be aware of how the bandwidth is represented when comparing the output from dierent
software packages.
Thecommand also implements several bandwidth estimation algorithms in the ’ks’ library
in R, which will estimate an optimized bandwidth matrix for you. The algorithms avail-
able are the plug-in estimator (bandwidth="PLUGIN"), smoothed cross validation (band-
width="SCV"), biased cross-validation (bandwidth="BCV"), a second BCV algorithm(band-
width="BCV2"), and least squares cross validation (bandwidth="LSCV"). Note that there
can be large dierences among the dierent bandwidth estimators, so it is recommended
that you try several of them in order to determine which is most biologically relevant to
your data and question. I have found the plug-in and SCV algorithms seem to perform very
well. Processing times may be long with large numbers of points (thousands). Note also that
some algorithms (e.g. LSCV) are sensitive to points with identical coordinates. You might
consider adding a small amount of random noise to your points in R if this is an issue with
your dataset. The bandwidths are calculated using the default settings for these estimators
in the ks library in R.
If the kernel is the quartic approximation to the bivariate normal distribution, then you
only specify a single value that represents the radius beyond which the density estimate for
the kernel is 0. Thus, the quartic kernel bandwidth parameters corresponds to a real distance
on the ground, unlike the bandwidth for the bivariate normal kernel which is a covariance
matrix. Thus, these two bandwidths do not directly map. You cannot, for instance, estimate
the optimal bandwidth using a bivariate normal kernel algorithm (like least squared cross
validation) and then use it in a quartic kernel calculation: the optimal bandwidth for the
quartic kernel will be very dierent.
The uniform kernel corresponds to what is also sometimes referred to as ’simple density’.
The bandwidth represents the radius of a circle within which points are counted around each
cell. The density value is simply n / pi*h
2
,where n is the nunmber of points in the circle.
It takes some experience to learn what suitable cell size values are. A cell size that is
too large will result in a ’blocky’ output raster that is a poor statistical approximation to a
continuous surface. A cell size that is too small will result in a very large output raster (many
cells) that takes a long time to calculate. I suggest the following rule of thumb to calculate
a reasonable bandwidth: take the square root of the x or y variance value (whichever is
smaller) and divide by 5 or 10 (I usually round to the nearest big number - so 36.7 becomes
40). Before using this rule of thumb value calculate how many cells this will result in for the
output (take the width and height of you input points, divide by the cell size, and multiply
the resulting numbers together). If you get a value somewhere between 1-20 million, then you
have a reasonable value. If you have a value much larger then 20 million cells then consider
increasing the cell size.
Ascaling factor is often used in KDE calculations to prevent a loss of precision in density
values. Point density values are often very small numbers, and some raster formats do not
support double-precision values (the Imagine img format is the only format that does, and
for that reason I recommend it as the format for the output raster). The scaling factor is
just a value that the point density values are multiplied to make them larger. The default is
1000000. Again, scaling factors may vary between software packages and this is something
that must be considered when making comparisons.
91
Pdf remove metadata - add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata
get pdf metadata; pdf xmp metadata editor
Pdf remove metadata - VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata
analyze pdf metadata; change pdf metadata creation date
Weights can be optionally specied for each point via a eld in the attribute table. The
kernel based on each point is weighted by the value in this eld, and the density estimates
are standardized by dividing by the sum of the weight values. Thus, you do not need to
standardize the weights yourself. By default (when no weight eld is specied) all points are
weighted equally.
By default the output extent is automatically calculated as the extent of the input point
datasetplus asuitable buer distance that ensures the density surface is notunduly truncated
at the edges. However, you may override this extent using the ’ext’ option which requires
that you specify either a reference geospatial layer (vector or raster dataset), or the minimum
x, maximum x, minimum y, and maximum y coordinates of the desired extent.
Syntax
kde(in, out, bandwidth, cellsize, [weighteld], [scalingfactor], [kernel], [ext], [edgein ation],
[where]);
in
the input point data source
out
the output raster data source
bandwidth
the bandwidth (see the help documentation for details); bandwidth esti-
mators include: SCV, BCV, BCV2, PLUGIN, LSCV, CVh
cellsize
the cell size dimension of the output raster
[weighteld]
the name of a eld in the input table that contains the weighting value
for each point (the default is no eld and equal weighting of all points)
[scalingfactor] multiplies densities by this value - see help for details (default=1000000)
[kernel]
kernel type (default=GAUSSIAN; options: GAUSSIAN, QUARTIC,
UNIFORM)
[ext]
the input reference data source (vector or raster dataset), or coordinates,
that denes the analysis extent
[edgein ation] the extra distance to add to each side of the output raster extent when
determining raster dimensions (default=0)
[where]
the selection statement that will be applied to the feature data source to
identify a subset of features to process (see full Help documentation for
further details)
Example
kde(in="C:ndatanlocs.shp", out="C:ndatankdeloc1.img", bandwidth=c(10000,10000,0),
cellsize=20);
kde(in="C:ndatanlocs.shp", out="C:ndatankdeloc2", bandwidth=10000, cellsize=20,
weighteld="WEIGHTS");
kde(in="C:ndatanlocs.shp", out="C:ndatankdeloc3", bandwidth=40000, cellsize=20,
kernel="UNIFORM");
kde(in="C:ndatanlocs.shp", out="C:ndatankdeloc4.tif", bandwidth=500, cellsize=50,
kernel="QUARTIC", edgein ation=200);
92
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
pdf metadata editor online; read pdf metadata java
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to remove consecutive pages from PDF file in VB.NET. Enable
batch pdf metadata editor; google search pdf metadata
3.68 kmeans
K-means Classication: Performs k-means clustering on a set of elds in a feature data
source table.
Description
This tool performs k-means clustering on a set of elds in a feature data source table (e.g.
apoint attribute table). K-means clustering is a statistical method of grouping data. The
user species the number of groups and the elds that contain the relevant data, and the
algorithm groups similar records into each of those groups. You can specify any number of
elds to be used in the clustering process. Although this is not a spatial algorithm, you
can supply spatial data to the algorithm. For instance, given a point data set the x and y
coordinates of the points could be supplied to the algorithm and the result would be spatial
groupings of locations.
It is a stochastic process so may not yield exactly the same results each time you run it
unless there are clear and obvious groupings in your data that correspond to the number of
groups you have identied. The stochasticity arises because the initial ’centres’ of each of the
clusters are generated randomly in n-dimensional space. The ’iters’ parameter corresponds
to the ’iters.max’ parameter in the R kmeans command, and controls the maximum number
of iterations that are attempted when searching for a better model.
The output comma delimited text le this command creates contains the summary of the
statistical output of the tool: the number of records in each group, the within group sums of
squares, and the coordinates of the centres of the clusters in n-dimensional space.
For further information on the R kmeans command, type ’? kmeans’ at the R prompt,
and press Enter.
This command is driven by R. Type ’citation’ to see the suggested citation for R.
Syntax
kmeans(in, k,  ds, out d, [iters], [outle], [where]);
in
the input feature data source
k
the number of groups into which the data is partitioned
ds
alist of the numerical elds that the algorithm is based on
out d
the output eld that will contain the group membership ID numbers
[iters]
the maximum number of iterations allowed
[outle] if specied the cluster size and within group sums of squares are written
to this delimited text le
[where] the selection statement that will be applied to the feature data source to
identify a subset of features to process (see full Help documentation for
further details)
93
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
console application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability to remove a range of pages from PDF file. Free trial package
embed metadata in pdf; pdf xmp metadata viewer
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Remove.pdf"; // Remove password in the input file and output to a new file. int
c# read pdf metadata; pdf metadata viewer online
Example
kmeans(in="C:ndatanplots.shp", k=10,  ds=c("X","Y","NDVI","Slope"),
out d="CLUSTER");
kmeans(in="C:ndatanmypoints.shp", k=100,  ds=c("X","Y"), out d="CLUSTER",
iters=100, outle="C:ndatankmeansdata.csv");
3.69 licensestatus
License Status: Reports the current availability and product level ofESRI ArcGIS licenses.
Description
This command reports the current availability and product level of ESRI ArcGIS licenses
on your system. GME only requires an ArcView license, but will search for any license
that is available on a users system in this order: ArcView, ArcEditor, ArcInfo, ArcServer,
ArcEngine. It will use the rst one from this list that is available. If none are available then
you will not be able to run GME.
Ido not know whether GME will run with an ArcServer or ArcEngine license (I suspect
not). But I have no means of testing this and it seemed prudent to at least try in the code.
Iwould be interested in hearing from you if you can test this.
Syntax
licensestatus);
Example
licensestatus
3.70 lineofsight2d
Line Of Sight (2D): Generates polygons representing visible areas from source viewpoints
given a polygon barrier dataset.
Description
This tool denes the area that is visible from a source point given a set of barriers (polygons)
that block the line of sight. The outer limits of the visible area are dened by a radius
the user species. If multiple viewpoints are specied, then the output can be specied as
independent polygons, the union of these polygons, or the intersection of these polygons.
This facilitates answering questions such as ’What area can be seen from any viewpoint?’
and ’What area can be seen from all viewpoints simultaneously?’.
94
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
Ability to remove and delete bookmark and outline from PDF document. Merge and split PDF file with bookmark. Save PDF file with bookmark open.
rename pdf files from metadata; view pdf metadata in explorer
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete
adding metadata to pdf; pdf metadata reader
This is a two dimensional vector model of visibility in contrast to the three dimensional
raster DEM based model of visibility. There are advantages and disadvantages to both
approaches. The advantage of this 2D vector model is that it may be more precise (often
the horizontal extent of objects is mapped more precisely than the vertical dimension). The
disadvantage is that it does not account for elevation, rather it assumes that all barriers block
visibility.
Syntax
lineofsight2d(poly, radius, out, [pnt], [source], [independent], [union], [intersect], [where]);
poly
the barrier polygon data source
radius
the maximum radius around source points out to which the visibility
polygons is calculated
out
the output polygon data source
[pnt]
input point data source representing the locations from which visibility
polygons are calculated (see the ’source’ option as an alternative to this
parameter)
[source]
the coordinates of the location from which the visibility polygon is cal-
culated specied using the c(x, y) syntax (see the ’pnt’ for an alternative
way of specifying this location
[independent] (TRUE/FALSE) if true, one polygon is produced for each input point
regardless (polygons are independent of one another and may overlap)
(default=TRUE)
[union]
(TRUE/FALSE) if true, one polygon is produced as output by unioning
all the visibility polygons, thereby representing all areas that can be seen
from at least one source point (default=FALSE)
[intersect]
(TRUE/FALSE) if true, one polygon is produced as output by intersect-
ing all the visibility polygons, thereby representing the areas that can be
seen from all source points (default=FALSE)
[where]
the lter/selection statement that will be applied to the input polygon
data source to identify a subset of features to process
Example
lineofsight2d(poly="C:ndatanislands.shp", radius=20000, out="C:ndatanvisible.shp",
pnt="C:ndatanobservers.shp", union=TRUE);
lineofsight2d(poly="C:ndatanobstacles.shp", radius=1000, out="C:ndatanvisible.shp",
source=c(123456.1,9876543.9));
lineofsight2d(poly="C:ndatanbarriers.shp", radius=50000, out="C:ndatanvisible.shp",
pnt="C:ndatantargets.shp", intersect=TRUE);
3.71 list.raster
List Raster Datasets: Creates a list of raster datasets in folders and subfolders matching
user-specied search criteria.
95
C# TIFF: TIFF Metadata Editor, How to Write & Read TIFF Metadata
You can also update, remove, and add metadata. List<EXIFField> exifMetadata = collection.ExifFields; You can also update, remove, and add metadata.
bulk edit pdf metadata; delete metadata from pdf
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
projects. Basically, you can use robust APIs to select a PDF page, define the text character position, and remove it from PDF document.
edit pdf metadata acrobat; read pdf metadata
Description
The command searches a folder (and optionally all subfolders and geodatabases) for raster
datasets, storing the results in a variable in GME (a list of strings containing the full path
to each raster dataset, with a default name of "rasterlist"). If a ’match’ string is specied,
only raster datasets with names matching this search string are returned (e.g. if match="b*"
only raster datasets beginning with the letter b are returned).
When using the list of datasets in scripting and automation it is often useful to have a
corresponding list that contains only the name of the raster dataset. If a value is specied
for the namevariable parameter, a second variable in GME is created that contains only the
dataset name (with no extension). For instance, if the rst dataset in the returned list is
"C:ndatanlandcover.img", the corresponding value in the namevariable list is "landcover".
This means that the raster dataset name can be easily retrieved and used in naming output
les in a script.
This command applies only to Grids, GeoTIFFs (*.tif), Imagine Image (*.img), and
geodatabase raster formats. By default, geodatabases are not searched (as this takes much
more time, and storing raster datasets in geodatabases is both rare and undesirable).
The command will print the resulting list to the output window. For very large lists this
may be unwanted, and it can be switched o by setting print=FALSE.
Syntax
list.raster(in, [match], [subfolders], [geodatabases], [variable], [namevariable], [print]);
in
the folder to search
[match]
only include datasets that match this text (wildcards allowed)
[subfolders]
(TRUE/FALSE) If TRUE, also searches all subfolders (default=FALSE)
[geodatabases] (TRUE/FALSE) If TRUE, also searches all geodatabases (de-
fault=FALSE)
[variable]
the full path of returned raster datasets are stored in a variable of this
name (default=rasterlist)
[namevariable] if specied, an additional variable containing only the names of the raster
datasets (without le extensions) is created
[print]
(TRUE/FALSE) If TRUE, the list of datasets is printed to the output
window (default=TRUE)
Example
list.raster(in="C:ndata");
list.raster(in="C:ndata", match="*.img", subfolder=TRUE, variable="imglist");
list.raster(in="C:ndata", match="NDVI*", geodatabase=TRUE, subfolder=TRUE,
namevariable="rasternames", print=FALSE);
96
3.72 list.vector
List Vector Datasets: Creates a list of vector datasets in folders and subfolders matching
user-specied search criteria.
Description
The command searches a folder (and optionally all subfolders and geodatabases) for vector
datasets, storing the results in a variable in GME (a list of strings containing the full path to
each vector dataset, with a default name of "vectorlist"). If a ’match’ string is specied, only
vector datasets with names matching this search string are returned (e.g. if match="b*" only
vector datasets beginning with the letter b are returned). The search can also be restricted to
specic geometry types (point, line or polygon) using the type parameter (by default, vector
datasets of any geometry type are returned).
When using the list of datasets in scripting and automation it is often useful to have a
corresponding list that contains only the name of the vector dataset. If a value is specied
for the namevariable parameter, a second variable in GME is created that contains only the
dataset name (with no extension). For instance, if the rst dataset in the returned list is
"C:ndatansoil.shp", the corresponding value in the namevariable list is "soil". This means
that the vector dataset name can be easily retrieved and used in naming output les in a
script.
The command will print the resulting list to the output window. For very large lists this
may be unwanted, and it can be switched o by setting print=FALSE.
Syntax
list.vector(in, [match], [type], [subfolders], [variable], [namevariable], [print]);
in
the folder to search
[match]
only include datasets that match this text (wildcards allowed)
[type]
only list datasets of this geometry type (options: ANY, POLYGON,
POLYLINE, POINT)
[subfolders]
(TRUE/FALSE) If TRUE, also searches all subfolders (default=FALSE)
[variable]
the full path of returned raster datasets are stored in a variable of this
name (default=vectorlist)
[namevariable] if specied, an additional variable containing only the names of the raster
datasets (without le extensions) is created
[print]
(TRUE/FALSE) If TRUE, the list of datasets is printed to the output
window (default=TRUE)
Example
list.vector(in="C:ndata");
list.vector(in="C:ndata", match="*.shp",, type="POINT", subfolder=TRUE,
variable="shapeles");
97
list.vector(in="C:ndata", match="samp*", subfolder=TRUE, namevariable="names",
print=FALSE);
3.73 listintersectingfeatures
List Intersecting Features: For each feature in an input layer this tool creates a list of
other features (in the same layer or a dierent layer) that intersect it.
Description
This tool creates a delimited text le that summarizes intersections among features. For each
feature (point, line or polygon) in a dataset the tool identies which features from the same
or another dataset intersect it, and writes the unique ID numbers to the output le.
By default the output le contains one line per feature of the input data source (not
including features with no intersections at all), followed by the count of intersecting features,
and then a list of the ID numbers. The alternative ’linear’ format consists of one pair of
intersecting features per line (only the two ID numbers are shown).
The delimiting character can be specied. See the ’delimiter’ command for instructions
on how to change the delimiting character on all tabular text output (this is a separate
command that you would issue before this command, not a parameter for this command).
Although the default spatial relationship is intersect, you can actually specify the type of
relationship to use. The options (and their abbreviations in parentheses) are: INTERSECTS
(I), CROSSES (CR), OVERLAPS (O), TOUCHES (T), WITHIN (W), CONTAINS (CO),
ENVELOPEINTERSECTS (EI), INDEXINTERSECTS (II). You may also specify a custom
relationship using: RELATExxxxxxxxx, where the x’s dene the custom relationship and
can assume values of F, T, or * (e.g. RELATEFFFTTT***). Refer to the ESRI Help
documentation for descriptions of these relationships.
Intersections can be computationally expensive, therefore it is recommended that you
consider taking steps to increase processing speed, especially for large datasets. Ensuring
that your feature dataset has a spatial index can improve search speed (see the Add Spatial
Index tool in ArcToolbox). You might also consider eliminating any features that are known
to have no overlap with the features in another layer. For instance, the ArcMap Select By
Location tool allows you to easily select overlapping features between two layers, which you
can then export into two new (temporary) layers that are the input to this tool. Reducing
the number of features in the layers will thus also improve search speeds.
98
Syntax
listintersectingfeatures(in, uideld, in2, uideld2, out, [relationship], [linear], [where]);
in
the input feature data source
uideld
the unique ID eld of the rst vector data source
in2
the second vector data source
uideld2
the unique ID eld of the second vector data source
out
the full path to the output delimited text le
[relationship] the spatial relationship to detect features (default=INTERSECTS; op-
tions: INTERSECTS, CROSSES, OVERLAPS, TOUCHES, WITHIN,
CONTAINS, ENVELOPEINTERSECTS, INDEXINTERSECTS)
[linear]
(TRUE/FALSE) if true, one pair of ID numbers is written per line (de-
fault=FALSE)
[where]
the lter/selection statement that will be applied to the rst (’in’, not
’in2’) feature class to identify a subset of features to process
Example
listintersectingfeatures(in="C:ndatanplots.shp", uideld="PLOTID",
in2="C:ndatantransects.shp", uideld2="TID", out="C:ndatantransinplots.csv",
linear=TRUE);
listintersectingfeatures(in="C:ndatanzones.shp", uideld="ZNID",
in2="C:ndatanroads.shp", uideld2="RDID", out="C:ndatanisectfeat.csv");
listintersectingfeatures(in="C:ndatanparcels.shp", uideld="PID",
in2="C:ndatanschoolzones.shp", uideld2="SCHID", out="C:ndatanisectfeat.csv",
relationship="OVERLAPS", linear=TRUE);
3.74 ls
List GME Variables: List the names and assigned values of the variables the user has
dened.
Description
This command lists the names and assigned values of the variables the user has dened. It
is similar to the R command ls(), except that this tool also lists the variable values.
Syntax
ls);
Example
ls();
99
3.75 mergesampleplots
Merge Sample Plots: Merges sample plots based on the area of suitable habitat within
plots so that resulting plots contain a minimum area of suitable habitat to sample.
Description
The purpose of this tool is to merge sampling plots (and/or zones) that contain less than a
specied area of suitable habitat. It is designed for use with plot and zones layers that have
been created with the genregionsampleplots command. This tool can also be applied to a
plot layer that has no corresponding zone layer. The dierence is that when a zone is also
specied, merging of plots occurs preferentially within the same zone.
It is essential that you specify the zone and plot layer that were created simultaneously
using the genregionsampleplots tool. If you have run that tool more than once, you must not
mix a zone and plot layer from dierent sessions (the unique ID values are unlikely to match
and this will result in this merging tool producing nonsensical data). It is also not advisable
to use a previously merged zone/plot layer as the input to this tool.
Dene the minimum suitable habitat area in coordinate system units e.g. square meters
for UTM. This value corresponds to the values in the ArSuitHab eld that were produced
by the genregionsampleplots command. Any zones with a value of ArSuitHab less than the
value specied will be merged using the merging rule you specify. When a plot is merged, the
attribute elds are updated and the polygon it has been merged with is deleted. Note that
the new, merged plot is not evaluated to determine if the minimum suitable area criteria has
been met. However, this merged polygon is available for other plots to be merged with. Note
that after merging the plot IDs will still be unique, but may not be a consecutive series as
some of the plots have been deleted. After the plots are merged, the zones are evaluated for
merging. If a zone is merged then the plots that are contained within this zone are updated
to re ect the new zone ID value.
Merging Rules. For all merging rules the term neighbour refers to the four bordering
plots in the four cardinal directions. A plot on the edge of a zone, however, will have fewer
than four neighbours because merging of plots across zones is not permitted.
1. Dominant Neighbour Rule. The plot (or zone) is merged with the neighbour that
contains the greatest total area of suitable habitat (the maximum ArSuitHab value).
2. Longest Border Rule. The plot (or zone) is merged with the neighbour that shares the
border passing through the greatest amount of suitable habitat. The line representing the
shared border is intersected with the suitability raster and the proportion of suitable habitat
cells intersected by that line is calculated. The border with the greatest value denes which
polygons are merged.
3. Simple Contiguity Rule. The plot (or zone) is split into halves: north and south halves,
and east and west halves (i.e. two pairs of halves, not four quarters). The half containing
the greatest proportion of suitable habitat denes the neighbour that is selected for merging.
In landscapes in which the suitable area is highly fragmented, the Dominant Neighbour
Rule is probably the best choice.
100
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested