNTID",
outline="C:ndatangraphedges.shp", outlink="C:ndatangraphlinks.shp",
exportnode="C:ndatanexportnodes.csv", exportedge="C:ndatanexportedges.shp");
graph.createfrompolygons(in="C:ndatanpatchpolygons.shp", uideld="PATCHID",
outline="C:ndatangraphedges.shp", outlink="C:ndatangraphlinks.shp",
exportnode="C:ndatanexportnodes.csv", exportedge="C:ndatanexportedges.shp",
nodeweighteld="AREA", where="POPULATION > 0");
3.57 import.asciigrid
Import Raster From ASCII Grid: Imports an ASCII grid le to a binary raster format
(GRID, TIFF, IMG).
Description
This tool imports an ASCII grid le to a binary raster format (Grid, GeoTIFF, or Imagine
Image format). The ASCII raster le must conform to certain standards, although the tool
does allow some  exibility in the specication of the header information.
ASCII raster les begin with 5 or 6 lines of header information that determine the extent
and orientation of the raster. For example:
ncols 43200
nrows 18000
xllcorner -180
yllcorner -60
cellsize 0.0083333337679505
NODATA
value -9999
-9999 -9999 ...
The Nodata line is optional, although it is wise to specify it to prevent default values
from being used that may con ict with your data. The header lines can also be specied
with each line bracketed within <...>, e.g. <ncols 43200>. White space (spaces, tabs) on
the header lines should not in uence the ability of the tool to extract the header data.
To determine if your ASCII le meets the appropriate formatting criteria, you can open
the ASCII grid le in a text editor (e.g. Notepad++) if it is small enough (no more than a
few megabytes usually). For larger les the GME le.readlines command is an easy way of
viewing the header. E.g.:
le.readlines(le="C:ndatanclimate.asc", start=1, end=6);
You must specify the appropriate output raster pixel type. The options are double pre-
cision (range: any real number), long integer (range: +/- 2.1 billion), short integer (range:
+/- 32768), or byte (range: 0-255). You should be able to determine the appropriate pixel
type from the metadata associated with the ASCII grid le. Failing that, you can inspect
the le to attempt to determine the range. Again, the GME le.readlines command is useful
for inspecting small portions of even very large les. E.g.:
78
le.readlines(le="C:ndatanclimate.asc", start=5000, end=5001);
Note that you will usually only want to inspect one line at a time using this command (each
line contains a lot of data). If the output type is DOUBLE, then you must specify the output
as a IMG format raster.
Ideally, you should select the smallest output pixel data type for your date (byte < short
<long < double in terms of the number of bytes of storage space required to store a single
value. Although double is the most  exible format in that it can store almost any number,
it also requires several times more disk space than the other types.
The projection information for the data must also be provided. You need to reference an
ESRI .prj le. You can either reference an prj le from a dataset you know to be in the same
projection, or copy the appropriate prj le from the
C:nProgram FilesnArcGISnDesktop10.0nCoordinate Systems
folder. It is useful to copy the le locally to the same folder as the grid les. See the
Projection Denition File section for more details on working with and creating projection
les.
Syntax
import.asciigrid(in, prj, out, type, [delimiter]);
in
the input ASCII grid le
prj
the le containing the projection data of the input raster
out
the output raster, including the extension in the case of an IMG or TIF
formats
type
the output raster pixel data type (options: DOUBLE, LONG, SHORT,
CHAR)
[delimiter] the delimiting character(s) - normally one of these keywords: SPACE
(default), COMMA, TAB, SEMICOLON, or COLON (see full help doc-
umentation for further details)
Example
import.asciigrid(in="C:ndatanclimate.asc", prj="C:ndatanWGS 1984.prj",
out="C:ndatanclimate.img", type="LONG");
3.58 import.hadisst
Import Raster From HADISST: Imports seas surface temperature rasters from HDF
format to an ArcGIS supported raster format.
Description
This is a highly specialised tool that imports seas surface temperature rasters from HDF
format to a raster format that is supported by ArcGIS. This website describes the dataset
this tool is targeted at: http://badc.nerc.ac.uk/data/hadisst.
79
To use this tool you should download all of the monthly global datasets you are interested
in (that may be several hundred) into a single folder. This tool will process all of the HDF
les it nds in the specied folder, import the data to grid format, georeference the rasters,
and build the statistics on each raster so that they display correctly.
Syntax
import.hadisst(in, out);
in
the input folder containing the HadiSST HDF les
out the output folder forthe imported rasters (anew, empty folder isstrongly
recommended)
Example
import.hadisst(in="C:ndatanhadisst", out="C:ndatanimported");
3.59 isectfeatures
Intersect Features: Calculates intersections between geometries (points, lines or polygons).
Description
This tool calculates intersections between geometries (points, lines or polygons). If you
specify a single input feature data source, then it calculates intersections between geometries
within that dataset. If you specify two input datasets then the tool calculates intersections
between each feature in the rst dataset with the features in the second dataset.
The ’dimension’ option allows you to control the dimension of the geometry returned: 0
refers to points, 1 refers to lines, and 2 refers to polygons. An intersection between points
and any other geometry can only result in point geometries. Lines intersecting with lines can
return either point geometries (where two lines cross), or line geometries (where two lines
overlap exactly for a non-zero distance). Polygons intersecting with lines can result in either
points (where the boundary of the polygon overlaps with the lines) or lines (the portion of
the line that is contained by the polygon). And polygons intersecting with polygons can
result in polygons (where the two polygons overlap) or points (there the boundaries of the
polygons cross).
The output layer will contain the unique ID numbers of each of the geometries that were
used to calculate the intersections, hence the need to specify a unique ID eld for the input
data sources. This means that you can join the attributes of the original tables to the output
of this tool if you need to.
For within-layer intersections, the tool will only calculate an intersection once. If a layers
has two features, A and B, the tool will start by calculating the intersection between A and B,
but will then not calculate the intersection between B and A as this would create duplication
in the output layer.
80
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested